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enchantment The Voice of New Mexico’s Rural Electric Cooperatives

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VAL I T S E F S S A EGR U L B D E E W AT THE


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enchantment July 1, 2018 • Vol. 70, No. 07 USPS 175-880 • ISSN 0046-1946 Circulation 101,692

enchantment (ISSN 0046-1946) is published monthly by the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association, 614 Don Gaspar Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 87505. enchantment provides reliable, helpful information on rural living and energy use to electric cooperative members and customers.

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Nearly 102,000 families and businesses receive enchantment Magazine as electric cooperative members. Non-member subscriptions are available at $12 per year or $18 for two years, payable to NMRECA. Allow four to eight weeks for delivery. Periodical Postage paid at Santa Fe, NM 87501-9998 and additional mailing offices. CHANGE OF ADDRESS Postmaster: Send address changes to 614 Don Gaspar Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 87505-4428. Readers who receive the publication through their electric cooperative membership should report address changes to their local electric cooperative office. THE NEW MEXICO RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION provides legislative and educational services for the 17 cooperatives that deliver electric power to New Mexico’s rural areas and small communities. The mission of the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association is to strengthen, support, unify, and represent Cooperative member interests at the local, state, and national levels. Each cooperative has a representative on the association’s board of directors, which controls the editorial content and advertising policy of enchantment through its Publications Committee. OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Charles Pinson, President, Central Valley Electric Cooperative, Artesia George Biel, Vice President, Sierra Electric Cooperative, Elephant Butte Tim Morrow, Secretary-Treasurer, Springer Electric Cooperative, Springer BOARD OF DIRECTORS Duane Frost, Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative, Mountainair William C. Miller, Jr., Columbus Electric Cooperative, Deming Arsenio Salazar, Continental Divide Electric Cooperative, Grants Lance R. Adkins, Farmers’ Electric Cooperative, Clovis Cristobal Duran, Kit Carson Electric Cooperative, Taos Robert Caudle, Lea County Electric Cooperative, Lovington Robert Quintana, Mora-San Miguel Electric Cooperative, Mora Tomas G. Rivas, Northern Río Arriba Electric Cooperative, Chama Preston Stone, Otero County Electric Cooperative, Cloudcroft Antonio Sanchez, Jr., Roosevelt County Electric Cooperative, Portales Judith Holcomb, Socorro Electric Cooperative Travis Sullivan Southwestern Electric Cooperative, Clayton Wayne Connell, Tri-State G&T Association, Westminster, Colorado Charles G. Wagner, Western Farmers Electric Cooperative, Oklahoma NATIONAL DIRECTOR David Spradlin, Springer Electric Cooperative, Springer

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DEPARTMENTS

INSIDE READS

Co-op Newswire

12 View from enchantment 5 Small town grows in size during bluegrass festival. Toe-Tapping Tunes

New Mexico's "Merci" Train

Boxcars shipped to America as a gratitude of thanks.

15 Hale To The Stars

MEMBERS OF THE PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE William C. Miller, Jr., Chairman, Columbus Electric Cooperative Arsenio Salazar, Continental Divide Electric Cooperative Cristobal Duran, Kit Carson Electric Cooperative Robert Caudle, Lea County Electric Cooperative NEW MEXICO RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 614 Don Gaspar Avenue Phone: 505-982-4671 Santa Fe, NM 87505 Fax: 505-982-0153 www.nmelectric.coop www.enchantment.coop Keven J. Groenewold, Chief Executive Officer, kgroenewold@nmelectric.coop Susan M. Espinoza, Editor, sespinoza@nmelectric.coop Tom Condit, Assistant Editor, tcondit@nmelectric.coop DISPLAY ADVERTISING Rates available upon request. Cooperative members and New Mexico display advertisers email Susan M. Espinoza at sespinoza@nmelectric.coop or call 505-9824671. National representative: American MainStreet Publications, 800-626-1181. Advertisements in enchantment are paid solicitations and are not endorsed by the publisher or the electric cooperatives that are members of the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association. PRODUCT SATISFACTION AND DELIVERY RESPONSIBILITY LIE SOLELY WITH THE ADVERTISER. Copyright ©2018, New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Inc. Reproduction prohibited without written permission of the publisher.

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Enchanted Journeys

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On The Menu

8

Energy Sense

10

Book Chat

15

Vecinos 16

On the Cover: Colorful

flowers adorn a wicker bench and a guitar waiting to get played. File photo.

Backyard Trails

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Trading Post

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Youth Art

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Your Co-op Page

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Co-op Newswire Officers of the NMRECA Board of Directors

Wildland Fire Safety Every year, wildfires burn across the U.S., and more and more people are living where wildfires are a real risk. But by working together, residents can make their own property—and their neighborhood—much safer from wildfire.

O

n May 24, 2018, after the adjournment of the New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NMRECA) Annual Meeting, the NMRECA Board of Directors reelected by acclamation Charles T. Pinson, president, representing Central Valley Electric Cooperative; George Biel, vice president, representing Sierra Electric Cooperative; and Tim Morrow, secretary-treasurer, representing Springer Electric Cooperative. The New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association, which publishes enchantment, is a statewide not-for-profit service organization for New Mexico’s rural electric cooperatives. Organized in 1944 and headquartered in Santa Fe, NMRECA represents the interest of the electric cooperatives who are members of NMRECA and their members through actively working to protect cooperative interests before regulatory, political and governmental bodies as well as the general

Action steps for around your home: NMRECA Board Officers (l to r): Tim Morrow, secretary-treasurer, representing Springer Electric Cooperative; Charles T. Pinson, president, representing Central Valley Electric Cooperative; and George Biel, vice president, representing Sierra Electric Cooperative.

public; administering the New Mexico Rural Electric SelfInsurer’s Fund, a workers’ compensation fund owned by New Mexico’s rural electric cooperatives; and coordinating specialized training for its members.

• CLEAR leaves and other vegetative debris from roofs, gutters, porches, and decks. This helps prevent embers from igniting your home. • REMOVE dead vegetation and other items from under your deck or porch, and within 10 feet of the house. • SCREEN in areas below patios and decks with wire mesh to prevent debris and combustible materials from accumulating. • REMOVE flammable materials (wood piles, propane tanks) within 30 feet of your home’s foundation and outbuildings. If it can catch fire, don’t let it touch your house, deck or porch. • PRUNE trees so the lowest branches are 6 to 10 feet from the ground. Wildfire can spread to tree tops. • KEEP lawn hydrated and maintained. If it is brown, cut it down to reduce fire intensity. Dry grass and shrubs are fuel for wildfire.

How to Contact enchantment

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Phone 505-982-4671 Email comments@nmelectric.coop Facebook facebook.com/enchantmentnmreca Mail 614 Don Gaspar Avenue Santa Fe, NM 87505 Community Events events@nmelectric.coop


View from enchantment

The Power of Electric Vehicles

One of the biggest selling points for electric cars is their effect on the environment, and that can also depend on where you live.

