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enchantment The Voice of New Mexico’s Rural Electric Cooperatives

The Heart of Weaving


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enchantment June 1, 2018 • Vol. 70, No. 06 USPS 175-880 • ISSN 0046-1946 Circulation 101,746

enchantment (ISSN 0046-1946) is published monthly by the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association, 614 Don Gaspar Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 87505. enchantment provides reliable, helpful information on rural living and energy use to electric cooperative members and customers.

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Nearly 102,000 families and businesses receive enchantment Magazine as electric cooperative members. Non-member subscriptions are available at $12 per year or $18 for two years, payable to NMRECA. Allow four to eight weeks for delivery. Periodical Postage paid at Santa Fe, NM 87501-9998 and additional mailing offices. CHANGE OF ADDRESS Postmaster: Send address changes to 614 Don Gaspar Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 87505-4428. Readers who receive the publication through their electric cooperative membership should report address changes to their local electric cooperative office. THE NEW MEXICO RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION provides legislative and educational services for the 17 cooperatives that deliver electric power to New Mexico’s rural areas and small communities. The mission of the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association is to strengthen, support, unify, and represent Cooperative member interests at the local, state, and national levels. Each cooperative has a representative on the association’s board of directors, which controls the editorial content and advertising policy of enchantment through its Publications Committee. OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Charles Pinson, President, Central Valley Electric Cooperative, Artesia George Biel, Vice President, Sierra Electric Cooperative, Elephant Butte Tim Morrow, Secretary-Treasurer, Springer Electric Cooperative, Springer BOARD OF DIRECTORS Duane Frost, Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative, Mountainair William C. Miller, Jr., Columbus Electric Cooperative, Deming Arsenio Salazar, Continental Divide Electric Cooperative, Grants Lance R. Adkins, Farmers’ Electric Cooperative, Clovis Cristobal Duran, Kit Carson Electric Cooperative, Taos Robert Caudle, Lea County Electric Cooperative, Lovington Robert Quintana, Mora-San Miguel Electric Cooperative, Mora Tomas G. Rivas, Northern Río Arriba Electric Cooperative, Chama Preston Stone, Otero County Electric Cooperative, Cloudcroft Antonio Sanchez, Jr., Roosevelt County Electric Cooperative, Portales Travis Sullivan Southwestern Electric Cooperative, Clayton Wayne Connell, Tri-State G&T Association, Westminster, Colorado Charles G. Wagner, Western Farmers Electric Cooperative, Oklahoma NATIONAL DIRECTOR David Spradlin, Springer Electric Cooperative, Springer MEMBERS OF THE PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE William C. Miller, Jr., Chairman, Columbus Electric Cooperative Arsenio Salazar, Continental Divide Electric Cooperative Cristobal Duran, Kit Carson Electric Cooperative Robert Caudle, Lea County Electric Cooperative Leroy Anaya, Socorro Electric Cooperative NEW MEXICO RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 614 Don Gaspar Avenue Phone: 505-982-4671 Santa Fe, NM 87505 Fax: 505-982-0153 www.nmelectric.coop www.enchantment.coop Keven J. Groenewold, Chief Executive Officer, kgroenewold@nmelectric.coop Susan M. Espinoza, Editor, sespinoza@nmelectric.coop Tom Condit, Assistant Editor, tcondit@nmelectric.coop DISPLAY ADVERTISING Rates available upon request. Cooperative members and New Mexico display advertisers email Susan M. Espinoza at sespinoza@nmelectric.coop or call 505-9824671. National representative: American MainStreet Publications, 800-626-1181. Advertisements in enchantment are paid solicitations and are not endorsed by the publisher or the electric cooperatives that are members of the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association. PRODUCT SATISFACTION AND DELIVERY RESPONSIBILITY LIE SOLELY WITH THE ADVERTISER. Copyright ©2018, New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Inc. Reproduction prohibited without written permission of the publisher.

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DEPARTMENTS

INSIDE READS

Co-op Newswire

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Festival of Quilts

A colorful array of quilts awaits you at this festival.

7 View from enchantment 5

Be Wise about Fires

9 Hale To The Stars

The Land of Enchantment is parched, tips to help prevent wildfires.

100th Anniversary Celebration

A historic journey of Eagle Nest Dam and Lake.

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Enchanted Journeys

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12 On The Menu

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Energy Sense

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Book Chat

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The Heart of Weaving

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Meet the Electric John Deere

16 Vecinos 20

Youth learn to weave and embrace their heritage. John Deere unveils its battery-powered tractor.

On the Cover

A student from the Bááháálí Navajo Youth Summer Employment Program works on a rug. Photo by Gloria Washburn.

Backyard Trails

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Trading Post

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Youth Art

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Your Co-op Page

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Co-op Newswire

Lineman School Dedication

An enchantment redesign is underway. Stay tuned.

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How to Contact enchantment

n conjunction with the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NMRECA) and the Central New Mexico (CNM) Rio Rancho Campus, the new lineman school was dedicated on March 23, 2018, in Rio Rancho at CNM’s Rio Rancho Campus. Over a 100 people were in attendance for this ribbon cutting ceremony. “This was a total co-op effort and something we can all be proud of,” said NMRECA CEO Keven J. Groenewold. The ceremony was featured on the local KRQE news station. To see the video search online for: New electric power training facility opens at CNM.

Phone 505-982-4671 Email comments@nmelectric.coop Facebook facebook.com/enchantmentnmreca Mail 614 Don Gaspar Avenue Santa Fe, NM 87505 Community Events events@nmelectric.coop

Prizes: 9 winners receive $75 each; 1 grand prize winner receives $150 and the photo is featured as the August cover photo.

WILD AND TAME

Animal Expressions Photo Contest We’re looking for some awesome animal expressions for this year’s photo contest. Take a trip to your local zoo, wildlife center, hometown petting zoo, or your yard to take photos of your favorite animal. Seriously, we’re not monkeying around. Submit your favorite photo of lions, gorillas, birds, giraffes, alpacas, llamas, squirrels, iguanas, cows, horses, pets, or any animal of your choice! Just make sure it’s a great facial expression. The winning photos will be featured in the August enchantment. 4

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Contest Rules: Photos must be taken in New Mexico. Entrants must be a New Mexico electric co-op member. Information Required: Full Name • Mailing Address Phone Number • Electric Co-op Name • Details of Photo Send Submissions By: June 22, 2018 Email jpg file to enchantmentphotos@nmelectric.coop Mail to: Animal Expressions Photo Contest enchantment, 614 Don Gaspar Avenue Santa Fe, NM 87505 Questions: Email tcondit@nmelectric.coop or call Tom at 505-982-4671. enchantment reserves print and web rights for all winning photos. 1806


View from enchantment

The New Mexico roll of past participants includes farmers, ranchers, state legislators, business owners and a few congressional staffers.

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Youth Tour, an Americana Co-op Adventure

xperience of a lifetime. That’s how Rural Electric Youth Tour delegates describe their trip to Washington D.C. And this year, the New Mexico Youth Tour is sending 43 young people to our nation’s capital. And oh, what a tour it will be. For one week in June, our young people see firsthand the sights and sounds of our government in action. They interact with our senators and representatives. They learn about the electric cooperative movement and return home with a much broader appreciation of our great nation and its people. Youth Tour brings together some 2,100 teens from 43 states for a oncein-a-lifetime opportunity culminating in Washington, D.C. Students dance on a boat cruise down the Potomac and see the roots of American history. They learn about electric co-ops and grassroots political advocacy. They live in close quarters for up to a week and are given a small taste of freedom and independence. They sleep a little and talk a lot. These students become college roommates, professional colleagues, lifelong friends, and sometimes even spouses. Here in New Mexico, one Youth Tour alum sits on a co-op board of trustees. For some, it’s a fun trip that later brings fond memories. To others,

Youth Tour inspires kids to discover the adults they’re going to be. For those accepted into the Youth Leadership Council (YLC), the experience is even richer. These students— one representative from each participating state—work the Congressional Action Center at the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s (NRECA) Annual Meeting. They also participate in a special meeting one month after the Youth Tour to delve more deeply into leadership and cooperative grassroots issues. This honor, for Youth Tour 2017-2018, went to Joseph “Tyler” Overberger from Roy. Much has changed during the past half-century since Youth Tour was born, but the one constant has been the students, who never fail to be amazed, inspired, humbled, and grateful, according to the faithful electric co-op employees who bring new groups back to Washington every year. Youth Tour was born from a speech at the 1957 NRECA Annual Meeting by then—Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson. He was a longtime advocate of electric co-ops, having lobbied for the creation of Pedernales Electric Cooperative in 1937 as a young politician in Texas. “If one thing comes out of this meeting, it will be sending youngsters to the national capital where they can actually see

Keven J. Groenewold. P.E. Chief Executive Officer New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association

what the flag stands for and represents,” the future president said. With that encouragement, Texas electric co-ops began sending summer interns to work in the senator’s Washington, D.C., office. In 1958, an electric co-op in Iowa sponsored the first group of 34 young people on a weeklong study tour of the nation’s capital. Later that same year, another busload went to Washington from Illinois. The idea grew, and other states sent busloads of students throughout the summer. By 1959, the Youth Tour had grown to 130 participants. The New Mexico roll of past participants includes farmers, ranchers, state legislators, business owners and a few congressional staffers. Former attendees now send their own sons and daughters to Youth Tour. With this type of endorsement, third generation participants are right around the corner. It’s a pleasure to see 43 young New Mexicans join the Youth Tour ranks this year. I’m sure they will represent themselves, their families and our co-op community well. And they will long remember this experience of a lifetime.

