Page 1

enchantment The Voice of New Mexico’s Rural Electric Cooperatives

The Taos Avalanche Center

SAFETY ON THE slopes


B Bu ig tt ger on s

FREE Car Charge r

t o N rac nt Co

“My friends all hate their cell phones… I love mine!” Here’s why.

Say good-bye to everything you hate about cell phones. Say hello to the Jitterbug Flip. “Cell phones have gotten so small, I can barely dial mine.” Not the Jitterbug ® Flip. It features a large keypad for easier dialing. It even has a larger display and a powerful, hearing aid compatible speaker, so it’s easy to see and conversations are clear. “I had to get my son to program it.” Your Jitterbug Flip setup process is simple. We’ll even program it with your favorite numbers. “What if I don’t remember a number?” Friendly, helpful Personal Operators are available 24 hours a day and will even greet you by name when you call. “I’d like a cell phone to use in an emergency.” Now you can turn your phone into a personal safety device with 5Star ® Service. In any uncertain or unsafe situation, simply press the 5Star button to speak immediately with a highly-trained Urgent Response Agent who will confirm your location, evaluate your situation and get you the help you need, 24/7. “My cell phone company wants to lock me in a two-year contract!” Not with the Jitterbug Flip. There are no contracts to sign and no cancellation fees. “My phone’s battery only lasts a short time.” Unlike most cell phones that need to be recharged every day, the Jitterbug Flip was designed with a long-lasting battery, so you won’t have to worry about running out of power.

Order now and receive a FREE Car Charger – a $25 value for your Jitterbug Flip. Call now!

Monthly Plan

$14.99/mo1

$19.99/mo1

Monthly Minutes

200

600

Personal Operator Assistance

24/7

24/7

No add’l charge

No add’l charge

FREE

FREE

Nationwide Coverage

YES

YES

30-Day Return Policy2

YES

YES

Long Distance Calls Voice Dial

More minute plans and Health & Safety Packages available. Ask your Jitterbug expert for details.

5Star Enabled

12:45P Mon Dec 25

“Many phones have features that are rarely needed and hard to use!” The Jitterbug Flip contains easy-to-use features that are meaningful to you. A built-in camera makes it easy and fun for you to capture and share your favorite memories. And a flashlight with a built-in magnifier helps you see in dimly lit areas. The Jitterbug Flip has all the features you need. Enough talk. Isn’t it time you found out more about the cell phone that’s changing all the rules? Call now! Jitterbug product experts are standing by.

Available in Red and Graphite.

Call toll-free to get your

Jitterbug Flip Cell Phone

Please mention promotional code 107745.

1-888-677-6612

We proudly accept the following credit cards:

47669

www.JitterbugDirect.com

IMPORTANT CONSUMER INFORMATION: Jitterbug is owned by GreatCall, Inc. Your invoices will come from GreatCall. 1Monthly fees do not include government taxes or assessment surcharges and are subject to change. Plans and services may require purchase of a Jitterbug Flip and a one-time setup fee of $35. Coverage is not available everywhere. 5Star or 9-1-1 calls can only be made when cellular service is available. 5Star Service will be able to track an approximate location when your device is turned on, but we cannot guarantee an exact location. 2We will refund the full price of the Jitterbug phone and the activation fee (or setup fee) if it is returned within 30 days of purchase in like-new condition. We will also refund your first monthly service charge if you have less than 30 minutes of usage. If you have more than 30 minutes of usage, a per minute charge of 35 cents will be deducted from your refund for each minute over 30 minutes. You will be charged a $10 restocking fee. The shipping charges are not refundable. There are no additional fees to call GreatCall’s U.S.-based customer service. However, for calls to a Personal Operator in which a service is completed, you will be charged 99 cents per call, and minutes will be deducted from your monthly rate plan balance equal to the length of the call and any call connected by the Personal Operator. Jitterbug, GreatCall and 5Star are registered trademarks of GreatCall, Inc. Copyright ©2017 GreatCall, Inc. ©2017 firstSTREET for Boomers and Beyond, Inc.

2

JANUARY 2018

enchantment.coop


enchantment

8

January 1, 2018 • Vol. 70, No. 01 USPS 175-880 • ISSN 0046-1946 Circulation 101,828

enchantment (ISSN 0046-1946) is published monthly by the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association, 614 Don Gaspar Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 87505. enchantment provides reliable, helpful information on rural living and energy use to electric cooperative members and customers.

16

Nearly 102,000 families and businesses receive enchantment Magazine as electric cooperative members. Non-member subscriptions are available at $12 per year or $18 for two years, payable to NMRECA. Allow four to eight weeks for delivery. Periodical Postage paid at Santa Fe, NM 87501-9998 and additional mailing offices. CHANGE OF ADDRESS Postmaster: Send address changes to 614 Don Gaspar Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 87505-4428. Readers who receive the publication through their electric cooperative membership should report address changes to their local electric cooperative office.

18

THE NEW MEXICO RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION provides legislative and educational services for the 17 cooperatives that deliver electric power to New Mexico’s rural areas and small communities. The mission of the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association is to strengthen, support, unify, and represent Cooperative member interests at the local, state, and national levels. Each cooperative has a representative on the association’s board of directors, which controls the editorial content and advertising policy of enchantment through its Publications Committee.

23

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Charles Pinson, President, Central Valley Electric Cooperative, Artesia George Biel, Vice President, Sierra Electric Cooperative, Elephant Butte Tim Morrow, Secretary-Treasurer, Springer Electric Cooperative, Springer BOARD OF DIRECTORS Duane Frost, Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative, Mountainair William C. Miller, Jr., Columbus Electric Cooperative, Deming Arsenio Salazar, Continental Divide Electric Cooperative, Grants Lance R. Adkins, Farmers’ Electric Cooperative, Clovis Cristobal Duran, Kit Carson Electric Cooperative, Taos Robert Caudle, Lea County Electric Cooperative, Lovington Robert Quintana, Mora-San Miguel Electric Cooperative, Mora Tomas G. Rivas, Northern Río Arriba Electric Cooperative, Chama Preston Stone, Otero County Electric Cooperative, Cloudcroft Antonio Sanchez, Jr., Roosevelt County Electric Cooperative, Portales Leroy Anaya, Socorro Electric Cooperative, Socorro Gary Rinker, Southwestern Electric Cooperative, Clayton Wayne Connell, Tri-State G&T Association, Westminster, Colorado Charles G. Wagner, Western Farmers Electric Cooperative, Oklahoma

INSIDE READS

NATIONAL DIRECTOR David Spradlin, Springer Electric Cooperative, Springer

Christmas Cactus Plant Growing Tips 17

MEMBERS OF THE PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE William C. Miller, Jr., Chairman, Columbus Electric Cooperative Lance R. Adkins, Farmers’ Electric Cooperative Robert Quintana, Mora-San Miguel Electric Cooperative Antonio Sanchez, Jr., Roosevelt County Electric Cooperative Leroy Anaya, Socorro Electric Cooperative

Your Connection to Vital Electricity

Calling Authors, Illustrators, Artists

9

Your participation helps others learn to read.

Safety on the Slopes

Ski patrollers assess the snow in the backcountry so others can have fun and be safe.

12

Keep your Christmas cactus growing year round. How electricity gets to your home or business.

19

NEW MEXICO RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 614 Don Gaspar Avenue Phone: 505-982-4671 Santa Fe, NM 87505 Fax: 505-982-0153 www.nmelectric.coop www.enchantment.coop Keven J. Groenewold, Chief Executive Officer, kgroenewold@nmelectric.coop Susan M. Espinoza, Editor, sespinoza@nmelectric.coop Tom Condit, Assistant Editor, tcondit@nmelectric.coop DISPLAY ADVERTISING Rates available upon request. Cooperative members and New Mexico display advertisers email Kim Vigil at advertising@nmelectric.coop or call 303-253-5255. National representative: American MainStreet Publications, 800-626-1181. Advertisements in enchantment are paid solicitations and are not endorsed by the publisher or the electric cooperatives of New Mexico. PRODUCT SATISFACTION AND DELIVERY RESPONSIBILITY LIE SOLELY WITH THE ADVERTISER. Copyright ©2018, New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Inc. Reproduction prohibited without written permission of the publisher.

DEPARTMENTS Co-op Newswire

4

View from enchantment 5 Hale To The Stars

6

Enchanted Journeys

6

On The Menu

8

Energy Sense

10

Book Chat

14

Vecinos 16 On the Cover: On a blue bird day, skiers hike the “Ridge” at Taos Ski Valley for some fresh powder. Photo by Michele Potter.

Backyard Trails

18

Trading Post

20

Youth Art

23

Your Co-op Page

24

enchantment.coop

JANUARY 2018

3


Co-op Newswire Electric Co-op Crews Attend Meter School

E

lectric co-op crew members attended an educational, training meter school in Moriarty in December at Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative. From across the state, over 30 electric co-op staff members participated in the meter school. The purpose of the school is to receive educational training, perform hands-on training and to learn more about safety issues so crew members may enhance their work skills to keep the power on, for you. Training includes learning about 1 & 3 phase meter components and testing, meter boards, transformer connections and troubleshooting, and more. The meter school is coordinated through the New Mexico Rural Electric Self-Insurer’s Fund (NMRESIF), in coordination with the NMRESIF Safety Committee and the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives, Loss Control Division.

