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enchantment The Voice of New Mexico’s Rural Electric Cooperatives

CENTRAL NEW MEXICO ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

AUGUST 2021

Making a Difference Animal rescues and sanctuaries in New Mexico help wildlife of all species.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF SANTUARIO DE KARUNA


GALLUP McKINLEY COUNTY SCHOOLS | 2021-2022 CALENDAR GALLUP McKINLEY COUNTY SCHOOLS | 2021-2022 CALENDAR 4 4

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17 Juneteenth Observed 17 Juneteenth Observed Every Friday is Early Release. Every Friday is Early Release. There will also be Early Release There will also be Early Release on October 14th , January 6th on 14thth, January 6th andOctober March 24 and March 24th




AUGUST 2021 CONTENTS  We Are enchantment  View From enchantment  Hale to the Stars

 NSF Grant Funds Study  Energy Sense  Book Chat  Making a Difference  Your Electric Co-op

 

 New Music Series Features Local Talent  On the Menu  Understanding Solar Options





 The Market Place  Youth Art

 enchantment.coop

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enchantment!

We live in the Land of Enchantment … We are

Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month When shopping for new lightbulbs, know the difference between lumens and watts. Lumens measure the amount of light produced by the bulb. Watts measure energy consumption. Energysaving LEDs come in a variety of colors and brightness levels and last - times longer than incandescent bulbs.

enchantment monthly photo winner

Take a photo of you holding YOUR MAGAZINE AND WIN!

Congratulations to… Otero County Electric Cooperative member Diane McMahon, who took this photo of her friend holding the March edition of enchantment magazine while on a trip to Chena Hot Springs in Fairbanks, Alaska.

Diane wins $20!

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How to contact enchantment Phone 505-982-4671

Email enchantment@nmelectric.coop Facebook facebook.com/enchantmentnmreca Mail 614 Don Gaspar Ave. Santa Fe, NM 87505 Community Events events@nmelectric.coop Display Ads enchantmentads@nmelectric.coop Book Chat Inquiries enchantment@nmelectric.coop Take a photo of yourself or someone with the magazine and email it with a few words about the photo. Include your name, mailing address and co-op name. One lucky member will win $20. Submitting your photo(s) gives us permission to publish or post the photo(s) in enchantment, on Facebook and in other media outlets. Email to: enchantment@nmelectric.coop

enchantment

August 1, 2021 • Vol. 73, No. 08 USPS 175-880 • ISSN 0046-1946 enchantment (ISSN -) is published monthly by the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association,  Don Gaspar Ave., Santa Fe, NM . enchantment provides reliable, helpful information on rural living and energy use to electric cooperative members and customers. More than , families and businesses receive enchantment magazine as electric cooperative members. Nonmember subscriptions are available at $ a year or $ for two years, payable to NMRECA. Allow four to eight weeks for first delivery. PERIODICAL POSTAGE paid at Santa Fe, NM - and additional mailing offices. CHANGE OF ADDRESS: Postmaster, please send address changes to  Don Gaspar Ave., Santa Fe, NM -. Readers who receive the publication through their electric cooperative membership should report address changes to their local electric cooperative office. THE NEW MEXICO RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION provides legislative and educational services

to the cooperatives that are members of the association and deliver electric power to New Mexico’s rural areas and small communities. The mission of the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association is to strengthen, support, unify and represent cooperative member interests at the local, state and national levels. Each cooperative has a representative on the association’s board of directors, which controls the editorial content and advertising policy of enchantment through its Publications Committee. OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Charles Pinson, president, Central Valley Electric Co-op, Artesia; Tim Morrow, vice president, Springer Electric Co-op, Springer; Duane Frost, secretary-treasurer, Central NM Electric Co-op, Mountainair. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Chris Martinez, Columbus Electric Co-op, Deming; Keith Gottlieb, Continental Divide Electric Co-op, Grants; Lance R. Adkins, Farmers’ Electric Co-op, Clovis; Robert Caudle, Lea County Electric Co-op, Lovington; James Ortiz, Mora-San Miguel Electric Cooperative; Thomas G. Rivas, Northern Río Arriba Electric Co-op, Chama; Preston Stone, Otero County Electric Co-op, Cloudcroft; Antonio Sanchez Jr., Roosevelt County Electric Co-op, Portales; George Biel, Sierra Electric Co-op, Elephant Butte; Donald L. Wolberg, Socorro Electric Co-op, Socorro; Travis Sullivan, Southwestern Electric Co-op, Clayton; Wayne Connell, Tri-State G&T Association, Westminster, Colorado; Charles G. Wagner, Western Farmers Electric Co-op, Oklahoma. NEW MEXICO RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION

 Don Gaspar Ave. Phone: -- Santa Fe, NM  Fax: -- nmelectric.coop enchantment.coop Keven J. Groenewold, CEO, kgroenewold@nmelectric.coop Tom Condit, director of communications, tcondit@nmelectric.coop DISPLAY ADVERTISING: Rates available upon request. Co-op members and New Mexico display advertisers, email Shaylyn at enchantmentads@nmelectric.coop or call --. National representative: American MainStreet Publications, --. Advertisements in enchantment are paid solicitations and are not endorsed by the publisher or the electric cooperatives that are members of the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association. PRODUCT SATISFACTION AND DELIVERY RESPONSIBILITY LIE SOLELY WITH THE ADVERTISER. ©  New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association Inc., in partnership with Pioneer Utility Resources. Reproduction prohibited without written permission of the publisher.

enchantment.coop


view from enchantment I By Keven J. Groenewold, CEO New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association

Affordable Electricity Powers Quality of Life

In today’s world, you won’t find many items that cost less than $5. You can buy a gallon of milk, a gallon of gas or a latte from your favorite coffee house. But did you know an average day’s worth of electricity costs less than $5? Even in our country’s shifting energy climate, electricity remains a good value. In fact, electricity has about the same cost per day of any of the items listed above. And not all of those items are necessary for daily life. In New Mexico, the average monthly residential electric bill—depending on your co-op—ranges from $65 to $120. This is $2 to $4 a day for a service you use 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. What other services do we depend on so much that only costs us $2 to $4 a day. We all should think about our daily necessities—electricity and gasoline, to name a couple—and think about the cost of the special treats we allow ourselves to buy on a weekly basis; maybe even on a daily basis for some. We don’t often question the cost of a flavored coffee drink, but it costs as much to buy that drink as it does to buy a day’s worth of power. And yet, we frequently get upset if our electricity rates rise. It makes sense. We rely on electricity. Electricity is a necessity and an expectation. We expect the lights to come on when we flip the switch, and we expect our power to stay on during the best and worst conditions. How else would we keep our food fresh, our homes cool in

en c h a n tm en t.coop

the summer or warm in the winter? It is easy to cut a guilty pleasure from your spending routine here and there to save a few dollars—which many of us had to do through this pandemic. But we cannot simply cut electricity out of our budgets if times get tough or we decide to scale back our spending. Perhaps that is why it is so upsetting to us when our rates increase, even if only in small increments. It is nearly impossible for us to think about what our lives would be like if we did not have electricity. If at times it doesn’t seem electricity is affordable, remember that even as the demand for electricity grows, annual cost increases still remain low—especially when compared to other consumer goods, such as medical care, education, gasoline and, yes, even lattes. Electricity is still a great bargain. I would be remiss if I did not give a big shout out to all of you members for staying current on your electric bills. The Public Regulation Commission requires us to track arrearage numbers for 30 days, 60 days and 90 plus days. We have filed these overdue amounts for members from November 2019 through June 2021. The total amount in November 2019 was $5.2 million. The amount reported in June 2021 was $5.7 million. This is a cumulative amount for all of our member co-ops, for all classes. It never was less than $4 million, and never more than $7 million monthly.

Remember, your local electric cooperative is committed to making sure all of our members have safe, reliable, affordable electric service in their homes and communities. The next time you crave a latte, remember your electric bill, and think about what a great deal you are getting for your dollar! Finally, thank you all for standing tall with your co-op throughout the past 18 months of pandemic times. Greener pastures are ahead.