E

lectric vehicles account for just 1.2 percent of the U.S. vehicle market, but sales are booming, growing 25 percent last year. And they’re getting better and cheaper as researchers improve the batteries that power them. Here’s a guide to help you decide if an electric car is for you—or if you just want to be smarter about one of the next big things in energy. The first thing to realize about electric cars is they can drive more than enough miles for you on a single charge, even if you live out in the wideopen countryside. Try keeping track of your actual daily use. If you look at how many miles you drive in a day, for most people in the United States, even in rural areas, that number is less than 40 miles per day. So if your car has a range of 120 miles, that’s a lot of wiggle room. According to the Federal Highway Administration, the average American drives 25 miles a day, and for rural areas, that average is 34 miles a day. When an electric car is done driving for the day, you can plug it in to recharge overnight. Essentially, you’re topping off the gas tank while you sleep, giving you a fully-charged battery every morning. There are three options to charge an electric car: Level 1—The simplest charging technique is to plug the car into a standard

home outlet. That will charge the battery at a rate that will add from two to five miles to its range each hour. That’s pretty slow, but the battery might start the charging session already partly charged, depending on how far it’s driven that day. Level 2—Faster charging will require a professional installer to upgrade the home’s voltage for a unit that will add between 10 and 25 miles of range for each hour of charging—a rate that would fully charge the battery overnight. Installing a Level 2 charger in a house or garage would run $500 to $800 for the equipment, plus at least that much for the labor. Timers can also be used to charge the vehicle in the middle of the night when electric consumption is typically lower. Level 3—DC fast charge requires specialized equipment more suited to public charging stations, and will bring a car battery up to 80 percent of capacity in 30 minutes. Another factor affecting the economics of an electric car is, of course, the cost of the vehicle. As electric cars improve, projections put their cost coming down to match conventional vehicles by about the year 2025. But today, the average electric car costs close to $40,000, compared with less than $30,000 for an internal combustion engine.

Keven J. Groenewold. P.E. Chief Executive Officer New Mexico Rural Electric Cooperative Association

For many people, one of the biggest selling points for electric cars is their effect on the environment, and that can also depend on where you live. The sources of electricity for a local utility vary across the country. One major environmental group analyzed local electric utility fuel mixes, and determined that for most of the country, electric vehicles have much less of an effect on the environment than conventional vehicles. That study by the Union of Concerned Scientists shows that in the middle part of the country, driving an electric vehicle has the equivalent environmental benefits of driving a gasoline-powered car that gets 41-50 miles per gallon. For much of the rest of the country, it’s like driving a car that gets well over 50 miles per gallon. “Seventy-five percent of people now live in places where driving on electricity is cleaner than a 50 mpg gasoline car,” says the report from the Union of Concerned Scientists. Also, the range of the vehicle will be affected by whether you regularly drive up and down mountains, or make a lot of use of the heater or air conditioner. As you read more about electric vehicles, continue to ask questions and research on whether an electric vehicle is right for you.

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Hale to the stars BY ALAN HALE

J

uly is the month of the Red Planet—Mars. Mars is at “opposition,” i.e., directly opposite the sun in the sky on Thursday night the 26th, but because Mars’ orbit around the sun is distinctly non-circular, not all oppositions are alike. Mars is currently near the closest point of its orbit, and four days after opposition, Mars passes 35.8 million miles from Earth—only 1.2 million miles farther away from us than it was during the much-ballyhooed close approach in 2003. For us Earthlings, this means Mars will appear brighter and larger than it has in the past 15 years. It rises in the southeast during dusk, is highest above the southern horizon around 1 a.m. MDT, and sets around sunrise. Already somewhat high in the western sky during dusk is the brilliant planet Venus; as it catches up to Earth in their respective orbits around the sun, Venus brightens and grows larger in apparent size, although its phase (detectable with small backyard telescopes) is shrinking. Somewhat below Venus is Mercury, which is moderately high in the dusk sky in early July but disappears into sunlight after mid-month. Shining high in our southern sky during the evening hours is our solar system’s largest planet, Jupiter. Trailing along about three hours after Jupiter, and thus

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Enchanted Journeys Hubble Space Telescope image of Mars, obtained around the time of the previous opposition in May 2016, when it was 11 million miles farther from Earth than it will be this month. NASA photograph. being highest above the horizon around midnight, is the ringed planet, Saturn. Its system of rings continues to appear as wide open as they can ever appear to us. Sky-watchers equipped with moderate-size and larger backyard telescopes can witness a special treat on the night of July 4-5, when between 10 p.m. and 1 a.m. MDT, a dim background star passes behind the rings, repeatedly dimming and brightening as it passes through the various rings and gaps. There are two eclipses in July, although neither is visible from our part of the world. On Friday the 13th, a small partial solar eclipse will be visible from the southern Indian Ocean between Australia and Antarctica; most of the eclipse takes place over water, although Tasmania and parts of Victoria and South Australia will see it. On Friday the 27th, a fine total eclipse of the moon is visible from the Eastern Hemisphere, with the best views being from India, the Middle East, and eastern Africa; Europe and western Africa will see it during the evening hours, while Australia and the Orient will see it before dawn.

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Have a safe and fun Fourth of July!

July 1 • Rociada Health and Wellness Fair Pendaries 800-515-3095 July 4 • Grants Annual Wild West Days Rodeo Grants Rodeo Grounds 505-292-1300

July 14 • Fort Sumner Billy The Kid’s Legends Day Sixx Shooter Gallery 575-355-6666

July 6-8 • Roswell UFO Festival Chaves County Courthouse 575-914-8018

July 14-15 • Abiquiu Lavender in the Valley Festival Purple Adobe Lavender Farm 505-685-0082

July 7 • Clovis Star Party Oasis State Park 575-356-5331

July 20-22 • Weed Weed Bluegrass Festival Weed Community Center 575-687-3316

July 7 • Los Ojos Nature Walk Heron Lake 575-588-7470

July 21 • Artesia National Day of The Cowboy Downtown 575-746-4212

July 7-8 • Taos Talpa CC Quilter’s Show Stables Gallery 575-751-1014

July 21 • Villanueva Fiesta de Santiago Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 575-421-2548

July 13-15 • Chama Christmas in July Downtown Businesses 800-477-0149

July 27-29 • Corona Corona Festival Village 575-849-5511

July 13-15 • Magdalena Old Timers Reunion Rodeo Grounds 505-506-5735

July 28 • Edgewood Music & Arts Festival Wildlife West’s Amphitheater 505-281-7655

July 14 • Fence Lake Swap Meet/Farmers Market Community Center 505-788-2256

July 28 • Logan Prairie Fest Ute Lake State Park 575-445-5607


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On The Menu BY SHARON NIEDERMAN Kale Slaw Kale Slaw

Rice Salad

3 strips bacon (optional) 1 lb. young tender kale, stems removed, leaves chopped 1½ cups cabbage, shredded 1 small red onion, sliced thin 1 medium tomato, seeded, cubed ½ green bell pepper, seeded, finely chopped ½ red bell pepper, seeded, finely chopped Dressing 1 cup mayonnaise ½ cup sour cream 1 tsp. Dijon mustard ½ tsp. curry powder 1 Tb. milk 1 Tb. white wine vinegar Salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 Tbs. fresh parsley, chopped Saute bacon until crisp. Drain. Crumble and reserve. Reserve drippings. Combine kale with cabbage, red onion, tomato, green and red peppers in large bowl. Lightly toss. In a separate bowl, combine mayonnaise with sour cream, beat in mustard, curry, milk, vinegar, salt, and pepper to taste. Pour dressing over salad just before serving. Toss well. Sprinkle with bacon and parsley. Serves 4-6.