Feds Release $15 Million for EV Extreme Fast Charging Systems To build consumer acceptance of plug-in electric vehicles (EVs), the U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) has announced up to $15 million for research projects on batteries and auto electrification technologies and infrastructure that would enable extreme fast charging systems that can replenish fully depleted EV battery packs to about 80 percent strength in 15 minutes. Currently, Level 3 AC fast chargers (240 V, drawing up to 96 kW from the grid) and High-Speed DC Fast Chargers (sometimes called a Combo Charging System, at 480 V DC and up to 90 kW) can reach that mark in around 30 minutes. VTO hopes to build on its lithium-ion battery advancements that have the potential to reduce EV battery costs to $219 per kWh of usable energy, about an 80 percent reduction since 2008. Source: CFC Solutions

4

JANUARY 2018

enchantment.coop

Get Your Copy of the Legislative Almanac Get a first glance look at the Senate or House member who represents your district. The Legislative Almanac is used statewide by colleges, libraries, businesses, and cooperative members like you. The 2018 Legislative Almanac will be available mid- to late January 2018. You have the opportunity to download the smart app to your smart device from any of the two app stores or call our office to find out how you can get a copy. Call 505-982-4671.

Download the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s

Legislative Almanac

to your iPhone, iPad or Android device.

Scan this QR Code to get the app!

Or search for

NMRECA Legislative Almanac

Download the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s

Legislative Almanac

We are working on a redesign of the enchantment for 2018. Same size, same paper stock but fresh design elements. Classified advertisers, you will have new categories to select from. Thank you.

How to Contact enchantment Download the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s

Phone Legislative Almanac

505-982-4671 Scan this Email QR Code to comments@nmelectric.coop get the app! Facebook facebook.com/enchantmentnmreca Or search for NMRECA Mail Legislative 614 Don Gaspar Avenue Almanac Santa Fe, NM 87505 Community Events events@nmelectric.coop to your iPhone, iPad or Android device.

Download the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s

Legislative Almanac


View from enchantment

Designer Electricity at Your Fingertips

“ ”

New technology, new regulations and new ways of thinking are reshaping the utility industry.

T

he thermostat on your wall marks a new era in electricity. Whether it’s a dial-style older than you or a digital model installed last month, it’s become more than just a way to set the temperature in your home. That familiar gadget is now a gateway to a world where consumers have more say over their electric service. You might call it designer electricity. New technology, new regulations and new ways of thinking are reshaping the utility industry. These days, consumers can regulate the temperature in their home more precisely. They can even generate their own electricity with rooftop solar panels and sell the excess power back to their utility. A new programmable thermostat can be set to avoid heating and cooling when you’re not home, or even set separate temperatures for rooms you don’t use often. And that’s just the beginning of ways consumers are making more of their own energy decisions. Highly efficient LED (light-emitting diode) bulbs can be controlled from your smartphone. Washers and dryers sense how much water and heat need to be used to clean and dry your clothes. All that efficiency makes a difference. Americans used about two percent less electricity in the past

three years according to the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration (EIA). EIA expects the trend to continue for at least the next couple of years. Efficient technologies really make a big difference. While efficiency saves energy dollars, the story of battery storage shows the bigger picture of how consumers are putting utility decision-making into their own hands. The story began with homeowners using portable, motorized generators to power refrigerators and other crucial appliances during extended electric outages. Then battery technology improved, driven by the demand for smaller and stronger chargers for smartphones and other electronics. Battery companies thought their new and improved product could grab part of the portable generator market. Two years ago, Tesla, the high-end electric car company, announced a battery designed to look attractive enough to hang on your wall and provide backup power. Other companies followed. In addition to promising relief from power outages, Tesla promoted its battery to the growing renewable energy market. Homeowners installing solar panels on their roofs ran into a problem—they generated a lot of electricity in the middle of a

Keven J. Groenewold. P.E. Chief Executive Officer New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association

sunny day, when no one was home to use it, and none at night, when they were home wanting to use electricity. Batteries could store the sunlight. More options for consumers complicates work for electric co-ops. Our business plan didn’t account for consumers storing electricity, reversing the flow through power lines as they sell electricity back to the co-op, or for the declining sales resulting from energy efficiency. However, co-ops are in a unique position, with long power lines that have to cover a much larger area. That is leading to use of energy storage technology to run pilot programs testing utility-scale batteries, as it gets really expensive to hook the last person at the end of three or four miles of line. Co-ops might be in a more natural position to adopt batteries for use in those remote locations. While the march toward more choices in electric service might seem inevitable—do you want to spend $10,000 for a photovoltaic system on your roof and another $10,000 for a battery to avoid a couple of hours a year of power outage? In this new era of more energy options, vendors will be promoting batteries, solar panels and other gizmos. So, talk to your co-op first because the folks there are the local energy experts.

enchantment.coop

JANUARY 2018

5


Enchanted Journeys

Hale to the stars BY ALAN HALE

T

he new year of 2018 starts off with a rather unusual situation which began late last year: during the evening hours there are no bright planets visible in the sky. The only two evening-sky planets visible at all are the distant worlds Uranus and Neptune. Even Neptune— slowly traveling through the constellation Aquarius—is fairly low in the southwest, and sets a couple of hours after the end of dusk. Uranus, traveling slowly through the constellation Pisces, remains visible throughout the evening, and sets around midnight. Both worlds can be detected with binoculars but don’t look like much more than grayish-green dots. Not until around 3:00 a.m. do the brighter planets start to rise. Jupiter and (significantly dimmer) Mars are quite close to one another in early January, and pass within half a degree (the moon’s apparent diameter) of each other on Sunday morning, the 7th. Afterwards, they pull apart as they go their separate ways. When Mars comes closest to Earth in late July, it will be the closest it has been to our planet in 15 years. Mercury rises just before the beginning of dawn on New Year’s Day, but afterwards starts sinking into the dawn sky. On

6

JANUARY 2018

A total lunar eclipse at dawn. Photograph by Alan Hale.

Saturday morning, the 13th, Mercury passes close by Saturn, which now starts to climb its way out of twilight. Mercury completely disappears into twilight within a few days, while by the end of January, Saturn rises half an hour before the beginning of dawn. There are two full moons during January. The first one of these takes place on the evening of New Year’s Day, and the second one is on Wednesday, January 31. This occurrence of two full moons within the same calendar month takes place about once every three years, on the average, and the second full moon is sometimes referred to as a “Blue Moon.” The “Blue Moon” in January, however, will also be bloodred, for a total lunar eclipse takes place on that morning. The moon begins to enter the “umbra,” Earth’s dark inner shadow, a little before 5:00 a.m., and the total eclipse itself begins an hour later, a little after the beginning of dawn. Dawn will be well underway when mid-eclipse occurs at 6:30 a.m., and the moon will be close to setting (and the sun close to rising) by the time totality ends a few minutes after 7:00 a.m.

enchantment.coop

January 1 • Bayard 7th Annual 1st Day Hike City of Rocks State Park 575-536-2800 January 1 • Las Vegas Polar Bear Plunge Storrie Lake 505-425-7278

January 13 • Clovis Dr. MLK Jr. Scholarship Breakfast Clovis High School Cafeteria 575-762-2752

January 1 • Radium Springs First Day Hike Leasburg Dam State Park 575-524-4068

January 13 • Red River Torchlight Parade & Fireworks Red River Ski Area 575-754-2223

January 1 • Raton Polar Bear Plunge Lake Maloya 575-445-2413

January 14 • Artesia An evening with Groucho Marx Ocotillo Performing Arts Center 575-746-4212

January 2 • Alto Full Moon Ceremony High Mesa Healing Center 575-336-7777

January 15 • Grants Dr. MLK Jr. Extravaganza 515 W. High Street 505-285-5388

January 6 • Alamogordo Beginner’s Hike Christ Community Church 575-404-3891

January 20 • Taos Claire Chase Harwood Museum 575-758-9826

January 6 • Socorro Star Party NM Tech Etscorn Observatory 575-835-8927

January 27 • Deming Party Gras Gala Mimbres Valley Learning Center 575-546-2674

January 12 • Crownpoint Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction Elementary School 505-786-2130

January 27 • Eagle Nest Ice Fishing Tournament Eagle Nest Lake 575-377-1594

January 13 • Chama Chama Chile Ski Classic 2018 Hwy. 17 Mile Marker 2 575-265-0590

January 27 • Sipapu Moonlight Hike & Campfire The Lodge 800-587-2240


o ct N a r e nt Fe Co No ly th on

Breakthrough technology converts phone calls to captions.

M

New amplified phone lets you hear AND see the conversation. The Hamilton® CapTel® Captioned Telephone converts phone conversations to easy-to-read captions for individuals with hearing loss.