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Enchanted Journeys

Hale to the stars BY ALAN HALE

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n distinct contrast to the situation that existed just a few short months ago, the short and warm nights of June are filled with planets. The June evening skies are dominated by Venus, which shines brilliantly in the west and attains its highest dark-time location of the year. Venus doesn’t set until close to 11:00 p.m., local time. Meanwhile, towards the end of June, Mercury pokes its way into the dusk sky. Our solar system’s largest planet, Jupiter, remains well placed for viewing, being at its highest above the southern horizon during dusk and remaining visible in the southwestern sky until setting shortly before the beginning of dawn. The second-largest planet, Saturn, passes through its opposition on Tuesday, June 26, and is visible all night. It is located to the north of the prominent “teapot” shape of the constellation Sagittarius, and its system of rings is about as wide open as we can ever see them from Earth. The Red Planet, Mars, rises around midnight at the beginning of June. Mars rapidly approaches Earth, and brightens dramatically, shining prominently in the southeastern sky throughout the morning hours. When at opposition at the end of next month, Mars will come the closest to Earth it has been in 15 years.

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A composite image of the asteroid Vesta, from images taken by Dawn between July 2011 and September 2012. The large structure at the bottom is the central peak of the crater Rheasilvia. NASA photograph.

On any given night, dozens of asteroids are visible with large backyard telescopes, although the large majority are very dim objects. However, the brightest and second-largest of the “main belt” asteroids, Vesta—about 325 miles across—is well placed for viewing, being located in Sagittarius just a little to the northwest of Saturn. Vesta is currently bright enough to view with the unaided eye, appearing as a dim “star” that gradually shifts its location from night to night. Vesta was studied extensively by the Dawn spacecraft in late 2011 and early 2012 (before Dawn headed off towards the largest asteroid, Ceres), and among other things found that Vesta possesses a layered internal structure (core, mantle, crust) like Earth and the other large planets possess. A very large crater near Vesta’s south pole, named Rheasilvia, was created by a major impact event about a billion years ago, and some of the meteorites that we have found on Earth’s surface originated as rocks blown into space during that event.

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June 2 • Magdalena Magdalena Frontier Festival Main Street library 575-854-2361 June 2 • Questa National Trails Day Downtown 575-586-0651

June 16 • Cloudcroft Fiesta In The Clouds Sacred Heart Mission 575-430-0034

June 2, 9, 16, 23 • Roswell Free Summer Movies Parks & Recreation Department 575-914-8018

June 16 • Clovis Operation Wounded Warrior Ride High Plains Harley-Davidson 575-769-1000

June 6 - 7 • Watrous Junior Ranger Camp Fort Union National Monument 505-425-8025

June 16 • Hillsboro Stroll through History Black Range Museum 928-830-8687

June 9 • Fence Lake Fence Lake Swap Meet Fence Lake Community Center 505-788-2256

June 16 • Mountainair Acoustic Blues and Brews MMAC Center 505-705-5556

June 9 • Jemez Springs Fiesta en el Valle Valles Caldera National Preserve 575-829-4100

June 22-23 • Alamogordo Southern NM Festival of Quilts Otero County Fairgrounds 575-921-7444

June 9 • Mountainair Las 9 Vidas de Maxmilliano II Cibola Arts Gallery 505-847-0324

June 24 • Taos Young Artist Concert Taos Community Auditorium 575-758-2052

June 9-10 • Edgewood East Mountain Fiber Farm Tour East Mountains 505-286-1783

June 30 • Edgewood Wildlife Festival Wildlife West Nature Park 505-281-7655

June 10 • Capitan 100th Anniv. of U.S. Marines in WWI Capitan Public Library 575-336-7752

June 30-July 1 • Rociada Health and Wellness Fair Pendaries 800-515-3095


Festival of Quilts

Quilters and crafters alike have responded with enthusiasm as vendors fill booths with a spectacular range of fabric colors and patterns. Handcrafted items including woodworking, baskets, unique jewelry, and custom made shoes, among other items give the event a festive feeling. The SNMFQ is not a traditional quilt show, but rather a celebratory festival of quilting and textile art at the center. For non-quilters, it is an especially welcoming event, and artists of all genres will find the event to their liking. Specialty machine dealers represent-

ing a wide variety of equipment manufacturers will set up machines, including embroidery and long-arm machines, for demonstration. This year’s children’s organization beneficiary is First Robotics NM (a STEM­Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics program). Students in the local area can learn about the four areas of technology through participation in hands-on and minds-­on activities. For more information visit www.snmfq.com, email rainee.mackewich@fnb4u.com or call 575-437-4880.

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uilters know about the quilting events in Houston and Paducah, but…Alamogordo, NM? Yes, small town Alamogordo is slowly but surely becoming a quilters’s destination. The 9th Annual Southern New Mexico Festival of Quilts (SNMFQ) welcomes world-renowned quilter, artist, and musician Ricky Tims this year. Perennial Australian visitor, photographer, author, tutor, and quilter Pam Holland, nationally known quilter, teacher, and textile artist Sue Rasmussen from California, and international travelers Quilters de Mexico will also be at the SNMFQ in Alamogordo, June 20- 23. While enjoying green chile cheeseburgers and fries with international quilter Pam Holland some 10 years ago, an original idea for the festival was hatched that has since blossomed into a full three-day celebration of quilting and a charity event. Tens of thousands of dollars have been raised over the years to support youth and children’s programs in Otero County. The 2018 Southern New Mexico Festival of Quilts will be held on June 20-23, at the Otero County Fairgrounds and the Flickinger Center downtown. Classes are June 20-23, and the public event is June 22-23. A special musical concert headlining Ricky Tims will be held on Friday, June 22 as part of the Festival. The Southern New Mexico Festival of Quilts is filled with classes taught by Tims, Holland and Rasmussen, quilt displays, a variety of vendors (not just quilting related), and a musical evening with Tims.

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MAY 2018

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On The Menu BY SHARON NIEDERMAN

ROTISSERIE CHICKEN Your Go-To-Chicken When you don’t particularly feel like cooking dinner, or when you are pressed for time, one of the best go-to items in the supermarket is the rotisserie chicken. It’s so easy to go home, bake a potato, pour out some salad from a bag, slice the chicken, and serve it. Voila, a complete meal in about 20 minutes. There are other tasty foods, though may require a bit more time, rotisserie chicken is good to use also. In addition to the ideas below, the versatile roast chicken is also good for stir fry, in spaghetti sauce, enchiladas, and as an ingredient in a quick curry with rice. Homemade stock can be made in advance and is essential to the final outcome of these dishes.

Greek Chicken-Lemon Soup

Green Chile Chicken Vegetable Soup

8 cups homemade chicken stock 3 lemons, juiced ¾ cup carrots, shredded ¾ cup onion, diced ¾ cup celery, diced 2 cubes chicken bouillon 3�8 tsp. white pepper 6 Tbs. butter 6 Tbs. flour 7 egg yolks 1 cup orzo

Olive oil for frying 1 medium onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, chopped 1�2 cup zucchini, sliced ½ cup green beans 1 cup corn 2 Tbs. parsley, chopped 2 Tbs. cilantro, chopped 1 cup chicken, chopped ½–1 cup medium-hot green chile, chopped Corn chips

Combine broth, lemon juice, carrots, celery, onion, bouillon, and pepper. Bring to a boil on high. Lower heat and simmer 20 minutes. In a separate saucepan, combine butter and flour, stirring constantly. Add to soup pot. Beat egg yolks until they become lighter. Gradually add a spoonful or two of hot soup to the egg yolk mixture, stirring constantly. Gradually add 1 cup more soup to yolk mixture. Return to soup pot. Add cooked orzo. Stir well. Serves 16. Freezes well. From the kitchen of Kathy Matthews.

Sauté onion and garlic in olive oil. Add to 4 cups homemade chicken broth. Stir and bring to a boil. Add zucchini, green beans, corn, parsley, and cilantro. Lower heat and simmer until vegetables are tender. Carrots and peas, whether fresh or frozen, or whatever vegetables you have in the refrigerator will also work. Add chicken. Heat through. Add green chile. Serve over corn chips. Makes 4 generous bowls. From the kitchen of Nancy Harmon.

