Page 1


1 COSMETICS CASE IN THE FORM OF A SHELL

4

2 AXE DECORATED WITH A FIGURE OF A GODDESS

11

3 YOUNG DIONYSOS WITH PANTHERESS

15

4 STATUETTE OF AMUN 20 5 STATUETTE OF A SEATED IBEX

24

6 LINEN SQUARE OF TA-NEDJEM 28 7 POMPEIIAN TABLE WITH WOLVES

32

8 MASK OF A DEITY

38

9 USHABTI WITH THE NAME OF IMEN-NEB-NEHEH

43

10 BLACK FIGURE KYLIX ATTRIBUTED TO THE HUNT PAINTER 47 11 STATUETTE OF DEDU-AMUN

50

12 STELE WITH A MAN AND BOY

55

13 MALE PORTRAIT (A PRIEST OR THE EMPEROR GORDIAN II)

60

14 CAMEO WITH MINERVA / ATHENA

64

15 RED FIGURE DINOS ATTRIBUTED TO THE PAINTER OF LOUVRE MNB 1148

68

16 ABSTRACT “IDOL” WITH VERTICAL EYES

73

17 FAYUM MUMMY PORTRAIT

77

18 Black Figure Amphora ATTRIBUTED TO THE LYSIPPIDES PAINTER

81

French texts

85

PHOENIX ancient Art SA – 2016 / 33 3


1

COSMETICS CASE IN THE FORM OF A SHELL Graeco-Roman, late Hellenistic – early Roman, 2nd century B.C. – 1st century A.D. Banded agate and gold D: 10.6 cm This cosmetics case of agate belongs to the category of ancient luxuria, and as such is included among a small number extremely rare works that form a distinctive group of magnificently designed objects. The beauty of this unusually striated natural stone was enhanced by a highly skilled ancient lapidary who carved it into the form of a scallop shell. Shells of various kinds already received great attention in the Mycenaean period when they were depicted on vases, and small gold pendants in the form of shells were used for earrings and necklaces. Since that time, objects and images in the form of shells were ubiquitous in Greek and Roman decorative art. During the Greek Classical period small, shell-shaped terracotta vessels served as containers for perfumed oil or ointment, and in the Roman world marble sculptures of nymphs holding shells became popular for the decoration of fountains. Very few rock crystal, glass or silver shells have survived, and this intact shell of agate is even rarer and absolutely unique. Its shape accurately depicts the shell of Pecten jacobaeus – the Mediterranean scallop shell. Following the designs of nature, this manmade agate shell actually consists of two shells: the convex lower shell, which allows the animal to rest securely on the seabed, and the flatter upper shell. These fan-like shells terminate and are joined at a centrally located umbone or beak, with “ears” or “auricles” extending out on both sides. In a living organism, the shell exhibits growth rings radiating from the umbone, while ribs fanning out from the center serve to strengthen to the shells’ structure. Vessels and containers in the form of shells constitute a special group and they vary greatly in their utilitarian use and materials employed for their execution: gold, silver, bronze, terracotta, glass, marble, as well as semi-precious stones like rock crystal and agate. In the Mediterranean

4

33885

world agate was a popular stone since the Minoan period. Theophrastus (On Stones V 31) mentions that the name of the stone is derived from the river Achates in Sicily where it was first found, and that it is sold at a high price. It is assumed that workshops in Antioch and especially in Alexandria manufactured most of the agate vessels in the Hellenistic and Roman period. Egypt did not have its own agate mines, so unworked pieces of the stone were brought mainly from India. Agate vessels of various shapes were esteemed by members of the ruling houses, priests, and wealthy international clientele. Objects made of agate were part of highly important temple dedications, and specific jugs and ladles of this stone were used during religious ceremonies to make libations. Drinking vessels such as cups, bowls, goblets, skyphoi, and kantharoi made up part of the most prestigious table services and often served as diplomatic gifts. Pliny (Natural History 37.54) reports on many varieties of agate, and comments that while agate was previously of great value, it was inexpensive during his time. This probably should not be taken for granted as Seneca, his contemporary, includes gemstone cups in the “trophies of Luxury” and complains about the wealthy Romans’ excessive extravagance in their use: “for luxury would be too cheap if men did not drink to one another out of hollow gems the wine to be afterwards thrown up again” (On Benefits VII 9). Shell-shaped bowls of silver and bronze found at Pompeii and other sites in the region of Vesuvius were used as serving dishes and as baking molds. Similarly shaped objects could be used at a woman’s toilet as a scoop for pouring water. Among the most desirable items that a woman might possess would be a shell-shaped cosmetics case with a lid made of rock crystal, or of banded agate like the scallop shell form under consideration. This particular type of shell is significant as it is associated with the sea-born Aphrodite. The Hermitage Museum’s plastic


” Very few rock crystal, glass or silver shells have survived, and this intact shell of agate is even rarer and absolutely unique.”

vase, dated to the 4th century B.C., takes the form of Aphrodite emerging from the shells on which she floated ashore [fig. 1]. As an allegorical concept, Aphrodite’s shell could be understood as container of her lustrous beauty. It is not unusual that a real shell with attached silver fixtures or a case designed in the form of this bivalve shell were destined for use by women, who could then associate themselves with the ultimate beauty of this goddess.

and irregular milky-white, grey, and brown veins of agate correspond to the form of this shell as found in nature. The entire surface is finely smoothed by polishing, which demonstrates the high skill of the craftsman. Such subtle polishing works well as decorative effect and increases the pleasant tactile impression when the piece is handled – but it does not distract from the shell’s naturalistic appearance, which was likely the artist’s intention.

In this agate cosmetics case the two shells are joined by means of a small gold rod passing through the carved hinges at the edge of the beak and “ears.” Such a fixture is typical for silver shells of the Hellenistic period [fig. 2, Antikensammlung, Berlin; fig. 3, Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Taranto]. Remains of red, blue, and white pigments in one of such boxes confirm that they were used as cosmetics cases. The ends of the gold rod terminate with small roundels whose edges are encircled by small gold beads. A hole in the middle of the edge of the flatter shell (the lid of the container) probably served as the place of attachment for a small handle (a gold stud). The precisely carved ribs

By the time of Augustus many artisans specializing in the carving of rare or semi-precious stone had settled in Rome, where they met the growing number of important commissions for such luxurious works. Jewelry made of agate was highly valued by the ruling aristocracy. Polished agate stones set in gold and agate beads were used for necklaces. Most of the surviving vessels of agate are small containers, like perfume bottles, cups and bowls. In the world of ancient Rome such objects were greatly admired for their beauty and sophisticated modeling. Such admiration of natural beauty persists in our own time, as this magnificent, beautiful shell of agate demonstrates. 7


CONDITION Excellent condition and primarily intact; the shell is well-preserved and retains its original, ancient polished surface; some very small chips at the edges and on the loop in the middle of the convex shell; some cracks and part of the edge of the convex shell were reattached with glue, a hole on the side of the same shell. PROVENANCE Formerly, Me P. Sciclounoff collection, acquired in the 1960s; Ex- Dr. L. collection, Switzerland, since 1975. BIBLIOGRAPHY BALL S. H., A Roman Book on Precious Stones, Los Angeles, 1950. BÜHLER H.-P., Antike Gefässe aus Edelsteinen, Mainz/Rhine, 1973. DE JULIIS E. M. et al., Gli Ori di Taranto in Età Ellenistica, Milano, 1984, pp. 58-62 no. 8 ; 355-356 no. 318; 374 no. 7. GASPARRI C., Vasi antichi in pietra dura a Firenze e a Roma, in Prospettiva 19, 1979, pp. 4-13. LAPATIN K., Luxus: The Sumptuous Arts of Greece and Rome, Los Angeles, 2015, p. 125. Rediscovering Pompeii, exhibition catalogue, Roma, 1990, pp. 188-191, nos. 86, 88. PLATZ-HORSTER G., NIEMEYER B., REICHE I., Der Silberfund von Paternò in der Antikensammlung Berlin, in Jahrbuch des Deutsches Archäologisches Instituts 118, 2003, pp. 208-210, pl. 3-6. WALTERS H. B., Catalogue of the Engraved Gems and Cameos, Greek, Etruscan and Roman in the British Museum, London, 1926, p. 372, nos. 3979-3983.

fig. 1 Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg

8

fig. 2 Antikensammlung, Berlin

fig. 3 Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Taranto


2

AXE DECORATED WITH A FIGURE OF A GODDESS Canaanite, 18th – 13th century B.C. Bronze H: 13.7 cm The design of the axe, although without an immediate analogy, fits in the artistic milieu of the vast geographical and multicultural area of ancient Anatolia and Levant. The axe’s narrow shape is typical for the kind of the socket axe, the elaborate decoration transforms the piece in a unique art object. The oval aperture on each side of the shaft is framed by a deep groove with the sharp ridges, the shallow groves follow the curving line of the flared blade. A tall figure cast in spectacular relief occupies the entire operative part of the axe, the head is placed at the shaft area and the feet are at the bottom of the blade; such a design makes the object rather impractical – although the blade is sharp, it was not probably a tool nor a weapon, but a ceremonial axe. The female figure of a goddess is most probably Astarte and is represented as standing frontally except for the feet, which are turned right on one side, and left on another side. She is depicted with great attention to details. She wears not too long hair arranged with the rolled edges at the level of her cheeks, short incision lines depict the individual hairs; one can also recognize the triangular lines showing the ray-like parts of a diadem at the front of the hair. The cavities of her large, wide-open eyes were probably inlaid in antiquity; if this is correct, such a decorative feature would also place the item in the category of the ritual object. The long and wide eyebrows meeting at the nasal bridge are modeled with short and thin incision lines which accentuate almost unnaturally large eyes. The round face has a small, pointed chin (the line in the middle suggests the dimpled shape); the vertical composition is stressed by a long, prominent nose. The neck is thin and long, it connects the large

30611

head with the delicately shaped, rounded shoulders. There is a tiny depression at the bottom of the neck, it is not clear if this is a collarbone depression or a circular pendant connected to the necklace indicated by two horizontal and diagonal lines. The facial features (especially the large inlayed eyes) and the body proportions find parallels among the images in the Canaanite and Syro-Hittite art. The arms are bent and pressed against the chest in a particular gesture when the hands support the small, ball-shaped breasts. Two short lines at the wrists mark the bracelets. The figure is semi-nude, and there is a contrast of soft volumes of the naked parts (shoulders, arms, and chest) and the stiff form of the long triangular skirt, a kind of a kilt, with overlapping side marked by multiple diagonal incision lines and with a double row of the hem (or fringes) similarly incised. There is little doubt that the figure represents a goddess related to the cult of fertility. The iconography can be traced back to the Early Bronze Age (late 3rd millennium B.C.). A great number of figurines made of silver and gold, bronze, lead, clay, and even ivory, found in different areas of the Near East, represent the nude female enface, with her hands clasping her breasts, with prominently shown pubic area, and long neck with necklaces; sometimes the figure is half-clad. Similar images appear on the Near Eastern seals and relief plaques. Their style can be different and based on the aesthetic preferences of a local artist’s workshop. The identity of the goddess also varies, it was associated with the mother goddess, birth goddess or goddess of sexual love.

11


CONDITION

In a good condition; some traces of green oxides on surface; beautiful reddish brown-colored patina. PROVENANCE

Formerly, American private collection, New York, acquired in 1990.  BIBLIOGRAPHY AKURGAL E., The Art of the Hittites, New York, 1962, pl. 35. ARUZ J. (ed.), Art of the First Cities. The Third Millennium B.C. from the Mediterranean to the Indus. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New Haven, London, 2003, p. 164, no. 107a, b; p. 279, no. 181. BLACK J., GREEN A., Gods, Demons and Symbols of Ancient Mesopotamia; An Illustrated Dictionary, Austin, 2000, p. 144. COLLON D., First Impressions: Cylinder Seals in the Ancient Near East, London, 1987, p. 46, no. 165; p. 166, no. 775. HARPER P. O., ARUZ J., TALLON F., The Royal City of Susa: Ancient Near Eastern Treasures from the Louvre, New York, 1992, pp. 189-193, nos. 127-131. MUSCARELLA O. W., Bronze and Iron: Ancient Near Eastern Artifacts in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1998, pp. 412-413, no. 567. NEGBI O., Canaanite Gods in Metal; An Archaeological Study of Ancient Syro-Palestinian Figurines, Tel Aviv, 1976, pp. 67-74, pl. 40-43. TOLSTIKOV V., TREISTER M., The Gold of Troy: Searching for Homer’s Fabled City, New York, 1996, p. 194, no. 258. 12


3

YOUNG DIONYSOS WITH PANTHERESS Greek, Hellenistic (Pergamene style), second half of the 2nd century B.C. Marble H: 80 cm This marble group is a remarkable example of Greek sculpture of the Late Hellenistic period, superb in workmanship and style. It presents the sculptural motif of which knowledge is mostly based on either small items (clay or bronze appliques and statuettes) of the 4th century B.C. or later Roman representations in larger scale (marble statues or sarcophagi panels). The design and the execution in marble relates to the Pergamene style; the dynamic poses and the pictorial effects achieved by the vigorous carving technique are its main characteristic features. The representation belongs to the statuary type called “The Resting Dionysos�. Smaller than life size, it represents the young god of wine and patron of theatre, Dionysos, with the pantheress, his animal companion. The analogous surviving sculptures in the round and reliefs help to reconstruct the entire composition and the mythological story involved in the depiction. Although the figure appears motionless, the pose captures a pause in the continuing movement and interaction with the other figures. This interaction could be virtual if this sculpture was designed as a single piece, or it could be actual if the marble figure was part of a multi-figured sculptural group. As a single piece of sculpture, the figure of Dionysos in the frontal composition represents his divine solemn stance, a self-manifestation: a figure in a relaxed posture, completely opened to the viewer. This pose is expressed by the body leaning on the support (a tree trunk, partially hidden by the drapery) on the side allowing the left foot to rest on the back of the pantheress in a casual way, without any heavy pressure on it. Such a motif is naturalistic, and it transforms the image of the god from the transcendental to the realm of a human being (this is an impor-

30379

tant issue of Hellenistic art). The nonchalant moment continues with the gesture of the right arm raised above the shoulder and the hand placed on the crown of the head - the level of the preserved shoulder indicates this particular composition, also seen in the replicas. The left hand, most probably, held the drinking cup, a kantharos, which is tilted so that the wine is pouring out. The imagined drops of wine spill from its rim and reach the open mouth of the recumbent animal whose head is raised as if awaiting for more of the divine liquid (the inebriation of the animal makes sense in the context of the Dionysian power; the scene is also symbolic and refers to the god who presides over fertility; the developed and full teats of the animal, with no cubs nearby, are also evident marks of such symbolism). This story-telling motif indicates that both the figures of Dionysos and a pantheress in the present piece are an iconographical extraction from the even larger depiction of the Dionysiac procession known mainly from the later sarcophagi panels of the Roman Imperial period, with its major episodes: the triumphal procession of Dionysos, his appearance on Naxos and finding Ariadne. The festive band of the god, thiasos, consisting of the dancing satyrs and maenads, with musical instruments and drinking vessels, Pan, Silenos, Hermaphrodite, Erotes, centaurs, the exotic animals (elephant, panther, lion), and the god in the middle of the cheerful crowd, proceed in an inspired and ever-lasting mood of joy. The god of wine is inebriated himself and seeks support, usually a satyr standing nearby and helping him to keep his balance. In our piece the neighboring figure is substituted by a tree trunk completely covered from the front by the cascading folds of the long mantle and partially seen from the side.