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{ hale to the stars I By Alan Hale {

August’s Evening Views

F

ive planets in our solar system are bright and easily visible to the unaided eye. Quite frequently, all five are visible at some time or other during the course of a single night. This August, however, is not among those times. Only three of them—Venus, Jupiter and Saturn—are visible this month. The other two, Mercury and Mars, are very low in the dusk sky. In fact, they have a close conjunction with each other Thursday, August 19, but the two worlds are so close to the sun by that time that this event is essentially not observable. Our neighboring world, Venus, continues the slow climb into our evening sky that began a few months ago. Throughout August, it sets around the end of dusk. During the next few months, Venus gradually climbs higher above our western horizon. By late this year, it will be a brilliant beacon in our western skies during the evening. The nighttime skies during August belong to our solar system’s two largest worlds, Jupiter and Saturn. Both planets this month are at opposition, i.e., directly opposite the sun in the sky. Saturn reaches the position on the 1st, and Jupiter on the 19th. Throughout the month, both worlds will rise around sunset. They will be highest above our southern horizon in the hours around midnight, and will set around sunrise. NASA’s Juno spacecraft, which has been orbiting Jupiter and conducting scientific observations of the planet since 2016,

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completed its primary mission last month. Its mission has been extended through 2025, and this will include close flybys of some of Jupiter’s large moons. The first of these encounters, a flyby of Ganymede, was in June. Next up is a flyby of Europa in September 2022. The annual Perseid meteor shower reaches its peak Wednesday evening/Thursday morning, August 11-12. Under good conditions in dark, rural sites, as many as 60 or more meteors per hour may be visible. Since the moon will be just a few days past its new phase, viewing conditions should be good.

Jupiter’s moon Ganymede—the largest planetary moon in the solar system—as imaged by NASA’s Juno mission during its flyby of that world June 7, 2021. IMAGE COURTESY NASA/JPLCALTECH/SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE/MALIN SPACE SCIENCE SYSTEMS; PROCESSING BY KEVIN M. GILL, LICENSED VIA CREATIVE COMMONS.

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Science Grant Funds Quasar Study By Amanda Adame

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ew Mexico State University graduate student Bryson Stemock is joining approximately 2,000 young scholars in the nation to be offered a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship—the country’s oldest fellowship that directly supports graduate students in various STEM fields. The five-year fellowship will fund Bryson’s research as he pursues his doctorate in astronomy for three years with an annual stipend of $34,000 per year and an additional $12,000 a year for university tuition and fees, with two reserve years. “Knowing my funding is taken care of now will let me focus on what I’m actually here to do, which is to perform exciting research and begin my career as an astronomer,” Bryson says. His research engages innovative technology to learn more about the evolution of the universe using distant galaxies with active central black holes called quasars. “By studying the light from a quasar, we can learn about gas clouds in between us and the quasar that we normally can’t see because they’re too dim,” Bryson says. Analyzing the temperature or elements in just one or two gas clouds—or systems—can take up to a week for a trained professional. Currently, there are about 3,500 systems to study, which could take nearly 70 years to completely analyze. As newer larger telescopes are built, keeping up with the data is nearly impossible. “With these issues in mind, I’m using machine learning, which is a branch of artificial intelligence, to design neural networks that can analyze tens of thousands of systems in under an hour,” Bryson says. “While I’m very interested in what we can learn from these systems, my primary research is about increasing the rate at which we can learn about our universe from these systems. I have also worked with my friends and co-workers in the department to study these systems and to use the 3.5mm telescope at Apache Point Observatory on a fairly regular basis.” Born and raised in a small town along the Ohio/Pennsylvania border, Bryson received his bachelor’s degree in mathematics and physics/astronomy from Youngstown State University. After finding his passion for astronomy through his math and physics courses, Bryson applied to the NMSU astronomy graduate program and felt at home. “After visiting the department, I really liked the people and the environment in the astronomy department here,” he says. “Between that, the department’s close involvement with Apache Point Observatory, the wide breadth of topics studied in the department, and my particular interest in my current adviser, astronomy professor Chris Churchill’s area of research, I decided to accept my offer from NMSU.” “Bryson has a passionate drive and a tireless ‘get-in-there’ and ‘get-it-done’ attitude,” Chris says. “He is fearless in his research and totally unafraid to pioneer and exploit new technologies that

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Bryson Stemock is shown here in front of the Apache Point Observatory 3.5mm telescope, which he uses frequently for his research. Stemock received the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, which will provide three years of funding to pursue his doctorate. COURTESY PHOTO

promise to revolutionize how science itself is done. “We are entering the era of Big Data in which 100 billion new observations will be made in the next decade. Humans cannot cope with this volume of data. AI is our only hope, and this is what Bryson plans to do: develop the AI that will open science to the next level.” Bryson prepared for the rigorous and competitive fellowship application process last fall with the help of NMSU’s NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Workshop Series led by assistant of psychology professor Megan Papesh. “Professor Papesh connected me with Stephen Goldinger from the Arizona State University Department of Psychology, who provided incredibly insightful feedback and a valuable point of view as a reviewer external to my field of research.” Bryson says. “I am very grateful to Professor Goldinger, to Professor Papesh and everyone else who helped with the workshop.” For nearly 70 years, the NSF has funded about 60,000 Graduate Research Fellowships for students out of more than 500,000 applications. Of the fellows, 42 are Nobel Prize-winning scientists and more than 450 are members of the National Academy of Sciences. Bryson says he is thankful for the knowledge and skills he has gained during his time at NMSU, especially for the mentorship he has received from Chris. “I have learned more from him in two years than I can really put into words,” he says. “Professor Churchill has been instrumental in helping me to build my career in a field I had never worked in before. I am excited to continue learning from him as well as the other faculty and graduate workers in the department.” enchantment.coop


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DIY or Call in the Professionals? Q: When should I take on efficiency projects myself, and when should I hire a pro? A: When it comes to home do-it-yourself projects, I recently asked myself, “Why hire someone to do a mediocre job when I can do a mediocre job myself?” That may sound odd, but I hired a contractor to remodel my kitchen. Needless to say, I was not happy with the quality of the work. Unfortunately, hiring a contractor based on positive online reviews and references doesn’t always guarantee quality work. One reason to DIY instead of hiring a contractor is if you are convinced you can do a better job. Naturally, this depends on the scope of the project and how much you know about the work. There are additional reasons to tackle a home-efficiency project yourself: •  You are unable to find a contractor who is available and reasonably priced. •  You need the work completed in a tight timeframe or during odd hours. •  You are certain you can

save a lot of money. •  The job is one you may enjoy doing yourself. On the flip side, there are several good reasons to hire a contractor: •  Specialized equipment is required. For example, the best wall insulators use a fill tube, which results in a higher R-value. Some contractors use an infrared camera to review wall framing and air leaks. •  Specialized materials are needed. Attics need proper ventilation. Contractors may have easier access to buying attic insulation baffles or roof vents. •  There is a safety issue. I once moved insulation in our attic and accidentally stepped onto the sheetrock ceiling and fell through to my waist. My legs were dangling in the air, and the room below was littered with broken sheetrock and insulation. I wasn’t hurt but could have been. As I repaired the damage, I regretted the decision not to hire a contractor. •  Expertise is required beyond your capability, such as tuning a furnace or repairing holes in a sheetrock wall to match the wall around it. •  Tackling the project

This column was co-written by Pat Keegan and Brad Thiessen of Collaborative Efficiency. For more energy tips, go to collaborativeefficiency.com/energytips.

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Any handy homeowner can tackle sealing leaks and cracks where air can escape. PHOTO BY SCOTT VAN OSDOL

yourself will save little or no money. I discovered years ago some contractors can install insulation cheaper than I can buy it. As you consider whether to do the job yourself, research the required tools and supplies. There are amazing resources online. When you search for information about how to insulate an attic or how to air seal a home, you will find fact sheets and video tutorials from contractors, home improvement shows, big-box suppliers and material manufacturers. YouTube videos often show experts making the installation of anything seem simple. But

beware: Some of these videos are aimed at other experts and not DIY homeowners. To ensure you get technically sound information, visit the Energy Star website at www.energystar.gov. An energy auditor is another great resource, providing specifics about the materials you will need, and information about local contractors and suppliers. Don’t tackle energyefficiency projects yourself before doing thorough research. That upfront knowledge will help you even if you decide to hire a contractor. You will be able to identify and hire a contractor who knows you recognize a quality job.