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enchantment.coop

Chilaquiles

This one comes straight from my graduate school days in Boulder. Vegetable oil for frying 1 pkg. (dozen) corn tortillas for chips 3 cups chicken, chopped 1 tsp. ground cumin 2 cups Monterrey Jack cheese, shredded 1–2 cups green chile, chopped 2 cups sour cream ¼ cup cilantro, chopped (optional) Jalapeño slices (optional) Salt and pepper to taste Heat oil until very hot. Tear corn tortillas in large pieces. Fry and drain. In an electric skillet heated to 300, add oil to coat bottom of pan. Add chopped chicken and sauté for two minutes. Add cumin, continue stirring. Add cheese and stir until melted. Add green chile, mix well. Add sour cream, stir well, making sure mixture does not boil. When all is hot and well-blended, top with cilantro and sliced jalapenos if you wish. Flavor with salt and pepper. Pass the salsa.


BE WISE ABOUT FIRES Know Before You Go: To reduce the risk of fires caused by humans, many state and federal agencies have issued restrictions on public use. Some areas are closed until the fire danger decreases. Before planning a trip to a National Forest, National Park, or other public lands, call the toll-free Fire Restrictions Hotline at 877-864-6985, or click on USFS Region 3 Fire Information Restrictions page.

Campfires: Restrictions vary, in most areas, all wood and charcoal fires are prohibited, but gas or propane campstoves are allowed. Other areas allow campfires only in established campgrounds with fire grills or pits. A few areas have banned all ignition sources, including campstoves. If you do build a legal campfire, never leave it unattended; be sure it is dead out and cold to the touch before you go.

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Vehicles: Parking in tall grass or shrubs can start fires because the hot catalytic converter comes into contact with dry plant materials. Dry, windy conditions can turn smoldering grass into a wall of flames. Don’t park where vegetation is touching the underside of your vehicle. Motorcycles and ATVs should have spark arresters.

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Smoking: Smoldering cigarettes can start fires hours after being dropped or thrown away. Never toss cigarettes out of cars. Be aware of smoking restrictions in Forests, National Parks, BLM, and other public lands. Smoking may be restricted to inside vehicles or in paved parking areas.

Chainsaws and Other Equipment: Sparks from chainsaws, welding torches, and other equipment can cause wildfires. Use spark arresters. Refrain from welding and all use of spark-creating machines when the fire danger is high.

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Energy Sense

BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

Can Solar Work for My Home?

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ear Pat: I’m hearing a lot about solar power as an efficient option for homes today. Can you tell me some of the basics about solar energy and whether it’s something I should pursue? —Don Dear Don: There are three ways solar provides energy for your home: 1. Passive solar is a way to capture the sun’s heat directly, often through south-facing windows and dark-colored stone floors that can store heat. 2. Solar water heating systems typically have panels on a roof that collect solar energy and a pump that circulates heated water for storage in a water tank. 3. Photovoltaic (PV) systems also collect solar energy through a panel, but the PV panels actually convert the energy into electricity. I suspect you are referencing PV systems, which have skyrocketed in popularity in recent years. PV technology has improved, costs have dropped and financing offers are abundant. PV panels are usually installed on a roof in an array. The panels generate direct current (DC)

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power, which is then channeled through an inverter that feeds electricity into the home, back to the electric grid or to a battery system where it is stored for future use. Several factors go into calculating how cost-effective it would be to install a solar power system for your home. Once you’ve done your research, you can use the PVWatts Calculator to estimate how much production and value a PV system on your home could yield. An easier path is to find a qualified solar contractor to provide an estimate for a PV system. Look for contractors who are certified with the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP). Your local electric co-op may also have a list of recommended solar contractors. When you call contractors, they will typically ask several questions to determine if your home is a good candidate for solar. If it is, they will likely be able to provide an estimate. In order to complete an estimate, the contractor will need to determine the size of the system, which will depend on several factors, including:

enchantment.coop

Solar installers work high off the ground, on steep roofs and must drive fasteners through the roofing. This is a job that requires specialized training.

• Your current and anticipated electricity needs • Roof area, orientation and pitch (15 to 40 degrees is ideal) • The amount of sunlight your home receives per year • The amount of shade, dust, snow and/or other factors that can block sunlight If your roof will need replacing in the next few years, you’ll want to do that before installing solar panels, so be sure to include that expense when calculating the overall cost. There may be federal, state and utility tax credits and rebates available to offset the price of the equipment and installation. You can find links to these resources on my website at: www.collaborativeefficiency.com If the estimate you receive includes all the factors we’ve mentioned in this article, it should give you a fairly accurate idea of your return on investment. It’s also a good idea to get multiple estimates if you can, and to review the estimate with your electric co-op to

ensure the electric rate and metering arrangements are correct. Before you make a final decision, consider the following questions: • How does the investment in a PV system compare to upgrading the energy efficiency of your home? Efficiency upgrades can sometimes yield more bang for your buck and make your home more comfortable. A home energy audit can help you answer this question. • Is there a better way to invest in solar energy? Many co-ops offer community solar programs, which can produce solar electricity at a lower cost than residential systems. Investment in solar systems or energy efficiency upgrades to your home can help increase the resale value. Recent reports show that the presence of a PV system can raise a home’s resale value to an average of $15,000.


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And there’s more! The overstuffed, oversized biscuit style back and unique seat design will cradle you in comfort. Generously filled, wide armrests provide enhanced arm support when sitting or reclining. The high and low heat settings along with the multiple massage settings, can provide a soothing relaxation you might get at a spa – just imagine getting all that in a lift chair! It even has a battery backup in case of a power outage. Shipping charge includes white glove delivery. Professionals will deliver the chair to the exact spot in your home where you want it, unpack it, inspect it, test it, position it, and even carry the packaging away! You get your choice of fabrics and colors – Call now!

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e r s v i a n r y n C A e h l t ebrati 0 0 1 of eagle nest o dam and lake

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By Yvonne O’Brien, Member, Friends of Eagle Nest Lake and Cimarron Canyon State Parks

Photo above: An evening view of Eagle Nest Dam and Lake just east of Eagle Nest. Photo by Yvonne O'Brien. Photos below: Construction of the dam began in the fall of 1916. Final inspection was made and certification granted on December 9, 1918. Photos courtesy of Ida Marie Hanson Trujillo.

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agle Nest Dam and Lake are located in the Moreno Valley of New Mexico’s highest northern mountains. On June 30, 2018, a major celebration and rededication will take place to mark its 100th anniversary. Settlers for many years dreamed of impounding the Cimarron River surplus, which would also halt periodic disastrous floods downstream. It was in the early 1900s this dream became a reality when Frank and Charles Springer, both lawyers and landowners, provided the direction and money to enhance their mining and land interests by building a dam. In 1907, Frank Springer filed a construction application with the State of New Mexico, which was approved the following year by New Mexico’s Territorial Engineer, Vernon Sullivan. Permit 71 authorized both the construction of a dam and the downstream distribution system. Although Springer now worked in Washington, D.C., nearly all of his money flowed back to New Mexico to pay for the dam and land acquisition, which cost nearly $700,000. Thereupon, the prestigious dam engineering/ design firm of Bartlett and Ranney of San Antonio, Texas, was hired for the job and it assigned Neal Hanson as project engineer. His first job was to bring in many workers from afar, plus local miners, cowboys, and a large crew from the Taos Pueblo. …continued on page 17

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Students work on tabletop looms in the chapter common room to create their own unique designs. The program typically has 10 to 15 students. Photo by Gloria Washburn.

M t r a e H e Th g n i v a e W of away Tuton

By Michele Hath

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aster Weaver Elouise Washburn digs down into storage tubs of student-made weavings from the Navajo Nation Bááháálí Chapter Summer Youth Employment program. She pulls out rug after rug, purses, bags for weaving tools, and horse cinches in traditional and contemporary patterns—original designs, Star Wars, and Pac Man. They are only a fraction of 10 years of programming. Washburn holds up a gorgeous black preschool-sized blanket dress with patterned strips, hovering butterflies, and silver buttons. “The students made blanket dresses for the Head Start kids,” she says with a smile, adding “my daughter made this one.” Another master weaver in the making. Since 2007, Program Director Gloria M. Skeet has hired youth to learn to weave each summer. The idea sparked after she recruited adult weavers and quilters for another program and only one weaver signed up. Many weavers are passing on, she explains, or the demands of weaving are too much for arthritic hands and knees. “I don’t know if I want to say [weaving is] a dying art in our craft, in our community, but I would say it was a concern.” The Navajo Nation Bááháálí, formerly Bread Springs, is located in Vanderwagen and is a member of Continental Divide Electric Cooperative headquartered in Grants. Skeet emphasizes that the Navajo Nation Summer Youth Employment initiative funds the program. But as we talked, it was clear the dedication and creative energy of Skeet and Washburn, along with many others, give it life. The program introduces students aged 16 to 24 to weaving through meaningful employment. Depending on money received, the program runs four to six weeks. The project supplies looms, yarn, and tools—not a small investment—and pays minimum wage. The students learn much more than weaving, though. Skeet and Washburn infuse the program with opportunities to develop work habits, skills, ethics, entrepreneurship, industry, and commitment to personal excellence.