Refreshing Summer Salads

Hot summer weather brings on the craving for meals that are light. Salads made from the beautiful fresh produce on sale at farmers markets are not only good for you, they are refreshing and keep the kitchen cool, too. Take these for a spin on the patio! 8

JULY 2018

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Rice Salad with Roasted Red Peppers, Chickpeas and Feta 2½ cups cold cooked rice 1 can (15 oz.) drained chickpeas ¾ cup feta cheese, diced 2/3 cup roasted red peppers, diced ½ cup fresh parsley, chopped ¼ cup fresh dill, chopped 3 green onions, thinly sliced Black pepper to taste Dressing ¼ cup fresh lemon juice

2 garlic cloves, peeled, minced or pressed 1�4 cup olive oil Salt and pepper In medium serving bowl combine rice, chickpeas, feta, peppers, parsley, dill, green onion, and black pepper. In jar with tight-fitting lid, combine all dressing ingredients and shake vigorously. Pour dressing over rice mixture and mix well. Let salad sit at least 1 hour before serving. Serves 2-3.

Thai-Style Noodles with Peanut Basil Sauce 1 cup fresh snow peas or prepared frozen 1 package (9 ozs.) refrigerated fettuccini (or prepared the usual way) ¾ cup coconut milk ½ cup crunchy peanut butter ½ cup vegetable broth 3 Tbs. soy sauce 2 Tbs. lime juice 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 tsps. sugar ¾ tsp. ground coriander 1 tsp. dried crushed red pepper 1 cup firmly packed Thai basil leaves, shredded (divided) 1 cup mung bean sprouts (divided) ¼ cup dry roasted peanuts Trim snow peas and cut in half. Parboil. Cook pasta according to package directions. In large saucepan, whisk together coconut milk, peanut butter, broth, soy sauce, lime juice, garlic, sugar, coriander, and red pepper. Cook over medium heat, whisking occasionally, around 5 minutes. Add snow peas, cooked pasta, ¾ cup each basil and bean sprouts. Toss with pasta. Place on serving platter. Sprinkle with remaining bean sprouts, ¼ cup basil and ¼ cup chopped peanuts. Serve with peanuts and lime wedges. Serves 3-4.


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Energy Sense

BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

D

ear Pat: Every month, I look over my electric bill, but a lot of it doesn’t make sense to me. Is there information included on my bill that can help me save money? —Don

Dear Don: It’s always a good idea to understand how you’re spending your money. You look over your credit card statement carefully each month, so you should do the same with your utility bills. As you’d suspect, analyzing your bill can help you save energy and money. If you live in an all-electric home, all of your home energy costs will be on the monthly bill from your electric cooperative. This bill will probably have one or more fixed charges that cover some of the costs your co-op incurs in delivering the power to your home. Beyond these fixed fees, you will pay for the power you have used that month, which is sold in kilowatt-hour (kWh) units. One kWh is equal to 1,000 watts over a onehour period. Think of 10 100-watt lights that are used for one hour. Most electric co-ops charge the same rate for a kWh no matter when you use it, but some offer a Time-of-Use rate that is higher during peak energy hours—when the wholesale price of electric-

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ity is higher because there’s greater demand. Some co-ops have different rates for different use tiers, so the rate could be higher or lower as monthly use increases. Electric rates can also vary by season and cost more during high-use months. If you’re being charged more for energy use during On-Peak hours, you can often adjust the time you use certain appliances and equipment, like your dishwasher, air conditioner, clothes washer or oven to Off-Peak hours. This won’t reduce your electric use, but it can save you money if your co-op offers a Time-of-Use rate. Most energy bills include a chart that shows your electric use over the past 12 months. If your home is electrically heated, you will see how much your use goes up in the winter. This chart can also show how much your use goes up during the summer when you’re running your air conditioner. Your electric co-op may offer tools on their website to help you track energy use and estimate how much you use for space heating, air conditioning and water heating, which are often the three largest energy

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Understanding Your Energy Bill

Sample Energy Use Chart

AVERAGE TEMP.

Source: Collaborative Efficiency

Most energy bills include an annual energy use chart, which can provide clues to identify areas of energy efficiency opportunities. Photo Credit: Collaborative Efficiency.

uses. Knowing how much you spend on heating or cooling can help you determine how much you might save by installing a new heat pump or other energy efficiency upgrade. Some co-ops also offer online energy audit tools that provide ways to reduce energy costs based on a detailed set of questions about your home. If your co-op doesn’t offer an online audit tool, or if you want a different perspective, you can try the EnergyStar Home Energy Yardstick. This resource can give you a good idea of your space heating and cooling use without using an online tool. Just total up your average electricity use for the months when you use the most energy and subtract the average amount you use in “shoulder months”—when you’re not cooling or heating your home. The difference is likely the amount you pay each month for heating and cooling. If someone says switching to a new heating or cooling system could save you 20 percent, they may mean you can save 20 percent on heating or cooling costs. Some

homes also have significant uses besides heating and cooling that increase their winter or summer bills, like a well pump, spa or swimming pool. You may receive a separate monthly bill for natural gas, or for propane or heating oil which might be delivered on an asneeded, keep-filled basis. The Home Energy Yardstick can accommodate any type of fuel you use in your home. Hopefully this information can help you analyze your energy bill and give you some general ideas on how you might be able to cut your energy expenses. The best way to turn these ideas into specific actions is to conduct an energy audit of your home. Contact your electric co-op to see if they offer free energy audits or if they can recommend a local professional.


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S E N U T G IN

P P A T E TO

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By Wende

AT THE WEED BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL

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Malakai Trujillo, grandson of Patricia Chesser, sings during the 2017 Weed Bluegrass Festival. Photo by Felicity Braziel and provided courtesy of the Weed Community Association.

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espite its name, music lovers will be on a natural high at the 23rd Annual Weed Bluegrass Festival on Saturday and Sunday, July 21-22. Weed is nestled in the mountains at over 7,000 feet—64 miles southeast of Ruidoso and 22 miles southeast of Cloudcroft. Each year since the mid-1990s, bluegrass bands have come from across the state and surrounding states to jam out at the festival. This year’s six bands are Blue Sky Country, Bobby Giles and Texas Gales, Higher Ground Bluegrass, Simple Gifts, Southern Flavor, and Tucumcari Crossroads. “We always try to get a few new bands, but have two or three that come almost every year, and their fans follow them,” says Mitch Hibbard, who is the Weed Community Association (WCA) webmaster. Powered by the Otero County Electric Cooperative, headquartered in Cloudcroft, the festival is held in the gym and cafeteria of the old Weed public school—which closed in 1991, and is now the Weed Community Center. John Bell, president of the Weed Community Association, says crowds range from 350-400. Since Weed only has one main road, Bell says the festival—which includes vendors selling jewelry, crafts and knickknacks—is easy to find. “Weed isn’t very busy and the festival is at the biggest building in town right across from the post office,” he says. According to Hibbard, 60 percent of gate receipts go to the bands and 40 percent—plus food, hat and T-shirt sales—go to cover expenses. Remaining revenue goes to a community scholarship fund, administered by the association. According to Shirley Stone Akers, the festival began in the mid-1990s with a group of musicians in southern New Mexico’s Sacramento Mountains playing bluegrass on a regular basis. Roy Merworth of Pecos Valley Bluegrass approached members of the Weed community and asked them to consider hosting a music festival “where people can come to the cool mountains in the summertime and enjoy listening to good bluegrass music.” The Weed Bluegrass Festival was born. The national bluegrass organization granted the small community (population approximately 60) the third weekend of every July for the festival. Frank Devine organized the festival for years until his death in 2008. Since then, Akers has coordinated the bands and scheduling. “The Weed Bluegrass Festival is our major fundraiser,” Akers says. “The earnings keep up the buildings and provide scholarships.” Bell says, “The entire festival is very family-oriented. Parents don’t have to worry about what their kids will hear. “We try to keep it light, fun and friendly.” On Saturday, each band performs for approximately 45 minutes in the morning and again in the afternoon. A highlight Saturday evening is the “band scramble” when the names of audience members who want to participate are drawn from a hat and they join band members on stage. “They play banjos, fiddles, mandolins, guitars or sing,” says Bell. “They do two songs each, then it rotates to the next group. “It’s a lot of fun for them and the audience. We do it especially to keep our youth interested in playing bluegrass,” says Bell.