15


The gesture formed by Dionysos’ right arm and the hand resting on the crown of his head is worth noting; it has been suggested, this represents drunkenness, while ecstasy could be a better explanation. The figure of the god is semidraped; he wears sandals with a thick sole and an overhanging tongue at the front (this type of sandal is called the lingula). The ample himation wraps the lower part of the body. Characteristically, the fabric line drops low, leaving the genitalia seen; such an arrangement is also employed in the statues of Apollo, and significantly, the statues of Hermaphrodite. In such statues the solemnity of the divine presentation is mixed with the eroticism of the appearance of the human body. It can also be observed that the eroticism of the present image of Dionysos is ambiguous, and the soft shapes and proportions of the body – narrow shoulders, a rather short torso, the high and pronounced hip – all refer to a female body. Although the features described may indicate a very youthful male, the effemi16

nate look of both Apollo and Dionysos became characteristic for their images in the Hellenistic period. The back of the present statue is flattened and treated more schematically. Combined with a very slim and narrow base, this could be a specific shaping of the marble sculpture destined for a setting in a limited space such as a niche of a fountain house or the pediment of a small shrine. The composition of the architectural structure would require a more elaborate program for its sculptural decoration: the central figure (Dionysos) and additional lateral figures (satyrs and maenads, Pan and Ariadne). This indicates that at a certain point of the motif’s evolution in Late Hellenistic period the single part (consisting of Dionysos leaning on a support or a figure of a satyr) was then expanded to a group of figures representing episodes from the myth such as the Triumph of Dionysos or the Finding of Ariadne on Naxos.


fig. 1

fig. 2

CONDITION The present figure with its alien or restored head still attached is recorded in the publications of the early 20th century [figs. 1-2]. The sculpture’s surface is overall very well preserved. There are signs showing repair already in antiquity (and thus the continuous veneration of statue): the broken areas around the right shoulder and the left arm have remains of the canals drilled to accommodate the iron pins used to fix the parts, they have the same weathering as the rest of the statue’s surface. There is a fracture along the shoulder of the left and damaged areas painted over on the upper side of the back; evidence of old restoration in the folds at the back of the statue. PROVENANCE Formerly, Gioacchino Ferroni private collection, Rome, prior to 1909; Jandolo et Tavazzi – Galerie Sangiogi, Rome, April 14th – 22nd 1909; Galerie Helbing, Munich, June 27th – 28th, 1910; Anonymous sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, March 13th, 1911; Ex- Georges Joseph Demotte private collection (1877-1923), Paris, 1919; Ex- Dr. Bres, Villa Fontevieille private collection, Grasse, prior to 1953; Ex- French private collection. PUBLISHED Jandolo et Tavazzi – Galerie Sangiogi, Catalogue of the sale after the death of Mr. Joachim Ferroni, April 14th- 22nd, 1909, no. 278, pl. LIV [fig. 1]; Galerie Helbing, Munich, Griechische Ausgrabungen, June 27th – 28th, 1910, no. 519,pl. 12; Hôtel Drouot, Paris, March 13th, 1911, pl. 3; REINACH S., Répertoire de la statuaire grecque et romaine IV, 2 ed., Paris, 1913, p. 63, no. 6 [fig. 2]; REINACH S., Répertoire de la statuaire grecque et romaine V, Paris, 1924, p. 45, no. 7 and p. 46, no. 8. BIBLIOGRAPHY Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae 3, Zürich, München, 1986, s.v. Dionysos, p. 436, nos. 126-127; s.v. Dionysos (in peripheria orientali), p. 522, no. 82; s.v. Dionysos-Bacchus, pp. 554-555, nos. 184-192. POCHMARSKI E., Dionysische Gruppen: Eine typologische Untersuchung zur Geschichte der Stützmotivs, Wien, 1990. POLLITT J. J., Art in the Hellenistic Age, Cambridge, New York, New Rochelle, Melbourne, Sydney, 1986, pp. 102-104. SMITH R. R. R., Hellenistic Sculpture, New York, 1991, pp. 156; 160-161. WILLERS D., Typus und Motiv: Aus der hellenistischen Entwicklungsgeschichte einer Zweifigurengruppe, in Antike Kunst 29 (2), 1986, pp. 137-150. 18


4

STATUETTE OF AMUN Egyptian, 3rd Intermediate Period (ca. 1069 – 664 B.C.) Bronze and gold H: 21.5 cm This solid bronze statuette was cast in the lost wax process. It represents a man standing upright on a small rectangular, thin base. The figure was attached to its original support by two tenons. The feathers were made separately and then inserted into the deep groove carved on top of the headdress. The details of the feathers and of the face are embellished by gold-leaf inlays. Cold-worked incisions skillfully detail the decoration of the loincloth, of the belt, of the rich necklace, of the facial features and of the toes. This statuette is remarkable both for its state of preservation and for its outstanding artistic qualities. The proportions of the figure are rather slender and slim, though the muscles of the legs and torso are athletic and welldeveloped. The man is an adult male in the prime of life. He is represented in a strictly frontal and frozen position, his left leg placed forward, in the typical typology of the effigies of the Theban god Amun. Aside from a finely striated loincloth, the man is naked. His left arm falls to his thigh, while his right arm is bent and brought back to the chest. In his clenched hands, he held attributes that are now lost (probably the was scepter, a symbol and hieroglyphic representation of Thebes, and the ankh cross, a symbol of life). The oval face is framed by a thin gold beard that descends from the ears to the chin; it then extends in a long false beard with braided incisions, attached to the sternum with a tenon. The details of the face are indicated by a fine modeling, while gold-leaf lines emphasize the eyebrows and the outline of the eyes. The god wears his customary headdress, the cylindrical crown surmounted by two ostrich feathers. The belt is adorned with zigzag lines.

20

32355

Amun was originally the local patron deity of Thebes. When the Thebans conquered the throne of Egypt, Amun became a universal god and was considered the king of the gods. His name means “the hidden one”, because nobody was supposed to see him: he was later assimilated to the sun god Ra, essential to life, under the name of Amun-Ra. Amun was presented as a demiurge, the creator of himself and of the universe, the maker of men and Egypt’s greatness. He gave birth to the four basic elements: Earth, Air, Heat and Humidity. He was therefore considered a creator and solar god, master of eternity and protector of the living: he especially protected the Pharaoh, taking his appearance (see, for instance, the statues of Tutankhamun/Amun). Mut (“the mother”) was his wife, and Khonsu (the moon god) their son. His attributes are the solar disk, the horns, the flail and the ankh symbol; he is represented with a ram's head or with a human face (sometimes provided with ram's horns, visible above the ears). CONDITION Complete and in remarkable condition, since the inlays are largely preserved and still in place. The solar disk on the feathers and the right eye are lost. Ample traces of green patina, superficial wear of the surface. PROVENANCE Formerly, Cattaui family collection, Switzerland, acquired in Cairo, prior to the 1950s and brought to Switzerland in 1956 when the family moved there. BIBLIOGRAPHY ANDREWS C.A.R., Objects for Eternity, Egyptian Antiquities from the W. Arnold Meijer Collection, Mainz/Rhine, 2006, pp. 175 ff. HILL M. (ed.), Offrandes aux dieux d’Egypte, Martigny, 2008, pp. 84 ff. SEIPEL W., Bilder für die Ewigkeit. 3000 Jahre ägyptische Kunst, Konstanz, 1983, no. 94.


” Amun became a universal god and was considered the king of the gods. His name means ‘the hidden one’, because nobody was supposed to see him.”

23


5

STATUETTE OF A SEATED IBEX Near Eastern (Proto-Elamite), ca. 3000 B.C. Silver H: 7.2 cm – L: 6.7 cm This silver sculpture can probably be identified as an ibex, as corroborated by the size and shape of the horns. The strong mountain animal is represented in a moment of rest, quietly seated with its legs folded under the body. The position of the head, which would have been directed towards the viewer, indicates that the left side of the piece was intended to be seen first. This ibex is a rare example of Proto-Elamite miniature metal sculpture. It was hammered from several sheets of silver: the figurine is composed of various elements that were made separately (body, head, horns, ears) and then soldered or inserted so as to form the animal. The statuette is entirely hollow. This outstanding ibex reflects both the remarkable technical skills of goldsmiths-craftsmen in such a remote period (between the late 4th and the early 3rd millennium B.C.), and their acute observation of nature: the animal is depicted in a very realistic way (despite its small size), a distinctive feature of this figurine that can be considered as a masterpiece of Near Eastern art. The shapes are rendered by a very nuanced and precise modeling, both on the body (natural attitude, volumes of the muscles, incised details, dotted coat, etc.) and on the head, where the realistic and delicate details are striking. Dedicated as offerings in a shrine, such figurines would have been regarded as substitutes for sacri-

24

7404

ficial animals. Alongside the real sheep, goats and bulls, their presence was probably seen as a symbolic, perpetual offering that would have pleased the deities, and highlighted the needs of the city and of its inhabitants. This object also shows a very particular detail, since the head of the animal can be removed from the body and placed back onto it as if it were a lid (the head can be inserted behind the ears into the neck, whose very smooth and well-finished edge was certainly not accidentally broken): the question therefore arises as to whether this figurine was not originally designed as a small container, rather than a statuette, perhaps to hold seeds or other offerings intended for the deity. Domesticated or wild, small herbivores were vitally important in the framework of ancient Near Eastern economy. This would explain why these animals (ibexes, goats, antelopes, sheep, etc.) are a favorite subject in the artistic production of these regions. Among the few related examples of Proto-Elamite silver sculpture, one should mention two figurines of antelopes [one is housed in the Metropolitan Museum, in New York, fig. 1; the other, made of molten silver, belonged to the L. Mildenberg collection, fig. 2], a statuette of a seated bull-man [New York, Metropolitan Museum, fig. 3] and a small ram housed in Boston [inv. 59.14, fig. 4]. All these pieces can be dated to circa 3000 B.C.


� This outstanding ibex reflects both the remarkable technical skills of goldsmiths-craftsmen in such a remote period (between the late 4th and the early 3rd millennium B.C.), and their acute observation of nature.“

CONDITION Complete and in good condition, but the inlays of the eyes and beard are now lost. Partially dotted and oxidized surface. Body partly deformed, especially in the lower part (unstable balance). PROVENANCE Formerly, English private collection, London, 1967; Ex- European private collection, Switzerland, acquired prior to 1997; imported to the US, February 10, 1998. BIBLIOGRAPHY For related examples, see: DORMAN P.F. et al., The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Egypt and the Near East, 1987, p. 129, no. 93 (Proto-Elamite bull-man). HARPER P.O. (ed.), The Royal City of Susa, New York, 1992, p. 68, no. 29 (antelope). KENDELL T., Ancient Near Eastern Art: New Gallery at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, in Minerva 10, 2, March-April 1999, p. 36, no. 2 (Elamite silver ram). KOZLOFF A.P. et al., More Animals in Ancient Art From the Leo Mildenberg Collection, Mainz/Rhine, 1983, p. 5, no. 4 (antelope). MAHBOUBIAN H., Art of Ancient Iran, Copper and Bronze, London, 1997, pp. 38-39 (Elamite bronze support).

fig. 1 The Met, New York

26

fig. 2 Ex- Mildenberg Collection

fig. 3 The Met, New York

fig. 4 MFA, Boston


6

LINEN SQUARE OF TA-NEDJEM Egyptian, New Kingdom (end of the 18th dynasty, 14th – early 13th century B.C.) Painted linen Dim.: 29 x 21 cm Now mounted in a wooden and glass frame, this square was made of linen, coated with a thin layer of white plaster and decorated with colors that remarkably retain their original brightness: black, brick red, blue, green and yellow. Below the short hieroglyphic text, written in black ink and in two columns, the artist painted a male, youthful figure: the man sits on a black seat provided with animal legs and with a high curved back. An offering table (a circular top supported by a tall foot), filled with pieces of bread, of vegetables and a piece of meat stands in front of him. A long, slightly undulated black line indicates the ground. The man is dressed in a finely pleated, kneelength loincloth; he holds a white strip in his right hand, and seems to extend his left arm towards the offerings placed on the table. His head is covered with a thick braided wig adorned with small curls that frame his forehead and topped by a perfumed ointment cone. He also wears an usekh necklace, composed of several rows of polychromatic beads. He is clearly identified by the hieroglyphic inscription that reads “offering of everything that is good and pure for the spirit of Ta-Nedjem, just of voice”. Ta-Nedjem, which means “the Gentle Country”, is not yet attested in the great book of Egyptian names at that time. These pieces of painted linen fabrics (also known as coffin shrouds) are extremely rare and belong to a body of work of which only about twenty surviving examples have been listed by K. El-Enany (among which our canvas is not included). They

28

31444

were made of the same linen cloth that was commonly used for the mummy bandages; they generally come from the village of Deir el-Medina, which used to be the craftsmen’s village (TaNedjem would have also been a artisan), in the Valley of the Kings. This site is mostly famous because the Pharaohs had chosen to build their last home there. The Sennefer canvas, now housed in the French Institute of Oriental Archaeology (inv. JE 54886), in Cairo, is the only funerary linen that was discovered in situ: it was placed on the large painted shroud surrounding the sarcophagus. According to scholars, it is possible that other panels would have been attached to the chest of the deceased, but rather on the inner sheet, which covered the strips directly. Typologically, the images painted on funerary textiles feature a simple and often repetitive structure: the deceased is seated in front of an offering table adorned with the funeral meal; in some cases, a second figure (an officiant, a son of the deceased) accompanies the owner of the fabric. The name of the deceased is indicated in the inscription, which also includes the usual offering formulas that allowed the soul of the deceased to survive in the afterlife. Our linen square with Ta-Nedjem can be related to three other fabrics, now housed in Boston [Museum of Fine Art, inv. 1981.657, fig. 1], in New York [Metropolitan Museum of Art, inv. 44.2.3, fig. 2] and in the Louvre [inv. N847, fig. 3]. The parallels between these works should be pointed on a typological level, but also from a stylistic point of view, with many similar details.