"It taught me to be patient, to think beautiful ideas, to be grateful your culture has found this art that everyone is in love with." — Shay Kinsel Shay Kinsel who participated in the program says, “What the program meant to me was very important as it was a learning experience about my culture. I am very lucky that I was able to participate in the weaving program because not everyone can. At first it was a job, then as soon as I started making my own ideas and finished my rug, I fell in love. It was very time consuming as well as sitting at a loom for a period of time, and making sure your sides do not warp in. It was honestly hard but worth it in the end, getting to see the final art amazes you. It taught me to be patient, to think beautiful ideas, to be grateful

Yazzie and Washburn also work closely with students to produce digital storytelling, part of the Methamphetamine & Suicide Prevention Initiative (MSPI) Navajo Story Telling Series. Students script and assemble these powerful video biographies to capture the importance of weaving in their lives. A creative means of expression, the project also develops technical, verbal, and visual communication skills. A key partner in the weaving program, MSPI, through the Gallup Indian Medical Center, provides staff for cultural enrichment seminars, team building, talking circles, and “walk-abouts” to collect plants for natural wool dying.

Master Weaver Elouise Washburn (left) and Program Director Gloria M. Skeet (right), display blanket dresses students made for the Bááháálí Head Start preschool. Photo by Michele Hathaway.

your culture has found this art that everyone is in love with. I was 16 when I joined the Bááháálí weaving program and it added a part of me I was truly proud of.” Aaron Yazzie, a college student intern with the program, also roots the youth in the history of Navajo weaving with a presentation that embraces a perspective of weaving around the world.

Although all artwork is the property of the program, students can enter their weavings in competitions. Skeet described the smiles and astonishment that transform students’ faces, hearts, and minds when they walk into a gallery to see their weaving on display—often with a prize ribbon in their category attached. Look for their work at the annual Gallup Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial,

Students weave small rugs which they can make into purses, weaving tool bags, blanket dresses, or even horse cinches. Photo by Michele Hathaway.

New Mexico Expo, and in galleries along the Gallup Arts Crawl. Some students return year after year, going on to become accomplished weavers. One student, who later moved to New York, started a successful weaving business. Skeet reminds me that weaving initially grew from an economic need in the 19th and 20th centuries when traders encouraged rug weaving for profit to entice tourists to the area. Weavers, mostly women, significantly supported their families through their art, and many still do. “One thing we are really, really proud of” says Skeet, “we always have young men. Sometimes one, sometimes two…among Navajos we’ve always had men who weave. And they turn out to be some of the best.” The program impacts more than student lives, though. Skeet leans forward, stretching her arms wide, as she describes how the youth have “helped to bring back the heart of weaving into the community.” “People would come in and they’d see young people weaving and it just did something to their souls …” “And we have a lot of … 30s and 40s who said, ‘I want to learn how to weave.’” As the students inspire older generations, they also begin to connect with them, bridging a gap that Skeet has seen widen over the years. These connections help root the students in their culture and identity as Diné. Weavings for sale are found on the Bááháálí Chapter website at: baahaali.navajochapters.org One hundred percent of purchases go back into the program.

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Meet the Electric John Deere By Kaley Lockwood, NRECA

G

reen and yellow are arguably the secondmost American set of colors, behind red, white and blue of course. This rings true particularly for those who operate John Deere machinery on a daily basis, as the growth of our nation is supremely dependent on the country’s agriculture industry, including the good folks who support it.

Technology in recent years has been the catalyst for the boom and bust of many industries. In the past decade or so, advancements in farming technology have primarily been focused on automation and precision, but with the automobile industry moving towards electric vehicles, the ag-industry is following suit. John Deere showcased the first, fully battery-powered tractor in 2017 at SIMA, an international agribusiness tradeshow in Paris. This technological innovation was given a ‘special mention’ as it truly is the first of its kind. Nicknamed SESAM, for Sustainable Energy Supply for Agricultural Machinery, this all-electric tractor is modeled after John Deere’s 6r series tractors. In a press release by John Deere, SESAM is said to have all of the same “features and functionality of a ‘conventional’ tractor while offering the benefits of electric power.” This emissions-free tractor runs at a lower noise level than other traditional tractors and is operated using two independent electric motors. The electrification of this tractor simplifies the moving parts and thus, greatly reduces the need for maintenance. …continued on page 21

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Benefitting Future Generations

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Touchstone Energy cooperatives make energy choices that benefit not only this generation, but future generations, making sure we all have the power we need to grow and flourish, right here in our hometown. Touchstone Energy cooperatives. Your source of power. And information. Touchstone Energy Cooperatives of New Mexico


Frank Springer Photo courtesy of the Raton Museum.

Eagle Nest Dam and Lake …continued from page 12 Construction began in the fall of 1916. First, the old roadway had to be relocated to McAvoy Pass; inlet and outlet tunnels completed; foundation and abutments from the natural hillside prepared. Unstable rock was removed and a cutoff trench built to anchor the dam. This was done all manually with shovels, picks, sledgehammers, and star drills, aided by dynamite charges to break up the rock. In 1917, a wooden trestle was constructed and a site-built wooden steam-powered crane was assembled atop. A series of ramps and stairs were used to move men and materials to the reach of the crane. According to current Dam Caretaker Greg Carlisle, “the “Cyclopean” design was used, where boulders and cement were used to fill the 23,000 cubic volume of the dam. The Hoover Dam was built using this same design.” The interlocking block and arch design uses the head pressure of the dam to keep the structure tight, pressing the load into the sound stone of the abutments. Portland sand and cement had to be brought in from a great distance. Rail service reached half way up Cimarron Canyon to Ute Park, but the last 11 miles was by wagon over primitive road and log bridges. When filled to spillway, the finished dam was 44.8 feet thick, 124 feet high

Charles Springer Photo courtesy of the Old Mill Museum, Cimarron.

Neal Hanson and Family Photo courtesy of Ida Marie Hanson Trujillo.

Ida Marie Hanson Trujillo Photo by Yvonne O'Brien.

and impounded 78,800-acre feet of water. Final inspection was made and certification granted on December 9, 1918, by State Engineer James A. French. In 2002, the Davis family of the CS Ranch sold Eagle Nest Dam and Lake to New Mexico’s Department of Game and Fish. Now operated by New Mexico’s State Park’s Division, it boasts a state-ofthe-art “green” visitor center where the park’s staff offer educational and recreational programs related to the Dam and Lake. Without the Dam, Eagle Nest Lake and Cimarron Canyon State Parks would not have been possible. This enduring legacy is priceless, not only for regional water use, but for the people who yearly partake in the camping, fishing, and hiking opportunities. After this project, Hanson went on to oversee construction of a 421-foot high dam in Madrid, Spain, which is still in use today. After 1920, Hanson returned to raise his family and farm and ranch on the CS, where he worked for Charlie Springer. He also continued to design irrigation and road projects that are still in operation. Frank Springer was also instrumental in the development of many other institutions, including the New Normal School in Las Vegas, now Highlands University; and the New Mexico Museum of Fine Art in Santa Fe where he gave the 1918 formal welcom-

ing address at its opening. His brother Charles, oversaw the dam project and remained in the state to farm and ranch on his properties. The Springer name remains alive as evidenced by the vast CS Ranch, the Town of Springer, and Springer Electric Cooperative headquartered in Springer.

Kit Carson Electric Cooperative in Taos, provides service to Eagle Nest Dam and Lake. To see all the events surrounding this 100th Anniversary Celebration, visit the Friends of Eagle Nest Lake and Cimarron Canyon State Parks website at: www.enl-cc-parkfriends.org

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JUNE 2018

17


Book Chat BY PHAEDRA GREENWOOD

WALTER UFER: RISE, FALL, RESURRECTION By Dean A. Porter 2017, 112 pages, $29.95 University of Oklahoma Press 800-627-7377; www.oupress.com The rise and fall of the modernist painter Walter Ufer, in and out of Taos Society of Artists, shows him torn between commercial work and deeper meaning. Porter tracks Ufer’s career from Munich to Chicago to Taos, New York and back, through alcoholism and reckless spending. He offers valuable insights into Ufer’s style compared to his friends Higgins and Blumenschein. Unlike Joseph Sharp, Ufer refuses to accessorize and dramatize the Indians or Hispanics, but paints them at relaxed moments in real life. Later, works revealed his compassion for the oppressed, but those paintings didn’t sell; in Taos he lived mainly on credit. Luckily Ufer married a loyal and proactive woman who created subscriptions lists and social networking to help market his paintings. “In her presence, Walter’s production increased dramatically.” More often, Mary was left behind waiting to be invited to join him on his latest endeavor. Many of Ufer’s “powerful statements of empathy” eventually found their way into prestigious museums all over the country. A beautiful book. Five Stars!