A simple idea… made possible with sophisticated technology. If you have trouble understanding a call, captioned telephone can change your life. During a phone call the words spoken to you appear on the phone’s screen – similar to closed captioning on TV. So when you make or receive a call, the words spoken to you are not only amplified by the phone, but scroll across the phone so you can listen while reading everything that’s said to you. Each call is routed through a call center, where computer technology – aided by a live representative – generates voice-to-text translations. The captioning is real-time, accurate and readable. Your conversation is private and the captioning service doesn’t cost you a penny. Internet Protocol Captioned Telephone Service (IP CTS) is regulated and funded by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and is designed exclusively for individuals with hearing loss. To learn more, visit www.fcc.gov. The Hamilton CapTel phone requires telephone

service and high-speed Internet access. WiFi Capable. Callers do not need special equipment or a captioned telephone in order to speak with you. Finally… a phone you can use again. The Hamilton CapTel phone is also packed with features to help make phone calls easier. The keypad has large, easy to use buttons. You get adjustable volume amplification along with the ability to save captions for review later. It even has an answering machine that provides you with the captions of each message.

“For years I avoided phone calls because I couldn’t understand the caller… now I don’t miss a thing!” SEE what you’ve been missing!

See for yourself with our exclusive home trial. Try a captioned telephone in your own home and if you are not completely amazed, simply return it within 60-days for a refund of the product purchase price. It even comes with a 5-year warranty.

Captioned Telephone Call now for our special introductory price! Call now Toll-Free

1-888-852-1376

Please mention promotion code 107744. The Captioning Telephone is intended for use by people with hearing loss. In purchasing a Captioning Telephone, you acknowledge that it will be used by someone who cannot hear well over a traditional phone. Hamilton is a registered trademark of Nedelco, Inc. d/b/a Hamilton Telecommunications. CapTel is a registered trademark of Ultratec, Inc.

enchantment.coop

JANUARY 2018

81135

Do you get discouraged when you hear your telephone ring? Do you avoid using your phone because hearing difficulties make it hard to understand the person on the other end of the line? For many Americans the telephone conversation – once an part of everyday life – has become a thing of the past. Because they can’t understand what is said to them on the phone, they’re often cut off from friends, family, doctors and caregivers. Now, thanks to innovative technology there is finally a better way.

7


On The Menu BY SHARON NIEDERMAN

Snow Day Warmer-Uppers and roast for 15 minutes. Remove from the oven. Reduce the oven temperature to 300 F. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a large Dutch oven and add the onion, celery, carrots, and leek. Cook over medium-low heat for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and cook for another 2 minutes. Pour the wine over the vegetables, bring to a boil, and cook over high heat until the liquid is reduced by half, about 10 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon salt and 1 teaspoon pepper. Tie the rosemary and thyme together with kitchen twine and add to the pot.

It’s January and hopefully, we have enough snow that we get a snow day now and then. It’s also the perfect time to concentrate on cooking a warm meal that requires time, and rewards you by filling up the house with delicious aromas.

Homemade Baked Beans 2 cups dried navy beans, rinse and drain 1 bay leaf 2 Tbs. olive oil 14 cups molasses 1/8 cup yellow mustard 3 Tbs. Worcestershire sauce ¾ cup ketchup Soak beans overnight or one hour in boiling water. Rinse and drain. Parboil with bay leaf and 1 tablespoon olive oil until tender, about two hours. Remove foam as it arises. Rinse and drain. In large bowl, mix beans, remaining tablespoon olive oil and remaining ingredients. Place in enamel or clay bean pot with snug lid. Add 1 cup boiling hot water.

8

JANUARY 2018

enchantment.coop

Bake 2-3 hours until beans are tender at 325 F. Sit occasionally, adding boiling water if necessary to keep beans from drying out. For a smokier taste, add 4 slices chopped uncooked bacon. Serves at least 6.

Ina Garten’s Short Ribs 8 beef short ribs, trimmed of fat Salt and pepper 1�4 cup olive oil 2 onions, medium-sized, chopped 4 cups celery, large diced 2 carrots, peeled, large diced 1 leek, cleaned, large diced, white part only 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 (750 ml) bottle of Burgundy or Pinot Noir or other dry red wine 2 sprigs rosemary, fresh 2 sprigs thyme, fresh 6 cups beef stock or broth 1 Tb. brown sugar Preheat oven to 400 F. Place the short ribs on a sheet pan, sprinkle with salt and pepper,

Place roasted ribs on top of the vegetables in the Dutch oven and add the beef stock and brown sugar. Bring to a simmer over high heat. Cover Dutch oven and bake for 2 hours or until the meat is very tender. Carefully remove the short ribs from the pot and set aside. Discard the herbs and skim the excess fat. Cook the vegetables and sauce over medium heat for 20 minutes, until reduced. Put the ribs back into the pot and heat through. Serve with the vegetables and sauce. Good with mashed potatoes or rice. Serves 4.


Calling Authors, Illustrators, Publishers, and Artists You are invited to participate in the 12th Annual Authors for Literacy Event scheduled on: April 28, 2018 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Moriarty Civic Center 202 S. Broadway • Moriarty This event is sponsored by the Moriarty Community Library and The Read “Write” Adult Literacy Program. Proceeds will benefit the Read “Write” Adult Literacy Program. The objectives for this event are: ➥ To raise awareness of the adult literacy related issues faced by Torrance County and New Mexico. ➥ To recruit volunteer tutors for the Read “Write” Adult Literacy Program. ➥ To promote the Moriarty Community Library and the services it provides. ➥ To provide an opportunity for authors to sell their books. ➥ To provide an opportunity for the community to meet some of New Mexico‘s authors. ➥ To promote the writing craft by having a writing contest.

SUPER COUPON

SAVE $230

6.5 HP (212 CC) OHV 30", 5 DRAWER CART HORIZONTAL SHAFT TOOL cu. in. of storage GAS ENGINE •• 8100 704 lb. capacity • Weighs 120 lbs. NOW Customer Rating Cu

Customer Rating

NOW $9999 $15 999 $ 99

ITEM 60363/69730 ITEM 69727 shown CALIFORNIA ONLY

COMPARE TO

HONDA

119 $

32999

MODEL: GX200UT2QX2

$

KOMELON $ 98

6

MODEL: L4825HV

$

1,150

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

Customer Rating

• 2000 lb. capacity • 27-3/16" Clearance

2500 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH WIRELESS REMOTE CONTROL

Customer Rating

9999

COMPARE TO

ITEM 97214 DOUBLE HH

$

19999

MODEL: 10712

COMPARE TO SUPERWINCH

$

Voted Best Winches

17999 $ 99 79

SAVE $130

MODEL: 1125220

ITEM 61840/61297/63476/61258 shown

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

• 10 ft. lift

89

$

MODEL: 21286

59

$19

99

DEWALT

COMPARE TO

ITEM 62515 66911 shown

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

109

COMPARE TO

Customer Rating

DEWALT

179

• 300 lb. working load

$3 $599

COMPARE TO

99

$

3998

ITEM 69385/62388/62409/62698/30900 shown

$

62432, 62429, 62428 shown

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

SAVE 69% NOW

$

9799

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

SAVE $380

COMPARE TO

HOBART

$

54999

MODEL: 381204099

ITEM 61888/68885 shown

NOW

99

$1 69 $17999

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

*Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 4/28/18.

MIBRO

$1 4999

$

COMPARE TO

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

29 PIECE TITANIUM DRILL BIT SET

SAVE 83%

MAXWORKS

$

222

SAVE $72

179

COMPARE TO

DEWALT

$

99

Customer Rating

49

MODEL: GP2002

NOW

ITEM 32879 60603 shown

ITEM 62281 61637 shown

$

99 1799 $9

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

21 GALLON, 2.5 HP, 125 PSI VERTICAL OIL-LUBE AIR COMPRESSOR • Air delivery: 5.8 CFM @ 40 PSI, SAVE $69 4.7 CFM @ 90 PSI

16999 Customer Rating

$

COMPARE TO

HUSKY

219

MODEL: C201H

60

MODEL: DW1369

SUPER COUPON

$

6499

MODEL: 426920

plates included

NOW

$

COMPARE TO

LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

NOW

99

$149

SUPER COUPON

NOW

99

$6

3 PIECE CURVED JAW LOCKING PLIERS SET LIFETIME WARRANTY

Customer Rating Cust

9

$ 99

SAVE 64%

10" 7"

5"

19

$ 97 HUSKY MODEL: 99454 ITEM 69091/61454 ITEM 91684/64036 62803/63635/67847 shown 64035/61249 shown COMPARE TO

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

16 OZ. HAMMERS WITH FIBERGLASS HANDLE

NOW

LIFETIME WARRANTY

99

$84

Blade sold separately.