CONDITION Complete and in very good condition, despite minor breaks (seat, background); irregular edge. The polychromy is still vibrant, the inscription is perfectly legible. PROVENANCE Formerly, Lucien Lépine collection, acquired in Gournah, Egypt, before 1926; with Paul Mallon (1884-1975), antiquarian, Paris - New York, acquired in 1926; Ex- Mrs. Arthur Sachs collection, acquired in 1927; Ex- J. Loviton (1903-1996) collection, Paris, acquired in 1939; thence by descent, H. F.-Loviton collection, France. BIBLIOGRAPHY ANDREU G. (ed.), Les artistes de Pharaon, Deir el-Médineh et la Vallée des Rois, Paris, 2002, p. 145, no. 88. Centenaire de l’Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale, Cairo, 1981, pp. 52-53 (Sennefer). EL-ENANY K., Un carré de lin peint au Musée de l’Agriculture du Caire (inv. 893), in Bulletin de l’Institut d’Archéologie orientale, 110, 2010, pp. 35-45 (list pp. 40 ff.). HAYES W.C., The Scepter of Egypt, New York, 1959, p. 320, fig 202. For stylistically related examples, see: Mummies & magic. The funerary Arts of Ancient Egypt, New York, 1959, p. 320, fig. 202 (Boston, MFA, inv. 1981.657) (see also http://www.mfa.org/collections/object/painted-coffin-shroud-4463) http://cartelfr.louvre.fr/cartelfr/visite?srv=car_not_frame&idNotice=3726&langue=fr (Louvre). http://www.metmuseum.org/search-results#!/search?q=painted%20linen%20inv.%20 44.2.3&page=1&searchFacet=Art (New York).

fig. 1 MFA, Boston

30

fig. 2 The Met, New York

fig. 3 The Louvre, Paris


7

POMPEIIAN TABLE WITH WOLVES Graeco-Roman, 1st century B.C. – 1st century A.D. Bronze, silver (inlays) and niello H: 71.1 cm – L: 81.3 cm – W: 52.4 cm Very few Roman bronze tables survived; among them, this piece is an outstanding example for its considerable size and elaborate decoration. The whole balance of the object is based on the inventive design of the geometric top and side panels, and of the sculptured, curved shapes of the legs. The rectangular top is supported by four slender legs of intricate composition: each leg is a combination of straight, convex and concave parts. Only the upper part recalls an architectural element (in the shape of a pilaster‘s capital, with a band of ivy leaves); the middle part is an imaginative combination composed of an acanthus scroll with a springing wolf’s head, placed above the animal's hind legs. The animal paws as finials of the furniture legs are typical for Greek and Roman chairs, stools, candelabra and tripods; in this piece, however, the spatial arrangement of all three parts of the leg makes them look like individual sculptures. The modeling of the animal’s head is remarkable. The bronzier did not miss any single detail: the hairs of the thick mane are plastically rendered, the locks are indicated by thin incisions; the eyes are pierced, creating a deep shadow that highlights the intense gaze of the animal, the open mouth reveals the fangs. The wolf’s fierce and aggressive appearance is linked to its apotropaic nature. Wolves were associated with Apollo, Mars, and his sons, the future founders of Rome, Romulus and Remus, who were adopted by a she-wolf. The surface of the legs is embellished by an additional ornamentation of decorative olive branches. The upper front area shows the olive branch in a vertical composition, the leaves

32

30179

and the fruits are arranged symmetrically. The middle section is divided in horizontal bands decorated with olive branches. This decoration included color inlays, now lost; one can imagine that all these elements would have largely contributed to the chromatic beauty of the piece. The surface of the top and the side panels were richly engraved and inlaid. A foliate escutcheon is engraved at the center of the top; it is composed of a wreath encircling a quatrefoil pattern with palmettes; the wreath is framed by ribbons. Each corner of the top is adorned by a six-petal rosette or star. The two long sides end with rectangular sections, each containing a lattice of four-petal rosettes (silver inlay). Silver was lavishly used on the edges and on the meander frieze that decorate the middle part of each side, while the background is covered by niello: the contrasting effect of the shining silver against the black background is a major component of this sophisticated decoration. Only a few other examples with similar silver inlays are documented: two rectangular tables with their support (one comes from Pompeii and is now housed in the National Archaeological Museum, Naples; the other one is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art), a couch in the Capitoline Museums, and separate furniture attachments in the National Archaeological Museum of Naples, and in the Metropolitan Museum. These specimens are all dated to the same period, and demonstrate the taste for luxury items and exotic decoration that spread in the Roman society after the Roman conquests in the East. From the late 2nd century B.C., artists and craftsmen of the Greek East introduced a whole variety of luxurious home objects, furniture and decorations, which were new to the patricians of the old generation.


� Wolves were associated with Apollo, Mars, and his sons, the future founders of Rome, Romulus and Remus, who were adopted by a she-wolf.�

34


The study of Roman furniture distinguishes five types of tables: the rectangular oblong table with three legs; the rectangular table with four legs; the rectangular or round table with a single support; the round table with three legs; the rectangular table with two solid cross supports. An additional type is the folding table made of wood or metal. By the late Republican period, Romans started to recline on couches to dine, echoing the traditional Greek way; the tables were arranged next to the guests, each one having his individual table. It is interesting to note that most of the elaborate decoration with silver inlays is not on

the top of the table but on the sides, as if the decoration was intended to be admired by a person in a reclining position. A particular feature of the wealthy Roman housing was to set the dining in different rooms or areas of the house, or the villa, depending on the daytime and weather, the occasion and the number of guests. The tables were therefore rather small or medium size, so as to be easily carried and removed once the dinner was over. There were also special tables that were placed next to the house shrines, the lararia, and that were used to store the vessels intended for the sacrifices and libations.

CONDITION The table is in fair condition. The tabletop and two of the legs are restored from fragments. One leg is a replacement. PROVENANCE Formerly, Luigi Grassi collection, Florence, Prof. L. Grassi (1858-1937) owned a well-established art gallery in Florence, in Via Cavour; with Piero Tozzi Galleries, New York, (1882-1974), acquired August 1, 1946 (inventory docs: no. 760 dated 1947 & 1953); Anonymous sale, Sotheby’s New York, June 18, 1991, Lot 155. EXHIBITED Pompeiana, Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, MA, USA, November 18 – December 15, 1948 (one leg), Lot 16. PUBLISHED Pompeiana, Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, MA, USA, November 18 – December 15, 1948 (one leg), Lot 16; Anonymous sale, Sotheby’s New York, June 18, 1991, Lot 155. BIBLIOGRAPHY Pompeii AD 79: Treasures from the National Archaeological Museum, Naples, with contributions from the Pompeii Antiquarium and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston, 1978, p. 178, nos. 174-176; pp. 198-199, nos. 245-247. RICHTER G. M. A., The Furniture of the Greeks, Etruscans and Romans, London, 1966, pp. 63-72; 93-95; 110-113; figs. 563-580, 656-657. 36

37


8

MASK OF A DEITY Piravend, 1st millennium B.C. Bronze H: 19.4 cm The considerable size, quality of the bronze cast and expressiveness of the image are combined to make this piece an outstanding work of Ancient Near Eastern and Persian art. To the contemporary eye, the work looks extraordinary in accordance with the esthetic principles of modern art and finds parallels in the styles of Amedeo Modigliani and Alberto Giacometti. It was composed in a distinctive elongated shape including the neck and part of the head (the face with high forehead, but no hair). The arching bows are modeled in relief meeting at the bridge of the nose in a characteristic joint that marks its median line. The nose is formed as a simple narrow triangular, and the nostrils are not indicated. Two pierced circular holes set close to the nose represent the eyes. A very small mouth is recessed, placed halfway between the nose and the tip of the long, narrow chin. Whether the sharp, exaggerated shape was intended to represent a pointed beard, is not clear. In accordance with the mask type, the other features are highly stylized; the chin and cheek bones create a unified form boarded at the top by the uninterrupted brow line, with the high forehead looking almost like a crown. The only additional feature are the rounded ears shown prominently as projected horizontally on the sides at eye level. Each ear has three piercing to receive the gold or silver earrings as votive dedications. In the absence of written sources, however, nothing else could be said about the ideological meaning of the object. The surface is clean and very smooth. There are holes at the top and bottom on the each side of

38

30173

the piece; probably made to fix the bronze item on a wooden pole as the top of a standard to be carried during religious ceremonies. A bronze mask from the Pomerance collection makes a rare iconographic parallel to the present piece, although the former also has the curved horns of an animal. This supports the idea that several types of masks were employed; each with its own meaning and representing a different fabulous diety or demon. CONDITION Excellent state of preservation, beautiful darkgreen patina. Exterior surface is clean; few scratches and chips from the original cast. Traces of clay core on the interior surface. The upper right hole is torn. PROVENANCE Formerly, S. Aboutaam collection, Beirut, acquired ca. 1960s; Ex- British private collection, ca. 1985; New York art market, late 1980s; American private collection, New York, acquired December 13, 1990. BIBLIOGRAPHY GHIRSHMAN R., The Art of Ancient Iran: From its Origin to the Time of Alexander the Great, New York, 1964, pp. 41-82. MOOREY P. R. S., Ancient Bronzes, Ceramics and Seals, The Nasli M. Heeramaneck Collection of Ancient Near Eastern, Central Asiatic, and European art, Los Angeles, 1981, pp. 14-17; 57-63, nos. 239, 240-241, 244,250-251, 254, 262, 266. The Pomerance Collection of Ancient Art, The Brooklyn Museum, New York, 1966, pp. 40-41, no. 46. MUSCARELLA O. W., Bronze and Iron: Ancient Near Eastern Artifacts in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1998, pp. 146-149, nos. 225-237; pp. 151152, nos. 238-242.


� To the contemporary eye, the work looks extraordinary in accordance with the esthetic principles of modern art and finds parallels in the styles of Amedeo Modigliani and Alberto Giacometti.�

40


9

USHABTI WITH THE NAME OF IMEN-NEB-NEHEH Egyptian, New Kingdom (late 18th – 19th Dynasty, ca. 1300 B.C.) Wood H: 24.8 cm Carved from a single piece of compact, hard dark wood, this work is outstanding for its remarkable artistic qualities, both in the slender, elegant proportions and in the plasticity (wellmodeled, sinuous shapes). Iconographically, this example can be related to many contemporary ushabtis, except for the position of the arms and hands that are not crossed on the chest, here, but placed lower than usually, with the hands barely clasped. The slender mummiform body is entirely wrapped in a shroud; although hidden by the fabric, the outline of the arms is clearly marked. The hands protrude from a vertical slit in the fabric and are indicated in relief; the figure holds a hoe (left hand) and a small seed sack (right hand). The broad, rounded face has the almost “smiling” expression typical of sculptures at that time; it is framed by a tripartite hairstyle, furrowed by deep horizontal incisions, which descends like a mat at the back and on the chest, forming two large, smooth and simple braids. A beautiful necklace composed of several rows of small beads, supported by two falcon heads visible on the shoulders, encircles his neck. The hieroglyphic text was engraved in ten lines, but is unfortunately damaged in the lower part. As is often the case, it contains an excerpt from chapter 6 of the Book of the Dead and indicates the name of the deceased, Imen-Neb-Neheh. According to the text, he was the master of the stables of the god Amon, which certainly includ-

25478

ed tens of thousand of animals; as indicated by contemporary written sources (see, for instance, the papyrus of Harris I), this livestock included both domesticated and wild animals. The funerary statuettes that are generally referred to as ushabtis, were most often made of blue faience; stone (steatite, “alabaster”/calcite, limestone, sandstone, occasionally quartzite, etc.), metal (bronze or other noble metals, usually available to the most wealthy classes) and wood examples are rarer: these images accompanied the deceased in the tomb and served as substitutes to accomplish the chores of the daily life linked to agriculture, transportation, construction, etc. CONDITION Aside from the feet, now lost, the statuette is complete and in excellent condition. Some lines of the inscription are faded. The surface of the face is partially worn (nose). PROVENANCE Formerly, Pierre and Claude Vérité collection, Paris, France, collected between 1930 and 1960. BIBLIOGRAPHY Other wooden examples: ANDREU G. (ed.), Les artistes de Pharaon, Deir-elMédineh et la Vallée des Rois, Paris, 2002, pp. 292 ff. PAGE-GASSER M. – WIESE A.B., Egypte, Moments d’éternité, Art égyptien dans les collections privées, Suisse, Mainz/Rhine, 1997, pp. 191 ff., nos. 124-125. In general on ushabtis, see: AUBERT J-F. and L., Statuettes égyptiennes, Chaouabtis, Ouchebtis, Paris, 1974.