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7/2/21 5:35 PM


book chat I By Michele Potter

www.michelepotter.com

Visit your local bookstores to buy books. Send your book for review to: Book Chat,  Don Gaspar Ave., Santa Fe, NM 5 The Little Woodhauler On Alaska’s Chilkoot Pass on Palm Sunday 1898, huge avalanches struck. Porters hauling loads for the gold miners died. One is the Woodhauler’s father in this kids’ novel. Now his 9-year-old son must haul even more wood in his little wagon to help his mother pay the rent. Enter the villain—a slimy, rich landlord who carries a pink umbrella and lets the Irish immigrant widow understand that if she marries him, he’ll forgive her debt. It’s hard not to like the Little Woodhauler—a sweet and scrappy boy who is loyal to his mom and to his best friend, a Native kid with whom he makes canoes and has adventures. Spoiler alert: Things don’t always end well, but in this novel, they do. A nice, big, funny Norwegian immigrant shows up in the nick of time to save the day by marrying the Woodhauler’s mother. Hallmark, yes. Feminist, nope. By Ruth and Larry Bradford Illustrations by Debby Emel Edwards Brother Malloy Xlibris.com

This coffee tablesized photography book is provocative, beautiful, sad, sacred. Mitakuye Oyasin means “All My Relatives” in English. In the preface, Aaron Huey Ironshell (aka photographer Aaron Huey) writes, “We say Mitakuye Oyasin at the beginning and the end of our ceremonies. But we also may say it in the morning and in the evening—and in those times of hardship and times of happiness—or in our own minds.” Amen. The opening two-page spread shows a night shot of a solitary man walking down a highway towards a car light; the sign along the road reads “Wounded Knee.” Other photos include: Tepees, twisted metal, buffalo, trash, a shirtless teenager with a belt that says “Zack” rides shirtless toward trailer houses. A line of men hoists the sacred Sundance tree. A pink Styrofoam tray of listless macaroni is held against a kid’s orange Nike shirt. An androgynous young person on a small pony walks through the forest into the dappled light.

Kingdom of the Sun Set in southwestern New Mexico, Terry’s debut collection of short stories explores characters who are you and me—all of us nobodies and somebodies. No shortcuts will be taken along this road to nowhere in particular— no detail too small, no character who isn’t flawed and therefore deeply human. In one story, a long-haul trucker picks up a truck-stop waitress and takes her to a local drive-in. Read to find out what should not have happened. A la J.D. Salinger, “Midnight Pools” is about a high school boy jilted by his girlfriend. They meet, anyway, late at night at various pools-about-town where they float, skinny dip and, of course, get caught doing stuff. The kid jumps over a wall and thinks: “I went down into the dirt, stared at the moon and laughed so hard I thought it was going to kill me.” I yearned for something wonderful to happen to these down-home folks. But Walt Disney is definitely not from Deming.

By Aaron Huey Radius Books Radiusbooks.org

By James Terry UNM Press unmpress.com

Mitakuye Oyasin

New Mexico: A History Here’s a useful, sturdy classic to anchor you in the vicissitudes of New Mexico’s historical currents. This steadfast trio of historians knows their business. History may start with agreed-upon-fact but historians then spin them as stories. Who gets to tell, and where and when and how? From prehistoric New Mexico to the rise of Chaco culture to Spaceport America, these stories are ours. My own personal favorites include: Cabeza de Vaca, a Black man who managed to walk from Florida, naked and starving, with a couple of companions. Then, there’s Reies Lopez Tijerina, a Texas-born Pentecostal minister whose rural-based movement apparently brought a unique twist to the civil rights movement. “Tierra o

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muerte” anyone? In terms of “Santa Fe,” the authors quote B.B. Price who calls it “a victim of its own popularity.” Then, there’s Farmington, which “grimly clings to its reputation as the Four Corners’ most prominent urban complex.” Authors remark “New Mexico’s unfettered growth and unwavering commitment to technological advancement since 1945 have exacted a toll on both the landscape and its people.” Who can argue? Their stories foster perspective; they help us see that history is us. By Joseph P. Sanchez, Robert L. Spude and Art Gomez University of Oklahoma Press oupress.com

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6/25/21 11:01 AM


Making a Difference Animal rescues and sanctuaries in New Mexico help wildlife of all species

By Margaret Nava

S

aying the people living in the Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative service area are passionate about endangered animals is an understatement. In fact, whenever an animal is sick, hurt or abused, someone in the area comes to the rescue. The folks at Wildlife West Nature Park in Edgewood have been rescuing and caring for New Mexico’s injured, abused and endangered native wildlife for more than 26 years. Founder and Executive Director Roger Alink and his 100% volunteer staff— including many members of the New Mexico Youth Conservation Corps—spend countless hours caring for animals; building and maintaining habitats; and educating visitors about the cougars, wolves, coyotes, bears, elk, deer, javelinas, foxes and birds that call this 122-acre site home. “Our animals are special,” Roger says. “All were rescued from some trauma, typically due to human interaction. Now, these special creatures live here at the park in safety and comfort, but they can no longer be truly free. They will always

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need our help, support and love.” The park is open year-round. It comes alive for family and school visits when it offers chuck wagon supper shows and in September when it releases white doves in honor of the victims of 9/11. The dove release is done simultaneously throughout the United States at the exact time the first plane hit the first tower. At the New Mexico Horse Rescue at Walkin’ N Circles Ranch 9 miles north of Edgewood, on-site caretakers and volunteers practice the four Rs: rescuing, rehabilitating, retraining and rehoming neglected or abandoned horses, donkeys and mules, many with health or behavioral issues. “The majority of horses that come to us have been seized by the Livestock Board due to abuse or severe neglect,” says Lauri Michael, vice president of the rescue. “We also take in horses surrendered by individuals who can no longer care for their equine. Last year, we found loving homes for 33 horses and rescued 26. The more horses that get adopted, the more we can save.” Founded in 2002, the rescue operates a thrift shop to help generate the more than $10,000 required to feed, house and provide medical attention to the 50 to 60

equines during their stay at the ranch. In nearby Tijeras, two grassroots organizations—the Santuario de Karuna and the New Mexico Farm Sanctuary—are dedicated to rescuing and protecting farm animals of all shapes and sizes. Based on the principles of vegan living, the organizations promote compassionate living through education, conservancy and advocacy. “Working with the animals here in sanctuary helps them to heal from their past and keeps our promise to make the rest of their lives the best of their lives,” says Santuario de Karuna co-founder Tamara Hubbard. Two pigs in need of a home were the beginning of the New Mexico Farm Sanctuary, which was founded in 2019 by Julie Cerros and her husband, Gabriel. The sanctuary quickly grew to include several pigs, goats, dogs, cats and dozens of wild cottontail rabbits. In Tijeras, dogs with special needs find loving hearts at Sunflower Sanctuary Animal Rescue and Lap Dog Rescue of New Mexico. Cynthia Dares—who worked with Best Friends Animal Rescue New Orleans to help rescue thousands of animals left behind after Hurricane Katrina, and herself is a survivor of the hurricane—founded Sunflower Sanctuary in 2008 to provide a loving and safe home where elderly dogs, enchantment.coop enchantment.coop


ABOVE: Gabriel and Julie Cerros founded the New Mexico Farm Sanctuary. PHOTO COURTESY OF NMFS RIGHT: All of the animals at Wildlife West are rescues. PHOTO BY ROGER HOLDEN OPPOSITE PAGE: Lauri Michael and Hildago at Walkin’ N Circles. PHOTO COURTESY OF WALKIN’ N CIRCLES

miniature horses, donkeys and goats could live out the rest of their years. “Our mission is to rescue, provide care for and adopt into loving homes New Mexico’s small companion dogs who find themselves living in shelters, unsuitable homes or navigating other difficult conditions,” says Barb Hoffman, a volunteer at Lap Dog Rescue of New Mexico. “Since its inception in the mid-1990s, LDRNM has fulfilled its commitment to bring as many dogs as possible out of the shelters, away from danger and delivered safely into a network of caring foster homes where they are cared for and socialized before adoption into loving, permanent homes.” Sunflower Sanctuary and Lap Dog Rescue are both nonprofit organizations entirely dependent on donations. Although not directly involved in rescue, Talking Talons Youth Leadership in Cedar Crest supports animal sanctuaries and brings wildlife that is not releasable— particularly hawks and falcons—to indoor and outdoor venues to educate, engage and inspire tomorrow’s environmental leaders. Working in partnership with the 21st Century Conservation Service Corps—a USDA Forest Service initiative—the enchantment.coop enchantment.coop

organization connects youth with job and training opportunities that protect and restore America’s natural resources. “Talking Talons Youth Leadership reaches over 3,000 youth and community members per year through its environmental, wildlife and leadership education programs,” Board President Genevieve Barrett says. “These programs help build a community that is better informed about what to do if they find an animal in need, and they help deepen our community’s knowledge of the positive actions to take to protect habitats and reduce hazards to our wild friends.” According to the Humane Society of the United States, “The shocking number of animal cruelty cases reported every day is just the tip of the iceberg. Most cases are never reported. Unlike violent crimes against people, cases of animal abuse are not compiled by state or federal agencies, making it difficult to calculate just how common they are.” People who work with animal rescue organizations often see things that disturb them. However, the alternative to animal rescue is a world full of suffering, abused, neglected or dangerous animals. To make a difference and fight animal