SAVE $114

$

114

99

COMPARE TO

KOBALT $ 98

Item 47873 shown

KOBALT $

ITEM 61971/61972/98199 shown

Customer Rating

COMPARE TO

199

MODEL: SM2507LW

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

YOUR CHOICE

9

$299

MODEL: 62742

4

$ 99 SAVE 70%

TYPE CLAW

ITEM 69006/60715/60714

RIP

69005/61262/47873

LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.

hft_nmenchantment_0118_M-REG127758.indd 1

3999

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO WELD

$1999

Customer Rating

ITEM 60658 97711 shown

170 AMP MIG/FLUX 10" SLIDING COMPOUND CORED WELDER MITER SAW • Powerful 15 amp motor

99

ITEM 62434, 62426, 62433,

• 5400 lb. capacity

20"

SUPER COUPON

NOW

$3 $599

3/8" x 14 FT., GRADE 43 TOWING CHAIN

HUSKY

14998

MODEL: HD00120

ITEM 61253/62326/61282 shown

LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

Customer Rating

14

$79

SAVE 90%

FARM & RANCH MODEL: FR1055

SUPER COUPON

MODEL: 5075800

99

$

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

99

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

MECHANIX $ 99

MODEL: H-21

NOW

MODEL: DCD780C2

SAVE 73%

57

55

10" PNEUMATIC TIRE

$99

$

$

99

SUPER COUPON

99

ITEM 63381

29

GPL

• 576 in. lbs. of torque • 2.5 amp hour battery • Weighs 3.6 lbs. Customer Rating SAVE $80 NOW

99

NOW

LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

SUPER COUPON

20 VOLT LITHIUM CORDLESS 1/2" COMPACT DRILL/DRIVER KIT

$

$

99

ITEM 69338/996 shown

BEATS

• 350 lb. capacity

NOW

$39

COMPARE TO

SUPER COUPON

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

SAVE 65%

99

LIMIT 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, safes, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Ames, Bauer, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Earthquake, Fischer, Hercules, Icon, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/28/18.

STEP STOOL/ 20 TON SHOP PRESS WORKING PLATFORM • Pair of arbor

Customer Rating

NOW

ROUGHNECK $ 99

SAVE $69

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

SAVE 55%

ANY SINGLE ITEM

COMPARE TO

RAPID PUMP® 3 TON LOW PROFILE HEAVY DUTY STEEL FLOOR JACK

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

SUPER COUPON

1 TON CHAIN HOIST

20% OFF

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

$4999

SAVE $120

$79

ITEM 69030 69031 shown

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/28/18. Limit one FREE GIFT coupon per customer per day.

• Weighs 73 lbs.

NOW

99

• Thumb Lock • Rubber Wrapped Case

SUPER COUPON

Battle Tested • Weighs 14.3 lbs. • 11-1/8" L x 4-1/2" H

NOW

$

COMPARE TO

COMPARE TO

SUPER COUPON

3-POINT QUICK HITCH

1" x 25 FT. TAPE MEASURE

SAVE $990

17999

ANY PURCHASE

WITH

LIFETIME WARRANTY

SNAP-ON MODEL: KRSC33APBO ITEM 61427/63308 69397/64059/64060/64061/95272 shown

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 4/28/18*

COMPARE TO

For more details or about booth space, call or email: 505-832-2513 moriartyauthorsevent@gmail.com

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

MECHANIC'S GLOVES

Please RSVP by March 24, 2018

FREE

800+ Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com

SUPER COUPON

11/21/17 9:06 AM

enchantment.coop

JANUARY 2018

9


Energy Sense

BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

How Smart Should You Get When Purchasing a New thermostat?

D

ear Pat: We have an old dial thermostat. There seem to be a lot of choices for thermostats nowadays, but are the pricier, more techfocused options worth the additional cost? —Ted. Dear Ted: Today, many thermostats offer great new technologies and can do things thermostats of the past simply could not do. That said, it’s certainly worth asking if these new thermostats can save enough money to justify the extra cost. Let’s start by looking at the three main options for thermostats: manual, programmable and smart. The main benefits of a manual thermostat like yours are that it’s simple to operate and there are no batteries to wear out and replace. You just have to remember to raise and lower the temperature setting in the morning and evening, and whenever you leave the house. The second option is the programmable thermostat. Typically, this type of thermostat allows settings for four different periods each day. Some models can even handle a different schedule for each day of the week. You control the settings so they will suit your climate, schedule and temperature preferences. You can easily override your program settings anytime.

10

JANUARY 2018

The third option is a smart or “learning” thermostat. A smart thermostat connects to your home’s Wi-Fi network. After installation, you input the basics of your schedule and temperature. Over time, as you change the settings, it learns your schedule and adjusts to minimize energy use. Smart thermostats can also detect when no one is home. You can also control it remotely by using an app on your smart phone or tablet. If your electric co-op has a demand response program that offers discounts for using less power during peak energy use hours, a smart thermostat can provide additional savings on your monthly power bill. The move to smart technology is a significant investment. Units can cost up to $400, although one manufacturer has a new model for about $170. It’s also important to note not all homes have the proper wiring in place to accommodate smart thermostats, so you may need to hire a professional to handle the installation. Back to your initial question: Are newer, more expensive thermostats worth the extra cost? How much a thermostat can save depends on how much you spend on heating and cooling your house. You can estimate your heating and cooling expenses by

enchantment.coop

An energy auditor demonstrates how to program a thermostat. Photo Credit: Piedmont Electric Co-op.

Tips to Use Your Thermostat More Efficiently

Smart thermostats learn from your behavior to maximize energy savings.

examining your electric bills (and other utility bills) related to heating your home. Compare the bills for winter and summer to those for spring and fall. Most of the difference is likely due to heating and cooling. If that amount is more than $900 per year, which is the national average, you have a better chance of a good return on your investment. The second factor that will determine how much you can save is how you are operating your old thermostat. If you are conscientious about adjusting the temperature to save energy when you’re leaving the house or going to bed, the new thermostat may not reduce your bills that much, even if you program it correctly or if it learns your behavior.

• Don’t adjust the thermostat temperature drastically hoping to heat or cool your home much more quickly. • For the greatest savings during winter months, keep the temperature at or below 68 degrees Fahrenheit while home during the day, and cooler during the night; during summer months, keep it at or above 78 degrees Fahrenheit while home. • You can save up to 10 percent off your monthly heating and cooling bill by turning back your thermostat by 7 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit for eight hours a day. • The thermostat is just one piece of the energy efficiency puzzle. You might be able to save more by adding insulation or sealing air leaks. A professional energy audit is always the best way to identify your home’s energy weaknesses.

As you make your decision, don’t forget to look to your electric co-op’s website for advice, ratings and maybe even rebates.


45-DAY FREEL

FDA Registered Hearing Aid

TRIA

✔ Buy direct from manufacturer ✔ 100% Risk-FREE 45-day home trial ✔ FREE shipping ✔ Payment plans available ✔ Licensed professionals

• Hearing aids by mail for 38 years • Over 750,000 satisfied customers

The Apollo-6200 is the perfect FDA registered digital hearing aid if you want the BEST technology for the BEST price. American Made electronics give you advanced technology in a durable, easy to maintain hearing aid. Includes four channel compression for crisp clear sound and feedback cancellation that virtually eliminates squeal. Discreet slim-tube design gives you the most natural sound with total comfort.

R

D

STE EGI RE

The typical hearing aid costs at least $2,000 but your price is no where near that with this special offer! Try the Apollo-6200 with NO MONEY DOWN completely Risk-FREE for 45 days in the comfort of your own home and see if it’s everything we’ve promised. Call today: 1-888-847-1189 and mention promo code 90-163.

R

D

ONLY $299!

STE EGI RE

High-quality American Made electronics

"They work better than the $4,600 hearing aid that I purchased months ago."

R.F. – Ruidoso Downs, NM

Advanced technology

100% Digital

Try our Apollo-6200 hearing aid risk-free for 45 days.

“Compact size. I can hear much better. Enjoy hearing the TV, music and birds singing.”

If you like it then pay only $299!

S.S. –Anthony, TX

By phone (Mon-Fri • 8 am - 5 pm Central Time)

Offer expires: 3/31/18

code: 90-163 1-888-847-1189 Promo

Order online

www.HearingHelpExpress.com/90163

Since 1979 Professional and affordable hearing help, for life!

Hearing Help Express • 1714 Sycamore Rd, PO Box 586 • DeKalb, IL 60115 © Hearing Help Express®, Inc

45-DAY RISK-FREE HOME TRIAL

A+ Rating Better Business Bureau

Licensed hearing aid dispensers on staff

100%

Satisfaction

GUARANTEED

LIMITE D 1 YEAR A R NTY R A W

enchantment.coop

PROTECTION

ANTEED GUAR

JANUARY 2018

11


The Taos Avalanche Center

SAFETY ON THE slopes BY MICHELE POTTER

S

le Potter. Photo by Michel

Taos Ski Valof the “Ridge” at p to e th to ay w r s, Colorado, in Skiers on thei ken near Twin Lake ta o ot ph n sig e ence Pass and ley. Avalanch ading to Independ le ad ro e th on y a steep valle Michele Potter. Aspen. Photos by

12

JANUARY 2018

enchantment.coop

now. There’s nothing like the quiet and serene beauty of snow when it falls and blankets mountains and fields. It’s just plain fun to get outdoors and play in the snow. Simply put, snow is beautiful. As a ski instructor for more than 25 years, I have pledged my troth to just such beauty. That, of course, and the elemental pleasure of sliding on it. But snow slides too, and it happens anywhere, anytime, and can kill. Whether one is skiing, snowboarding or snowmobiling. According to the Colorado Avalanche Information Center, roughly 30 people a year die in avalanches. In 2016, there were 10 deaths in 10 days. Andy Bond, director of the Taos Avalanche Center (TAC), hopes this number “plateaus,” though each season even more and more folks are hungry for nature’s “pure” experience. To save lives, Bond says, “I’d like to see better consistency with forecasting and methods. The community needs this and I want to give back.” He and Rachel Moscarella, also a veteran ski patroller at Taos Ski Valley, did just that—starting New Mexico’s first avalanche center. The Taos Avalanche Center (TAC), a notfor-profit and member of Kit Carson