43


� The hieroglyphic text was engraved in ten lines; it contains an excerpt from chapter 6 of the Book of the Dead.�

44


10

BLACK FIGURE KYLIX ATTRIBUTED TO THE HUNT PAINTER Greek (Laconian), 550 – 540 B.C. Ceramic H: 10.3 cm – D: 14.7 cm A beautiful, small-sized drinking cup (kylix), typical of the Greek production, more precisely from Laconia (a Spartan region located southeast of the Peloponnese peninsula). The color of the clay is especially yellowish orange compared to the typical reddish orange Attic production. The vessel has a deep bowl, two long, curved handles placed halfway between the lip and the bottom of the bowl, and a high trumpetshaped foot. The outer decoration of the kylix is simple, but very well-balanced, and follows the linear shapes of the vessel (black-glazed, slim foot, rays above the stem, series of more or less thick lines and stylized palmettes near the thin, glazed handles). This kylix was decorated in the black-figure technique. The main ornamentation was painted in the tondo: two pairs of geese with spread wings are represented by a mirror effect. Many incisions harmoniously detail the various parts of their bodies. Undulated lines also create a kind of movement in the wings, perfectly emphasized by a purple highlight. A floral composition inspired by a lotus flower is painted between each pair of birds. At the center, a flying eagle is still visible. Unfortunately, there was not enough space for the artist to achieve his symmetrical composition and he therefore had to represent a lotus bud on one side, and a simple circle with a cross on the other side. This vessel can be attributed to the so-called Hunt Painter, also known for another eponymous cup, now housed in the Louvre, depicting the famous scene of the Calydonian boar hunt. Four major workshops are listed for the blackfigure Laconian production in the 6th century B.C.: the workshops of the Naucratis Painter,

27234

of the Boread Painter, of the Horsemen Painter and, finally, of the Hunt Painter. The peak production in the workshop of the Hunt Painter is in the third quarter of the 6th century B.C. Among the approximately 131 works that have been documented throughout the Mediterranean basin, the main form is the cup for about 80% of the vessels. CONDITION Paint in very good condition; a crack in the foot, which was reglued from several fragments. PROVENANCE Formerly, P.C. private collection, Nürnberg, Germany, collected prior to 1982; Ex- European private collection, acquired in 2012. PUBLISHED SIMON E. (ed.), Mythen und Menschen, Griechische Vasenkunst aus einer deutschen Privatsammlung, Mainz/Rhine, 1997, no. 4, pp. 18-19 with ill.; STIBBE C. M., Das andere Sparta, Mainz/Rhine, 1996, no. 8, pp. 175-178 with ill.; STIBBE C. M., Lakonische Vasenmaler des sechsten Jh. V. Chr., Supplement, Mainz/Rhine, 2004, no. 137/15, p. 219, ill. 42. BIBLIOGRAPHY On the production of Laconian pottery, see: COUDIN F., Les vases laconiens entre orient et occident au VIe siècle av. J.-C.: formes et iconographie, in Revue archéologique 48, 2009/2: https://www.cairn.info/revue-archeologique-20092-page-227.html STIBBE C.M., Lakonische Vasenmaler des sechsten Jahrhunderts v. Chr., Amsterdam, 1972 (vol. 1 text, vol. 2 pl.), V. Der Jagd-Maler, pp. 121 ff. For the eponymous cup in the Louvre, see: STIBBE C.M., Lakonische Vasenmaler des sechsten Jahrhunderts v. Chr., Amsterdam, 1972, no. 220, ill. 78, 1. or http://www.photo.rmn.fr/archive/95-0000512C6NU0N09OAV.html

47


� Laconia, a Spartan region located southeast of the Peloponnese peninsula.�

48


11

STATUETTE OF DEDU-AMUN Egyptian, Middle Kingdom (13th Dynasty, ca. 1802 – 1640 B.C.) Serpentine H: 22.9 cm This outstanding work of art represents Deduamun, an elite male official. He is depicted striding confidently forward in the canonical ancient Egyptian pose with his left leg advanced. His arms are pressed alongside his body with his hands, palms open, resting on this thighs. His wears a wrap-around skirt, consisting of a single rectangular sheet of very fine linen with an adorned selvage edge. This linen sheet has been wrapped around his body so that the selvage edge rests on his abdomen. Its loose end has been tucked into itself to secure the garment in place, resembling the way one might wrap a beach towel around one’s body today. Jacques Vandier, the doyen of French critical art historians, has described this garment as la jupe sans apprêt, and remarks that it was the costume most frequently worn by officials of the court during the Middle Kingdom. Dedu-amun presents himself as a dutiful, respectful administrator and devotee of the gods. To that end, his statuette avoids ostentation. He is bare-footed and bare-chested. He wears no accessories such as bracelets or a necklace. His head is clean shaven. His facial expression appears to be one of purposeful determination. In keeping with ancient Egyptian artistic conventions, his upper torso is marked by a degree of corpulence, symbolizing his advantaged social and economic status as an elite administrator. His purposefully enlarged and outward facing ears symbolically allude to his ability to hear and listen to the petitions of those who looked to him for aid. His enlarged hands seem, likewise, to suggest the benevolent effects of his actions in office. Those characteristics of this work of art enable one to suggest that Dedu-amun lived during the end of Dynasty XII. During the earlier part of Dynasty XII, the wrap-around skirt was generally inscribed with one or more columns of hieroglyphs down its front and officials so rep-

50

33560

resented wear wigs, as seen in the statuette of Amenemhatankh in Paris. Toward the end of Dynasty XII, inscriptions tend to disappear from the front of the wrap-around kilt and officials begin to be increasingly depicted, as here, with clean shaven heads. The type continues into Dynasty XIII, as the seated statue of Renefsenebdag in Berlin and the bronze statuette of an anonymous official in Paris demonstrate. Nevertheless, the quality of the sculpting deteriorates and the paleography, or designs of the hieroglyphs, become less carefully carved into the stone during Dynasty XIII as comparisons with both the statuette of Imeny in Paris and of Ankhu, discovered at Elephantine, both of which are dated to Dynasty XIII, reveal. As a result, the aesthetic accomplishment of this work of art depicting Dedu-amun and the relative care with which the hieroglyphs are sculpted suggests that this depiction is to be dated to the end of Dynasty XII or the very beginning of Dynasty XIII. The statuette of Dedu-amun is inscribed with a single column of hieroglyphs down the back pillar and two rows parallel to the front edge of the integral rectangular plinth. One should note that the design of these carefully executed hieroglyphs and their content are written in what scholars term Middle Egyptian, the classic form of hieroglyphs. These are the types of signs and inscriptions that a modern student studies in order to gain competence in the Egyptian language. One can translate the inscription on the back pillar: A gift which pharaoh grants to the god Osiris, who is the Lord of Busiris, who is also the great god and Lord of Abydos so that Osiris in turn might grant an invocation offering of bread and beer and of oxen and fowl to the ka of the venerated one, named Dedu-amun, born to his mother, Sat-montu, who is true of voice. And those of the front of the integral base: The venerated one, Dedu-amun, born to his mother, Sat-montu, who is true of voice, the venerated one.


Such chronological discussions aside, this statuette of Dedu-amun must be discussed in terms of its art historical importance. The design of his head, when viewed in profile, is egg-shaped, somewhat elongated and mistakenly, perhaps, described as misshapen. One need not here rehearse the power struggles which characterized the administration of the Middle Kingdom. Suffice it to state that the tension between pharaoh and his elite administrators compelled these two competing factions to adopt stylistic characteristics intended to indicate in the most visual of terms their political differences. In order to articulate those differences the elite members of the administration elected the eggshaped cranium as their visual index for their

self-representation. A few centuries later, the so-called heretic pharaoh, Akhenaten, experienced similar rival factions in his court. In order to distance himself and members of his immediate entourage visually from others, he reintroduced the egg-shaped skull as the visual index for his revolutionary religious reform. The corpulent, somewhat androgynous appearance of the physique of Akhenaten himself is indebted to the nascent corpulence exhibited by the torso of elite officials of the Middle Kingdom, as seen as well in the torso of Dedu-amun. This highly refined figure of Dedu-amun and his other representations are a constant reminder of the superior artistic antecedents of the Amarna Period which are to be found in the art of the Middle Kingdom.

CONDITION The statuette is intact and exceptionally well-preserved. PROVENANCE Formerly, private collection; Anonymous sale, Sotheby’s London, 12th December 1988, Lot 68; American private collection, California. PUBLISHED Sotheby’s London, 12th December 1988, Lot 68. BIBLIOGRAPHY For la jupe sans apprêt, see: VANDIER J., Manuel d’archéologie égyptienne. III. Les grandes époques. La statuaire, Paris, 1958, pp. 249-250. For the statuette of Ankhu from Elephantine, see: HABACHI L., The Sanctuary of Heqa-ib [=Elephantine IV], Mainz/Rhine, 1985, no. 71. For Amememhatankh, Paris, Musée du Louvre E 11053, see: DELANGE E., Musée du Louvre. Catalogue des statues égyptiennes du Moyen Empire, 2060-1560 avant J.-C., Paris, 1987, pp. 69-70. For the anonymous statuette in bronze in Paris, Musée du Louvre E 27153, see: DELANGE E., Musée du Louvre. Catalogue des statues égyptiennes du Moyen Empire, 2060-1560 avant J.-C., Paris, 1987, pp. 211-213. For the statuette of Imeny , Musée du Louvre AF 460, see: DELANGE E., Musée du Louvre. Catalogue des statues égyptiennes du Moyen Empire, 2060-1560 avant J.-C., Paris, 1987, p. 219. For the seated statue of Renefsenebdag in Berlin, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Ägyptisches Museum und Papyrussammlung 10115, see: OPPENHEIM A., et al. (ed.), Ancient Egypt Transformed. The Middle Kingdom, New York, New Haven, and London, 2015, pp. 150-151, no. 85. For the names of Dedu-amun [literally, “the one whom the god Amun has given”] and Sat-montu [literally, “the daughter of the god Montu”], see: RANKE H., Die ägyptischen Personennamen, Glückstadt, 1935, p. 401, no. 8 and 289, 9, respectively. 53


12

STELE WITH A MAN AND BOY Greek (Severe style), second quarter of the 5th century B.C. Marble Dim.: 63 x 32 x 5.5 cm This extremely rare and important stele is adorned with a beautiful scene, in which two figures stand out in high relief on the smooth, flat surface; it is framed by a thick and round, finely worked rim. A palmette, with slightly hollow leaves and supported by two volutes, decorates the upper part of the composition: it is flanked by two elements with a sinuous outline, which recall the head of a dolphin. The posterior part is flat and simply dotted, while the sides and the edges of the palmette are smooth and wellcompleted. Although no trace is visible anymore, many details on this stele were certainly rendered or embellished with paint. At the man's legs, under his coat, are two series of holes pierced with a drill, and the surface is less well-finished: elements made separately (of marble or plaster) would have been attached there. This very gentle scene, characterized by the strong intimacy between the two figures, is certainly related to the funerary world: the man, the deceased, is dressed in a long coat draped around his body and over his left shoulder. His hair is short and his beard is trimmed. His hairstyle, known as krobilos (it ends with two long braids that are crossed behind the neck), is of a special, elaborate and rich type: as attested by many representations (large sculpture, vase painting), it was very fashionable in the Greek world during the first decades of the 5th century B.C. The man leans on a staff (whose end is visible in the lower right corner of the stele) and lowers his head to a boy, an entirely naked young servant, standing in front of him. The child emphasizes the close relationship between the two figures by raising his head to the man and, thus, meeting

30514

his eyes. The interaction is also physical, since, with his right hand, the deceased caresses the head of the child, who, in turn, touches the body of the man with his raised left arm placed on the drapery, at hips level. Perhaps the boy held an attribute in his right hand, like a strigil or an aryballos that was simply painted. Furthermore, as is the case on other contemporary stelae, one can imagine that a dog was sitting at the man's feet (where the surface is carved differently and the holes are visible): the animal would have symbolized more than just a companion, it would have accompanied its master on his journey to the infernal river. The representation of the deceased in a familiar environment (here, the owner of the stele is a middle-aged man, accompanied by his young slave) is a frequent theme on Greek funerary stelae in all regions, which, throughout the Classical period (5th and 4th centuries B.C.), regularly used conventional patterns for the monuments dedicated to both women and men. Although Greek funerary stelae are generally repetitive, our example is outstanding for its remarkable artistic and technical qualities. The artist perfectly rendered the depth, by carving the surface of the figures almost in the round and by hollowing their edge. The plastic shapes are very carefully modeled and embellished with various nuances, the anatomical details are accurate and realistic: this formal perfection finely reflects the psychological intensity of the scene. One of the most important group of tectonic sculpture in the Greek world, the Temple of Zeus at Olympia, provides close parallels for our stele. A comparison of the head of the stele’s owner with some heads of Heracles carved on the metopes of this temple (see especially Heracles

55


� The child emphasizes the close relationship between the two figures by raising his head to the man and, thus, meeting his eyes.“

56


with the birds of the Lake Stymphalis, with the Cretan bull, with Atlas, in the Augean stables) shows a strong typological and stylistic similarity; all these figures are also characterized by their “severe” expression, a term used by modern critics to define Greek art in the first half of the 5th century B.C. in the Greek world. It is especially worth noting the subtle treatment of

the faces, the rendering of the clearly delineated beard and mustache, with a slightly rounded, superficial modeling, and without details for the locks, which would have been painted. This stele would have therefore been produced in a workshop of mainland Greece (Peloponnese). It can be dated to between circa 470 and 450 B.C.

CONDITION Excellent state of preservation, but lower part now lost; the stele is composed of two reglued large fragments (central crack, in diagonal). Minor chips and small repairs. Surface in very good condition, aside from a superficial wear and lime deposits. PROVENANCE Formerly, J. Lions collection, St-Tropez – Geneva, acquired in the early 1970s. BIBLIOGRAPHY On Greek funerary steles during this period: CLAIRMONT C. W., Classical Attic Tombstones, Kilchberg, 1993. PFUHL E. – MÖBIUS H., Die ostgriechischen Grabreliefs, T. 1, Mainz/Rhine, 1977, pp. 8-37. Some related steles with young servants and dogs: BOARDMAN J., Greek Sculpture, The Classical Period, London, 1985, fig. 58 (Aegina). HAMIAUX M., La Sculpture grecque, t. I, Paris, 2001, no. 152, p. 158 (Louvre, Attica). PFUHL E. – MÖBIUS H., Die ostgriechischen Grabreliefs, T. 1, Mainz/Rhine, 1977, nos. 10, 12, 37 (eastern Greece). On the sculptures in Olympia: STEWART A., Greek Sculpture, A Exploration, New York – London, 1990, pp. 142 ff. (with previous bibliography). 59


13

MALE PORTRAIT (A PRIEST OR THE EMPEROR GORDIAN II) Roman, ca. 230 – 250 A.D. Bronze H: 33 cm This head has a rounded neck so as to be inserted into a bust or a statue. The man has a pronounced, aquiline nose. His eyes, carved in a crescent-moon shape, have a calm and intense expression. His flat hairstyle, with thin featherlike locks, is parted in three sections above the forehead. On the crown, the hair is disheveled. The eyebrows are rendered by herringboneshaped incisions. The figure is characterized by a headband, thinner at the back of the head where it is fastened in a “Heracles knot”. Thin lines suggest that it was prepared for gilding. Two holes in the skull were used to attach another ornament. Ancient repairs are still visible on the left ear and on the neck. The style of this head, somewhat rough in workmanship, cannot be easily determined. It should likely be dated to the mid-3rd century A.D., considering especially the treatment of the short, thin hair, with the locks indicated by small irregular incisions. As for the identity of the figure, one thinks of a priest because of the type of headband: he was committed to the service of a particular deity, currently impossible to identify, perhaps originating from the East. In Latin, a priest is a sacerdos, “a person who makes holy”. In Rome, like in pagan societies in general, priests did not have a specific spiritual mission. They simply were the guarantors of the worship in which they officiated. They did not belong to a caste and their role was not incompatible with participation in civil life: many of them also served in the judiciary court or in other public office. For instance, the orator Cicero was an augur and Julius Caesar a great Pontiff. It is also worth noting a typological similarity of the profile of the head with the monetary

60

15766

portraits of Gordian II, who reigned as an emperor only three weeks between March and April 238 A.D.: unfortunately, this figure, the son of the senator and Emperor Gordian I (both reigned at the same time, the father, too old, having associated his son to his principality), has no official and unanimously attested portraits. CONDITION Complete, in excellent condition; small rectangular plaques attest of ancient cold-worked finishings or repairs. Beautiful uniform green patina. PROVENANCE Formerly, Ambassadorial collection, early 1960s; thence by descent to the Mrs. Pilate collection, Vienna, Austria; Ex- H. K. collection, Vienna, Austria, acquired in 1976; European private collection, acquired in Switzerland in 2000. PUBLISHED Imago, Four Centuries of Roman Portraiture, Geneva New York, 2007, no. 12. BIBLIOGRAPHY JOHANSEN, F., Roman Portrait III, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, 1995, nos. 50, 51, 57, pp.123-126, 136-137. INAN, J. - ROSENBAUM E., Roman and early Byzantine Portrait Sculpture in Asia Minor, London, 1966, no. 252, pl. 139; no. 291, pl. 165 and no. 292 (for the pictures of the head no. 292 cf. INAN J.ROSENBAUM E., Römische und frühbyzantinische Porträtplastik aus der Türkei, Neue Funde, Mainz/ Rhine, 1979, pl. 189). On Gordian and his portraits, see: Histoire Auguste, Les trois Gordiens, VI, 1-2. VON HEINTZE H., Studien zu den Porträts des 3. Jahrhunderts n. Chr., in Mitteilungen des deutschen archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung 63, 1956, pp. 62 ff, pl. 31-32. WIGGERS H.B. – VON WEGNER M., Das römische Herrscherbild, Band 3, vol. 1, Caracalla bis Balbinus, Berlin, 1971, pp. 236 ff., pl. 73.