How To Help

Wildlife West Nature Park. Visit, become a sponsor or volunteer. Find more information at wildlifewest.org. Walkin N Circles. Shop at the thrift store, sponsor a horse, donate or volunteer. Call 505-286-0779 or visit wncr.org. Santuario de Karuna. Online donations may be made at santuariodekaruna.org. In-kind donations of building supplies and other useful items are welcome. New Mexico Farm Sanctuary. Visit nmfarmsanctuary.org for information. Sunflower Sanctuary Animal Rescue. Learn about sponsoring a senior or donating at sunflowersanctuary.org. Lap Dog Rescue of New Mexico. Adopt, foster, donate, sign up for Smith’s Inspiring Donations Program, Amazon Smile or create a birthday fundraiser on Facebook. Information is at lapdogrescue.org. Talking Talons. Lend your time, talent or financial support. See talkingtalons.org for training information and upcoming events. cruelty, consumers can avoid products tested on animals, change their diets, get politically involved, or volunteer at a shelter or sanctuary. “Compassion is contagious,” says Tamara of Santuario de Karuna. A U G U ST 2 0 2 1

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Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative

Chief Executive Officer Alena Brandenberger Mountainair Office P.O. Box  • Mountainair, NM  Moriarty Office P.O. Box  • Moriarty, NM  Telephone and Outages -- • -- Email marketing@cnmec.org Website www.cnmec.org Office Hours  a.m. to : p.m. (M-F)

Board of Trustees President Duane Frost Claunch, District  Vice President Wayne Connell Mountainair, District  Secretary Bill King Moriarty, District  Assistant Secretary Phil Wallin Moriarty, District  Treasurer Joe Vicente, Vaughn, District  Lisa Gardner Estancia, District  Santos Tapia, Jr. Moriarty, District  Mike Valdez Estancia, District 

Board Meeting The board of trustees meets the fourth Thursday of the month at  a.m. unless otherwise noted. Visit www.cnmec.org for meeting notices and location of the meeting. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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Set your thermostat as high as possible in the summer while still maintaining a comfortable temperature for your family. PHOTO COURTESY OF CONSUMERS ENERGY

Break Free of High Bills Soaring temperatures and sultry summer nights can cause electric bills to skyrocket. This summer, take a vacation from high electric bills by making your home— and your family’s habits—more energy efficient. Beat the Heat Air conditioning helps most Americans beat the sweltering summer heat. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, air conditioning accounts for as much as 50% of the average household electric bill. Proper maintenance and smart use of your home’s cooling system will help keep your electric bill in check. First, make sure your air conditioner’s external unit is clean and free of debris. Clear away dead leaves or overgrown plants and weeds to enable the unit to perform as it should. Second, change the air filters quarterly, or

more often in homes with allergy sufferers or smokers. Fresh filters not only reduce the strain on your cooling system, but improve air quality in the home. Third, the DOE recommends you set your thermostat as high as possible during the summer, while still maintaining a comfortable environment for your family. Increasing the temperature at least 2 degrees can make a noticeable difference on your bill. A programmable thermostat can lead to even greater savings by automatically adjusting the cooling system to run more often when you are at home and less often when you are away. enchantment.coop


Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative

Turn Up Savings With Proper Use of Ceiling Fans If you are like most Americans, you have at least one ceiling fan in your home. Ceiling fans help us feel more comfortable and are a decorative addition to our homes. If used correctly, they can help lower energy costs. Try the following tips to make the most of your ceiling fans. X  Flip the Switch

Most ceiling fans have a switch near the blades. In summer months, flip the switch so the blades operate in a counterclockwise direction, effectively producing a wind-chill effect. As a result, ceiling fans make the air near them feel cooler than it really is. In winter, move the switch so the fan blades rotate clockwise, creating a gentle updraft. The fan will push warm air from the ceiling into occupied areas of the room. Regardless of the season, operate the fan on the lowest speed that maintains your comfort level.

Window coverings are a low-cost, stylish way to keep out the sun’s rays. ADOBE STOCKPHOTO BY MEGANBETTERIDGE

Made in the Shade Windows are not only great sources of natural light, but also great sources of heat during the summer. Curtains, blinds and shades make your windows and home more energy efficient. Window coverings are a low-cost, stylish solution to shield the sun’s rays and keep the home’s interior cool and comfortable. Proper weatherstripping and caulking around window panes and casings keep the cool air in and the hot air out. Solar film applied to your home’s existing windows further repels the summer heat. Daily Grind Today’s appliances perform better and use less electricity than they did in the past. Despite their functionality and efficiency, most give off heat when in use. During peak daytime temperatures, residual heat from appliances can strain your home’s cooling system and send your power bill soaring. Run the dishwasher, clothes washer or dryer early morning or late night, when temperatures are cooler. When possible, turn off your dishwasher’s dryer cycle. This prevents residual heat from warming your home and saves on your power bill. Washing your clothes in cold water and hanging them out to dry are also great ways to reduce your energy consumption. As your summer heats up, go online to cnmec.org for more ways to lower your power bill. You can also visit TogetherWeSave. com to find out how little changes around the house can add up to big energy savings. enchantment.coop

X  Adjust Your Thermostat

In summer, when using a fan in conjunction with an air conditioner—or instead of it—you can turn your thermostat up 3 to 5 degrees without any reduction in comfort. Doing this saves money since a fan is less costly to run than an air conditioner. In winter, lower your thermostat’s set point by the same amount. As the fan pushes warm air down from the ceiling, the heat won’t run as often.

X  Choose the Right Size

Make sure your ceiling fan is the right size for the room. For example, a fan that is 36 to 44 inches in diameter will cool rooms up to 225 square feet. To cool a larger space, use a fan that is 52 inches or more.

X  Turn It Off

Turn off the fan when the room is unoccupied. Ceiling fans only cool people. They do not cool rooms.

Some of the hottest weather is in August. Use ceiling fans more and the air conditioner less so you don’t see a spike in your electric bill.

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New Music Series Features Local Talent

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he new music TV series “Bands of Enchantment” will air this summer and fall on PBS New Mexico and Texas. “Bands of Enchantment” was filmed live in Tucumcari. It features music acts from across the country. Discover the hottest new bands on the backdrop of beautiful New Mexico. The 30-minute televised event will be a pillar to the Southwest music scene. It is inspired by events such as Austin City Limits, SXSW, MTV Unplugged’ and American Bandstand. Bands of Enchantment will be an evening of music not to miss! The season one lineup includes Brett Dennen from Central Valley, California; Making Movies from Kansas City, Missouri; Southern Avenue from Memphis, Tennessee; Junior Mesa from Bakersfield, California; Lilly Hiatt from Nashville, Tennessee; The Texas Gentlemen from Dallas, Texas; Lydia Loveless from Columbus, Ohio; and Max Gomez from Taos. There are two special acoustic episodes with New Mexico’s very own Carlos Medina from Las Vegas, Micah Thunder from Albuquerque, Sara Marie Rorie from Santa Fe, and The Levi Platero Band from the Navajo Nation.

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Local Showtimes

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Making Movies, Las Vegas’s Carlos Medina and Brett Dennen perform on “Bands of Enchantment.”

‘Bands of Enchantment’ airs on the following stations: KENW. Mondays at 10:30 p.m. MT and Saturdays at 9:30 p.m. MT. KRWG. Saturdays at 10 p.m. MT. KNME. Saturdays at 4:30 p.m. MT, and 10 p.m. MT starting August 14. KACV. Saturdays at 10:30 p.m. MT. For more showtimes, visit www.bandsofenchantment.com/air-times.