Patricia Chesser, who lives an hour southwest of Roswell and has been the fiddle player for Blue Sky Country for over 20 years says, “The band scramble is a little nerve-wracking, but it’s a lot of fun. It kind of puts you on the spot on what you’re able to do.” “Of course, it’s only for the audience members who want to participate and some are good musicians. My husband, who is the emcee, tells them, ‘If you’re interested go get your name in the hat.’” Blue Sky Country’s five band members are from Artesia, Carlsbad and the Roswell area. “I can’t count how many times we’ve played at the festival. We’ve been there off and on since it began,” Chesser says. “So has Simple Gifts from Alamogordo.” Chesser says the festival is very casual and relaxed with a good variety of bands. “The community of Weed really takes care of their bands,” she says.

Weed is very remote, but I wish more people would come,” Chesser says. Bell says it is fortunate that Weed has the old school, and now the Weed Community Center, to host the festival. “We’re at 7,000 feet, so it’s a lot cooler up here than where people may come from,” Bell says. “July is when we get our summer rains, but all the events are inside so it doesn’t bother us.” Admission for Saturday is $15 per person. Ages 17 and under get in free. Saturday performances begin at 9 a.m. and wrap-up between 6-7 p.m. Visitors have an opportunity to buy a barbecue brisket lunch. Sunday’s program is free, and begins with a brief devotional at 9 a.m. Soon after, bands play gospel bluegrass music until around noon. During Sunday’s performance, morning cinnamon rolls are free, which

“The festival is very casual and relaxed with a good variety of bands.” ~Patricia Chesser In between their morning and afternoon sets, when not practicing, bands mingle with the audience. “I’m not good with names, but I recognize a lot of faces from year to year,” Chesser says. Although the festival cannot afford big-name bands, Chesser says they try to book ones who people recognize and will travel to see. “It’s a nice little event. I know

according to Bell, “a lady who has been running the cafeteria for years does a great job. Her cinnamon rolls go like hotcakes!” The Weed Baptist Church has a potluck on Sunday for the bands and their families. For more information, call John Bell at 575-6873316 or email johnbell8@sbcglobal.net, or email Mitch Hibbard at hibbard@pvt.net or call 575-687-3322.

Photos on this page, scenes from the 2017 Weed Bluegrass Festival. Photos by Felicity Braziel and provided courtesy of the Weed Community Association.

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Book Chat BY PHAEDRA GREENWOOD

MY WILD LIFE: A MEMOIR OF ADVENTURES HOMELAND BURNING By Brinn Colenda WITHIN AMERICA'S NATIONAL PARKS By Roland H. Wauer 2014, 288 pages, $39.95 Texas Tech University Press 800-832-4042; www.ttupress.org Wauer recalls “a wonderful way to make a living,” 32 years as a seasonal ranger in eight national parks including Crater Lake National Park in Oregon, Death Valley National Monument, Yosemite, Zion, Pinnacles National Monument in California, Big Bend, Texas, Great Smokey Mountains National Park, and the Virgin Islands. He also served as chief of the Division of Natural Resources in Washington, D.C. A biologist and avid birder, he made significant contributions to research projects on birds, mammals, reptiles, invertebrates, and other wildlife. He models how to be the interface between the natural world and the tourists who love the parks to death. At Glacier Bay in Alaska, a steady increase in cruise ships that go to see endangered humpback whales are endangering the humpbacks that shelter their calves in the summer. While serving the Southwest Regional Offices, he wrote a proposal for an ecological study of mountain lions near Carlsbad that were purportedly killing a rancher’s cattle. Never a dull moment. Well done.

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EARS OF CORN: LISTEN

2018, 292 pages, $17.95 Southern Yellow Pine Publishing 850-421-7420; www.syppublishing.com

By Max Early 2014, 100 pages, $28 3: A Taos Press 303 249 4731; www.3taospress.com

This is Book 2, a military thriller in a compelling series called “Callahan Family Saga,” classic tales of good vs. evil set in the naïve days before 9/11 when Americans thought “It can’t happen here.” The first book was Cochabamba Conspiracy, a world take-over attempt by the arch villain, Kurt Wallerine, that unrolls in Bolivia. The last one is Chita Quest, where Colonel Tom Callahan and his brother attempt to rescue their father, a Vietnam POW, from a prison camp in Siberia. Colenda is a retired lieutenant colonel, a pilot for over 20 years, who utilizes in riveting fiction his authentic and scary flights of derring do. His hero is Tom Callahan, and Colleen is his lovely, intrepid wife. One of his female pilots, Rhui, declares to her father, “All those innocents who are slaughtered by suicide bombers are somebody’s children. Even the bombers. The killing has to stop.” But Wallerine is on a revenge mission to burn up America’s wildlands. Read the book!

Max Early is a renowned poet and potter from Laguna Pueblo with pottery in many permanent collections nationwide. This beautifully designed book with many black and white photos and a few drawings is a credit to 3: A Taos Press for embracing with clarity and grace an indigenous culture. Early incorporates Keresan words into his poems to “heighten the vocal tonality” which works if you are familiar with the language. His poems alternate with prose vignettes that include a typical day in Laguna in the pursuit of the elk that “rampaged” the cornfield. At dusk the young men pursue more exotic game at the local bar, but the girls get away. Some of his most poignant poems are about picking piñon or shaping the clay from which he fashions his pots. Family photos alternate with photos of elegant Native pottery decorated with fine geometric designs. Among his awards is a Native American Community Scholar Appointment from the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

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GRANDPA LOLO’S MATANZA: A NEW MEXICO TRADITION By Nasario Garcia 2017, 54 glossy pages, $24.95 Rio Grande Books 505-344-9382; www.LPDPress.com Matanza is a ritual celebration of butchering a hog to feed the family—or sometimes the whole village—for the winter. It harks back to the days when every family knew exactly where their meat came from—the farm. Junie is an eight-year-old boy who was born and raised on the farm. The hog is named Bruno. He has been well cared for by the family for a year. Looking at Bruno over the fence, Junie has a moment of sadness. But remembers what his mother said: “Animals must die for us to put food on the table.” The older children watch the whole butchering process and often help with the small details. The story is completely straightforward, told in Spanish on the opposite page. The illustrations are simple and appropriate, but the story is long with many details and might be too much for the three-to-eight-yearold set.

To submit a book for review: include contact information and where to order.


New Mexico’s gratitude boxcar is exhibited inside the entrance to Expo New Mexico. Photo by Diana Stauffer.

New Mexico's “Merci” Train W

hen the people of France said “merci” to American citizens and soldiers in 1949 it was only the latest expression of friendship and unity from an old ally. Thousands of gifts, or “cadeaux” were carefully packed inside 49 narrow gauge boxcars dubbed The Merci Train and shipped to America. These treasures—drawings, porcelain, letters, dolls, a wedding dress, and significant historic artifacts—were given by French families in gratitude for the relief supplies donated by thousands of Americans just two years earlier on The Friendship Train. The Friendship Train was a spontaneous nationwide donation drive triggered by Drew Pearson, a newspaper columnist and popular radio commentator. His October 1947 description of the dire conditions in France, where rationing was still in place, galvanized a compassionate American response to collect supplies by rail and send them overseas before another cold winter set it.