� It is worth noting a typological similarity of the profile of the head with the portraits of Gordian II, who reigned as an emperor in 238 A.D.�

63


14

CAMEO WITH MINERVA / ATHENA Roman, Julio-Claudian period, 1st century A.D. Sardonyx Dim.: 4.8 x 2.9 cm This beautiful, four-layered cameo is elliptical in shape. In glyptics (the art of engraving or carving precious stones), the technique of the cameo is the opposite of that of the intaglio, in which the design is cut into the flat background and results in a negative image (seal). By contrast, the cameo features a positive image in relief projecting out of the background. This elaborate process reaches its apogee in our example. The sardonyx (a variety of chalcedony) also enables creating an outstanding, alternating pattern of brown and white layers. From a typological point of view, this masterpiece of glyptics was manufactured in the Roman period, more precisely in the Julio-Claudian period (1st century A.D.), but the gold brooch on which the stone was mounted should be dated to modern times. The female figure, seen in profile, can almost confidently be identified as Minerva/Athena: the high-crested, Attic helmet, and the aegis (a goatskin covered with snake scales, with the snake heads emerging from the outer edge, and the head of the Gorgon/Medusa clearly recognizable at the center of the chest) leave no doubt as to the identification. On the upper helmet still appears a refined representation of the goddess Victory, winged and driving a chariot, her whip raised above two horses (partially missing now), which she holds by the reins. A lion's head (seen in profile, its mouth wide open) is visible on the lower part that protects the neck of the goddess.

64

22635

This remarkable and delicate cameo recalls two famous masterpieces: the Great Cameo of France (now housed in the Cabinet des Médailles of the French National Library) and the Gemma Augustea (now in the Kunsthistorisches Museum, in Vienna). The first example, remarkable for its size, represents the triumph of Germanicus, as he leaves the Emperor Tiberius and his wife Livia; Mount Olympus is visible in the upper register. The decoration of the second example relates to one of Tiberius’s Germanic triumphs; one can see the divinized Augustus, under the features of Jupiter. These two pieces can be dated to the first quarter of the 1st century A.D. and some scholars suggest (although many others do not agree) that they would have both been made by the renowned contemporary carver of precious stones, Dioscorides (mentioned, by Pliny the Elder, as the one who carved a very similar effigy of the Emperor Augustus, which was then used as a seal by the emperors). The closest parallels for our work are the several cameos of the Cabinet des Médailles (National Library). They either portray Agrippina, mother and daughter, or mother-in-law and wife of the Emperor Claudius, sometimes as Minerva, or are portraits of princesses of the Court of Claudius, or Nero: in all cases, the facial features can be stylistically related to the Roman Historical period constituted by the first Imperial dynasty, the Julio-Claudians.


CONDITION Good overall condition, but the front of the helmet is broken; minor chips. At the back (smooth and flat), one can still see two letters: AP ( “ap” or “alpha rhô”: the initials of the artist or of the owner? We cannot say for certain). PROVENANCE Formerly, Melvin Gutman collection; Parke-Bernet, New York, April 3rd, 1970, Part VI, part of Lot 26; Ex- American private collection. Published Parke- Bernet, The Melvin Gutman Jewelry, Part VI, New York, April 3rd, 1970, part of Lot 26. BIBLIOGRAPHY VOLLENWEIDER M.-L. – AVISSEAU-BROUSTET M., Camées et intailles, Tome II, Les Portraits romains du Cabinet des médailles, Paris, 2003 (2 vol., text + pl.), nos 109-110 (profile of Agrippina I and II), nos 116-117 (similar bust of Minerva) and no. 275 (the Great Cameo of France). ZWIERLEIN-DIEHL E., Magie der Steine, Die antiken Prunkameen im Kunsthistorischen Museum, Wien, 2008, no. 6 (Gemma Augustea) pp. 98 ff and 263 ff. For the exact quote from Pliny, see: PLINE L’ANCIEN, Histoire naturelle, Volume II, Book 27 (on precious stones), chapter IV: http://remacle.org/bloodwolf/erudits/plineancien/livre37.htm 67


15

RED FIGURE DINOS ATTRIBUTED TO THE PAINTER OF LOUVRE MNB 1148 Italiote (Apulian), 340 – 320 B.C. Ceramic H: 28.6 cm – D: 32 cm A beautiful vessel, with a wide-mouthed, round shape; it was used for mixing water and wine at banquets. This dinos has a small disk-shaped base and stands on its own, but such rounded vessels without feet were usually supported by tall stands, so that the servants did not have to stoop to reach the diluted wine. One of the most famous examples of this type is the black-figure dinos with its stand of the Sophilos Painter, now housed in the British Museum. The illustrated scene, in the pure tradition of the red-figure technique, covers the entire belly of the vessel and elegantly embraces the surface. It represents a thiasus, or a Dionysian procession, composed of the traditional companions of the god Dionysos, the satyrs (naked and adorned with plant or vine crowns and/or wreaths) and the maenads, whose fluttering dresses emphasize the dance moves; the maenads sport elaborate hairstyles and wear jewels. From left to right, one sees a young woman holding a double flute (perhaps Ariadne), seated in the corner of a kline (a sort of bed or couch), on which lies Dionysos, in a semi-reclined position on one elbow, his head crowned with vine branches; the god, seen in three-quarter view, is almost naked, with a phiale in his hand; behind him, a young satyr carries a torch and a situla; then comes a silenus crouching on the back of a donkey adorned with a wreath; the silenus brandishes a skewer with food on it and a large skyphos; behind them, a young satyr holds a thyrsus, an alabastron and a small skin bag; he is followed by a young woman, who brings a thyrsus, grapes and a plate filled with various cakes, a young man holding a torch and a thyrsus, a young woman carrying flowers (partially faded) and a tambourine and, finally, by a young man

68

25327

with a thyrsus and a cist (all these figures move to the left); behind them, in the opposite direction (towards the right), a young satyr holds a torch; he is accompanied by a goat (also adorned with a wreath). A maenad holding a thyrsus and a situla, and a young satyr, placed on the left side of the kline, come at the end of the procession. The Dionysian nature of the scene is highlighted by many elements characteristic of this universe. For instance, the sacred strips that ornament the background of the procession, various plant or floral patterns, as well as trees and vine branches. The cults of Dionysos, the god of euphoria and ecstasy induced by wine, were usually held outdoors and at night, during hidden and initiating ceremonies in which music played a very important role. Our dinos is adorned with other typical decorative elements divided into various friezes, composed of meanders, with ova and dots, with tongues, etc. It is interesting noting that the link between the decoration and the specific use of this vessel at symposia is not limited to the main scene on the belly, but also emphasized by a series of vine leaves all around the neck. There is another dinos featuring an very similar scene (it is part of a private collection and was also published in Trendall and Cambitoglou, opus mentioned below). Our dinos however shows higher skills that suggest that the other vase would be a pale copy. Both vessels have obvious aesthetic qualities and can therefore be easily attributed to the Painter of Louvre MNB 1148 (his eponymous vase is a large loutrophoros, now housed in the Louvre). This painter was active in the second half of the 4th century B.C.


” It represents a Dionysian procession with a silenus crouching on the back of a donkey adorned with a wreath; the silenus brandishes a skewer and a skyphos.“

CONDITION The vessel was reglued from several fragments; minor gap-fills and repairs. PROVENANCE Formerly on the UK art market, 1970s; Christie's New York, June 14, 1993, Lot 47; New York art market; Ex- American private collection, New Jersey.  PUBLISHED TRENDALL A.D. and CAMBITOGLOU A., First Supplement to the Red-Figured Vases of Apulia, London, 1983, p. 101, no. 278b, pl. XX, 1-2 (for the similar dinos, see no. 278c, pl. XX, 3-4); Christie's New York, June 14, 1993, Lot 47.  BIBLIOGRAPHY TRENDALL A.D. and CAMBITOGLOU A., First Supplement to the Red-Figured Vases of Apulia, London, 1983, pp. 98 ff. (10. The Painter of Louvre MNB 1148 and the De Santis Group). For the dinos with its stand of the Sophilos Painter, housed in the British Museum, see: http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details. aspx?objectId=399358&partId=1 For the eponymous vase of the Painter of the Louvre MNB 1148, see: http://www.louvre.fr/oeuvre-notices/loutrophore-figures-rouges 70


16

ABSTRACT “IDOL” WITH VERTICAL EYES Proto-Sumerian, late 4th – 3rd millennium B.C. (ca. 3000 – 2500) Pink limestone H: 23.5 cm The "idol" was carved from a monolith of pink limestone, a material commonly used by Near Eastern craftsmen. The outline is slightly asymmetrical. The bottom is flat and perfectly complete, the lower edge is rounded. This rare object is composed of two distinctive elements: a) the ogive-shaped base with a somewhat rectangular bottom and rounded shoulders and b) the upper part, composed of two stacked rings of different size (the ring placed near the base is the biggest). As attested by the regular traces that are clearly visible in each circle, the holes were pierced with a tool similar to a drill. Deeply incised, horizontal lines highlight the connection between the body and the rings, as well as between the two rings.

15806

seum also presents a related scheme, but the circles are mounted on a long conical stem and placed horizontally; furthermore, the body is decorated with “architectural” patterns, which probably imitated a construction made of palmtree or reeds mats. There are also two seals - coming from the socalled “eye-temple” of Tell Brak and the other from Aleppo probably (the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford) -, whose representation can be compared with our example. The patterns engraved on these two seals represent an object that looks a lot like a “spectacle-idol” or like the Berlin "idol". They are also placed on a rectangular base with an incised decoration, maybe an altar.

Although the circles are placed vertically here, the general shape of this object confidently recalls the “spectacle-idols” and the “eye-idols”: from the late 4th millennium B.C., such pieces were produced and used in various Prehistorical sites of the Near East (Tepe Gawra, Tell Braq, etc.). Despite many existing differences (“eyeidols” have incised eyes instead of the characteristic rings of the “spectacle-idols”), some archaeologists think that they are variants of a unique type of object.

The meaning and/or purpose of these "idols" is debated since the first specimens were excavated by M. Mallowan (a British archaeologist and husband of Agatha Christie): some scholars suggest that these objects were depicting stylized human shapes and would have been linked to the religious sphere, while others think that they were part of the daily life (weights, load cells for weaving looms, instruments for the manufacture of textile yarns, etc.). Their multiple places of discovery (shrines, houses, necropolises, favissae, etc.) cannot solve this problem.

There are only a few items that can be related to our example: the closest parallel is certainly the “Sumero-Elamite votive piece” (according to the definition of P. Amiet), made of solidified bitumen, now housed in the Louvre. Despite obvious morphological differences (slightly larger dimensions, almost cubical base, smaller holes, absence of horizontal lines for the separation), the objects feature a similar design; it is therefore reasonable to assume that their use was also identical. A steatite "idol" in the Berlin Mu-

It should be admitted that similar shapes, on such a large area, and during such a long period of time, had various meanings. Some basic examples made of terracotta and summarily modeled would have been used as simple tools, while the more elaborate specimens showing a refined workmanship with incisions and perfectly symmetrical shapes, like our example, would have had a more symbolic purpose, in the framework of religious or magical beliefs, the nature of which remains unknown.

73


” A refined workmanship with incisions and perfectly symmetrical shapes.“

None of the known Mesopotamian deities has the eyes as a symbol, but the iconographic importance of this organ is documented in the religious sphere, since this class of abstract "idols" is characterized by their eyes, which are also a distinctive facial feature of the famous worshippers statuettes in the 3rd millennium B.C.: their oversized and/or polychromatic, wide open eyes would have translated a sort of wonder of the faithful in front of the deity. CONDITION Complete and in excellent condition; minor chips. The surface is perfectly polished. PROVENANCE Formerly, European private collection, collected in the 1970s. BIBLIOGRAPHY For the closest parallels, see: AMIET P., Elam, Auvers-sur-Seine, 1966, p. 159, no. 113 (Louvre). DU RY C.J., Art of the Ancient Near and Middle East, 1969, New York, pp. 40 ff. MALLOWAN M.A.E. in IRAQ 9, 1947, pl. XXVI, 1-2, pp. 156-157 (seals). On the “eye-idols” from Tell Brak and their meaning, see for instance: BRENIQUET C., Du fil à retordre: réflexions sur les « idoles aux yeux » et les fileuses de l’époque d’Uruk, in GASCHE H. – HROUDA B., Collectanea orientalia, Histoire, arts de l’espace et industrie de la terre, Etudes offertes en hommage à Agnès Spicket, Neuchâtel-Paris, 1996, pp. 31-53. CAUBET A., Des idoles et des lunettes, in Syria 83, 2006, pp. 177-181. FORTIN M. (ed.), Syrie, terre de civilisation, Montréal, 1999, p. 29. 74


17

FAYUM MUMMY PORTRAIT Egyptian, Roman period, first half of the 2nd century A.D. Painted wood Dim.: 36.4 x 25.8 cm This portrait, painted in encaustic (the term refers to a beeswax-based paint, used hot or cold, as was probably the case here) on a thin wooden panel, would have been inserted into the cartonnage wrapping that decorated the upper part of a mummy, as attested by details such as the rounded corners of the panel and the lighter shade of the edge of the painting. Inside the panel, the wood is slightly concave at the exact location that corresponded to the face of the deceased. Despite highly idealized facial features, this portrait clearly represents an adult, middle-aged man: his head is seen frontally, while his shoulders seem slightly turned to the left. Over his tunic, he wears a white toga, the large fold of which is visible on the shoulder, on the left side of the neck. Lines currently painted in brown indicate the border of the fabrics and form a sort of swastika; thick brushstrokes with whitish gray shades mark the folds, creating a beautiful chiaroscuro effect. The thin, elongated face conveys a melancholic expression, typical of this type of portraits. The many more or less pale pink shades, that the painter skillfully distributed on the surface, enable to highlight the different parts of the face, and to add volume and naturalism (forehead, cheekbones, nose). The muscles of the neck are indicated by large brushstrokes.