COURTESY PHOTOS

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on the menu I By Sue Hutchison

New Mexico Is Back in Business

After a difficult year, it’s time to support local farming, ranching and all things homegrown. New Mexico is replete with locally sourced goodness that can accent any recipe. During these pandemic recovery days, area farmers, ranchers and harvesters are nearly begging for support. Farmers markets are springing up across the state to give our resident growers a place to offer their wares as they provide for families and livelihood. This month’s recipes give prominence to our hardworking neighbors by featuring many homegrown ingredients. The goat cheese featured in the sausage and squash flatbread recipe comes from a goat farm in Capitan, and the ground beef comes from local beef producers in Carrizozo. Summer squash in the calabacita pecan salad is typically harvested throughout the summer—growers say the taste is best when crooked neck squash reaches 6 to 10 inches in length. Strawberries, best harvested in June or July, star in the strawberry cream cheese freezer pie recipe, offering a cool treat as summer’s heat comes and goes. Search for homegrown ingredients and shop locally. Let’s help New Mexico open back up in style!

Calabacita Pecan Salad For dressing: 1⁄3 cup olive oil 1 teaspoon chopped garlic 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 tablespoon dried basil leaves 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar For salad: 2 calabacita squash, thinly sliced

1 yellow squash, thinly sliced ¼ red onion, finely diced 1 cup grape tomatoes, halved 1 ear corn, kernels cut off, or 1 cup frozen corn, thawed Salt and pepper to taste ¼ cup roasted, chopped pecans Fresh basil leaves to garnish

In jar with tightly fitting lid, combine oil, garlic, cumin, dried basil and vinegar. Shake vigorously until well blended. Set aside. In a large mixing bowl, combine squash, tomatoes, corn, onion, salt and pepper. Toss to mix. Drizzle dressing over squash mixture and place in a serving bowl. Chill at least one hour prior to serving. Sprinkle pecans on top, garnish with basil leaves and serve.

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Strawberry Cream Cheese Freezer Pie For crust: 2 sleeves graham crackers (18-20 whole crackers) ½ cup finely minced pecans 4 tablespoons butter, melted ¼ cup flour For filling: 1 16-ounce bag frozen strawberries or 2 cups fresh strawberries

1 14-ounce can sweetened, condensed milk ½ cup cream cheese, room temperature 2 teaspoons vanilla 2 cups heavy cream Whipped cream and sliced strawberries to garnish

Place a large mixing bowl in refrigerator to chill. In food processor, pulse broken graham crackers, pecans and flour until fine crumbs form. Drizzle butter into crust mixture, pulsing until crumbs absorb butter. Press crust mixture on the bottom and sides of a 10-inch pie plate. Refrigerate until filled. With blender or immersion blender, blend strawberries until a pudding-like consistency forms, leaving small chunks of strawberries. Blend sweetened, condensed milk, cream cheese, vanilla together in chilled mixing bowl until smooth. Add heavy cream and blend on high until soft peaks form, approximately 4 to 5 minutes. Fold in strawberries and pour mixture into prepared crust. Place pie in freezer overnight. Remove from freezer 10 minutes prior to serving, and place knife in hot water to warm. May be garnished with whipped cream and fresh/sliced strawberries.

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Sausage and Squash Flatbread For sausage: 1 pound ground beef 2 teaspoons fennel seed ½ teaspoon ground pepper ½ teaspoon paprika ¼ teaspoon ground coriander ¼ teaspoon garlic powder ½-1 teaspoon red pepper flakes ½ teaspoon salt

2 prepared 6 to 8-inch flatbreads 1 zucchini, thinly sliced 1 yellow squash, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons olive oil ½ teaspoon ground pepper ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon dried oregano ½ red onion, thinly sliced 4 small colored peppers, sliced vertically ¼ cup chopped green or red chile 3-4 oz. goat cheese or other firm-curd cheese

Mix all ingredients together for sausage, fry until browned, drain and set aside. Place sliced zucchini and yellow squash in bowl, sprinkle 1 tablespoon olive oil and toss to coat. Add pepper, salt and oregano, and toss to coat. On grill or grill pan heated medium high, grill squash until lightly charred, 2-3 minutes on each side. Heat oven to 375 F. Coat a large, rimmed baking sheet with foil and lightly spray with cooking spray. Sprinkle remaining olive oil on flatbread. Place flatbread on baking sheet, arrange squash, onion, colored peppers and chopped chile on flatbread. Sprinkle sausage and goat cheese on flatbread. Bake for 20 minutes or until cheese is lightly browned.

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Sue Hutchison was born and raised a block from the freeway in Southern California. She had an early start with industrial, largescale cooking before age 20. She's always been both a beach bum and at home in the kitchen, where she enjoys making new creations.

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PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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Doctor urges seniors to get new medical alert device Seniors snap up new medical alert device that comes with no monthly bills

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bers are snapping up a sleek new medical alert device that comes with no monthly bills ever,” he said. Many seniors refuse to wear old style help buttons because they make them look old. But even worse, those medical alert systems come with monthly bills. To solve these problems Universal Physicians, a U.S. company, went to work to develop a new, modern, state-ofthe-art medical alert device. It’s called “FastHelp™” and it instantly connects

you to free unlimited nationwide help everywhere cell service is available with no contracts, no deposits and no monthly bills ever. “This slick new little device is designed to look like the pagers doctors wear every day. Seniors love them, because it actually makes them look important, not old,” Dr. Howren said. FastHelp is expected to hit store shelves later this year. But special newspaper promotiona l g ive aways are slated for seniors in select areas that call 1-800-275-0444 Ext. HELP3218. ■ (Continued on next page)


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

(Continued from previous page)

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You don’t need to shop around. We’ve done all the leg work, this deal is too good to pass up. FastHelp with the instant rebate is a real steal at just $149 and shipping and there are no monthly bills ever.

new medical alert device that comes with the exclusive FastHelp One-Touch E 911 Button that instantly connects you to free unlimited nationwide help everywhere cell service is available with no contracts or deposits. It connects you to the vast available network of cellular towers for free and saves seniors a ton of money because there are no monthly bills ever making this deal irresistible. Plus it’s the only medical alert device that makes seniors look important, not old.

sumers can’t get FastHelp in stores until later this year. That’s why it’s so important for seniors born before 1956 to call the National Rebate Center Hotline within the next 7 days. For those who miss that deadline, the sleek little medical alert device will set you back over $300 bucks.

Five Star Customer Reviews See what actual customers are saying about FastHelp VERY IMPRESSED “When I pressed the alert button, I got straight through to help and they answered me immediately. I live out in the country and my cell phone doesn’t always get reception... that was not a problem with my FastHelp device.” - Walter, TN LIFESAVER “When I got my FastHelp I never thought I’d have to use it, but when I fell and broke my hip it saved my life.” - Harold, OH Very appreciative of having FastHelp “I did have an emergency. Help RESPONDED quickly and came in a few minutes.” - Irving, PA

WE LOVE THE PRODUCT “We bought it outright with no bills ever.” - Rosemary, NY Safe anywhere “This little FastHelp device is my guardian angel. I’m so glad my daughter-inlaw got it for me.” - Pete, FL Everyone should have it “I’ve been telling everyone to get one. Thanks to the folks at FastHelp for taking good care of people when they need it.” - Mark, IA Love my unit and feel much safer “I am a 68 year old recent widow. Standing on a chair to put my tree topper on this Christmas I thought ‘What if I fell?’ Saw your ad and ordered my FastHelp unit.” - Megan, CA Unsolicited consumer feedback from satisfied customers as reported to Universal Physicians. Universal Physicians rated these customer reviews 5 stars

REBATE COUPON

VALID FOR USE 7 DAYS ONLY Amount of Rebate (AOR )

$150.00

2Y

1P

OFF

RE: HELP3218 DLV Y: ML2077R-1

1 OF 1

FASTHELP IS COVERED BY A 30-DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE LESS SHIPPING AND A 1 YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY. FASTHELP IS A 3G GSM CELLULAR DEVICE. FASTHELP WILL NOT BE ABLE TO MAKE 911 CALLS WHEN CELLULAR SERVICE IS NOT AVAILABLE SUCH AS IN REMOTE AREAS. FASTHELP USES GPS TRIANGULATIONS TO APPROXIMATE YOUR LOCATION WHEN YOUR DEVICE IS TURNED ON. DR. HOWREN IS A COMPENSATED MEDICAL ADVISOR. OH RESIDENTS ADD 6.5% SALES TAX. UNIVERSAL PHYSICIANS 7747 SUPREME AVE, NORTH CANTON, OH 44720. P7325 OF22284R-1


Talk with experts at your electric cooperative to learn about renewable options and the best way to work with outside sales companies. ADOBE STOCK PHOTO BY ANDY DEAN

Be in the Know About Solar Options Are you thinking of exploring solar power for your home? Be wary of aggressive sales tactics and companies that don’t have your best interests in mind. In 2018, New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas sued Vivint Solar for “high pressure” and “illegal” door-to-door sales tactics. The lawsuit alleges consumers were trapped into contracts that cost them more than if they had stayed with their local electric provider. Balderas said Vivint sales representatives used aggressive marketing tactics involving 3,600 consumers. The lawsuit

was settled last year for $1.95 million. However, none of the money went to the 3,600 consumers. They were left to fend for themselves in court. A few years ago, New Mexico passed a law requiring information disclosure by solar salespeople. The AG developed a four-page disclosure form that must be filled out at every sales presentation. The form can be accessed at NMAG.gov. Your local electric cooperative is ready to help you analyze any solar proposal you receive. After all, you own your co-op and we work for you.