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MADCAP MASQUERADE By Janet Chapman 2017, 176 pages, $19.95 University of New Mexico Press 800-249-7737; www.unmpress.com

Here’s a light-hearted comic romance in Shakespeare style with the female protagonist disguised as a young man. It’s set in the 1920s in Santa Fe during Fiestas which includes a masked ball and the burning of Zozobra. A slip of the scissors to her hair launches Amanda on a search for self-recognition. Her model is Mabel Dodge Lujan, who can do no wrong. Her villain is the intense and clever poet, Witter Bynner, who dares to criticize Mabel. The love interest is David, who at the outset seems dull, until Amanda reads an eloquent letter from him that reveals his admiration. In a tangle of missed connections, Amanda has lost hope, but is calmed as she watched an Indian dance. “The men’s singing, which had sounded monotonous to Amanda’s ears initially, quietly transformed itself into the beat of her own heart. Time seemed suspended, as if the moment stretched back all the way to the birth of the mountain ridges looming in the distance.” An enjoyable read.

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THE GLOBAL MIND AND THE RISE OF CIVILIZATION By Carl Johan Calleman, Ph.D. 2016, 320 pages, $20 Bear & Company 800-223-2336 ww.bearandcompanybooks.com Based on the nine waves of the Long Count Mayan calendar, Calleman studies the rise and fall of ancient civilizations around the world as humans become conscious of spacial relations, straight and perpendicular lines. He says there are no straight lines in nature, that the inspiration for the pyramids and megaliths came with the “downloading” of consciousness from the global mind. He discusses the hierarchical organization of the universe, the significance of the eight-partitioned sun wheel as it relates to the partitions of the brain, the cellular and atomic Trees of Life and the evolution of math from simple addition to calculus. It’s a lot to take in. It might send you looking for straight lines in crystals, inspecting spider webs or staring at the horizon above the ocean. Whether or not it’s all true, it’s a fascinating read. Calleman has written two other books on this subject. He has a Ph.D. in physical biology from the University of Stockholm and lives in Santa Fe.

HOW THE CROCKA DOG CAME TO BE By Ross Van Dusen 2015, 52 pages, $21.95 Rio Grande Books www.lpdpress.com Crocka Dog was not always a monster. He started out as a little yellow puppy who was lost just off Mean Street somewhere down Bad Alley. Searching for shelter he was scratched by a cat and kicked around by inhabitants who were meaner than mean. That’s why he started to change, grew big and fierce and bit the shoe that kicked him. By the time the dogcatcher arrived with his net, little yellow puppy had turned into Crocka Dog, a monster, ready to fight. He chewed up the dogcatcher’s truck and spit out the bumper, chewed up an army tank and also a blimp. (But let the crew go.) Lucky for him, a little boy named Elwood had been watching out the window. Elwood knew exactly what to do. It was just the opposite of what you’d think. Van Dusen has a ball with this story about anger management, reminiscent of those childhood books Smashing Cars or Where the Wild Things Are. A fun read.

To submit a book for review: include contact information and where to order.


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JUNE 2018

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Vecinos BY DEBB JOHNSON

The Other Rodeo Black Water Tank • Rodeo Hotel • Myers General Store • The Silver Dollar Bar

I

n the Bootheel of New Mexico, there’s a railroad town with no railroad and a man who knows it better than anyone. M.E. “Jr” Gomez was born in Animas in 1937 in the railroad section house next to the cattle pens. His father worked for the railroad and when Gomez was two, the family moved to Rodeo. Rodeo was a bustling railroad town with saloons, churches, brothels, banks, feed, and grocery stores. The only electricity was provided by the power plant outside Ray Edington’s store. When the diesel engine would lug down, Gomez knew his mother had plugged in her electric iron! Rural electric lines came to Rodeo in the early 50s, but it took a while for electricity to be delivered to all the homes now serviced by Columbus Electric Cooperative headquartered in Deming. Gomez and his six siblings helped his father build the family home in Rodeo. They all helped collect Johnson grass and dig native mud to make adobe bricks. Their father laid the bricks one-by-one, completing the home in 1949. Growing up in Rodeo in the 40s and 50s was exciting. Trains ran through town carrying people, cattle, and copper ore from Douglas, Arizona to El Paso, Texas. When Gomez bought a $2 guitar, he taught himself to play by watching local brick mason “Turkey” Tovarez. He practiced by playing for the cattle in the pens near the railroad tracks. As a teenager, Gomez worked a variety of jobs. After graduating from high school he moved to California, but the fast paced life there made him long for home so he returned to Rodeo and married the love of his life, Grace Borger. Gomez and Grace raised six kids and today live in the same adobe house that Gomez helped build as a child.

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Gomez worked as a telegraph operator for the railroad, did some ranching and well drilling before he was hired as the head of maintenance at Animas Public Schools. Gomez says he was not the department head, he was the entire maintenance staff! He took care of the buildings, sport fields and drove the buses! He held this job for 26 years and eventually had a real staff to help him. Gomez learned harmonica and fiddle in addition to guitar, and played for community dances. His many talents include song writing, poetry, storytelling and woodcarving. Early on, Gomez learned to whittle and carved many scenes from his boyhood in Rodeo. His son, Richard, asked what the train depot was like, so Gomez carved a depot, then he carved the tall black water tank and the coal tower, then the Rodeo Hotel, Myers General Store, The Silver Dollar Bar, and soon he had a model of the whole town. This model was displayed for years in the museum in Lordsburg, but is currently dismantled and looking for a new home. The model includes the Highway 80 overpass that crossed over the tracks just north of Gomez’s home. The railroad operated until 1962 when it was abandoned. By 1965, all the rails and ties had been removed. Soon all the railroad buildings and the overpass on Highway 80 were gone too. Gomez and Grace live surrounded by the memories of old Rodeo with the wood carvings and models of the once lively town. Gomez loves to share his memories and has published a compilation of his recollections in a book called “The Other Rodeo.” It features some of the only known photos of buildings and businesses that used to thrive in the busy railroad town of Rodeo, New Mexico.


Meet the Electric John Deere …continued from page 16

These two motors power an adapted Direct Drive transmission, producing 130 kilowatts of continuous power with a peak output of 400 horsepower, according to Farm-Equipment. com. The website also affirms that the tractor takes 3 hours to fully charge and can run up to 4 hours in the field with speeds ranging from 2 to 30 mph. As a comparison, the Tesla model 3 may have a capacity of up to 75-kilowatt hours of battery storage (kWh), providing a range of about 310 miles. The SESAM has a capacity of 130 kWh with a range of about 34 miles, which means that this tractor uses a lot more electricity in a shorter period of time. In order for the SESAM to take off, the battery capacity will need to expand to support the sun-up to sun-down longevity of farm work. In fact, the President and CEO of Autonomous Tractor Corporation, Kraig Schulz, purported that a 200 horsepower electric tractor would hypothetically need about 1,500 kWh of batteries to complete a full day’s work. As energy storage technology continues to advance, it’s only a matter of time before John Deere manufactures a tractor that can meet this need. Although SESAM’s battery technology may not yet be practical for a full day of farming, the all-electric tractor is a very exciting development for the agriculture industry. This is one of many future steps in the direction of electrifying agricultural machinery and integrating this equipment with renewables. As the press release stated, “The SESAM tractor is a major part of John Deere’s vision of the energy-independent farm of the future.” This push towards electrification of farm machinery in lieu of using fossil fuels directly supports the beneficial electrification movement. This concept, known fully as “environmentally beneficial electrification,” is gaining traction among a growing number of groups in the U.S. including local electric cooperatives. Frequently promoted as a means to reducing greenhouse gases and helping the environment, beneficial electrification also helps consumers by providing products that are cleaner, quieter and easier to maintain. John Deere’s SESAM tractor does just that.

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Backyard Trails BY CRAIG SPRINGER Chloride cottage.

Pioneer Store Museum Monte Cristo.

Chloride: A step back in time

P

lace names that speak to mineral extraction abound throughout New Mexico: Oro Grande, Copper City, Silver City, and so on. Then there’s Chloride. Maybe it makes you think of bleach. It should not; it’s a grade of silver ore. The tiny Sierra County town lies on the east flank of the Black Range and sprung to life during the mining boom of the 1880s that yielded a number of towns throughout the state’s longest mountain range. Where Mineral Creek and Chloride Gulch converge, a small flat valley afforded space for a town to be platted. Beneath the juniper-studded hills, prospectors scratched the earth and found color. Chloride was among a handful of communities full of optimism that they would be the next metropolis. Nearby Fluorine, Phillipsburg, Grafton, Roundyville, and Robinson are nothing more than vaporous thoughts. Only Winston and nearby Chloride would remain. Chloride had all the trappings of a boom town: cantinas, hotels, stores, assay offices, a stage line, and a sawmill. To our benefit, the town was home to the Black Range newspaper that chronicled the comings and goings of its miners and those who supported the extractive industry. Optimism and hope permeated the names of the mines surrounding Chloride. The Silver Monument was the mine first to be developed in the late 1880s, up on the head of Chloride Gulch. The Colossal, the U.S. Treasury, and New Era mines yielded significant amounts of silver and gold. Pioneer Store Museum display case.

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Pioneer Store Museum tack wall.

Chloride building.

Bank cafe exterior.