30950

The man has a short beard, partially faded, and a mustache with well-detailed locks; his short, curly hair covers his head like a regular skullcap that reveals the ears. The conquest of Egypt by Octavian (following the battle of Actium in 30 B.C.) brought this region into the Roman Empire under the authority of a prefect chosen by Rome. From that moment on, Italic influences in Egyptian art are obvious, especially in the funeral sphere, which mixed Roman and local traditions: individualized portraits, like our example, gradually replaced the idealized and standardized cartonnage masks of the Ptolemaic period. Usually made during the lifetime of their owner, they were placed directly on the face of the mummy and mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies: the figure is not only identified by his/her name anymore (according to Egyptian tradition), but also thanks to his realistic image, the Italic style portrait. The first examples of these portraits were excavated in the oasis of Fayum (in archaeological literature, they are designated as “Fayum portraits�) circa the late 19th century, but important discoveries were also made at Saqqara, Thebes, Antinopolis, Arsinoe, etc.

77


CONDITION Panel in good condition, despite minor chips near the edges. Paint in good overall condition, but forming a thick crust in places. Many modern damages and restorations. PROVENANCE Formerly, American private collection, New York, 1940s; Ex- Swiss private collection, Geneva. PUBLISHED PARLASCA K., Ritratti di mummie, in A. ADRANI, Repertorio d’arte dell’Egitto greco-romano, vol. 1, Palermo, 1969, p. 83, no. 212, pl. 52.4; PAGE-GASSER M. – WIESE A.B., Egypte, Moments d’éternité. Art égyptien dans les collections privées, Suisse, Mainz/Rhine, 1997, pp. 317-318, no. 220. BIBLIOGRAPHY Among the extensive bibliography on the topic, see: DOXIADIS E., Portraits du Fayoum, Paris, 1997, p. 24, nos. 18-19; p. 52, no. 35; pp. 76-77, nos. 67-70. WALKER S. – BIERBRIER M., Ancient Faces. Mummy Portraits from Roman Egypt, London, 1997. 78


18

Black Figure Amphora ATTRIBUTED TO THE LYSIPPIDES PAINTER Greek (Attic), ca. 530 – 510 B.C. Ceramic H: 61.6 cm Side A: Apotheosis of Herakles Side B: Warriors in Combat This magnificent vessel is an important artwork in the history of Greek vase painting; it is equally significant for the study of Greek mythology and epic literature. According to the established tradition, figurative motives were designed as panels placed on both sides of the amphora, which are divided by the handles. Painted details are well-preserved in added red and white slip, and the figural panel is framed above with a palmette-lotus chain. The ornaments enrich the decorative effect of the whole: rays extend upward from the foot and a stylized branch of ivy leaves decorates the sides of the handles; narrow red bands extend around the body of the vase and down the edges of the handles. The subsidiary decoration is the same for the other side of the vase.

The fallen Antilochos has been stripped of his armor and lies on his back, face upward and with his left arm over his head; his fingers are curled and blood flows from his wounds. Each warrior wears a chitoniskos, a short chiton, and is armed with a crested Corinthian helmet, cuirass, and greaves. Both warriors have swords suspended from baldrics and each holds a spear in the upraised right hand; each warrior has a Boeotian shield securely held by their left arm and hand. The shield of the warrior at the right is decorated with a shield device consisting of a large rosette between two writhing snakes. An eagle flies to the left between the warriors. The scene is flanked by the mother of Achilles, Thetis at the left, and the mother of Memnon, Eos at the right.

Side A: The procession of Herakles to Mt. Olympos is depicted with Herakles resting his club over his shoulder while accompanied by his patron, the goddess Athena, who wears a highcrested helmet, her distinctive snake-edged aegis, and chiton. She steps into the chariot and holds the reins in each hand and a spear in her right hand. Dionysos holds grapevines that fill the field and stands at the far side of the horses with his head turned back. He wears a chiton and himation, and a wreath of ivy around his head. Following him, Apollo plays the kithara and wears a patterned chiton and himation with a fillet of laurel binding up his long hair. The procession is led by a youth, perhaps Iolaos, nephew of Herakles, wearing a fillet and loosely wrapped in a himation while holding two spears that rest upon his shoulder.

Images of combat for the body of a fallen warrior are not rare in Greek Archaic vase painting. However it is relatively unusual to represent the deceased entirely naked – without armor or any protection whatsoever – which contributes to this representation’s particularly touching and emotional aspect, already made more so by the gesturing mothers at the left and right of the scene. Episodes from ancient literature and Homer’s Iliad, filled with such heart-rending scenarios, surely provided ample inspiration for the painters of Greek vases. Seen here at the feet of the combatants, the image of the mortally wounded Antilochos – blood pouring from his wounds, open-mouthed with head turned back and virtually lifeless with his eye closed, his left arm arched over and framing his face, his right arm extending downward to his groin and covering his genitalia – contributes to an extremely moving scene depicted in late black-figure vase painting, perhaps under the influence of similar scenes in (then contemporary) red-figure.

Side B: Achilles at the left, and Memnon at the right, fight over the body of Antilochos in the presence of their mothers, Thetis and Eos.

31552

81


Battling over the body of a fallen warrior was as furious and as important in the Iliad as the battles themselves, for death was not the end for a defeated warrior. If taken by the enemy, his body would be stripped of its armor and his weapons became a prize for the victor. The enemy could mutilate and further dishonor the deceased by leaving the corpse unburied. Warriors could also hold the corpse of an enemy for ransom, which, depending on the importance and status of the deceased, could comprise a vast treasure of objects as evidenced by Priam’s offerings to Achilles in order to retrieve the body of Hector. The warriors on this vase recall many such encounters known from ancient literature, such as the battle of Diomedes and Aeneas over the body of Pandaros (Iliad 5.297 ff.), Agamemnon and Koon for the body of Iphidamas (Iliad 11.218 ff.), Menelaos and Hector for the body of Euphorbos (Iliad 17.1-113), and Glaukos, Aeneas, and Hector fight Patroklos and Aiantes for the body of Sarpedon (Iliad 16.563 ff.). In one of the greatest encounters of the epic struggle, Greeks led by Ajax battle the Trojans led by Hector for the body of beloved Patroklos (Iliad 17.319 ff.). Among the most important accomplishments of Ajax will be the rescue of the body of Achilles from the battlefield (Aethiopis and Little Iliad). However, the presence of two women at the battle scene on this vase identifies the conflict as that of Achilles fighting Memnon over the body of Antilochos, as their two divine mothers, Thetis and Eos, look on. As the tragedy of conflict unfolded, each mother previously pleaded with Zeus to spare the life of their son. Antilochos, who famously sacrificed his life to save his father Nestor, was Achilles’ closest comrade after Patroklos had been killed. 82

A similar scene – a very close parallel to Achilles and Memnon fighting over Antilochos with Eos and Thetis, as seen on this amphora – is depicted on the Lysippides Painter’s black-figure amphora in the Vatican (Museo Gregoriano Etrusco 357, side B). J. D. Beazley considered the Lysippides Painter as a commendable successor and follower of Exekias, the masterful black-figure vase painter. The Lysippides Painter takes his name from the inscription, Lysippides kalos – “Lysippides is beautiful,” on a neck amphora in the British Museum (London B 211, ABV 256.14). CONDITION Entirely preserved, no part is missing; broken and repaired from large fragments; minor repainting of gaps and cracks; few scratches; minor flacking of black pigment; minor chips on the rim and base. PROVENANCE Formerly, US private collection, New York; Anonymous sale, Christie’s New York, June 11, 2003, Lot 102; Ex- US private collection. PUBLISHED Christie’s New York, June 11, 2003, pp. 91- 93, Lot 102; Minerva, International Review of Ancient Art and Archaeology 14.5, September-October 2003, p. 28, fig. 7; MUTH S., Gewalt im Bild, Das Phanomen der medialen Gewalt im Athen des 6. und 5. Jahrhunderts vor Chr., Berlin, 2008, p. 183, fig. 100; Beazley Archive (BA) no. 9022317. BIBLIOGRAPHY BURKERT W., Greek Religion, Cambridge MA, 1985, pp. 121-122. MUTH S., Gewalt im Bild, Das Phanomen der medialen Gewalt im Athen des 6. und 5. Jahrhunderts vor Chr., Berlin, 2008, pp. 183-185. SCHEFOLD K. Gods and Heroes in Late Archaic Greek Art, Cambridge, 1992, pp. 268-270, figs. 322-325. WESCOAT B., Poets and Heroes: Scenes of the Trojan War, Atlanta, 1986, pp. 32-33, no. 7.


French texts

85


1

FLACON A COSMETIQUES EN FORME DE COQUILLAGE Art gréco-romain, fin de l’époque hellénistique – début de l’époque romaine, IIe s. av. J.-C. – Ier s. apr. J.-C. Agate striée et or D : 10.6 cm

33885

Ce flacon à cosmétiques en agate fait partie des luxuria anciens et appartient, en tant que tel, a un petit ensemble d’oeuvres extrêmement rares qui forment une classe distincte d'objets de prestige. La beauté naturelle de la pierre, ici exceptionnellement striée, est accentuée par le superbe travail du sculpteur qui a taillé cette pièce en forme de coquille Saint-Jacques. Cette forme, très en vogue à l’époque mycénienne, se retrouve sur des récipients, mais aussi sur des petits pendentifs utilisés pour la fabrication de boucles d'oreilles et de colliers. Depuis ce temps, les objets et images en forme de coquillage sont omniprésents dans l'art décoratif grec et romain. A l’époque classique grecque, on trouve des petits récipients en forme de coquillage qui servaient pour la conservation d’huiles ou d’onguents parfumés ; dans le monde romain, les sculptures en marbre de nymphes tenant des coquillages étaient très appréciées pour la décoration des fontaines. Très peu de coquillages en cristal de roche, en verre ou en argent étant conservés, cet exemplaire intact en agate n’en est que plus rare et unique. Il reproduit précisément la forme du Pecten Jacobaeus - la coquille Saint-Jacques de la Méditerranée : les deux coques sont parfaitement représentées, avec la coquille inférieure bombée qui accueille le corps du mollusque et la valve supérieure complètement plate. Les deux coquilles sont pourvues de côtes en éventail et reliées par un ligament dorsal ; elles s’élargissent ensuite de chaque côté du crochet en deux « oreilles » presque identiques. Sur les coquilles naturelles, des stries de croissance rayonnent de l’umbo au bord ventral ; le relief des sillons sert principalement à renforcer la coquille. Les récipients en forme de coquillage constituent une catégorie spécifique, et varient considérablement dans leur utilisation et dans les matériaux utilisés pour leur exécution : or, argent, bronze, argile, verre, marbre, mais aussi pierres semi-précieuses comme le cristal de roche et l’agate. Dans le monde méditerranéen, l’agate était très prisée depuis l’époque minoenne. Théophraste (Sur les Pierres, V, 31) mentionne que le nom de la pierre vient de la rivière Achates, en Sicile, où elle fut découverte, et qu'elle se vendait à un prix élevé. On suppose que ce sont les ateliers d'Antioche, et surtout ceux d’Alexandrie qui fabriquaient la plupart des récipients en agate à l’époque hellénistique et romaine. L'Egypte ne possédant pas de mines d’agate, elle faisait importer des morceaux bruts de la pierre, principalement d'Inde. Les récipients de toutes formes en agate étaient très recherchés par les membres des maisons régnantes, les prêtres et la riche clientèle internationale. Ils faisaient partie des offrandes pour les temples importants, et on utilisait des cruches et des louches en agate pour les libations lors des cérémonies religieuses. Les vases à boire comme les coupes, les bols, les gobelets, les skyphoi et les canthares faisaient partie des plus prestigieux services de table et servaient souvent de cadeaux diplomatiques. Pline (Histoire naturelle, 37.54) liste de nombreuses variétés d'agate, et explique que bien que l’agate ait été auparavant de grande valeur, elle était bon marché de son temps. Il ne faut, toutefois, pas se fier à ce commentaire, puisque Sénèque, son contemporain, inclut les coupes en pierres précieuses dans les « trophées de luxe » et se plaint de l'extravagance excessive des riches Romains dans leur utilisation : « car vos orgies seraient trop peu coûteuses si les rasades dont on se fait raison et qui doivent se vomir ensuite ne se portaient à la ronde dans de profondes pierres précieuses » (Des Bienfaits, VII, 9). Les bols en forme de coquillages en argent et en bronze mis au jour à Pompéi et sur d'autres sites de la région du Vésuve étaient utilisés pour les repas et comme moules de cuisson. D’autres objets de forme identique étaient peut-être également utilisés pour la toilette féminine, comme les