Beginning with fewer than a dozen rail cars of foodstuffs in California and the Pacific Northwest, new boxcars regularly joined the original ones to accommodate this rolling expansion of support from Americans. An astounding 700 boxcars finally arrived in New York carrying more than $40 million worth of precious food and grain. The railroads handled the cargo for free. Dock workers waived their wages. And, the trans-Atlantic shipping company said “no charge!” The arrival of American citizen aide in 1947 was so moving to a French veteran and railroad worker that he initiated a “thank you” campaign: his nation would fill an assembly of decorated boxcars with gifts of appreciation from grateful French families and send one car to each of the states (plus one for the District of Columbia and Hawaii). The Merci Train was born. The diminutive French boxcars, frequently known as “wagons,” were familiar to many

By Diana Stauffer

American veterans at the time: Doughboys under command of General John J. “Black Jack” Pershing used them to move ammunition and personnel up to the trenches in 1918. American GIs traveled in the “wagons” loaded with critical supplies during the arduous, post-D-Day push against Nazi Germany in 1944 and 1945. The boxcars are still known today as Forty and Eights because they could accommodate 40 men or 8 horses. New Mexico’s gratitude boxcar was received by Governor Thomas Mabry and columnist Drew Pearson in Santa Fe on February 16, 1949. The estimated 400 items were unpacked and displayed at St. Michael’s College before eventually being distributed to 14 libraries and colleges across the state. Sadly, most items seem to have been forgotten or lost over the years. One known exception is the Socorro Public Library where …continued on page 17

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Vecinos BY HELEN DAVIS Evert Clawson

Writer, Rancher or Renaissance Man? T

o talk to Evert Clawson is to touch history and glimpse the ways of many peoples. A true New Mexican, Clawson grew up and spent most of his life in the Cibola and McKinley Counties area once his education and mission work in Canada were completed. But Clawson has a life-long interest in history, not only local ranching, mining and development, but American and world history. A co-op member of Continental Divide Electric Cooperative headquartered in Grants, Clawson says before the co-op came into the area, people used the old ways, wood and oil to heat and provide light. The co-op, Clawson says, was the first provider of connected services the area saw. Clawson grew up in Ramah until his father moved the family in the 1940s and established a trading post that served the nearby Navajo communities and anyone who needed goods along Route 66. As a young man working in the business, Clawson got to know some of the Navajo people who, using the trading post to purchase goods, put valuables into pawn for safe keeping between ceremonials or just to visit. He picked up a working knowledge of what he calls “trader Navajo” and still maintains relationships in the Navajo community. Drawing on his interest in history, Clawson has written and published one book and is in the process of getting a prequel into print and ebook form. Dine' Da Hogaa or Battles of the People, came out in print in 2016 and is the story of a United States Army officer during his career under Kit Carson in the “Indian Wars.” The author says the book was unexpectedly wellreceived by many Navajos and a Navajo reader told him, “You don’t write like Hillerman.”

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The Trekkers, in final stages of pre-publishing work, covers the history of a family leading up to the time of the military story. A distant son of Scotland himself, Clawson begins the story in Scotland and moves it through a MacLeod clansman’s travels from there into the New World as he gets established. Clawson expects to write a series of 15 or so related books in the saga. To handle publication of both ebooks and multiple print versions, Clawson established his own publishing company, using his initials, ETC, in the form of his ranching brand, as his logo and company name. For now, Clawson is publishing only his own work, but in the future…who knows? The writer worked for Anaconda Mine in a metallurgic tracking department and later worked as a public servant. Retired now, the Bluewater resident is planning to turn his hand to beef ranching as well as writing. Clawson is looking into the challenging project of raising Japanese-style Wagyu cattle. The meat from Wagyu-bred and raised animals is known as highly expensive, bringing $100 a pound in some markets. Although it is called decadent by some, Clawson says, “It is healthier than lake trout and costs about the same.” He says many think of “beef’ as a huge steak with lots of flavorful fat, but a small portion of good Wagyu is all you need. Like trout. Will Clawson soon join other New Mexico Wagyu ranchers? Let’s check back with him in a year or so and find out.


“Merci” Train …continued from page 15 several glass cases display some of the French gifts. New Mexico’s original Merci Train boxcar fell into disrepair and became a storage shed at the New Mexico State Fairgrounds. A replacement boxcar was purchased from the French national railroad, and then restored by a group of dedicated volunteers, including Frenchspeaking New Mexicans in 1989.

Photo of a 40 and 8 commemorative medal which belonged to Diana Stauffer's grandfather, who was a 40 and 8 Society member and officer during WWI. Photo by Diana Stauffer.

Today, it is proudly exhibited inside the entrance to Expo New Mexico along with its forlorn predecessor. In November during the Veterans Day weekend, in observance of the 100th anniversary of the end of WWI, the two boxcars will be rededicated in honor of our French allies and all American veterans, but especially those who experienced the 40s and 8s during their military service. Though mostly a forgotten event that was celebrated enthusiastically nationwide in 1949, the Forty and Eight boxcar remains a symbol of the special, on-going affection between historic allies who are two of the world’s oldest democracies. Anyone with first-hand memories of the Merci Train is encouraged to email Diana Stauffer at: djs2rad@sprintmail.com

Democratic member control Unlike investor-owned electric utilities, our rural electric association is governed by a representative from each of our 43 member electric distribution cooperatives and public power districts. They each share the leadership of our association to power the potential of more than 1 million consumer-members like you.

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Backyard Trails BY CRAIG SPRINGER A Very Peculiar Fish: Brown Trout

It may be an adage worn smooth like a rounded cobble stone, but America is predominately a nation of immigrants. Our ancestors arrived at these shores from around the globe, and with them they brought things familiar like music, language, clothing, food—and fish. And so it is with the brown trout. It occurs in lakes and streams throughout New Mexico in waters cold enough to harbor them. But the brown trout is an immigrant not of a so recent vintage. The brown trout is native only to the Old World, hence the commonly used term here in New Mexico: “German brown trout.” While the fish naturally occurred in Germany, the fish was found throughout much of Europe and western Asia. They naturally occurred in the lakes and streams from Norway to Morocco and from Pakistan through England to Iceland. That wide distribution created a breadth of natural diversity within the species, both in outward appearance and in ways of making a living. In their native range three forms exist, those living their entire lives in streams, in lakes, and those that make runs to the sea. Brown trout eggs were transported across the Atlantic and incubated in New York as early as 1864. By the early 1900s, streams in New Mexico were being planted with the immigrant fish. The Santa Fe New Mexican reported in May 1908 that a “very peculiar fish,” a German brown trout some 22 inches long and nearly four pounds was angled out of the Pecos River near Windsor Creek.

They are anything but peculiar in New Mexico anymore. You can find brown trout in mountain streams of the Gila, Sacramentos, Jemez and Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Brown trout have a reputation of playing hard to get. There is no question this fish is harder to catch than any other species of trout in North America. Trout population studies reveal that brown trout are caught less frequently than other trout species, even where they are equally abundant. Brown trout grow—and eat—the most when water temperatures range from 50 to 74 degrees. Their favored fare depends on place. In little creeks, it’s bugs, both terrestrial and aquatic that makes up most of the diet. Summertime caddis and mayfly hatches send browns into a feeding frenzy. But browns do have a penchant for eating other fish. Larger waters that harbor other species of fish typically produce carnivorous brown trout. Flies or spinners might land your own “peculiar fish.”