Pioneer Store Museum. A new era did in fact come along. The United States government changed the country’s monetary policy in 1893, drastically reducing the need for silver. The move caused an economic depression called The Panic of 1893 that lasted nearly a decade. The price of silver plummeted. Miners left. Buildings were abandoned. The last ore shipment left Chloride in 1925. The post office closed—but 31 years later. Despite corrosive forces of neglect, the wind and intense summer storms, Chloride hung on. Though a mere vestige of its boom time remains, it is worth a visit that can take you back in time to embrace New Mexico’s past in former late-Victorian buildings, adorned with gingerbread trim. Mining capitalists who came from back East brought their architecture with them. You can see what else they left behind, in a good many artifacts on display at the Pioneer Store Museum. The Monte Cristo Gift Shop and Gallery is a short saunter away. Both are open daily, 10:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m. It’s all a short jaunt, 31 miles from I-25, up NM 52 near Elephant Butte. Visit www.sierracountynewmexico.info for more details. All photos courtesy of SierraCounty.info

Saloon.


With other attachments, BCS will till, chip limbs, mow, blow snow, and more!

​Summer Special Ad Blow-Out! It’s summertime and we're celebrating by offering you a special ad deal.

Stocking BCS Dealers in NM: Albuquerque Power Equipment 8996 4th St. NW Albuquerque, NM 87114 (505) 897-9002

You get a 1/6 page-sized ( 2.33" x 5.20") ad with full-color for only $118!

Acosta Equipment 155 NW Frontage Rd. San Acacia, NM 87831 (575) 835-3961

That's right, only $118! (No other discounts apply)

Sante Fe Power Equipment 1364 Jorgensen Ln. Sante Fe, NM 87507 (505) 471-8620

July issue deadline: June 8 August issue deadline: July 9

SUMMER SALE!

Email us at enchantment@nmelectric. coop for more information or call 505-982-4671 and ask for Tom or Susan.

PROFESSIONAL SERIES TRACTORS: $300 OFF + FREE QUICK HITCH

Professional Series Tractors (Models 732 and up) can power BCS’s full line of PTO-driven attachments. • Differential Drive offers turn-on-a-dime maneuverability • Individual Wheel Brakes to assist with steering heavy attachments (Models 749+) • Lifetime Transmission Warranty included with ALL BCS MODELS

BUILDING Protect your equipment or workspace.

Las Cruces

550 South Compress, Las Cruces, NM 88005 575.224.6013

Se Habla Español

Sale prices valid June 1 - August 31, 2018

|

ROOFING

Get practical strength and curb appeal.

Farmington

2001 San Juan Blvd., Farmington, NM 87401 505.373.-2112

Contact us for MONTHLY SPECIALS

Change attachments with the flip of a lever!

COMPONENTS Find everything you need for your project.

Albuquerque

8316 Broadway SE, Albuquerque, NM 87105 505.312.5290

MEtALdEPotS.CoM © 2018 NCI Building Systems. All rights reserved.

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Trading Post

Big Toys

To Place a Classified Ad 1. Type or print ad neatly. 2. Cost is $20 for up to the first 40 words per ad, per category. Each additional word is 50¢. Ads with insufficient funds will not be printed. Ad published once unless paid for several issues. 3. Graphics such as brands or QR codes are an additional $5 to the original cost of ad. 4. Only members of New Mexico electric co-ops may place ads. 5. We reserve the right to reject any advertisement. 6. Ads due the 9th, one month prior. Ex: Ads due February 9 for the March issue. Ads postmarked after the deadline of the 9th will be placed in the next issue. 7. Fill out contact information and select a category: Name:____________________ Address:__________________ Name:____________________ City:______________________ Address:__________________ State:_____ ZIP:_____________ City:______________________ Telephone:________________ State:____ Zip:_____________ Cooperative:_______________ Telephone:________________ Big Toys (Tools______________ & Machinery) Cooperative:_ Country Critters&(Pets) Big Toys (Tools Machinery) LivestockCritters Round-Up Country (Pets)(Livestock)

DRINKING WATER STORAGE TANKS, HEAVY DUTY Black Poly, proven algae resistant. 125 to 11,000 gallons, NRCS and EQUIP approved. Please give us a chance to serve you! MasterCard or Visa accepted. Call 575-682-2308 or 1-800-603-8272. GREAT OFFER ON SOLAR SUBMERSIBLE SHALLOW/DEEP well pumps! ‘NRCS’ approved with 2-year warranty on selected pumps with affordable, easy installation! Order online at: www.solarsubmersiblewellpumps.com For a custom quote, email us at: sales@solarsubmersiblewellpumps.com or call 505-429-3093. 24/7 service. FOR SALE: GRAVEL CRUSHING PLANT, USED to build lakes on our ranch, ready for the next job, great condition, ready to go. Austin Western Primary with International Engine, new parts. Cedar Rapids Commander, newly rebuilt Detroit engine, new screens and belts, and more upgrades. Phoenix Conveyor, like new, powered by a CAT 5000 KW generator. Operates with one fellow loading and one operator in control room. MSHA approved. Never a citation, called an exemplary operation. Call 970-731-4707. SMALL P&W HORIZONTAL KNEE MILL, $600. Horizontal Band Saw, $200. 2-man Post Hole Auger, $400. Delta Jointer, $250. Call 505-281-1821. OVERHEAD FEED BINS. 1 TO 4 Compartment, 12 to 48 tons. Any size free standing cattle guards, no footing needed. Emery Welding, Clayton, NM, 575-3742320. eweld98@yahoo.com

LINCOLN WELDER FOR SALE. SA-200-F-162. ALL original. Very little use. Has been stored under a shed. Call 575-377-7007. CASE 621B FRONT END LOADER, BIG Bucket, 5.9 L Cummings Turbo engine, very good condition, ready to work, $31,000. Also: Gradall 9K Telehandler (Extended Lift Forks), JD 4045 engine, used daily, Foam Filled tires, 6 foot Rack, very good condition, $30,000. 575-430-1010. 2007 MUSTANG SKIDSTEERE, MODEL 2076, HRS 260, Drive: Wheeled, ROPS: enclosed, $23,200. Tree Sheer AWD Grapler also available, 300 gallon fuel tank with stand, $400. Call 505-454-0976. TROY-BILT ROTOTILLER HORSE MODEL, FORWARD ROTATING-REAR tine tiller, new, never used, kept in garage. $750. Call 915-588-2204. FOR SALE: TRUCK &/OR TRAILER. 1997 T800 Kenworth, Cat C10, 10 speed, 541,000 miles, single axle, jake brake, AC, cruise, sleeper, $15,000. 2013 Neville ground load cattle trailer 8’x44’, 4 compartments, full open tailgate with slider, cleated rubber floor, spray liner, clean, 16,000 miles, $30,500. Contact mosimannranch@gmail.com for pictures and details or 575-666-2145. FOR SALE: 1974 LN 9000 FORD Tandem Dump truck; heavy duty equipment trailer Pintle Hitch; Galion Motor Grader; older cable tool drilling rig, many tools. For details call 575-779-1977 or 575-7589701. Leave message, no texts. IRRIGATION PIPE-6”, 8” & 10” PVC and Aluminum with new gates and gaskets. Bonnets, alfalfa valves, T’s, elbows, plugs & butterfly valves available. 1/2 price of new and delivery available. Call or text Sierra at 575-770-8441.

Country Critters HORSE AND DONKEY TACK, DRIVING HARNESS work cart. Call 505-281-1821.

Livestock Round-Up ALPACA HERD REDUCTION! WE ARE MOVING and need to place some of our show, breeding, and fiber quality alpacas into new homes. Prices start at $500 per animal. Packages are available and very reasonable! Call or text Vivian at 575-430-4882. NOT ALL WATER TANKS ARE CREATED Equal! Is Quality, Value and Longevity important to you? Buy High Specific Gravity, Heavy Weight, Long Warranty, Superior Black NRCS tanks. Lowest prices only provide minimum standards, lower weights, and shorter warranties. Find out more! 575-430-1010. NEW MEXICO DRINKING WATER STORAGE TANKS, Heavy Duty Black Poly. Fittings customized to your needs NRCS and EQUIP approved. High Specific Gravity, Heavy Weight, Long Warranty, Algae Resistant, Black NRCS Water Tanks. Call 1-800-603-8272 or 575-682-2308. MINIATURE HORSES FOR SALE. MARES, STUD and Foals. Call 228-265-0632. MOUNTAIN TOP GOATS. BABIES ARE ON the ground. We have Milkers, Bucks, Babies, Pets, Cabrito and Weed Eaters for sale. All 4-H and Show Quality. Nubians, Mini-Nubians, LaManchas, Mini-LaManchas and Nigerian Dwarfs. In Capitan, call 575-354-2846.