Electric Cooperative, opened in 2016. It is among nearly 13 other centers located throughout the country. Most of the centers work in conjunction with the U.S. Forest Service. The Taos Avalanche Center also collaborates with the National Weather Service. The avalanche centers educate, forecast, observe, record, report the weather, report the snowpack, and offer avalanche summaries. Last season, TAC produced about 45 videos. It also offers avalanche programs to youth. Like any ski journal, a sample 2017 report from the TAC website, reflects the risks and rewards of a life spent in the mountains: “The end of February and beginning of March brought a return of powder with a small avalanche cycle that was confined to sensitive small storm slab instability. In the backcountry on February, we were remote triggering storm slabs from long distances [think explosives] since this was an upside down storm. This instability was short lived and produced some good powder skiing after a long dry February.” Most avalanche accidents seem to occur on “blue bird days,” which are beautiful, blue, sunny days after an overnight snowfall. Bond and his colleagues provide online reports from


snow pits. Like chefs in gleaming white kitchens, (only in this case up to their eyeballs in snow pits), they describe how nature’s forces of wind and moisture layer and pack the snow, perhaps cooking up the perfect snow slide. In other words, they dig and measure snow out in the backcountry assessing the outcome of potential avalanches. Bond’s knowledge is honed, partly with his mentor, world-renowned climber Dave Hahn, with whom he guides on Mount Rainier, the highest mountain in Washington. Many who love backcountry winter experiences also need this wisdom too, like Bond. Ninety percent of avalanche incidents occur when a person or someone in their party sets off an avalanche. Still, too many boarders and skiers rely on the “experts” such as resort mountain managers and patrollers instead of thinking for themselves. But more outdoors people and ski patrollers are taking transceivers (avalanche radios or location beacons) with them within ski area boundaries, especially in the steeps (steep mountain slopes). One avalanche story is seared into my memory when I first arrived at

Taos Ski Valley 22 years ago. A local skier was killed in the Wheeler Peak Wilderness in the Carson National Forest, outside the ski area boundaries during one last powder ride. Rescuers and their dogs could do nothing (the likelihood of being found alive after 15 minutes decreases very quickly; after two hours it’s virtually nil). Last October, a 23-year-old woman with extensive avalanche training died in Montana, buried in a three-foot slab while skiing in the backcountry with her boyfriend. After three hours of searching for her, he hiked out, reported the location, and took his own life. Her transceiver was found in her backpack turned off. Avalanches affect more than those who die. Says Bond, “I’ve lost a lot of friends to avalanches.” Snow does not like sudden change. It is ephemeral and moody. It can bond, shear, drift, compact, transition, grow weak, turn icy, and sluff. Most avalanches in these parts are not wet avalanches or sluffs, but dry slab avalanches, which shear off from their moorings like a plate pushed off a table—only at 80 mph. The clichés about avalanche experts being the only

Photos, left to right: Last January at the Williams Lake area near Taos Ski Valley, Andy Bond analyzes the snow pack structure and identifies potential weak layers to see how reactive they are. Photo courtesy of Taos Avalanche Center. Skiers at the top of the “Ridge” at Taos Ski Valley. Looking for freshies in West Basin on a perfect deep-powder day last April. Photos by Michele Potter.

ones who get caught in avalanches is untrue. Training really helps. In our “Red Bull Culture,” we want big fun, and the danger zone coincides with the fun zone (most avalanches occur between 35-45 degrees of slope). The cold heart of the monster loves 38 degrees. Super steep slopes usually clear themselves. A quarter of the folks in avalanches are killed by rocks, trees and cliffs. Another quarter of its victims are snuffed out by carbon dioxide as they are buried. So listen to the mountains: Are they saying: “please go away” or “come on in?” When in doubt, get out. The mountain’s not going anywhere. Oh, and check out the TAC website at: www.taosavalanchecenter.org

Snow Country Checklist • Gear: Transceiver, shovel, probe, partner. • Train: You have to practice! • Forecast: Check the Taos Avalanche Center website: www.taosavalanchecenter.org • Picture: Check obvious clues like recent storms, wind loaded pockets, shooting cracks. • Get out of harm’s way: Some days, just go home.

enchantment.coop

JANUARY 2018

13


Book Chat BY PHAEDRA GREENWOOD

COLOR JASON AND HIS FUNNY MACHINES

JAZZ MUSIC: POEMS IN THE RHYTHM OF LIFE

By Ross Van Dusen 2016, 24 illustrations, $9.95 Rio Grande Books 505-344-9382

By Tom Banks 2013, 146 pages, $19.95 Sunstone Press 800-243-5644; www.sunstonepress.com

Here’s a whimsical and entertaining children’s activity book for ages three to eight from an author who has won six book awards since 2015 including the 2016 Eric Hoffer Montaigne Award, the 2016 Children’s Book, Southwest Book Design & Production Award, and New Mexico-Arizona Book Award. This unique activity book is a supplement to the Ross Van Dusen’s science series, What Makes a Rainbow?, What Makes A Snowflake?, and What Makes Lightning? This activity book offers Jason’s fantastic machines and fanciful inventions, puzzles, mazes and connect-the-dots games that may challenge the child’s logic and inspire his or her sense of adventure. The blank backs of coloring pages can be used for the child’s own imaginative drawings and inventions. (A scientist at Stanford is actually creating stunning synthetic snowflakes.)

Tom Banks majored in English at Indiana University. He muses on life with pathos and wry humor. To this poet life has a dancing rhythm of its own, like jazz that swerves this way and that, and yet sustains its own beat. Falling apart he tries to reassemble the pieces and discovers that they don’t fit, “So I’ll have to devise a new puzzle/based on the loose pieces of me…” Luckily, those “loose pieces” integrate in his poetry. “Grounded and still/On a high soaring orb/enclosed, and yet part of a star.” In the natural world he sees lines that stand alone or intersect, or radiate from space and time, yet all evolve from the same source. “Only dreams” he reflects, “have no lines…only dark light is permitted.” He discovers his truth with: “It can’t be that everything’s so untrue/This illusion is a passing thing for sure.” All that’s left is “the glimmer” and “the open sky beyond.”

14

JANUARY 2018

enchantment.coop

PAUL PLETKA: IMAGINED WESTS By Amy Scott Contributions by Paul Pletka 2017, $65, 248 pages University of Oklahoma Press 800-627-7377; www.oupress.com In his foreword James K. Balinger, Director Emeritis of the Phoenix Art Museum, describes Paul Pletka’s art as “leaving his unsettled viewers to resolve his visual mysteries.” Pletka came of age in Grand Junction, Colorado, where he explored ancestral memory in geological layers of a red rock landscape still haunted by an indigenous culture. As a young man visiting Taos, he discovered a diverse artistic community that catalyzed his work while he absorbed the integration of Pueblo rituals with Catholic rites such as the Matachines Dance which is still performed at Taos Pueblo. His symbolic repertoire expanded to include Native artifacts and Hispanic culture, expressed in various techniques of modern art. Shamans, ghost dancers and images of the crucifixion affirm death as a spiritual transformation. Pletka says he paints “a terrible, compelling beauty” with “a profound and personal passion, literally bred in the bone…” Five brilliant stars!

TRULY TEXAS MEXICAN: A NATIVE CULINARY HERITAGE IN RECIPES By Adan Medrano 2014, 256 pages, $29.95 Texas Tech University Press 800-832-4042; ww.ttupress.org Enjoy the flavor profile of a hundred time-honored Texas Mexican recipes in the “mouth-watering interconnectedness of culture and cuisine.” Learn about the complexities of aromatic chiles and techniques to develop their unique flavors from the region north and south of the lower Rio Grande, from San Antonio down to Nava, Mexico. In the first chapter, Medrano relates a history of the Texas Indians that goes back a thousand years, how the resilient cultures survived through continuous change and adaptation. “Drying meat and fish had always been important to food preservation and taste …” he writes. But as native cooks fled to Catholic missionaries, their culinary creativity grew to include pigs, cattle, goats, onions, and garlic. In the face of disastrous losses of land and language, economic and political standing, “Food was the cultural activity that held us together.” Five delicious stars. To submit a book for review: include contact information and where to order.


COUNTRY LIVING MADE EASIER WITH MUELLER STEEL BUILDINGS Mueller steel buildings can be customized to meet your agricultural needs. Whether it’s a storage space or a multi-functional ranch facility, we can help design and manufacture a barn that goes beyond your expectations. www.muellerinc.com 877-2-MUELLER (877-268-3553)

enchantment.coop

JANUARY 2018

15


Vecinos BY ARIANA KRAMER

Finding Inspiration in Youth Art

S

aiSravya Bandla is a young, talented artist who lives in Quay County and attends eighth grade at San Jon Municipal Schools. In recent years, she has submitted several drawings to enchantment magazine’s Youth Art contest and has been a published winner. Drawing according to enchantment magazine topics, SaiSravya has illustrated a car, a chile, a dinosaur, people baking cookies, a person skating, and a coyote (her school’s mascot). After her chile drawing was published, SaiSravya was contacted by someone who asked to use it on a greeting card. “I find the prompts fun to draw,” says SaiSravya. She described her techniques using paper, pencils, eraser, and ink. “I begin with a normal letter-sized paper and I draw with a pencil. After I think everything looks good, I erase my pencil marks so I can see them a little bit. I sketch it and after that I make it neat to prepare it for color. After that, I use colored pencils mostly but sometimes markers to outline it and give it some definition. I use black gel pen to outline it, or black marker. I finish cleaning up the edges with an eraser.” SaiSravya creates borders around some of her drawings. For her portraits, she uses a fine gel pen to outline eyes and lips. I like to draw animal and human portraits,” says SaiSravya. She especially likes to draw her family, and dogs named Cherry and Silver. Her father, Nagarajan, inspired SaiSravya to draw family portraits. She admires his artistic ability.