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home this is

Mueller custom buildings make beautiful living spaces. Our manufactured & engineered exteriors provide flexibility for you to design a completely personalized interior, while supporting large spans and open floor plans. Give us a call or drop by today, and find out more about custom metal buildings from Mueller.* www.muellerinc.com 877-2-MUELLER (877-268-3553)

*Some exterior structures, such as decks & porches, were added post-engineering and not designed by Mueller. Please check local building codes before ordering.

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Trading Post

Big Toys

To Place a Classified Ad 1. Type or print ad neatly. 2. Cost is $20 for up to the first 40 words per ad, per category. Each additional word is 50¢. Ads with insufficient funds will not be printed. Ad published once unless paid for several issues. 3. Graphics such as brands or QR codes are an additional $5 to the original cost of ad. 4. Only members of New Mexico electric co-ops may place ads. 5. We reserve the right to reject any advertisement. 6. Ads due the 9th, one month prior. Ex: Ads due February 9 for the March issue. Ads postmarked after the deadline of the 9th will be placed in the next issue. 7. Fill out contact information and select a category: Name:____________________ Address:__________________ Name:____________________ City:______________________ Address:__________________ State:_____ ZIP:_____________ City:______________________ Telephone:________________ State:____ Zip:_____________ Cooperative:_______________ Telephone:________________ Big Toys (Tools______________ & Machinery) Cooperative:_ Country Critters&(Pets) Big Toys (Tools Machinery) LivestockCritters Round-Up Country (Pets)(Livestock) Odd & Ends (Camping, Music, Digital) Livestock Round-Up (Livestock) Roof&Over Head (Real Estate) Odd EndsYour (Camping, Music, Digital) Things That Vroom! (Vehicles) Vintage FindsGo(Antiques & Collectibles) Vintage Collectibles) Roof OverFinds Your(Antiques Head (Real& Estate) When Opportunity Knocks Things That Go Vroom! (Vehicles) (Business & Employment) When Opportunity Knocks 8. Mail your ad and payment to: (Business & Employment) NMRECA 614 Don Gaspar Avenue Santa Fe, NM 87505

Make check or money order payable to NMRECA Advertisements in enchantment are paid solicitations are notor endorsed by theorder Makeand check money publisher or the electric cooperatives of New payable to NMRECA Mexico. PRODUCT SATISFACTION AND DELIVERY RESPONSIBILITY LIE SOLELY WITH THE ADVERTISER.

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DRINKING WATER STORAGE TANKS, HEAVY DUTY Black Poly, proven algae resistant. 125 to 11,000 gallons, NRCS and EQUIP approved. Please give us a chance to serve you! MasterCard or Visa accepted. Call 575-682-2308 or 1-800-603-8272. GREAT OFFER ON SOLAR SUBMERSIBLE SHALLOW/DEEP well pumps! ‘NRCS’ approved with 2-year warranty on selected pumps with affordable, easy installation! For a custom quote, email: sales@solarsubmersiblewellpumps.com or call 505-429-3093. Order online at: www.solarsubmersiblewellpumps.com, 24/7 service. OVERHEAD FEED BINS. 1 TO 4 Compartment, 12 to 48 tons. Any size free standing cattle guards, no footing needed. Emery Welding, Clayton, NM, 575-374-2320 or 575-207-7402. eweld98@yahoo.com PRE TARIFF PRICE INCREASES: A 24,000 pound GVWR 25 foot tandem dually gooseneck equipment trailer is $8,162 with double hacks and spare. Logan 2 horse slant load bumper pull trailer, $9,955. Financing available with approved credit. Trades welcomed. Sandia Trailer Sales, 3 miles West of Edgewood on Old Highway 66. 800-832-0603. Visit www.sandiatrailer.com CASE 621B FRONT END LOADER, BIG Bucket, 5.9 L Cummings Turbo engine, very good condition, ready to work, $31,000. Also: Gradall 9K Telehandler (Extended Lift Forks), JD 4045 engine, used daily, Foam Filled tires, 6 foot Rack, very good condition, $30,000. 575-430-1010. IRRIGATION PIPE-6”, 8” & 10” PVC and Aluminum with new gates and gaskets. Bonnets, alfalfa valves, T’s, elbows, plugs & butterfly valves available. 1/2 price of new and delivery available. Call or text Sierra at 575-770-8441.

Livestock Round-Up MOUNTAIN TOP GOATS. BABIES ARE ON the ground. We have Milkers, Bucks, Babies, Pets, Cabrito and Weed Eaters for sale. All 4-H and Show Quality. Nubians, Mini-Nubians, LaManchas, Mini-LaManchas and Nigerian Dwarfs. In Capitan, call 575-354-2846. MINIATURE HORSES FOR SALE. CALL 228-265-0632.

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ALPACA HERD REDUCTION! WE ARE MOVING and need to place some of our show, breeding, and fiber quality alpacas into new homes. Prices start at $500 per animal. Packages are available and very reasonable! Call or text Vivian at 575-430-4882. NOT ALL WATER TANKS ARE CREATED Equal! Is Quality, Value and Longevity important to you? Buy High Specific Gravity, Heavy Weight, Long Warranty, Superior Black NRCS tanks. Lowest prices only provide minimum standards, lower weights, and shorter warranties. Find out more! 575-430-1010. NEW MEXICO DRINKING WATER STORAGE TANKS, Heavy Duty Black Poly. Fittings customized to your needs NRCS and EQUIP approved. High Specific Gravity, Heavy Weight, Long Warranty, Algae Resistant, Black NRCS Water Tanks. Call 1-800-603-8272 or 575-682-2308. MINIATURE HORSES FOR SALE. MARES, STUD and Foals. Call 228-265-0632. YAK HERD DISPERSAL. 21 COWS, 9 calves (on the ground), 6 yearlings, 5 bulls. Call 575-377-7007. CUSTOM CUT QUARTER/HALF/WHOLE BEEF. PLACE YOUR order now for our Fall Beef Round-Up. Locally raised grass-fed and grass-finished beef, dry-aged 3 weeks, no antibiotics, growth-hormones or other junk. Free deliveries to Edgewood, Las Vegas, Alamogordo, Santa Fe or pick up at Fort Sumner. $8.00-$8.50/lb of meat you receive. Includes everything; butchering, dryaging, cutting/packaging, delivery! Choose cut sheet and order on leannaturalbeef.com/custom-cut-beef, call Mimi “the beef lady” at 575-403-6904, JX Ranch Natural Beef, Tucumcari.

Odds & Ends HEADSTONES (I.E. CEMETERY MONUMENTS) IS OUR BUSINESS. Over 1,000 designs. An eternal memory of a loved one. TAOS MOUNTAIN HERITAGE. Call 575-770-2507 or email: taos_mt_heritage@msn.com Website: www.taosmountainheritage.com HOWDY! PECOS PABLO. “INTRODUCING MIRACLE MARY!” Capulin jelly, jams and raw mountain wildflower honey. Search: White Ford Bronco and American flag in Glorieta Exit 299, Santa Fe or 505603-2310, pecospablo@hotmail.com FOR SALE OR TRADE: 1987 HIDEWAY-OVER the cab camper, 8-1/2 feet, used less than a dozen times, very clean. One owner. Garaged. Call 575-485-2591.