AUGUST 28

Red Dirt Black Gold Festival Artesia Main Street and Artesia Arts and Cultural invite you to a free live concert featuring Bart Crow and Reckless Kelly. Live music starts at 5:30 p.m. There will be food vendors, merchandise sales, a cornhole tournament and NM Brewfest throughout the event. DOWNTOWN ARTESIA

reddirtblackgold.com

SEPTEMBER 18

People’s Choice Green Chile Cook-Off, Round 2 Hotel Artesia hosts this free event from noon to 6 p.m. Enjoy the great food and competition while listening to JD and the Badlands Band. Call the hotel at 575-746-2066 for more information or a registration form. ARTESIA

www.facebook.com/events/611340520262268/

575-746-2066

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A U G U ST 2 021

enchantment.coop


Scientists get amazing rates on home loans.* *So can people who binge-watch science fiction.

THE TRUSTED CHOICE SINCE 1976!

We stock the area’s largest supply of all things pertaining to water! • Solar well systems • Plumbing fittings • Water storage tanks • Pressure tanks

• Full septic systems • Poly pipe • PVC pipe • Fencing supplies

We are proud to serve our local community and provide cost-effective solutions for any water or well project. On behalf of everyone at Williams Windmill, we want to thank all our customers for their patronage and look forward to serving the Southwest for many more years to come! Exit 156 • Frontage Rd • Lemitar NM (575) 835-1630 williamswindmill.com

When you join SLFCU, you open a door to smarter home loans for you and the ones you love. SLFCU provides smart home loans for savvy home buyers. • Low, competitive rates on fixed and adjustable rate mortgages • No private mortgage insurance (PMI), ever • Exceptional service for the life of your loan

We Are Your Rural Property Specialists. Farms • Ranches Homes • Auctions

Contact Us Today!

O: 505-832-7008 • C: 505-410-9951 myra@UCFarmHomeRealty.com Myra Oden, Owner / Broker www.UCFarmHomeRealty.com

Advertise in

Make the smart decision in your home buying journey. Apply for pre-approval to get started today.

slfcu.org/HomeLoans

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THE MARKET PLACE

Animals NOT ALL WATER TANKS ARE CREATED EQUAL! Are quality,

value and longevity important to you? Buy high specific gravity, heavyweight, long warranty, superior black NRCS tanks. Lowest prices only provide minimum standards, lower weights and shorter warranties. Find out more! 575-430-1010.

NEW MEXICO DRINKING WATER STORAGE TANKS, heavy-duty

black poly. Fittings customized to your needs. NRCS and EQUIP approved. High specific gravity, heavyweight, long warranty, algae resistant, black NRCS water tanks. Call 800-603-8272 or 575-682-2308.

RABBITS, ALL AGES AND SIZES.

For pets, show, meat, fur. Polish, New Zealand, Californians. Cages, feeders, door latches, urine and wire guards. Call Gene at 505-906-1291 in Jamestown, New Mexico, at The Bunny Farm. All calls will be answered.

SADDLES AND TACK. Everything for the horse. Western & English tack bought and sold. Rancho Elisa Stables LLC, 500 Route 66 East, Moriarty, NM 87035. Call 505-832-5113 or email ranchoelisastablesfr@swcp.com LET US MARKET YOUR LIVESTOCK. Live auction every

Wednesday at 11 a.m. View online at dvauction.com, country bid or live auction. If you’ve got ‘em, we’ll sell’em. Call 575-374-2505. fivestateslivestockauction@gmail.com

FOR SALE: 2 - Priefert 5’x14’ panels and 2 - 5’x16’ panels $300., 10 - Round pen 10’ panels and 4’ gate $300 and 500 gallon fuel tank on skids $100. 26

A U G U ST 2 021

MOUNTAIN-TOP GOATS, babies are on the ground milkers, bucks, babies, boer show wethers, weed eaters, cabrito and pets. Show quality Nubians, Mini Nubians, La Manchas, Mini La Manchas, Nigerian Dwarf and Boer goats. Also, Hair Sheep, Royal White and Painted Desert Cross. In Capitan, call 575-937-0342. ORGANIC PLANT FOOD, worm casting, 50 cents per pound or $20. for a five gallon bucket full equal to 40 pounds. In Deming and Silver City area. For more information, call 575545-3704 or email murellwhitaker37@gmail.com

Business WANTED: Elderly couple on a beautiful ranch wants live-in housekeeper. Call 575-485-8553 for more details. SUNSET SADDLES OFFERS CUSTOM LEATHERWORK; ie:

saddles, chaps, chinks, holsters, belts, etc. Also saddle and tack repair. Located in La Luz, NM. Call 575-2578874 or email sunsetsaddles@yahoo.com

Equipment IRRIGATION PIPE FOR SALE! 6”, 8”, 10” PVC and aluminum pipe. Half the price of new and ready for the field. More efficient and less time consuming. Also have alfalfa valves, hydrants, butterfly valves, T’s and Elbows. Delivery available. Call/Text Sierra 575-770-8441. ANTIQUE METAL LATHE, Carroll Jamison, 40” between centers, 10” swing, patented in 1910. Prerunner of the South Bend Lathe. For more information call Wes Burris at 575-835-2340 or 575-574-8784.

GREAT OFFER ON SOLAR SUBMERSIBLE SHALLOW/DEEP WELL PUMPS! NRCS approved with

two-year warranty on selected pumps with affordable, easy installation! For a custom quote, call 505-429-3093 or email us at solarwellpumpsonline@ gmail.com, 24/7 service. Order online at our website: www.solarwellpumpsonline.com

DRINKING WATER STORAGE TANKS, heavy-duty black poly,

proven algae resistant. 125 to 11,000 gallons, NRCS and EQUIP approved. Please give us a chance to serve you! MasterCard or Visa accepted. Call 575682-2308 or 1-800-603-8272.

FISHING TACKLE WANTED:

“Antique” lures, reels, rods, tackle boxes. Pre-1950, please. Collector paying highest prices for “Grandpaw’s” tackle box. Lures $50 to $5,000 each. Reels $100 to $7,500 each. Send photos to: tacklechaser@aol.com or call Rick at 575-354-0365.

OVERHEAD FEED BINS. 1 to 4 compartment, 12 to 48 tons. Any size free standing cattle guards, no footing needed. Emery Welding, Clayton, New Mexico. Call 575-374-2320 or 575-2077402. Email: eweld98@yahoo.com CATTLE TRAILER FOR SALE,

five wheel, 8x30 with wheels and tires, metal frame with board sides. $2,500. For more information call 505-401-3494.

Great Finds BUYING OLD STUFF: Gas pumps and parts 1960’s or earlier, advertising signs, neon clocks, old car parts in original boxes, motor oil cans, license plate collections, Route 66 items, old metal road signs, odd and weird stuff. Fair prices paid. Have pickup, will travel. Gas Guy in Embudo, 505-852-2995.

enchantment.coop


RAILROAD ITEMS WANTED:

Kerosene lanterns, brass locks, keys, badges, uniforms, bells, whistles, and pre-1950 employee timetables. Always seeking items from any early New Mexico railroad, especially D&RG, C&S, EP&NE, EP&SW, AT&SF, SP or Rock Island. Call Randy Dunson at 575-7603341 or 575-356-6919.

WANTED: NEW MEXICO MOTORCYCLE LICENSE PLATES 1912-1970. Paying $100-$500 each.

Also buying NM car plates 1900-1923. Visit NMplates.com for history and 4,500 photographs of NM plates. Bill Johnston, Box 1, Organ, NM 880520001. Email: Bill@NMplates.com or call 575-382-7804.