16

JANUARY 2018

“He draws portraits a lot and they look really pretty,” she says. Her other family members also encourage her art. SaiSravya’s mother, Radha, gives her ideas about what to draw, and her sister, SaiSruthi (aka Kushi), looks over her drawings and makes suggestions. In school, SaiSravya’s favorite subjects are math and science. “I think science is easier to understand than other subjects. Science is fascinating and interesting. The thing I like about math is I like to solve equations. I find it easy after you practice it.” SaiSravya also enjoys spelling, and has participated at the state level in the international spelling bee. She plays volleyball, badminton and chess. SaiSravya is grateful to her English teacher, Ms. Sours, for introducing her to enchantment magazine’s Youth Art drawing contest. Asked if she has suggestions for future Youth Art topics, SaiSravya replies, “I like galaxies and space, so maybe it could be space.” The Bandla family gets electricity from Farmers’ Electric Cooperative, headquartered in Clovis, which serves Curry, DeBaca, Guadalupe, Harding, Quay, Roosevelt, and San Miguel counties. SaiSravya appreciates that Farmers’ Electric Cooperative uses wind power. “I like the fact the co-op has 24 hours of electricity and doesn’t pollute the environment,” she says.

enchantment.coop


Christmas Cactus Plant Growing Tips Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera bridgesii), a hybrid plant and member of the cactus family, is known for blooming during the holiday season in the northern hemisphere. Following are tips to encourage a longer blooming period and for a return bloom the following year. ▶ Let the soil dry slightly between waterings. Surplus water should drain away, leaving the soil as moist as a wrung-out sponge. ▶ Avoid drafty locations near open doors and heater vents. These locations speed the drying of the soil and plants. Keep the plants in a cool location. Cool air slows the aging of the flowers, but do not let the temperature drop below 50 F. ▶ Keep in a brightly lit location. If there is sufficient light, the plants can photosynthesize and manufacture food to sustain the plant and flowers. ▶ Do not apply fertilizer during flowering. Wait until spring, when new growth appears, to fertilize and replant. ▶ Once buds set, don't move the plant around too much. Flower buds will drop off if the plant is moved or suddenly exposed to temperature changes. ▶ In the spring, you can prune your cactus by cutting between stem segments using clean, sharp shears. Flower buds develop at the distal edges (ends) of each stem, so by pruning, you are encouraging branching and therefore maximizing flower potential next season. Those cuttings can be easily propagated by letting stems of 2–3 segments in length dry for a day so the wound callouses over and then replanting them in new soil, taking care not to place stems upside down in the new soil. ▶ Next fall, be sure to keep your Christmas cactus in a spot where it gets a full dose of dark time (10–12 hours per day) so that flowering is induced all over again. Source: NMSU Horticulture

We’re seeing sunshine in a whole new light. Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association supplies power to 11 electric cooperatives in New Mexico. We are the #1 cooperative solar G&T in the country. That’s un-renew-a-believable!

Together, we generate possibilities.

Visit Randy at www.tristate.coop/renewables

enchantment.coop

JANUARY 2018

17


Backyard Trails BY CRAIG SPRINGER

Winter Base Camp: Jemez Springs

S

ure, it is cold. But that’s no reason to stay home and hunker down indoors. Jemez Springs is a one-tank destination from much of central and northern New Mexico. Daytripper or over-nighter, there’s a good time waiting for you. The small village is tucked between steep, red stone canyon walls in the Jemez River valley on the south flank of the pinestudded Jemez Mountains. It’s named after the notable mineral baths that bubble up, treated and heated in earth’s basement. This time of year they send plumes of steam billowing into the air. The same volcanic activity that spewed out hot ash and created the soft immensity of the nearby Valles Caldera, today warms mineral-laden water. Jemez Springs can be your base camp for forays afield to earn some time soaking in a mineral bath, later. The hot mineral water that feels so good to bathe in, also made an interesting geological feature near the village. Mineral-rich waters converge with the Jemez River and over eons have created Soda Dam. Its striated rock with grottos look like a contorted mammoth mushroom. A short drive to the north through the green-black treed canyon, you can pull into the aptly named Valle Grande. It is grand—a huge treeless basin at the bottom of the Valles Caldera National Preserve. The views are wonderful, and provided ample snow lies on the ground, it’s a great place to snowshoe under the light-blue dome of sky. Adventurous anglers can cast a wet fly to brown trout that wait in the dark lair of an undercut bank in San Antonio Creek that purls over the valley floor. The Jemez Historic Site is nestled in a side canyon in the village. It’s a national historic landmark, a preserved Spanish mission and Native American village that dates to 1621, when Franciscan priests established a church. A trail with interpretive signs wends through it and carries you back some 500 years. The mission was built on the Pueblo of Giusewa populated by the ancestors of the present-day Walatowa people. If you come to Jemez Springs from the south, be sure to visit the Walatowa visitor center. The mineral bathhouses in the village are a primary reason to visit. They offer clean and private soaking at affordable rates. The baths are not suitable for small children, however. What a great way to end a day hiking or moseying around the village and nearby sites. To learn more, visit jemezsprings.org

18

JANUARY 2018

enchantment.coop

Jemez Hot Springs. Photo by Jim McCue.

Jemez State Monument at Jemez Springs. Photo by Julien Johnson.

Elk Lodge romance. Photo by Norman Johnson.

Soda Dam near Jemez Springs. Photo by Craig Springer.


enchantment.coop

JANUARY 2018

19


Trading Post

Big Toys

To Place a Classified Ad 1. Type or print ad neatly. 2. Cost is $20 for up to the first 40 words per ad, per category. Each additional word is 50¢. Ads with insufficient funds will not be printed. Ad published once unless paid for several issues. 3. Graphics such as brands or QR codes are an additional $5 to the original cost of ad. 4. Only members of New Mexico electric co-ops may place ads. 5. We reserve the right to reject any advertisement. 6. Ads due the 9th, one month prior. Ex: Ads due February 9 for the March issue. Ads postmarked after the deadline of the 9th will be placed in the next issue. 7. Fill out contact information and select a category: Name:____________________ Address:__________________ Name:____________________ City:______________________ Address:__________________ State:_____ ZIP:_____________ City:______________________ Telephone:________________ State:____ Zip:_____________ Cooperative:_______________ Telephone:________________ Big Toys (Tools______________ & Machinery) Cooperative:_ Country Critters&(Pets) Big Toys (Tools Machinery) LivestockCritters Round-Up Country (Pets)(Livestock) Odd & Ends (Camping, Music, Digital) Livestock Round-Up (Livestock) Roof&Over Head (Real Estate) Odd EndsYour (Camping, Music, Digital) Things That Vroom! (Vehicles) Vintage FindsGo(Antiques & Collectibles) Vintage Collectibles) Roof OverFinds Your(Antiques Head (Real& Estate) When Opportunity Knocks Things That Go Vroom! (Vehicles) (Business & Employment) When Opportunity Knocks 8. Mail your ad and payment to: (Business & Employment) NMRECA 614 Don Gaspar Avenue Santa Fe, NM 87505

Make check or money order payable to NMRECA

Advertisements in enchantment are paid solicitations are notor endorsed by theorder Makeand check money publisher or the electric cooperatives of New payable to NMRECA Mexico. PRODUCT SATISFACTION AND DELIVERY RESPONSIBILITY LIE SOLELY WITH THE ADVERTISER.