LEATHER BUSINESS-MANY STAMPS, TOOLS, LEATHER, TABLE, dyes, too much to list. No leather machine. $2,500 or best offer. Call 928-899-1131, Prescott area. KENMORE ELECTRIC DRYER: MODEL 69522, WHITE, 7.0 cubic feet, smart dry technology wrinkle guard temperature control, 4 drying temperatures. $100. Full size bunk beds and mattress: 2x4, 2x6 knotty pine frame. $500. Call 817-8320608. Alto, NM. COFFINS, CASKETS & URNS. Individually handcrafted of solid wood. Simple. Natural. Unique. Quality Craftsmanship. 505-286-9410 or www.theoldpinebox.com for FREE funeral information. Proudly serving New Mexico since 2004.

Roof Over Your Head TORREON, NEW MEXICO. 30 MILES TO I-40. Mobile home, 14x70, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, carport. All utilities on 3 lots. $6,500 down, Real Estate contract for $27,000. 5% interest, 7 year contract. Hunting, fishing, hiking. Call 1-505-705-5239. LIVESTOCK FARM, 7-1/4 ACRES OF VALLEY land along the Rio Grande River, south of Las Cruces, NM. Mobile home, irrigation well, carport, 15 large metal pens with working alley and hay barn. 6 foot V-mesh fence around property. Refrigerated air and natural gas. Price reduced to $195,000. Call 575-434-2221. TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES NEAR ELEPHANT BUTTE Lake. Furnished Mobile Home in gated community. Asking price is $6,000. A great buy to own or rent out. The gated location has a $150 a month rental fee. Other cost would be propane and electric. Insurance is also required. Water and trash disposal is free. Located ten minutes from Marina del Sol at Elephant Butte Lake. Covered carport for the fishing boat, truck, etc. Contact: 505-615-6668. HILLSBORO HOME FOR SALE BY OWNER or Lease. Beautifully, completely renovated, 3 bedroom 2 bath secluded home, 1,700 square feet, custom cabinets, abundant wildlife, walking distance from downtown Hillsboro on 1.92+ acres. $269,000/$700 month. Owner financing. Call 575-895-5154. OMG! FIVE ISOLATED ACRES IN MCINTOSH with low monthly payments and only $500 down. Property has a magnificent view of the Manzano mountains. Stop paying rent and own your own land. Phone line already installed. You better hurry! nmlandgrant@yahoo.com or 701-265-4799.


YOUR ONE STOP SHOP FOR: WATER WELL • WINDMILL SOLAR • ELECTRICAL

CONCHAS, 000 BOAT DOCK DRIVE. VACANT land just over 1/2 acre. Water access at high mark. $49,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575456-2000. Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, www.bigmesarealty.com or 575-760-5461. CONCHAS, 0000 BOAT DOCK DRIVE. VACANT land just over 1/2 acre. Water access at high mark. $49,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461 or www.bigmesarealty.com CONCHAS, TBD BIG MESA AVENUE. IMPROVED high level waterfront lot with septic on .83 acres. $98,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575456-2000. Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, www.bigmesarealty.com or 575-760-5461. WEST OF CONCHAS/GARITA, 134 PAISANO. 1 bedroom, 1 bath home with 1 bath guesthouse. Just over 7 acres. $34,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575-7605461. www.bigmesarealty.com FENCE LAKE, 295 PINE HILL ROAD. 2 bedroom, 3 bath log home on just over 60 acres, well, outbuildings, corrals, hunting opportunities. $350,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

Installations • Repairs and Supplies Call Today for Freedom with SERVICES (COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL • RESIDENTIAL) STAND ALONE SOLAR SYSTEMS (575) 895-3306 3 9th St., Hillsboro, NM 88042

• New Construction and Remodel for Solar, General Electrical, Water Well and Windmill Systems • Customized Stand Alone Solar Designs for both Water Systems and Electrical Systems • Supply, Test and Service Water Pump Systems • Maintenance and Repair • Water Purification Systems • Parking Lot Lighting nmwatersupplyinc @ gmail . com

that PRODUCE and STORE ELECTRICITY.

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SAN ANTONIO, NM, ZANJA ROAD. 4.66 acres irrigated farmland in Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District. Has produced alfalfa and grass hay crops. Utilities nearby. $75,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com SOUTH OF CLOVIS, 4205 SOUTH PRINCE (533 US 70). Commercial potential on former irrigated farm land. Corrals, 3 phase power. $300,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575456-2000. Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, www.bigmesarealty.com or 575-760-5461. WEST OF DATIL, 458 SOUTHERN TRAIL, Sugarloaf Mountain Subdivision. Home, outbuildings and well on 5.82 acres. Beautiful views. $105,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com GRADY, 300 MARSHALL. 3 BEDROOM, 2 bath two-story home, corrals and outbuildings, Village water. $59,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575-760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com

Stocking BCS Dealers in NM: Albuquerque Power Equipment 8996 4th St. NW Albuquerque, NM 87114 (505) 897-9002 Acosta Equipment 155 NW Frontage Rd. San Acacia, NM 87831 (575) 835-3961 Sante Fe Power Equipment 1364 Jorgensen Ln. Sante Fe, NM 87507 (505) 471-8620 Sale prices valid June 1 - August 31, 2018

LAKE ARTHUR, NM: 458 FENCED ACRES. Located NW corner of Anita and Wichita Roads. No utilities. Electric available on South end. $229,000. Call Kris, 575-703-9355.

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ONLY $85,000

10 Beautiful Acres outside of Las Vegas, NM. 10 of the prettiest acres you will ever see! Incredible views to the top of the Sangre De Cristo Mountains. Private location behind a secure, automated, community gate with the Santa Fe NF approx. 1/2 mile down the road. Water & electric in place with at least two possible building sites. Completely fenced. Cannot be seen from the main road. A VERY private setting! A combination of pines, cottonwoods, cedars, and pastures. Renowned hunting & fishing! Morphy & Storrie Lakes, Gallinas, Tecolote, & Peco’s rivers for incredible trout fishing. Las Vegas, NM is the same area that the “Longmire” series shoots on location with Walt Longmire’s “office” in the downtown square. MANY other movies were filmed here. Home of the “Harvey Girls” Hotel/Railroad line, Plaza Hotel/Ilfield Dept. Store, La Castaneda Hotel, New Mexico Highlands University, Montezuma Castle nearby. Actual property is very close to Patrick Swayze’s 7,000 acre ranch, Hermit’s Peak, & Camp Blue Haven. 60 minutes to Santa Fe. You will not be disappointed! Asking $85,000. Make offer. Call 505-850-5557.

​Summer Special Ad Blow-Out!

TULAROSA, 509 RIATA ROAD. 4 BEDROOM, 2 bath log home on 70 acres with office room and detached garage. 13 acres have pistachio orchard, barn. $640,000. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575-7605461. www.bigmesarealty.com WANTED! FARMS AND RANCHES. LET US list and sell your rural property today. Broker has over 40 years of experience in production agriculture and is a farm owner. Big Mesa Realty, 575-456-2000. Paul Stout, Broker, NMREL 17843, 575760-5461. www.bigmesarealty.com CABALLO LAND FOR SALE, 7/8 ACRE. Metal boat shed, 12x44 mobile home, well with submersible pump, septic tank, 2 propane tanks, storage shed, extra camp trailer. $64,500. #12 Palo Road. Call 575-437-1810 or 575-921-1478. TRI-COUNTY REAL ESTATE: 38 ACRES, WINDMILL, tank, utilities, views, trees, $45,000. 40 acres, Criswell Ranch, secluded, $16,000. 160 acres, views, trees, secluded, fenced on 2 sides, $200,000. 40 acres, SH36 Frontage, utilities, $30,000. 12 acres, Rancho Alegres, thick trees, private, $18,000. Call Gregg Fix, Qualifying Broker, 575838-6018 or go to landsofamerica.com/ member/12695 LOT #14 IN SAGEBRUSH, LA LUZ, NM on Alamo Street. All underground utilities at property line on paved road (electric, gas, water, TV, phone), .960 acres totally enclosed with 7’ cedar pole privacy fence. Los is on cul-de-sac. $59,500. Call 575-430-4192.