FISHING TACKLE WANTED:

“Antique” lures, reels, rods, tackle boxes. Pre-1950, please. Collector paying highest prices for “Grandpaw’s” tackle box. Lures $50 to $5,000 each. Reels $100 to $7,500 each. Send photos to: tacklechaser@aol.com or call Rick at 575-354-0365.

HEADSTONES (I.E. CEMETERY MONUMENTS) is our business.

Over 1,000 designs. An eternal memory of a loved one. TAOS MOUNTAIN HERITAGE. Call 575-770-2507 or Email: taos_mt_heritage@msn.com Website: www.taosmountainheritage.com

FOR GOD LOVED THE WORLD

so much that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not die but have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to be its judge, but to be its Savior. John 3:16-17 For more information, contact johnfitz2011@gmail.com

LOUIS L’ AMOUR COMPLETE LEATHERETTE EDITION, 109 books. $500. Near Mayhill, NM off Highway 82. For more information, call John at 575-491-1516.

WANTED: OLDER AIRSTREAM, SPARTAN, SILVER STREAK, AVION or similar style travel trailers.

Any condition considered. Wrecked or gutted trailers included. Please call Rick at 505-690-8272. enchantment.coop

2014 HARLEY MOTORCYCLE,

soft tail deluxe, 5,000 miles, $5,000 in extra chrome, like new. $15,000. 2001 Yamaha, 1,600cc, 10,000 miles, new tires and battery, $3,700 firm. Also for sale: tools, tires, fishing gear and antiques. In Edgewood area. Call 505-227-9957 for more information.

ANTIQUES FOR SALE: two very very

old “Werlitzer” Juke Boxes, very old oil “glass” lamps, large old flour mill, bar “liquor” mirrors, etc. Must see or make offer on things! For more information, please call Angie at 505-852-2740 or Eric at 505-901-0779.

NM GRASS FED AND FINISHED BEEF. Humanely raised without anti-

biotics or hormones on the native grass pastures of the Gran Quivira Ranch. Beef that you will love and feel great about eating! Lean Hamburger to Filet Mignon - one pound to a whole beef - we have what you want! Call, text or email Vagabond Cattle Company, 575420-5868, gypsyranchher@gmail.com

Real Estate 2 MOUNTAIN CABINS, 25+ acres at 8,000 feet, Wildhorse Ranch Subdivision, Pie Town, NM. Well on stream with 5,000 storage tank and fire hydrant. New Mexico Hunting unit 13. To view this property, go to: https://fsbo.com/listings/listings/show/ id/520104/ CONCHAS, BOAT DOCK DRIVE.

3 lots just over 1/2 acre per property. Two lots starting at $32,000 each. One lot at $35,000. Close to shoreline. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

CONCHAS, 0 AND 00 RIDGE DRIVE. Two tracts with two lots per

each property (lots are 100x100 or .23 acre). Each tract has a permitted septic that has never been used. Electricity and co-op water nearby. $50,000 per tract. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575-7605461. www.bigmesarealty.com

CUERVO, 0 MESITA PASS ROAD.

148 acres in Mesita Ranch Subdivision. Beautiful mesa views, perfect for homesite and or livestock. $85,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

NOGAL, TBD BARBER AVENUE. PRICE REDUCED! 2.89 acres in town-

site of Nogal. Co-op water and electricity nearby. $45,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

SAN ANTONIO, NM. 0 ZANJA ROAD. 4.66 acres irrigated farmland in Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District with ditch water rights. Produces alfalfa and grass hay crops. Utilities nearby. $69,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

SUMNER LAKE, 0 RIVER RANCHES ROAD, Tract 7 (at inter-

section with State Road 203). Just over 20 acres. Scenic views just west of lake. $18,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

RIBERA, 340 CR B41E. Just over 32 acres with 3-bedroom, 2-bath home, hay barn, two detached garages. Just over 20 of those acres are in alfalfa and grass hay production. Pecos River frontage and acequia water rights. Scenic views and close to I-25. $695,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com DATIL, 464 SOUTHERN TRAIL.

Sugarloaf Mountain Subdivision, 5.5 acres vacant land. Scenic views of mountains and San Augustin Plains. $8,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

40 ACRES OFF COUNTY ROAD 21.

Pasture land. Power at road. Good water area. New field fencing around perimeter. 45 minutes to Albuquerque or Santa Fe. $70,000. Call 505-331-3509.

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D

DATIL, HERRINGTON CANYON ROAD/CRISWELL RANCH AREA.

Choice of 44 or 40 acres. Great for off grid living or hunting. Vacant land. $32,000 each. Big Mesa Realty, 575-4562000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

DATIL, 31 OLD HIGHWAY 60.

2-bedroom, 1-bath home with bonus room that could be used for bedroom on three lots. Well, stone fence. Great for hunting property or rental opportunity. $57,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

PIE TOWN, SOUTH OF WILD HORSE SUBDIVISION/GOAT RANCH ROAD. Two tracts. 20 acres

for $16,000 and 40 acres for $32,000. Vacant land. Big Mesa Realty, 575-4562000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

PIE TOWN, TBD STATE ROAD 603/ THE WOODS SUBDIVISION. PRICE REDUCED! Just over 48 acres

vacant land, fenced with cleared land in corner for homesite. Great views, close to US 60 and Pie Town. $120,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

To Place a Classified Ad

1. Visit www.enchantment.coop/classifieds and complete form. You will be contacted by email with price and to pay by credit card (5% processing fee). 2. Or, complete form and select category. 3. Write ad on another sheet of paper. 4. Price: $20 up to first 40 words per ad, per category, per month. After 40 words, each word is 50 cents. Add $5 for small graphics such as cattle brands. Phone numbers, emails and websites count as one word.

To Send and Pay Your Classified Ad 1. Mail ad and payment (Payable to NMRECA) NMRECA • enchantment 614 Don Gaspar Ave. Santa Fe, NM 87505 28

A U G U ST 2 021

WANTED! WORKING FAMILY FARMS AND RANCHES to list and

sell. Broker has over 50 years of experience working on the family farm in New Mexico and has been a farm owner and operator since 1988. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

CURRY, ROOSEVELT AND QUAY COUNTIES. In Clovis, Portales and

Tucumcari, or in the country. We want your properties to list and sell. Homes, farms and ranches. Broker is life resident of Curry County and Clovis native. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575-7605461. www.bigmesarealty.com

FENCE LAKE, 295 PINE HILL ROAD. 60 acres with over 2,300 sq. ft.

log home, pipe corrals and outbuildings. Scenic views and one hour from Gallup. $265,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-4562000. Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

RAMAH, 281 CANDY KITCHEN ROAD, 42 acres (3 lots) in Lewis Ranch Subdivision. Scenic views and one hour from Grants. $100,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000, Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

Deadline

1. Due the 9th, one month prior. Ex: Ads due August 9 for the September issue.

Good to Know 1. Only members of New Mexico electric cooperatives may place ads. 2. We reserve the right to reject any ad. 4. Advertisements in enchantment are paid solicitations and are not endorsed by the publisher or the electric cooperatives of New Mexico. 5. PRODUCT SATISFACTION AND DELIVERY RESPONSIBILITY LIE SOLELY WITH THE ADVERTISER.

Questions

1. Call: 505-982-4671 or 2. Email: enchantment@nmelectric.coop

LOGAN “LAKEVIEW” LOT.

Amazing view and quiet privacy! Approximately 1.69 acres surrounded by native trees and arroyos. Open spaces east and west. Close to state park trails and lake. Terry Real Estate. Call 575403-8522 or 575-403-8831.

PIE TOWN, 0 LOU LOU LANE, WILD HORSE SUBDIVISION. Just

over 20 acres vacant land located in Phase/Unit I. $29,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000, Paul Stout, broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

HILLSBORO HOME, 3-bedroom, 2-bath, beautifully renovated on quiet county road in secluded valley on 1.9+/acres. Fifteen minute walk to downtown historic Hillsboro. Fantastic views in North Percha creek, prolific wildlife. For Sale by owner, $217,000, possible owner financing. Call 575-895-5154. MOUNTAIN VISTAS! RATON, NM. 3-bedroom, 2-bath, 1/2 base-

ment home. Custom woodwork, large screened-in porch, large front porch, small acreage. All rooms look out onto beautiful mountain vistas, mountain lake close by. Wild turkey roam through year-round, hear the elk bugle in the fall. Approximately 5 miles from Raton, off of Highway 72. Call 575-447-5578.