20

JANUARY 2018

DRINKING WATER STORAGE TANKS, HEAVY DUTY Black Poly, proven algae resistant. 125 to 11,000 gallons, NRCS and EQUIP approved. Please give us a chance to serve you! MasterCard or Visa accepted. Call 575-682-2308 or 1-800-603-8272. GREAT OFFER ON SOLAR SUBMERSIBLE SHALLOW/DEEP well pumps! ‘NRCS’ approved with 2-year warranty on selected pumps with affordable, easy installation! For a custom quote, call 505-429-3093. Or order online at: www.solarsubmersiblewellpumps. com You can also email anytime at: sales@solarsubmersiblewellpumps.com 24/7 service. OVERHEAD FEED BINS: 1 TO 4 compartments, 12 to 48 tons, save $45 to $75 per ton bulk vx. sack feed. Solar Pannel Rack, 3 or 4 pannel racks, 4 to 6 inch pipe. 20 and 40 foot shipping containers. Contact Emery Welding in Clayton, NM. Call 575-374-2320 or email: eweld98@yahoo.com 1997 NEW HOLLAND 8870 MFD TRACTOR. 80% rubber, powershift, duals. $39,500. Front Line Equipment Company. Call 575-456-1000. KINZE ROW CROP PLANTER, 16R30. STACK fold, lift assist wheels, gauge wheels, monitor. $12,500. Front Line Equipment Company. Call 575-456-1000. WESTINGHOUSE 100 AMP BRK. BOX WITH breakers 240-110, Bull Dog safety SW 30 Amp 240-110, Square D safety SW 30 Amp 600 vac, all 3 like new for $150. One ton chain hoist, $40. Call 505-287-7611. WANTED TO PURCHASE: GOOD USED SIDEROLL irrigation system or moveable sprinkler system for small alfalfa acreage. Please call and leave a message at 806-647-2209. AFFORDABLE SOLAR WATER PUMPS! REPLACE THAT broken windmill with a solar pump. New well with no electricity? THINK SOLAR! Less expense, easier maintenance. See if we have “Solutions 4 U.” Call us and 505407-6553 or 575-742-8050. Or email: Solutions4u@yucca.net

enchantment.coop

Country Critters SEVEN MONTH OLD RED HEELER. SPAYED, shots, dewclaws, micro-chipped. Housebroken, crate trained, basic obedience training. Call 505-281-6564 or email: ponitrax@gmail.com

Livestock Round-Up GRASSFED BEEF: NM 100% GRASSFED BEEF. No hormones. No growth stimulants. Processed to your specifications. From $2.85 per lb. plus processing. Edgewood/Cedar Grove, NM. 505-286-0286. Mention this ad for a discount www.moonbeamranch.com HAYGRAZER-WARNER SWEET BEE QUALITY, FINE STEMMED, 4’x6’ round bales only $85 ton in field. 30 miles SE of Portales. 575-760-4223 or 575-273-4220. NOT ALL WATER TANKS ARE CREATED Equal! Is Quality, Value and Longevity important to you? Buy High Specific Gravity, Heavy Weight, Long Warranty, Superior Black NRCS tanks. Lowest prices only provide minimum standards, lower weights, and shorter warranties. Find out more! 575-430-1010. NEW MEXICO DRINKING WATER STORAGE TANKS, Heavy Duty Black Poly. Fittings customized to your needs NRCS and EQUIP approved. High Specific Gravity, Heavy Weight, Long Warranty, Algae Resistant, Black NRCS Water Tanks. Call 1-800-6038272 or 575-682-2308. FOR SALE: 2 NEW MEXICO BRANDS 7 RHC RHH; 7 RHC RHH. Price negotiable. Call 505-281-1510.

CIRCLE A FARMS AND SUPPLY IN Capitan, NM has premium quality Hay and Feed. We are a dealer for Farmway Feeds. Alfalfa, Wheat Hay, Oat Hay, Sweet Cane Hay, Grass Hay, in 2 string bales, round bales, and large square bales. Loading and delivery available. Weather King portable buildings dealer and American Steel Carports. Come check out all we have to offer. Lincoln County’s most experienced and best priced for your animal feed needs. Call 575-491-7518.

Odds & Ends COFFINS, CASKETS & URNS. Simple, Natural, Unique. Shipping or delivery available. Call 505-286-9410 for FREE funeral information. Visit our website at www.theoldpinebox.com SOLAR EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEM PACKAGES. TOP quality products at reasonable prices. Let our years of solar design and installation experience work for you. Call or text 575-937-3528 or see our website/catalog at www.powergenx.com WOOD BURNING KITCHEN COOK STOVE. 6 top plates and a warmer cabinet on top. Silver and white Louise Washington, Gray and Dudley Nashville #108. Excellent condition. Ask for Lee Cordova at 505-469-0181. HEADSTONES (I.E. CEMETERY MONUMENTS) IS OUR BUSINESS. Over 1,000 designs. An eternal memory of a loved one. Taos Mountain Heritage. email: taos_mt_heritage@msn.com or call 575-770-2507. Or visit our website: www.taosmountainheritage.com 250 GALLON PROPANE TANK WITH REGULATOR, $600. Call 575-776-5568 and leave a message.

MOUNTAIN TOP GOATS. BABIES ARE ON the ground. We have Milkers, Bucks, Babies, Pets, Cabrito and Weed Eaters for sale. All 4-H and Show Quality. Nubians, Mini-Nubians, LaManchas, Mini-LaManchas and Nigerian Dwarfs. In Capitan, call 575-354-2846.

THE BEST TIME FOR TREE MAINTENANCE is in the winter months. Call Furlong’s Tree Service for your free estimate. We offer trimming, removal, hygienic maintenance, fire-scaping, timer stand improvement. Husband and wife team, licensed and bonded. Call 575-313-2634.

YOUNG REPLACEMENT EWES-EIGHT MONTHS, GOOD BREEDING Ramboulliet, open face multibirth progeny. Large, lean body frame. Taos County. Call 575-5861323 or 575-770-2881.

CASKETS: HANDMADE NATURAL CASKETS ONLY $399. Call Dave. Leave a message at 575-666-2140 or 505-652-0106. Located near Wagon Mound, New Mexico on Route #271.


YOUR ONE STOP SHOP FOR: WATER WELL • WINDMILL SOLAR • ELECTRICAL

Tel: 575-835-1630

www.williamswindmill.com

NRCS and EQUIP approved water storage tanks. • Many sizes available and always in stock. • Lowest Prices in State. • Delivery and Setup Available. We also Manufacture Welded Galvanized Storage Tanks. Also available Galvanized, Poly, Fiberglass, and Rubber Tire Troughs.

Installations • Repairs and Supplies Call Today for Freedom with SERVICES (COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL • RESIDENTIAL) STAND ALONE SOLAR SYSTEMS (575) 895-3306 3 9th St., Hillsboro, NM 88042

nmwatersupplyinc @ gmail . com

Roof Over Your Head LAKEHOUSE FOR SALE WITH SCENIC VIEW of Elephant Butte Lake. 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 1.5 acres. Large detached garage, covered porches, private well with softener and R/O system. Central refrigerated A/C. FSBO. $198,000. Email for details: hunter.dstallman@gmail.com LOOKING FOR WATER? GIFTED TO FIND underground streams. Reputable dowser with 50+ years experience. To God Be Thy Glory! Contact Joe Graves at 575758-3600. In Taos, 75 miles north of Santa Fe. God Bless You! PRIME REAL ESTATE IN CLOUDCROFT, NM. 2-story wooden building on corner of Burro and Glorieta Avenue. 200 Burro Avenue. Owner finance for $225,000 or $175,000 cash. Call Robert, 432202-6419 or Roy, 575-551-4657. BLUEWATER, NEW MEXICO. THREE ACRES WITH private road. Fenced and gated with RV trailer and much more. One mile from the lake. See craigslist for pictures, under Bluewater. Call 505-243-4108.

that PRODUCE and STORE ELECTRICITY.

• New Construction and Remodel for Solar, General Electrical, Water Well and Windmill Systems • Customized Stand Alone Solar Designs for both Water Systems and Electrical Systems • Supply, Test and Service Water Pump Systems • Maintenance and Repair • Water Purification Systems • Parking Lot Lighting

COUNTRY HOME ON 70 ACRES. FENCED, 30x80 metal barn with large stalls, hay storage, tack room, pipe corral. Solid older mobile home, mature trees. Outbuildings, dog pens, loafing shed. Private with good access on county maintained road. Alamogordo. $165,000. 575-415-1791. CONCHAS, 7543 NM 104. 3 BEDROOM, 2 bath double-wide with sunroom on 2.91 acres. Detached garage, carport, outbuildings, chain link fence with remote gate. Highway frontage with commercial potential. $135,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000, Paul Stout, Broker NMREL 17843, 575-7605461, www.bigmesarealty.com CONCHAS, 000 BOAT DOCK DRIVE. VACANT land just over 1/2 acre. Water access at high mark. $49,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000, Paul Stout, Broker NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461, www.bigmesarealty.com CONCHAS, 0000 BOAT DOCK DRIVE. VACANT land just over 1/2 acre. Water access at high mark. $49,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000, Paul Stout, Broker NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461, www.bigmesarealty.com

facebook . com /@ nmwaterandelectric

CALL 520-808-6937. PARADISE HOME IN THE beautiful Chiricahua Mountains for sale. Great year-round climate for bird watching. National forest nearby. Has 1 bedroom, 1 bath, guesthouse. Fixer Upper. Two-story main house, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, spa room, could be converted into 2 bedrooms. Hunters dream with room for processing meat, with walk-in refrigerator unit, stainless steel sink, table meat saw. Furniture and appliances. Reduced price, $85,000. CONCHAS, TBD BIG MESA AVENUE. IMPROVED high level waterfront lot with septic on .83 acres. $98,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000, Paul Stout, Broker NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461, www.bigmesarealty.com 1923 GRAND AVENUE, LAS VEGAS, NM. 3 bedroom, 2 bath on .25. acres. $115,000. Owner may carry with 10% down and good credit. Sunset Realty, 575-4277078, buyersol@aol.com WEST OF CONCHAS/GARITA, 134 PAISANO. 1 bedroom, 1 bath home with 1 bath guesthouse. Just over 7 acres. $34,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000, Paul Stout, Broker NMREL 17843, 575-7605461, www.bigmesarealty.com