It’s summertime and we're celebrating by offering you a special ad deal. You get a 1/6 page-sized ( 2.33" x 5.20") ad with full-color for only $118! That's right, only $118! (No other discounts apply)

August issue deadline: July 9 September issue deadline: August July 9 For more details, contact Susan by email at enchantment@nmelectric.coop or call 505-982-4671

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NEW CLASSIFIED SECTION COMING SOON! An updated classified section is coming your way in the next few months. You spoke and we listened. • It will be easier to categorize your items since there will only be six categories. • You can already visit the enchantment website at www.enchantment.coop and send in your ad. We will then call you with a price. • You can already pay your ad with a credit card immediately over the phone. (There is a 5% processing fee.) Questions? Call Mary Margaret at 505-982-4671. Or, email enchantment@nmelectric.coop Thank you for advertising in enchantment.

enchantment.coop

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER. #44 Loma Linda Ranch Road, Vadito, NM 87579. Near Angostura-Tres Ritos, NM, State Road #518. Two bedroom, 1 bath, living and kitchen area. 2-car garage and running well. Adjacent lot included. Beautiful scenic view, 8 miles from Sipapu. $110,000. Call for details, 817-455-0160. 4-1/2 ACRES FOR SALE IN MEDANALES. $25,000. Call 505-685-0063 for more information. LOOKING FOR WATER? GIFTED TO FIND underground streams. Reputable dowser with 50+ years experience. To God Be Thy Glory! Contact Joe Graves at 575-7583600. In Taos, 75 miles north of Santa Fe. God Bless You! SOCORRO: CHOICE OF 2, 5-6 ACRE irrigated organic farms with homes. Located in city limits with direct access to Rio Grande. Mountain views, all water rights, mature fruit trees. New 30 million dollar levy with miles of trails and parks. Call for pictures or details. $190,000 OBO. Owner, 505-550-3123. FOR SALE: 2-STORY HOME. 3 BEDROOM, 2 baths out of Mayhill, NM toward Cloudcroft. Address is #2 South Avenue, Mayhill, NM. Top and bottom covered deck. The backyard joins the National forest. Possible owner finance with substantial down payment. Call Peggy, 575-390-9948. TORRANCE COUNTY FARM LAND, 160 ACRES including 122 acres of deeded water rights for sale. Located near Old 66 and Lexco Road. Barn with pipe lots, separate barn with lot and hay barn. $900,000. Contact Beth for more information. 505-228-3880. FISHING? BUY A CAMPSITE OR HOME south side of Bluewater Lake, 1/2 acre in trees, view of lake, water, septic, electric, $12,000. 1 acre, all utilities, $16,000. 1/2 acre, $8,000. 2 acres, small house, all utilities, $42,000. 4 bedroom, 3 bath, fully furnished, all utilities, $80,000. Call David at 505-228-8439. WATER DOWSING AND CONSULTING. PROVEN SUCCESS, 42 years experience in Lincoln County. Will travel. Contact Elliot Topper at 575-354-2984 or 575-937-2722.

Things That Go Vroom! 1946 3/4 TON FLAT-BED PICKUP. BODY in good condition with no dings, dents. With minimal surface rust. Window glass original but rear window is cracked. Straight six cylinder. Last ran in 1988. For details call 575-743-0091.

2005 WINNEBAGO ADVENTURER M-35A CLASS A motor home. 46,000 miles, 131 hours on generator. Full body paint on all fiberglass. Basement A/C, three slides, Michelin tires. Workhorse chasis 8.1 Chevy gas engine. Allison transmission. $57,500. Call 575-430-4192.

Vintage Finds RAILROAD ITEMS WANTED: KEROSENE LANTERNS, BRASS locks, keys, badges, uniforms, bells, whistles, and pre-1950 employee timetables. Always seeking items from any early New Mexico railroad, especially D&RG, C&S, EP&NE, EP&SW, AT&SF, SP or Rock Island. Call Randy Dunson at 575-356-6919 or 575-760-3341. WANTED: NEW MEXICO MOTORCYCLE LICENSE PLATES 1912-1959. Paying $100-$500 each. Also buying some New Mexico car plates 1900-1923. WANTED: New Mexico Highway Journal magazine, 1923-1927, New Mexico Automobile License Directory (”The Zia Book”), Motor Vehicle Register books, 1900-1949. See the New Mexico Transportation History Project website NMplates.com for 2,500+ color photographs and 100+ year history of New Mexico license plates. Bill Johnston, Box 1, Organ, NM 88052-0001. Email: Bill@NMplates.com or telephone 575-382-7804. THANK YOU FOR ADVERTISING in enchantment! FOR SALE OR TRADE: 1973 CHEVY Impala Station Wagon, 400 motor, like new, always garaged. Collector quality. 132,000 miles. One owner. Call 575-485-2591. BUYING OLD STUFF: GAS PUMPS AND parts 1960’s or earlier, advertising signs, neon clocks, old car parts in original boxes, motor oil cans, license plate collections, Route 66 items, old metal road signs, odd and weird stuff. Fair prices paid. Have pickup, will travel. Gas Guy in Embudo, 505-852-2995.

When Opportunity Knocks LOVE TO TRAVEL? JOIN US ON a Pacific Wine Country fundraising cruise for Not Forgotten Outreach Veterans Programs in Taos. You get a fun Vacation, they get the benefits! Book now, limited availability. 575-587-2087, sleslie@dreamvacations.com or www.membercruises.com/notforgottenoutreach-taos


Four-Wheel Fun! We've got our helmets on and we're ready to have some FourWheel Fun! Awesome Job Youth Artists! For August, draw either The Tin Man from the Wizard of Oz or R2-D2 from Star Wars. One of your fellow Youth Artists suggested drawings of a unicorn, a dragon, a sea monster, or a flying dog. So for September, put on your wings and send your drawings of Whimsical Winged Creatures. Keep sending us your suggestions.

Send Your Drawing by Email: We accept Youth Art drawings by email. Send jpg file and required information by the 9th to: enchantment@nmelectric.coop Remember: Print your name, age, mailing address, phone number, and co-op name on your drawings. Otherwise, your drawings are disqualified. Remember: color, dark ink or pencil on plain white 8.50 x 11.00 size paper is best. Accept artwork up to age 13. Mail to: Youth Editor, 614 Don Gaspar Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 87505. Entries must be here by the 9th of the month before publication. Each published artist receives $10 for his or her work.

Marilyn Moreno-Cortes, Age 10, Logan

Santiago Gallegos, Age 10, Ribera

Jaryn Bruce, Age 13, Melrose

Brooklynn Keene, Age 8, San Fidel

Jahkeem Graham, Age 12, Moriarty

Ava Mata, Age 10, Anton Chico

Jeryko Morain, Age 10, Moriarty

Kendrick Martin, Age 10, Grady

Della Wickline, Age 8, Sandia Park

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2018 July enchantment  

Feature story: Toe-Tapping Tunes at the Weed Bluegrass Festival

2018 July enchantment  

Feature story: Toe-Tapping Tunes at the Weed Bluegrass Festival