86

louches pour verser de l'eau. Mais le flacon à cosmétiques en forme de coquillage, avec un couvercle en cristal de roche ou en agate striée, comme l’exemplaire en examen, était l’un des objets les plus convoités qu'une femme puisse posséder. Le coquillage lui-même était significatif, puisqu’il renvoyait à Aphrodite, née de l’écume des vagues. Un récipient conservé au Musée de l'Ermitage, et daté du IVe siècle av. J.-C., reproduit d’ailleurs la forme d'Aphrodite émergeant de coquillages sur lesquels elle flotte [fig. 1]. Allégoriquement, le coquillage d'Aphrodite peut être considéré comme le contenant de la beauté éclatante de la déesse. Il n’était pas rare d’offrir à une femme un vrai coquillage décoré de montures en argent [fig. 2, Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Taranto] ou une boîte en forme de bivalve, l'associant ainsi à la beauté absolue d’Aphrodite. Dans la pièce en examen, les deux coques sont reliées au moyen d'une petite tige d'or passée dans des charnières sculptées au bord du crochet et des « oreilles ». Ce montage est typique des récipients en argent et en forme de coquillages de l’époque hellénistique [fig. 3, Antikensammlung, Berlin ; fig. 4, Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Taranto]. Des restes de pigments rouges, bleus et blancs dans l'une de ces boîtes confirment qu'elles étaient bien utilisées pour contenir des cosmétiques. Les extrémités de la tige en or se terminent par des petites rondelles, dont les bords sont encerclés de petites billes en or. Un trou au milieu de la bordure de la valve la plus plate (le couvercle du récipient) servait probablement à fixer une petite poignée (un bouton en or). Les nervures habilement sculptées et les veines irrégulières de l’agate, d’un blanc laiteux, grises et brunes, correspondent à la forme de ce coquillage tel qu'on le trouve dans la nature. La surface entière est finement lissée par polissage, ce qui démontre la grande habileté de l'artisan et augmente la sensation tactile agréable lorsque on tient l’objet dans ses mains, sans toutefois effacer le caractère réaliste de l’objet, comme le souhaitait probablement l'artiste. A l’époque d’Auguste, beaucoup d'artisans spécialisés dans la taille de pierres rares ou semiprécieuses étaient installés à Rome, où ils répondaient à la commande croissante de ces luxueux objets. Les bijoux en agate étaient très appréciés de l'aristocratie dirigeante. On utilisait des pierres en agate polie, montées dans des perles en or et en agate, pour la fabrication de colliers. La plupart des récipients en agate encore conservés sont de petite taille, comme les bouteilles de parfum, les coupes et les bols. Dans la Rome antique, les objets de ce type étaient infiniment admirés pour leur beauté et leur degré de sophistication. Aujourd’hui encore, on ne peut s’empêcher d’être émerveillé par la finesse et le réalisme de ce magnifique flacon en agate. CONSERVATION Intact et en excellent état ; la forme du coquillage est bien conservée et présente encore sa surface polie d'origine ; petits éclats sur les bords et sur le dessus de la coque bombée ; quelques fissures ; une partie du bord de la coque bombée ont été recollées ; trou sur le côté de la même coque. PROVENANCE Ancienne collection Me P. Sciclounoff, acquis dans les années 1960 ; collection du Dr. L., Suisse, depuis 1975. BIBLIOGRAPHIE BALL S. H., A Roman Book on Precious Stones, Los Angeles, 1950. BÜHLER H.-P., Antike Gefässe aus Edelsteinen, Mainz/Rhine, 1973. DE JULIIS E. M. et al., Gli Ori di Taranto in Età Ellenistica, Milano, 1984, pp. 58-62, no. 8 ; 355-356, no. 318 ; 374, no. 7. GASPARRI C., Vasi antichi in pietra dura a Firenze e a Roma, dans Prospettiva 19, 1979, pp. 4-13. LAPATIN K., Luxus : The Sumptuous Arts of Greece and Rome, Los Angeles, 2015, p. 125. Rediscovering Pompeii, catalogue d’exposition, Roma, 1990, pp. 188-191, nos. 86, 88.

87


PLATZ-HORSTER G., NIEMEYER B., REICHE I., Der Silberfund von Paternò in der Antikensammlung Berlin, in Jahrbuch des Deutsches Archäologisches Instituts 118, 2003, pp. 208-210, pl. 3-6. WALTERS H. B., Catalogue of the Engraved Gems and Cameos, Greek, Etruscan and Roman in the British Museum, London, 1926, p. 372, nos. 3979-3983.

2

avec les mains serrant les seins, la zone pubienne en évidence, et un long cou orné de colliers ; parfois le personnage n’est qu’à moitié dévêtu. Des images similaires apparaissent sur les sceaux et les plaques en relief du Proche-Orient. Leur style peut varier, sur la base des préférences esthétiques de l'atelier d'un artiste local. L'identité de la déesse varie également, on l’associe généralement à la déesse-mère, à la déesse de la naissance ou de l'amour charnel.

LAME DE HACHE DECOREE D’UNE DEESSE Art cananéen, XVIIIe – XIIIe siècle av. J.-C. Bronze H : 13.7 cm

CONSERVATION Bon état général ; quelques traces d’oxydations verdâtres en surface ; magnifique patine brun-rouge. PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière américaine, New York, acquis en 1990.

30611

BIBLIOGRAPHIE AKURGAL E., The Art of the Hittites, New York, 1962, pl. 35. ARUZ J. (ed.), Art of the First Cities. The Third Millennium B.C. from the Mediterranean to the Indus. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New Haven, London, 2003, p. 164, no. 107a, b ; p. 279, no. 181. BLACK J., GREEN A., Gods, Demons and Symbols of Ancient Mesopotamia ; An Illustrated Dictionary, Austin, 2000, p. 144. COLLON D., First Impressions : Cylinder Seals in the Ancient Near East, London, 1987, p. 46, no. 165 ; p. 166, no. 775. HARPER P. O., ARUZ J., TALLON F., The Royal City of Susa : Ancient Near Eastern Treasures from the Louvre, New York, 1992, pp. 189-193, nos. 127-131. MUSCARELLA O. W., Bronze and Iron : Ancient Near Eastern Artifacts in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1998, pp. 412-413, no. 567. NEGBI O., Canaanite Gods in Metal ; An Archaeological Study of Ancient Syro-Palestinian Figurines, Tel Aviv, 1976, pp. 67-74, pl. 40-43. TOLSTIKOV V., TREISTER M., The Gold of Troy : Searching for Homer’s Fabled City, New York, 1996, p. 194, no. 258.

Bien qu’il ne présente aucune analogie immédiate, le style de cette hache s’inscrit parfaitement dans le cadre artistique de la vaste région géographique et multiculturelle qui couvrait l’Anatolie et le Levant. La forme étroite de la lame, caractéristique de ce type de hache à douille, et son ornementation raffinée font de cet objet une pièce unique. La section ovale de part et d’autre de la zone d’emmanchement est flanquée de rainures profondes aux arêtes vives qui suivent la ligne légèrement courbe de la lame évasée. Une figure, représentée en haut relief, occupe toute la partie opérationnelle de la hache : sa tête est placée vers le manche et ses pieds au bas de la lame. Bien que la lame soit aiguisée, la conception élaborée de cette hache la rend inadéquate comme arme, suggérant plutôt une fonction cérémonielle. Le personnage féminin est très probablement la déesse Astarté et est représenté debout, de face, sauf pour les pieds qui sont tournés chacun d’un côté. Une grande attention a été portée aux détails : les cheveux mi-longs sont coiffés avec les pointes enroulées jusqu’aux joues, des mèches éparses sont indiquées par de petits traits incisés ; des lignes triangulaires, pareilles à des rayons, suggèrent la présence d'un diadème sur le haut du front. Les yeux grands ouverts étaient probablement incrustés de pierres à l’origine ; dans ce cas, cet objet aurait également pu avoir une fonction rituelle. Les longs sourcils épais qui se rejoignent au-dessus du nez sont représentés par de fines incisions qui donnent aux yeux une taille presque surnaturelle. Le visage est rond, avec un petit menton pointu (la ligne qui le traverse indique probablement une fossette) ; l’axe vertical de la composition est souligné par le long nez proéminent. Le long cou mince relie la grande tête aux épaules délicatement arrondies. Une petite dépression est visible au bas du cou, dont on ne peut toutefois dire si elle indique la clavicule ou un pendentif circulaire qui serait relié au collier représenté par deux lignes horizontales et diagonales. Les traits du visage (en particulier les grands yeux incrustés) et les proportions du corps rappellent les images de l'art cananéen et Syro-Hittite. Les bras sont pliés et pressés contre la poitrine, comme si les mains retenaient les petits seins en forme de boule. Deux petites lignes sur les poignets indiquent la présence de bracelets. Le personnage est à moitié dévêtu, comme le souligne le léger contraste de volume entre les parties nues (les épaules, les bras et la poitrine) et celles qui sont couvertes par la longue jupe triangulaire, une sorte de kilt, dont les côtés sont ornés de lignes incisées en diagonale et d’un double ourlet (franges?) également incisé. Cette femme représente sans aucun doute une déesse liée au culte de la fertilité. Son iconographie remonte à l'âge du bronze (fin du IIIe millénaire av. J.-C.). Beaucoup de figurines de ce type en argent et en or, en bronze, en plomb, en argile et même en ivoire ont été découvertes dans différentes régions proche-orientales ; elles représentent des personnages féminins nus, en position frontale,

88

3

JEUNE DIONYSOS AVEC UNE PANTHERE Art grec, époque hellénistique (style pergaménien), deuxième moitié du IIe siècle av. J.-C. Marbre H : 80 cm

30379

Ce groupe en marbre est une oeuvre exceptionnelle de l’époque hellénistique tardive, tant pas sa qualité que par son style. Il représente un motif sculptural que nous connaissons principalement par des pièces de petite taille du IVe siècle av. J.-C. (appliques et statuettes en argile ou en bronze), ou par des représentations romaines ultérieures de plus grande dimension (statues en marbre ou panneaux de sarcophages). La mise en scène du sujet représenté et l'utilisation du marbre renvoient clairement au style pergaménien ; les positions dynamiques des personnages et leurs expressions très marquées sont caractéristiques de cette technique sculpturale. Le thème représenté ici est celui du « Dionysos au repos ». On y voit le jeune dieu du vin et du théâtre, Dionysos, en compagnie d’une panthère, son animal apprivoisé. Les deux protagonistes sont plus petits que grandeur nature. Des sculptures similaires en ronde-bosse et en relief encore conservées permettent de reconstituer l'ensemble de la composition et l'histoire mythologique qui s’y réfère. Bien que le personnage semble immobile, sa position est celle d’un homme figé en plein mouvement et en pleine interaction avec les autres personnages. Cette interaction pouvait être

89


virtuelle si la sculpture était constituée d’une pièce unique, ou réelle si le personnage en marbre faisait partie d'un groupe sculptural plus complet. Considérée dans son individualité, la statue de Dionysos, vue de face, reflète son statut divin et solennel : debout, dans une attitude détendue, offert au regard du spectateur. La position du corps penché sur un support placé de côté (un tronc d'arbre, partiellement caché par la draperie) accentue cette impression et permet au pied gauche de se poser sur le dos de la panthère de manière décontractée, sans exercer de réelle pression sur l’animal. Le caractère naturaliste sous-jacent de la représentation transpose l'image du dieu de la sphère transcendantale au royaume de l’Humain (un point central dans l'art hellénistique). La nonchalance du personnage est également exprimée par le geste du bras droit levé au-dessus de l'épaule, la main placée sur la couronne posée sur la tête. La partie de l’épaule encore conservée nous permet d’imaginer la composition original que l’on retrouve sur de nombreuses copies : la main gauche tenait probablement le récipient, un canthare, incliné de façon à ce que le vin s’en déverse. Des gouttes de vin imaginaires s’écoulent du bord de la coupe pour atteindre la bouche ouverte du fauve couché qui soulève la tête, comme en attente du liquide divin (l'ivresse de l'animal est logique dans le contexte de la puissance dionysiaque ; cette scène symbolique fait aussi référence au pouvoir de fertilité du dieu ; les tétines développées et pleines de l'animal, sans ses petits à proximité, sont des marques évidentes de ce symbolisme). Le thématique narrative mettant en scène Dionysos accompagné d’une panthère s’inscrit dans les représentations iconographiques majeures de la procession dionysiaque, connue principalement par les panneaux de sarcophages de l’époque romaine impériale, dont les principaux épisodes sont les suivants : la procession triomphale de Dionysos, son arrivée à Naxos et sa rencontre avec Ariane. Le cortège festif du dieu, le thiase, composé de satyres et de ménades en pleine danse, portant des instruments de musique et des coupes, Pan, Silène, Hermaphrodite, des Eros, des centaures, des animaux exotiques (éléphant, panthère, lion) et, au milieu de cette foule joyeuse, Dionysos défilant d’humeur inspirée et joyeuse. Le dieu du vin est lui-même en état d'ébriété et cherche un soutien, habituellement un satyre, qui l'aiderait à garder son équilibre. Dans la pièce en examen, ce personnage est remplacé par un tronc d'arbre, vu partiellement de côté et complètement recouvert à l’avant par les plis en cascade du long manteau. Le geste du bras droit de Dionysos, avec la main posée sur la couronne, pourrait aussi suggérer l'ivresse, mais l'extase divine semble être une meilleure explication. Le dieu est simplement vêtu d’une draperie ; il porte des sandales à semelle épaisse, décorées d’une languette sur le devant (ce type de sandale est appelé lingula). Un grand himation enveloppe la partie inférieure de son corps. Le bord du tissu tombe bas sur les hanches, laissant les organes génitaux découverts ; ce type de disposition caractéristique est également employé pour les statues d'Apollon et, de manière significative, pour les statues d’Hermaphrodite. Ce type de statues mêle ainsi la solennité du divin à l'érotisme inhérent au corps humain. Dans ce cas, toutefois, c'est un érotisme ambigu qui est attribué à Dionysos : les formes et les proportions du corps sont molles - épaules étroites, torse un peu court, hanche haute et prononcée - et suggèrent plutôt un corps féminin. Bien que les détails relevés indiquent qu’il s’agit d’un homme très jeune, l’air efféminé d’Apollon et de Dionysos est devenu un trait distinctif de leur apparence à l’époque hellénistique.

satyres et les ménades, Pan et Ariane. On peut dès lors en déduire qu’à un certain stade de l'évolution du motif à l’époque hellénistique tardive, on aurait ajouté à la partie unique (composée de Dionysos appuyé sur un support ou sur un satyre) un groupe de personnages représentant des épisodes tirés d’autres mythes, comme le Triomphe de Dionysos ou la Rencontre avec Ariane à Naxos. CONSERVATION La statue, dont la tête actuelle ne correspond pas à l’original ou a été restaurée, est mentionnée dans plusieurs publications du début du XXe siècle [figs. 1-2]. La surface de la sculpture est, dans l'ensemble, très bien conservée. Il subsiste des traces de réparation datant de l'Antiquité : les zones brisées autour de l'épaule droite et du bras gauche montrent des restes des canaux percés pour accueillir les tenons en fer utilisés pour assembler les différentes parties ; elles présentent la même usure que le reste de la surface de la statue. Fracture le long de l'épaule gauche, parties endommagées repeintes sur le haut du dos ; traces de restauration ancienne dans les plis, à l'arrière de la statue. PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière Gioacchino Ferroni, Rome, avant 1909 ; Jandolo et Tavazzi - Galerie Sangiogi, Rome, 14-22 avril 1909 ; Galerie Helbing, Munich, 27-28 juin 1910 ; Vente anonyme, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 13 mars 1911 ; ancienne collection particulière Georges Joseph Demotte (1877-1923), Paris, 1919 ; ancienne collection particulière du Dr. Bres, Villa Fontevieille, Grasse, avant 1953 ; ancienne collection particulière française. PUBLIE Jandolo et Tavazzi - Galerie Sangiogi, Catalogue de la vente organisée après la mort de M. Joachim Ferroni, 14-22 avril 1909, no. 278, pl. LIV [fig. 1] ; Galerie Helbing, Munich, Griechische Ausgrabungen, 27-28 juin 1910, no. 519, pl. 12 ; Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 13 mars 1911, pl. 3 ; REINACH S., Répertoire de la statuaire grecque et romaine IV, 2 éd., Paris, 1913, p. 63, no. 6 [fig. 2] ; REINACH S., Répertoire de la statuaire grecque et romaine V, Paris, 1924, p. 45, no. 7 et p. 46, no. 8. BIBLIOGRAPHIE Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae 3, Zürich, München, 1986, s.v. Dionysos, p. 436, nos. 126-127 ; s.v. Dionysos (in peripheria orientali), p. 522, no. 82 ; s.v. Dionysos-Bacchus, pp. 554-555, nos. 184-192. POCHMARSKI E., Dionysische Gruppen : Eine typologische Untersuchung zur Geschichte der Stützmotivs, Wien, 1990. POLLITT J. J., Art in the Hellenistic Age, Cambridge, New York, New Rochelle, Melbourne, Sydney, 1986, pp. 102-104. SMITH R. R. R., Hellenistic Sculpture, New York, 1991, pp. 156 ; 160-161. WILLERS D., Typus und Motiv : Aus der hellenistischen Entwicklungsgeschichte einer Zweifigurengruppe, dans Antike Kunst 29 (2), 1986, pp. 137-150.