GRADY, 300 MARSHALL. 3 BEDROOM, 2 bath, attached carport, horse property on almost one acre, village water. $59,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000, Paul Stout, Broker NMREL 17843, 575-7605461, www.bigmesarealty.com GORGEOUS EAST MOUNTAIN HOME APPROXIMATELY 30 minutes from Albuquerque. This home is located in a pretty canyon on one acre of fenced land. It has a huge wraparound deck, 3 bedrooms, updated bath, washer and dryer (Maytag). All appliances are included. It has a good working well and storage shed and a newer metal roof. It has been freshly painted inside and out and has new flooring (carpet and vinyl). You can see it on Zillow at 02 Peak Road, Edgewood, NM. Or contact Annie St. Claire, Associate Broker at 505-730-0051. She accepts texts. 1104 DOUGLAS, LAS VEGAS, NM. COMMERCIAL zoning, major cosmetic repairs needed. 5 bedrooms, 2 bath, kitchen, full basement. Next to university, had apartment in back, drive thru Douglas or Diamond. $115,000. Will listen to offer. Sunset Realty, 505-4248748, buyersol@aol.com

enchantment.coop

JANUARY 2018

21


Meat Grinders, Saws, Slicers, Cutlery, Seasonings Everything for the home butcher

d class ser l v or

Pioneer Butcher Supplies

ice

w

Free Butcher Supply Catalog

in Loveland CO, since 1975

1-888-891-7057 toll free

d e e p S h g i H Internet el

ho

B & C TRADING COMPANY. NOW open for business. Buying, selling, trading authentic antique Western Colonial memorabilia, saddles, spurs, bronzes, Navajo tapestries, jewelry, rare collectibles. Cash paid for antique firearms! Open 10-5, Monday-Saturday. 397 Highway 518, Mora, NM. Call 512-571-7733.

e metown f

Special Promo** Free Install with a One-Year Term

866.215.5333 . wi-power.com Wi-Power Internet serves the following cities: Deming, Edgewood, Elephant Butte, Las Cruces, Maxwell, Moriarty, Mountainair, Raton, Sandia Park, Silver City, Socorro, Springer,Truth or Consequences and many of their surrounding communities.

*Services provided by TransWorld Network, Corp. Not available in all areas. With approved credit. Restrictions, terms, & conditions apply. Taxes, regulatory, installation/activation, surcharges & other charges not included. Call for details or visit www.wi-power.com or www.twncorp.com for additional information and for terms and conditions of services. Customers on qualifying internet plans may receive maximum download speeds ranging from 1.5 Mbps to 10.0 Mbps. Actual download speeds will vary. 2. Wi-Power Phone not available with satellite Internet. Minimum 512 Kbps Internet connection speed required. International call rates apply. Unlimited calling applies to local and long distance calls within the contiguous United States. Digital Phone 911 Service operates differently than traditional 911. See http://www.wi-power.com/911.html for information. Unlimited usage subject to “fair and normal” usage limitations as described in terms and conditions. **Offer expires December 31, 2017. Free installation available on a one year term Internet plan. Certain terms and conditions apply. Offer available for new customers. With approved credit.

FENCE LAKE, 295 PINE HILL ROAD. 2 bedroom, 3 bath log home on just over 60 acres. Well, outbuildings, corrals, hunting opportunities. $385,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000, Paul Stout, Broker NMREL 17843, 575-7605461, www.bigmesarealty.com

63 E. WILLARD ROAD, EDGEWOOD, NM. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage on .75 acres. $280,000. Excellent location, approximately 3/4 miles from Interstate 40 and approximately 20 miles to Albuquerque. Sunset Realty, 505-424-8748, buyersol@aol.com

WANTED! FARMS AND RANCHES. LET US sell your rural property today. Broker has over 40 years experience in production agriculture and is a farm owner. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000, Paul Stout, Broker NMREL 17843, 575-7605461, www.bigmesarealty.com

RANCHOS DE TAOS. COMMERCIAL, 2 ACRES, has a well and a 4500 square foot building, no value placed on building. Adjacent to Sage Brush Inn, on South Side, 208’ x 416’ highway frontage. Sunset Realty, 505-424-8748, buyersol@aol.com

HOME SITES IN MOUNTAINAIR OFF STATE Highway 55. 1/3 and 1/2 acre. Covenant protected. Underground utilities: water, sewer, electric, gas, telephone. Starting at $14,000. Owner financing. 505-467-8661, 303-913-9168 or www.granquiviraestates.com 28 WOODED ACRES IN MOUNTAINAIR, NM off State Highway 55. Ready for development with water, electric, and easy access. Other utilities adjacent. $5,000 per acre. Owner financing. 505-4678661, 303-913-9168 or visit website: www.granquiviraestates.com

22

JANUARY 2018

LINCOLN COUNTY. 11 ACRES, WOODS AND meadow next to National forest. Excellent hunting area. Excellent views. National forest trails, hiking and horseback. Perfect for retirement, mild climate. Discount for cash. 505-281-2598. THANKS FOR YOUR BUSINESS ADVERTISERS! SOUTHWESTERN STYLE ADOBE HOME. 2500 SQUARE feet, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, R-57 insulation, 2 fireplaces, vigas and corbels. 7 acres fenced in northwest Tucumcari. $210,000. Owner will finance with 10% down. Can text photos. Call 575-403-5936.

enchantment.coop

WEBSITE: MOUNTAINDOVEREALTY.COM PHONE: 575-687-3769. OWNER-BROKER, B.A. Olsen. Email: mtndove@pvtn.net

Things That Go Vroom! 2002 GMC YUKON XL. 2 WHEEL drive, 5.3 litre engine, power windows/ locks, leather, under 97,000 actual miles. $8,500. Front Line Equipment Company. Call 575-456-1000.

Vintage Finds RAILROAD ITEMS WANTED: KEROSENE LANTERNS, BRASS locks, keys, badges, uniforms, bells, whistles, and pre1950 employee timetables. Always seeking items from any early New Mexico railroad, especially D&RG, C&S, EP&NE, EP&SW, AT&SF, SP or Rock Island. Call Randy Dunson at 575-356-6919 or 575-760-3341. 1948 IHC KD5, WILL RUN, GOOD body, $5,000. Call 575-776-5568 and leave a message.

BUYING OLD STUFF: GAS PUMPS AND parts 1960’s or earlier, advertising signs, neon clocks, old car parts in original boxes, motor oil cans, license plate collections, Route 66 items, old metal road signs, odd and weird stuff. Fair prices paid. Have pickup, will travel. Gas Guy in Embudo, 505-852-2995. WANTED: NEW MEXICO MOTORCYCLE LICENSE PLATES 1912-1959. Paying $100-$500 each. Also buying some New Mexico car plates 1900-1923. WANTED: New Mexico Highway Journal magazine, 1923-1927, New Mexico Automobile License Directory (”The Zia Book”), Motor Vehicle Register books, 1900-1949. See the New Mexico Transportation History Project website NMplates.com for 2,500+ color photographs and 100+ year history of New Mexico license plates. Bill Johnston, Box 1, Organ, NM 880520001. Email: Bill@NMplates.com or telephone 575-382-7804.

When Opportunity Knocks 37% OF MEXICO LIVES ON $5 or less a day. We are starting a 501(c)3 to help the poor kids go to school. If you know how to write grants or how to establish a 501(c)3 organization or want to help, call 575-494-0973. HORSE PASTURE WITH LOAFING SHED TO lease. Full care. Arroyo Seco, NM. $225 monthly. BHS instructor, perfect record. Call 575-776-5568 and leave a message.


Youth Artist Choice January was your choice to submit any drawing. Thanks for your colorful drawings. February’s topic is “Wacky Hand Shadows.” Have you ever noticed the shadow from your hand when the sun is streaming on it? Draw and color your hand shadow. Have fun and add a face. Maybe your hand shadow looks like a dinosaur. SaiSravya Bandla had a suggestion for a topic: Galaxy and Space. For March’s topic, sprint to the school library and find images of galaxy and space that you can draw.

Send Your Drawing by Email: We accept Youth Art drawings by email. Send jpg file and required information by the 9th to: enchantment@nmelectric.coop Remember: Print your name, age, mailing address, phone number, and co-op name on your drawings. Otherwise, your drawings are disqualified. Remember: color, dark ink or pencil on plain white 8.50 x 11.00 size paper is best. Accept artwork up to age 13. Mail to: Youth Editor, 614 Don Gaspar Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 87505. Entries must be here by the 9th of the month before publication. Each published artist receives $10 for his or her work.

Analiya Brown, Age 11, Grants

Fidel Baeza, Age 9, Lake Arthur

Desmond Cates, Age 6, Grenville

Connor Smith, Age 9, Cloudcroft

Aaden Cordova, Age 7, El Prado

Christopher Lopez, Age 5, Vadito

Jose Porras, Age 9, Roswell

Felicity Pino, Age 10, Mescalero

Ariana Romero, Age 8, Anton Chico

enchantment.coop

JANUARY 2018

23

January 2018 enchantment  

The Taos Avalanche Center

January 2018 enchantment  

The Taos Avalanche Center