Name:________________________ ___________________________ Address:_______________________ ___________________________ City:_________________________ State:_________ ZIP:_____________ Phone:________________________ Cooperative:____________________ Select Category Below

Animals

Great Finds

Business

Real Estate

Equipment

Vehicles

enchantment.coop


21 ACRES OF RURAL LIVING in

HOME FOR SALE IN KENNA, NM

southwest New Mexico. Paved highway frontage. All utilities (well, septic, power and propane) for two home sites. Northern acreage has hook-ups for a manufactured home. South acreage includes a 2,100 sq. ft., 3-bedroom, 1-bath home with large addition, hot tub, lots of potential. Addition is not finished giving the new owner the chance to “make it their own”. Property is fenced and has several outbuildings. If you are looking for a peaceful rural property, give me a call and come see for yourself. Call Sandy at 575-590-3225.

LA JOYA, 1.47 ACRE FENCED CORNER LOT. Wonderful moun-

CIMARRON, NM COMMERCIAL PROPERTY, 100+ year old, 3,500 sq.

CHARMING RANCHER IN CIMARRON, NM, 4-bedroom,

ft. brick building with an attached 2,000 sq. ft. building. Located on 5+ lots in historic “New Town” with good highway visibility. Extensive electrical and plumbing work done on main building in 2004. Potential for a variety of uses: studio, gallery, retail. $225,000. Call 575-635-2829.

EAST OF BERNARDO with 530 feet

frontage on north side of Highway 60 approximately eight miles east of I-25 exit 175. From 12 to 20 acres available fall 2021. Fenced with power, interest in well included in largest package. Borders, but not part of Tierra Grande Subdivision. Plat and details will be mailed upon your request. For more information, call owner at 505-720-9519.

HOME IN RUIDOSO FOR SALE.

4-bedroom, 3-bath, 2-car garage. Approximately 3,500 sq. ft. +/-. Completely furnished. All city utilities. $360,000. For more information, call Tom at 575-258-3598.

THRIVING MUFFLER SHOP IN CLOVIS FOR SALE. 8-bays and

6-overhead bay doors, 40 year history in this business. Paint room with fans and lights. One wash bay area. Over 6,000 sq. ft. of concrete. 2-lifts, 2-pipe benders. Call 575-799-9600 or 575-799-2980 for more details. Coletta Ray or Shelley Queener, Pioneer Realty. Brokers are related to the seller. www.clovisrealestatesales.com

enchantment.coop

(between Portales and Roswell), 3-bedroom, 2-bath, 2-car garage on two acres. Very private, yet close to Highway. $75,000. Sellers motivated to sell. Call or text 575-799-5512 or 575-791-2190.

tain views. 200 AMP electric plus RV hookup. Water co-op meter, 1,000 gallon septic. 25 miles from Belen, 38 miles from Socorro or Los Lunas, 60 miles from Albuquerque. $29,900. Call 505-934-6332, leave message.

2-bath on 1/3 acre, fenced. Renovated and updated. Light filled passive solar. Living/dining with beams, slider to deck with chiminia. Vaulted main suite, kitchen with granite, white self-close to ceiling cabinets. Radiant heating, gas, wood. Double insulation, rewired, plumbed, metal roof. Four outbuildings, three driveways, carport. Front porch with views. Excellent wifi/cell. $150,000. Call 575-376-1031.

OLD RAMAH POST OFFICE FOR SALE OR RENT. Heart of Indian

country. Main street location. Beams, plank floors and wrap around old style portal. Used as trading post, real estate office, food market. Perfect for art gallery or coffee shop. Insulated shipping container on included adjacent lot. $195,000. or best offer. Call 505-470-0450.

HOUSE ON SIX ACRES IN MOSQUERO, for sale by owner. All

located in the village with sewer and water connections, plus fiber optics available. Priced at $120,000. Look at pictures and information on Zillow. com, look at New Mexico other listings or call Pat at 478-232-8792.

37+ ACRES IN VILLAGE OF WILLARD off highway 60. Fenced,

underground electric, water and gas accessible. $30,000. Owner Financing, low down, balance at 6%. Call 303-9139168 or email betty.shover@comcast.net

IRRIGATED 11 ACRE TUCUMCARI FARM available for long-term lease.

Partial tree farm. Includes 2,400 sq. ft. farmhouse, garage, hoop-house and outbuilding. $3,500 per month plus utilities. For more information, call Robin at 505-652-0232.

Vehicles CLASSIC 1977 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL. 460 V-8 engine.

Other than a new paint job, all original from factory. Smog pump has slight squealing noise. Other than that, excellent condition. 134,000 miles. $22,500 firm. Call 575-445-9529 or email larryrea2@msn.com

2012 35’ KOMFORT RV TRAVEL TRAILER. Tons of storage, three slide

outs, 1.5 baths, outdoor kitchen, flat screen TV and fireplace. $20,000. obo. For more information and photos, contact 575-706-1697.

2000 JAMBOREE FLEETWOOD 31 FT. MOTOR HOME, 66,700 miles.

As is $12,000 or best offer. Can send pictures on request. Call 575-799-8883 in Santa Rosa, NM.

THREE MOTORCYCLES FOR SALE. 1977 KZ 650, 4 cylinder, saddle

seat, back rest, 4-1 header. 1978 and 1981 Suzuki 550 4 cylinder. All running when stored. All have been garaged. All complete. Not running now. All three for $700., will not separate. All have titles. Call 575-682-3185 for more information.

1955 CHEVROLET AND 1934 FORD CAR PARTS FOR SALE. 1949

Chevrolet, 2 door sedan also called a “Fastback”. 1940 Ford, 4 door deluxe in restorable condition. 1936 Ford , 4 door sedan, good to build a Hotrod! 1949 Chevrolet, business coupe with chopped top. 1961 Corvette, basket case with most parts to be built. For more information, call 575-751-6155 in Taos, NM.

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youth art

An Artistic Splash! Congratulations to the Winners Rafael Brindle-Morales • Age 9 Socorro Electric Cooperative

Jessica Etcitty • Age 10 Contintental Divide Electric Cooperative

Artemis Greenling • Age 3 Mora-San Miguel Electric Cooperative

Camila Lin • Age 7 Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative

Jaylenne Lopez • Age 9 Farmers’ Electric Cooperative

Michael Vance • Age 10 Northern Rio Arriba Electric Cooperative

September’s Topic: Favorite School Subject Draw a picture about your favorite subject! October’s Topic: Halloween Delight or scare readers with your Halloween art! Send Your Drawing By mail: Youth Editor 614 Don Gaspar Ave. Santa Fe, NM 87505 By email: enchantment@nmelectric.coop Deadline: Submit by the 9th, one month prior to publication. Hooray! Winners Get Paid: $15 Have a Youth Art Topic? Email or mail to the addresses above, or call 505-982-4671.

5

items to include on the back of your drawing, otherwise YOU ARE DISQUALIFIED: 1. Name 2. Age 3. Mailing Address 4. Phone 5. Electric Co-op *Accepted artwork up to age 13. DON'T FORGET THESE ITEMS!

30

AU G U ST 2021

enchantment.coop


For the Members of Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative

ELECTRIFY + SAVE

UPGRADE TO ELECTRICITY AND SAVE Make the switch to cleaner electricity with more efficient household appliances and systems. From heat pumps to electric vehicles, these proven technologies can run your home cleanly, efficiently and cost-effectively. HEATING & COOLING WITH HEAT PUMPS According to the U.S. Department of Energy, when paired with proper insulation, an electric heat pump can save over 30 percent on your heating and cooling bills compared to conventional HVAC systems.

POWER UP YOUR GARDENING TOOLS Electric garden tools can last longer and are emissions-free, meaning you’ll smell the scents of summer, not the smell of exhaust. Plus, with modern technology, they are just as effective as gas-powered alternatives. Just charge the battery and go!

SAVE WITH AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE (EV) Sales of light-duty electric vehicles rose by 43% in 2020. On average, EVs have a lower cost of operation over their lifespan, and buyers are taking notice.

VISIT US AT www.tristate.coop/BE

Tri-State is a not-for-profit power supplier to cooperatives and public power districts in Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico and Wyoming.

Profile for New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative

CNMC August 2021 enchantment  

Feature story: Making a Difference

CNMC August 2021 enchantment  

Feature story: Making a Difference

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