Odd & Ends (Camping, Music, Digital) Livestock Round-Up (Livestock) Roof&Over Head (Real Estate) Odd EndsYour (Camping, Music, Digital) Things That Vroom! (Vehicles) Vintage FindsGo(Antiques & Collectibles) Vintage Collectibles) Roof OverFinds Your(Antiques Head (Real& Estate) When Opportunity Knocks Things That Go Vroom! (Vehicles) (Business & Employment) When Opportunity Knocks 8. Mail your ad and payment to: (Business & Employment) NMRECA 614 Don Gaspar Avenue Santa Fe, NM 87505

Make check or money order payable to NMRECA Advertisements in enchantment are paid solicitations are notor endorsed by theorder Makeand check money publisher or the electric cooperatives of New payable to NMRECA Mexico. PRODUCT SATISFACTION AND DELIVERY RESPONSIBILITY LIE SOLELY WITH THE ADVERTISER.

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JUNE 2018

NEW CLASSIFIED SECTION COMING SOON! new name • new categories • same great price • same great finds

An updated classified section is coming your way in the next few months. You spoke and we listened.

• It will be easier to categorize your items since there will only be six categories. • You can already visit the enchantment website at www.enchantment.coop and send in your ad. We will then call you with a price. • You can already pay your ad with a credit card immediately over the phone. (There is a 5% processing fee.)

enchantment.coop

Questions? Call Mary Margaret at 505-982-4671. Or, email enchantment@nmelectric.coop Thank you for advertising in enchantment. We certainly appreciate your business.


YOUR ONE STOP SHOP FOR: WATER WELL • WINDMILL SOLAR • ELECTRICAL Installations • Repairs and Supplies Call Today for Freedom with SERVICES (COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL • RESIDENTIAL) STAND ALONE SOLAR SYSTEMS (575) 895-3306 3 9th St., Hillsboro, NM 88042

Free Butcher Supply Catalog Meat Grinders, Saws, Slicers, Cutlery, Seasonings Everything for the home butcher

Pioneer Butcher Supplies in Loveland CO, since 1975

1-888-891-7057 toll free REGISTERED AND COMMERCIAL BLACK ANGUS BULLS. Fertility and Trich tested. Call 575-799-3233. MINIATURE HORSES FOR SALE. CALL 228-265-0632

Odds & Ends COFFINS, CASKETS & URNS. Individually handcrafted of solid wood. Simple. Natural. Unique. Quality Craftsmanship. www.theoldpinebox. com or 505-286-9410 for FREE funeral information. Proudly serving New Mexico since 2004.

nmwatersupplyinc @ gmail . com 40 YEARS OF STUFF. TOOLS, ART, garden tractors, vehicles, flea market stuff, M/Cs, lots of guns and rifles. Call for prices and appointment, 505-227-9957. $CASH REWARD$ FOR OLD FISHING TACKLE, pre 1950, lures, reels, rods, catalogs. Free appraisals. Will pay top $. Send photos to: tacklechaser@aol.com or call Rick at 575-354-0365. Thank you!

Roof Over Your Head

HOWDY! PECOS PABLO. “INTRODUCING MIRACLE MARY!” Capulin jelly, jams and raw mountain wildflower honey. Seach: Blue Toyota Tundra and American flag in either Santa Fe or Glorieta. Info: 505603-2310, pecospablo@hotmail.com

TORREON, NEW MEXICO. 30 MILES TO I-40. Mobile home, 14x70, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, carport. All utilities on 3 lots. $6,500 down, Real Estate contract for $27,000. 5% interest, 7 year contract. Hunting, fishing, hiking. Call 1-505-705-5239.

NEW, NEVER USED “AIR HAWK” ELECTRIC Powered Wheelchair, folds for transport or storage, $1,250. “Titan” Mobility Scooter, 4-wheel, great for outdoors, less than 1 hour operating time, excellent condition, $1,450. Photos available. Call 505-281-2189, leave message.

LINCOLN COUNTY, 6 ACRES NEXT TO national forest. Well maintained access. Mild climate. Enjoy the peace and quiet. Perfect for people with horses to retire. Owner will finance/discount for cash. Call 505-281-2598.

HEADSTONES (I.E. CEMETERY MONUMENTS) IS OUR BUSINESS. Over 1,000 designs. An eternal memory of a loved one. TAOS MOUNTAIN HERITAGE. Call 575-770-2507 or email: taos_mt_heritage@msn.com Website: www.taosmountainheritage.com

that PRODUCE and STORE ELECTRICITY.

• New Construction and Remodel for Solar, General Electrical, Water Well and Windmill Systems • Customized Stand Alone Solar Designs for both Water Systems and Electrical Systems • Supply, Test and Service Water Pump Systems • Maintenance and Repair • Water Purification Systems • Parking Lot Lighting

TORREON, NEW MEXICO. 30 MILES TO I-40. 1200 square feet on 1/2 acre on Highway 55. Fishing, hiking, camping, hunting. Call 1-505-705-5239. 4-1/2 ACRES FOR SALE IN MEDANALES. $25,000. Call 505-685-0063 for more information.

facebook . com /@ nmwaterandelectric

THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS IN sunny Southern New Mexico. If you want peace, privacy, safety and a great place to raise horses, cattle, goats and/or a huge garden, all within easy commuting distance to Deming, El Paso, Columbus or Las Cruces, you must look at this property. One bedroom modern, well-kept home on 80 fenced acres has a deep water well with 3 acre ft/year, A/C, ceiling fans and a laundry room. Owners made a lot of upgrades. Custom shades and blinds and wrought iron work and all appliances included. Many more features. Email: LunaHacienda@aol.com or call Gene at 505-660-1112 for more information and photos. Listed at $139,000. REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER. #44 Loma Linda Ranch Road, Vadito, NM 87579. Near Angostura-Tres Ritos, NM, State Road #518. Two bedroom, 1 bath, living and kitchen area. 2-car garage and running well. Adjacent lot included. Beautiful scenic view, 8 miles from Sipapu. $110,000. Call for details, 817-455-0160. CONCHAS, 7543 NM 104, 3 BEDROOM, 2 bath double wide with sunroom on 2.91 acres, detached garage, carport, outbuildings, chain link fence with remote gate. Highway frontage with commercial potential. $135,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000; Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

SAN ANTONIO, NM, ZANJA ROAD, 4.66 acres irrigated farmland in Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District. Has produced alfalfa and grass hay crops. Utilities nearby. $75,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000; Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com LOOKING FOR WATER? GIFTED TO FIND underground streams. Reputable dowser with 50+ years experience. To God Be Thy Glory! Contact Joe Graves at 575-7583600. In Taos, 75 miles north of Santa Fe. God Bless You! SOCORRO: CHOICE OF 2, 5-6 ACRE irrigated organic farms with homes. Located in city limits with direct access to Rio Grande. Mountain views, all water rights, mature fruit trees. New 30 million dollar levy with miles of trails and parks. Call for pictures or details. $190,000 OBO. Owner, 505-550-3123. MAGDALENA, NM GORGEOUS LAND WITH VIEWS-30 acres, $20,000; 30.23 acres, $35,000; 47.37 acres, $50,000; 30.25 acres, $27,000; all with electric at road. 30.01 acres electric hookup on property, $25,000. 40.05 acres, $42,000; 20.05 acres, $42,000; both with electric at road. Cynthia Welton, Realty One of New Mexico, 575-343-6242. THANK YOU FOR ADVERTISING IN ENCHANTMENT. The July issue classified deadline is June 9th. August issue is July 9th.

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FOR SALE: 2-STORY HOME. 3 BEDROOM, 2 baths out of Mayhill, NM toward Cloudcroft. Address is #2 South Avenue, Mayhill, NM. Top and bottom covered deck. The backyard joins the National forest. Possible owner finance with substantial down payment. Call Peggy, 575-390-9948. CONCHAS, 000 BOAT DOCK DRIVE. VACANT land just over 1/2 acre. Water access at high mark. $49,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000; Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, www.bigmesarealty.com 575-760-5461. CONCHAS, 0000 BOAT DOCK DRIVE. VACANT land just over 1/2 acre. Water access at high mark. $49,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000; Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com CONCHAS, TBD BIG MESA AVENUE, IMPROVED high level waterfront lot with septic on .83 acres. $98,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000; Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, www.bigmesarealty.com 575-760-5461. WEST OF CONCHAS/GARITA, 134 PAISANO, 1 bedroom, 1 bath home with 1 bath guesthouse, just over 7 acres. $98,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000; Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575-7605461. www.bigmesarealty.com FENCE LAKE, 295 PINE HILL ROAD, 2 bedroom, 3 bath log home on just over 60 acres, well, outbuildings, corrals, hunting opportunities. $350,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000; Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com SOUTH OF CLOVIS, 4205 SOUTH PRINCE (533 US 70), commercial potential on former irrigated farm land. Corrals, 3 phase power. $300,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000; Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, www.bigmesarealty. com 575-760-5461. WEST OF DATIL, 458 SOUTHERN TRAIL, Sugarloaf Mountain Subdivision, home, outbuildings and well on 5.82 acres. Beautiful views. $105,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000; Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com WANTED! FARMS AND RANCHES. LET US list and sell your rural property today. Broker has over 40 years experience in production agriculture and is a farm owner. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000; Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com VADITO, NM. 14 CAMINO DE MEDIO. 3-1/4 acres. $28,000, owner may carry. Call 505-316-1793, buyersol@aol.com

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FOR SALE BY OWNER: 369 SOUTH Roosevelt Road P, Portales, New Mexico. Location, Location, Location. Country living at it’s best! 35.9 acres with a beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 full bath brick home. This home has been remodeled. New metal roof, new Septic System, new heating and cooling system. Large living room with fireplace and vaulted ceiling. Large closets and lots of storage available. Attached double car garage. The property has a 50x30 metal barn with concrete floor. Covered shed with a small set of corrals. This property has highway frontage. Only 3 miles to downtown Portales, NM, 18 miles to Clovis, NM and approximately 20 miles to Cannon Air Force Base. Very peaceful and quiet with good neighbors. $325,000. Contact: LaVerne Inge, 575-607-5595, 575-356-5221. Pictures available on Zillow.com DATIL, NM-1.22 ACRES, $18,000; 4.13 ACRES, $30,000; 1.03 acres, $12,000; all have water and electric on property. 3.32 acres, $23,000; 1.72 acres, $13,200; electric at road. 1.43 acres with fixer upper MH, $42,300. Cynthia Welton, Realty One of New Mexico, 575-343-6242. “LONGMIRE” COUNTRY. 10 BEAUTIFUL ACRES OUTSIDE of Las Vegas, NM. Views to the top of the Sangre De Cristos. Private, gated, location. Well & electricity in place. Completely fenced. Pines, cottonwoods, cedars, and pastures. Patrick Swayze’s ranch nearby. 60 minutes to Santa Fe. $85,000/offer. 505-850-5557. FOR SALE: SMALL FRAME HOUSE IN Magdalena, New Mexico. On lot with small old pond and 1 bath and 2 bedrooms. A Handyman Special. $35,000 Call Donna at Old Westland Realty, 575-517-6170 or call 505-401-4352. TORRANCE COUNTY FARM LAND, 160 ACRES including 122 acres of deeded water rights for sale. Located near Old 66 and Lexco Road. Barn with pipe lots, separate barn with lot and hay barn. $900,000. Contact Beth for more information. 505-228-3880. FOR SALE: 640 ACRE FENCED RANCH. 3 bedroom brick home, two car garage, 1993 Dodge truck, lawnmower, and all furniture. Located 5 miles West of Dora on Highway 114. Out buildings and two wells. Turnkey ready. $375,000. 941-447-9204, howen@comcast.net FISHING? BUY A CAMPSITE OR HOME south side of Bluewater Lake, 1/2 acre in trees, view of lake, water, septic, electric, $12,000. 1 acre, all utilities, $16,000. 1/2 acre, $8,000. 2 acres, small house, all utilities, $42,000. 4 bedroom, 3 bath, fully furnished, all utilities, $80,000. Call David at 505-228-8439.

enchantment.coop

HOME FOR SALE IN LAS CRUCES on 1.25 acres, 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2-car garage, detached workshop, finished basement, refrigerated air, central heat, sunroom, gazebo, city water, swimming pool, EBID irrigation, $319,000. And/or 21 acre Pecan Farm for sale, Las Cruces, 2 wells, Elephant Butte irrigation water rights, $589,000. Possible owner financing. Call Henry at 575-647-0320. LAS VEGAS, NM. 1923 GRAND AVENUE. 3 bedroom, 1-3/4 bath, on .25 acre secluded lot, washer/dryer, water heater, refrigerator, stove, new carpet. Possible owner carry with 10% down. $115,000. Call 505-316-1793, buyersol@aol.com 1104 DOUGLAS. LAS VEGAS, NM. MAJOR cosmetic repairs needed. 5 bedrooms, 2 bath, kitchen, full basement, 10 rooms. Next to the university. Had an apartment, also needs to be redone, entry through Douglas or Diamond. $115,000, all offers considered. 505-3161793, buyersol@aol.com COSTILLA, NM, ALONG STATE HIGHWAY 522. 15 acres. $90,000, owner may carry. Call 505-316-1793, buyersol@aol.com WATER DOWSING AND CONSULTING. PROVEN SUCCESS, 42 years experience in Lincoln County. Will travel. Contact Elliot Topper at 575-354-2984 or 575-937-2722.

Things That Go Vroom! 1965 FORD RANCHERO-STRIPPED, READY FOR PAINT and body work. $3,000. Call 505-281-1821. 2004 40’ ALLEGRO BUS MOTORHOME,88,000 MILES. Solar, washer/dryer combo, 3 slides. $60,000 OBO. Call Lila at 419344-6357. San Antonio, New Mexico. 2017 MICRO MINNIE WINNEBAGO, 17 FOOT, dual axel trailer. Red, 30 gallon propane tanks, awning with LEDs, full bath, indoor/outdoor sound system. TV, oven, microwave, stove. Sleeps 3, queen bed, new 10-inch mattress, much more. 400 miles. $14,500. 505-783-4949. 2000 F350 LONG BED XLT SUPER Duty power stroke, automatic, 4 wheel drive. LA West Palm Package. Rhino liner. B&W 5th wheel turnover ball. One Owner. 60,187 miles. Excellent condition. $15,000. Call 575-377-6047. HONDA-2001 CIVIC LX, MANUAL SHIFT, ONE owner, runs well, good mileage, newer tires. $1,300. Call 575-445-7634. Raton, NM area.

Vintage Finds RAILROAD ITEMS WANTED: KEROSENE LANTERNS, BRASS locks, keys, badges, uniforms, bells, whistles, and pre-1950 employee timetables. Always seeking items from any early New Mexico railroad, especially D&RG, C&S, EP&NE, EP&SW, AT&SF, SP or Rock Island. Call Randy Dunson at 575-356-6919 or 575-760-3341. $CASH REWARD$ FOR OLD FISHING TACKLE, pre 1950, lures, reels, rods, catalogs. Free appraisals. Will pay top $. Send photos to: tacklechaser@aol.com or call Rick at 575-354-0365. Thank you! WANTED: NEW MEXICO MOTORCYCLE LICENSE PLATES 1912-1959. Paying $100-$500 each. Also buying some New Mexico car plates 1900-1923. WANTED: New Mexico Highway Journal magazine, 1923-1927, New Mexico Automobile License Directory (”The Zia Book”), Motor Vehicle Register books, 1900-1949. See the New Mexico Transportation History Project website NMplates.com for 2,500+ color photographs and 100+ year history of New Mexico license plates. Bill Johnston, Box 1, Organ, NM 88052-0001. Email: Bill@NMplates.com or telephone 575-382-7804. BUYING OLD STUFF: GAS PUMPS AND parts 1960’s or earlier, advertising signs, neon clocks, old car parts in original boxes, motor oil cans, license plate collections, Route 66 items, old metal road signs, odd and weird stuff. Fair prices paid. Have pickup, will travel. Gas Guy in Embudo, 505-852-2995.

When Opportunity Knocks LOVE TO TRAVEL? JOIN US ON a Pacific Wine Country fundraising cruise for Not Forgotten Outreach Veterans Programs in Taos. You get a fun Vacation, they get the benefits! Book now, limited availability. 575-587-2087, sleslie@dreamvacations.com or www.membercruises.com/notforgottenoutreach-taos

Seeking Advertising Sales Agent

Interested in earning extra income? Know business owners or folks who want or need to advertise their businesses? NMRECA, publisher of enchantment, is seeking an ad sales agent on a contract basis. Call Susan at 505-982-4671 or email your resume or contact information to sespinoza@nmelectric.coop


Under the Sea

Send Your Drawing by Email: We accept Youth Art drawings by email. Send jpg file and required information by the 9th to: enchantment@nmelectric.coop

enchantment staff has left the office and gone snorkeling Under the Sea. Awesome job Youth Artists! Rev your engines. Thanks to Kendrick out in Grady, we can all have some FourWheel Fun! For July, helmet up and send your drawings of four-wheel trucks, Jeeps, ATVs, anything with four-wheel drive. For August, draw either The Tin Man from the Wizard of Oz or R2-D2 from Star Wars. Have fun!

Remember: Print your name, age, mailing address, phone number, and co-op name on your drawings. Otherwise, your drawings are disqualified. Remember: color, dark ink or pencil on plain white 8.50 x 11.00 size paper is best. Accept artwork up to age 13. Mail to: Youth Editor, 614 Don Gaspar Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 87505. Entries must be here by the 9th of the month before publication. Each published artist receives $10 for his or her work.

Rainey Atencio, Age 9, Rociada

Marcus Cates, Age 2, Grenville

Jacob MontaĂąo, Age 12, Moriarty

Opal Kerr, Age 12, Magdalena

Ariana Romero, Age 8, Anton Chico

Isabelle Sena, Age 13, Melrose

Abby Ward, Age 8, Elida

Zoe Vella, Age 9, Lovington

Kyle Terry, Age 7, Logan

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June 2018 enchantment  

Feature story: The Heart of Weaving.

June 2018 enchantment  

Feature story: The Heart of Weaving.