Le dos de la statue est plat et traité de façon moins élaborée. Avec la base mince et étroite, cet élément pourrait suggérer que cette sculpture était en fait destinée à être insérée dans un espace restreint, comme la niche d'une fontaine ou le fronton d'un petit sanctuaire. La composition d’une telle structure architecturale aurait alors nécessité un programme plus riche pour sa décoration sculpturale, c’est-à-dire un personnage central, Dionysos, et des protagonistes secondaires, les 90

91


4

STATUETTE DU DIEU AMON Art égyptien, IIIe Période Intermédiaire (env. 1069 – 664 av. J.-C.) Bronze et or H : 21.5 cm

La statuette, coulée à la cire perdue, est en bronze massif et représente un homme qui se tient debout, sur une petite base rectangulaire et mince. Deux tenons permettaient de la fixer à son emplacement d’origine.

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection de la famille Cattaui, Suisse, acquis au Caire avant les années 1950 et amené en Suisse en 1956, lors de l’emménagement de la famille sur place.

Les plumes sont faites à part et insérées verticalement dans la rainure creusée sur le sommet de la couronne. Les détails des plumes et du visage sont rehaussés d’incrustations en feuilles d’or. Des incisions à froid, exécutées avec une belle maîtrise, détaillent l’ornementation du pagne, de la ceinture, du riche collier ainsi que les traits du visage et les orteils.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE ANDREWS C.A.R., Objects for Eternity, Egyptian Antiquities from the W. Arnold Meijer Collection, Mainz/Rhine, 2006, pp. 175 ff. HILL M. (ed.), Offrandes aux dieux d’Egypte, Martigny, 2008, pp. 84 ff. SEIPEL W., Bilder für die Ewigkeit. 3000 Jahre ägyptische Kunst, Konstanz, 1983, no. 94.

La statuette étonne non seulement par son état de conservation, mais aussi par ses remarquables qualités artistiques. Les proportions du personnage sont plutôt minces et élancées, même si la musculature est athlétique et bien développée, aussi bien sur le torse que sur les jambes : le bronzier a reproduit un homme adulte dans la force de l’âge. Représentée dans une position strictement frontale et un peu figée, avec la jambe gauche avancée, cette figure correspond, par sa typologie, aux effigies du dieu thébain Amon. A l’exception du pagne, finement strié et avec le repli bien indiqué, l’homme est nu. Son bras gauche descend librement le long du corps, jusqu’à toucher la cuisse, tandis que le droit est plié et ramené sur la poitrine. Dans les mains, serrées en poings, il tenait des attributs actuellement perdus (il portait probablement le sceptre-ouas, symbole et signe hiéroglyphique de la ville de Thèbes et la croix ankh, symbole de vie). Son visage ovale est encadré par une fine barbe en or, qui descend des oreilles jusqu’au menton ; celui-ci est prolongé par une longue barbe postiche aux incisions tressées et fixée par un tenon au sternum. Les détails du visage sont indiqués par un fin modelage, tandis que des traits en feuille d’or soulignent les sourcils et le contour de yeux. Sur la tête, il porte son couvre-chef habituel, la couronne cylindrique, surmontée par deux grandes plumes d’autruche. La ceinture est ornée de lignes en zigzag.

92

CONSERVATION Complet et dans un état remarquable, puisque même les incrustations sont en grande partie conservées et encore en place. Disque solaire sur les plumes et œil droit perdus. Amples traces de patine verte, surface par endroits usée.

32355

5

STATUETTE DE BOUQUETIN ASSIS Art proche-oriental (proto-élamite), vers 3000 av. J.-C. Argent H : 7.2 cm – L : 6.7 cm

7404

Cette sculpture en argent est probablement à identifier avec un bouquetin, à cause des dimensions et de la forme de ses cornes. Ce robuste animal des montagnes est représenté dans un moment de repos, tranquillement assis avec les pattes pliées sous le corps. La position de la tête, qui était certainement tournée vers le spectateur, indique que le côté gauche est le principal. Ce bouquetin est un rare exemple de sculpture proto-élamite miniature en métal, obtenue par martelage de plusieurs feuilles d’argent : la statuette est en effet composée de différents éléments travaillés séparément (corps, tête, cornes, oreilles) et soudés ou encastrés de façon à former l’animal. A l’intérieur, la statuette est entièrement creuse.

A l'origine, Amon était le dieu local des tribus de Thèbes. Lorsque les Thébains eurent conquis le trône d'Egypte, Amon devint une divinité universelle et fut considéré comme le père des dieux. Son nom signifie « caché », car personne n'était censé le voir : il sera ensuite assimilé au dieu solaire Râ, indispensable à la vie, sous le nom d'Amon-Râ.

La qualité de cet ibex témoigne non seulement de la remarquable maîtrise technique atteinte par les artisans-orfèvres à une époque si reculée (entre la fin du IVe et le début du IIIe millénaire av. J.-C.) mais aussi d’une capacité d’observation de la nature très poussée : le réalisme de l’animal (compte tenu de sa petite taille) est l’une des caractéristiques fondamentales de cette figurine, qui peut être considérée comme un petit chef-d’œuvre de l’art proche-oriental.

Amon était considéré comme un démiurge, c’est-à-dire qu’il se serait créé lui-même et aurait ensuite mis en route les mécanismes cosmiques pour donner vie à l’Egypte. Pour ce faire il donna naissance aux quatre éléments fondamentaux que sont la Terre, l’Air, la Chaleur et l’Humidité. Il est donc considéré comme un dieu créateur, solaire, maître de l’éternité et protecteur des vivants : en particulier, il veille sur le pharaon, dont il prend souvent l’aspect (cf. par exemple les nombreuses statues de Toutankhamon/Amon). Mout (« la mère ») était son épouse et Khonsou (le dieu lunaire) le fils qu’ils ont généré.

Les formes sont rendues par un modelage très nuancé et précis, aussi bien sur le corps (attitude naturelle, volumes de la musculature, détails incisés, pelage piqueté, etc.) que sur la tête, où le réalisme et la précision des détails sont remarquables. Dédiées comme offrandes dans un sanctuaire, les figurines de ce type étaient probablement considérées comme les substituts des animaux de sacrifice. A côté de celle bien réelle des moutons, des chèvres ou des taureaux, leur présence figurait en effet comme une offrande symbolique et perpétuelle, qui devait réjouir les dieux et les rendre attentifs et favorables aux nécessités de la cité et des hommes qui l’habitaient.

Ses attributs sont le disque solaire, les cornes, le fléau et le symbole ankh ; il est représenté avec une tête de bélier ou avec un visage humain (pourvu parfois de cornes de bélier, visibles au-dessus des oreilles).

Cet exemplaire présente un détail très particulier, puisque la tête de l’animal peut être enlevée du corps et remise à son emplacement comme s’il s’agissait d’un couvercle (la tête s’emboîte derrière les oreilles dans le cou, dont le bord très régulier et bien achevé n’a certainement pas été cassé accidentellement) : on peut donc se poser la question de savoir si la figurine n’a pas été conçue dès 93


le départ comme un petit récipient, plutôt que comme statuette, peut-être pour contenir des graines ou d’autres dons supplémentaires faits à la divinité. Domestiqués ou à l’état sauvage, les petits herbivores étaient à la base de l’économie des populations proche-orientales. C’est certainement pour cette raison que les animaux appartenant à ces races (bouquetins, chèvres, antilopes, moutons, etc.) sont un des sujets favoris de l’art de ces régions. Parmi les quelques exemples de sculpture proto-élamite en argent comparables, on peut mentionner deux figurines d’antilopes [une est conservée au Metropolitan Museum à New York, fig. 1 ; l’autre, en argent fondu, appartenait à la collection L. Mildenberg, fig. 2], une statuette d’homme-taureau assis [New York, Metropolitan Museum, fig. 3] et un petit bélier conservé à Boston [inv. 59.14, fig. 4]. Toutes ces pièces sont datées d’environ 3000 av. J.-C. CONSERVATION Complet et en bon état, mais incrustations des yeux et de la barbe perdues. Surface par endroits piquetée et oxydée. Corps partiellement déformé, surtout dans la partie inférieure (équilibre instable). PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière anglaise, Londres, 1967 ; collection particulière européenne, Suisse, acquis avant 1997 ; importé aux USA, le 10 février 1998. BIBLIOGRAPHIE Pour les comparaisons, v. : DORMAN P.F. et al., The Metropolitan Museum of Art : Egypt and the Near East, 1987, p. 129, no. 93 (hommetaureau proto-élamite). HARPER P.O. (ed.), The Royal City of Susa, New York, 1992, p. 68, no. 29 (antilope). KENDELL T., Ancient Near Eastern Art : New Gallery at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, in Minerva 10, 2, March-April 1999, p. 36, no. 2 (bélier élamite en argent). KOZLOFF A.P. et al., More Animals in Ancient Art From the L. Mildenberg Collection, Mainz/Rhine, 1983, p. 5, no. 4 (antilope). MAHBOUBIAN H., Art of Ancient Iran, Copper and Bronze, London, 1997, pp. 38-39 (support élamite en bronze).

6

CARRE DE LIN AU NOM DE TA-NEDJEM Art égyptien, Nouvel Empire (fin de la XVIIIe dynastie, XIVe – début du XIIIe s. av. J.-C.) Lin peint Dim. : 29 x 21 cm

31444

Actuellement monté dans un cadre fait de bois et de verre, le carré a été tissé en fils de lin, recouvert d’une mince couche de plâtre blanc et décoré avec des teintes qui ont gardé une belle vivacité : noir, rouge brique, bleu, vert et jaune. Au-dessous d’un bref texte en hiéroglyphes, écrit en noir et sur deux colonnes, le dessinateur a peint une figure masculine à l’aspect juvénile : l’homme est assis sur un siège noir, pourvu de pieds se terminant en patte d’animal et d’un dossier présentant des petites poignées incurvées. Devant lui, se trouve une table à offrande de type traditionnel (haut pied supportant un plateau circulaire), remplie de pains, de légumes et de viande. Un long trait noir, légèrement ondulé, indique le sol. L’homme est habillé d’un long pagne jusqu’aux genoux et finement plissé ; il tient une bandelette blanche dans la main droite, tandis que de la gauche, il semble toucher les offrandes posées sur 94

la table. Sa tête est recouverte d’une épaisse perruque faite de tresses ornées de bouclettes qui encadrent le front ; un cône d’onguent parfumé est fixé au sommet de son crâne. Comme parure, il porte au cou un collier ousekh, composé de plusieurs rangées de perles polychromes. L’inscription, à lire ainsi : « offrande de toute chose bonne et pure pour l’âme de Ta-Nedjem juste de voix », indique le nom du propriétaire de ce tissu. Ta-Nedjem est un nom masculin qui n’est pas encore attesté dans les listes de noms égyptiens des personnes de cette période et qui signifie « le Doux Pays ». Les carrés de lin égyptiens (qu’on appelle aussi parfois scapulaires, coffin shrouds en anglais) sont des documents funéraires extrêmement rares et même la liste dressée par K. El-Enany n’en compte qu’une vingtaine (parmi lesquels l’exemplaire en question n’est pas compris). Ils étaient fabriqués dans le même tissu que les bandelettes enveloppant les momies et proviennent généralement du village de Deir el-Médineh, dans la Vallée des Rois, où vivaient les artisans (Ta-Nedjem en était très probablement un) qui travaillaient à la construction et à la décoration des tombes et des temples funéraires du Nouvel Empire. Ce site est surtout célèbre parce que les pharaons de cette période l’avaient choisi comme emplacement pour l’édification de leur dernière demeure. Actuellement conservé au Caire auprès de l’Institut français d’Archéologie orientale (inv. JE 54886), le carré de Sennefer est le seul qui ait été trouvé dans sa position originale : lors de la découverte du tombeau, le tissu se trouvait sur le linceul en toile qui recouvrait l’extérieur du sarcophage de Sennefer. Selon la critique, il est par ailleurs possible que d’autres carrés aient été fixés sur la poitrine du défunt, mais plutôt sur le drap interne qui couvrait directement les bandelettes. Typologiquement, la décoration des carrés suit une structure simple et souvent répétitive : on y voit toujours le(-a) défunt(-e) assis(-e) sur son siège devant une table d’offrande ornée du repas funéraire ; occasionnellement, une deuxième figure (un officiant ou un fils du défunt) accompagne le propriétaire du tissu. Le nom du défunt est indiqué dans l’inscription, qui comprend aussi les habituelles formules d’offrande qui permettaient à l’âme du défunt de survivre dans l’au-delà. L’exemplaire de Ta-Nedjem se rapproche de trois autres tissus, conservés à Boston [Museum of Fine Art, inv. 1981.657, fig. 1], à New York [MET, inv. 44.2.3 fig. 2] et au Louvre [inv. N847 fig. 3]. Les analogies ne se situent pas uniquement au niveau typologique, mais aussi stylistique, puisque de nombreux détails y sont traités de manière très similaire. CONSERVATION Complet et en très bon état malgré quelques lacunes (siège, fond) ; bord irrégulier. Polychromie encore vive, inscription parfaitement lisible. PROVENANCE Ancienne collection Lucien Lépine, acquis à Gournah, Egypte, avant 1926 ; avec Paul Mallon (1884-1975), antiquaire, Paris - New York, acquis en 1926 ; ancienne collection de Mme Arthur Sachs, acquis en 1927 ; ancienne collection J. Loviton (1903-1996), Paris, acquis en 1939 ; puis par descendance, collection H. F.Loviton, France. BIBLIOGRAPHIE ANDREU G. (ed.), Les artistes de Pharaon, Deir el-Médineh et la Vallée des Rois, Paris, 2002, p. 145, no. 88. Centenaire de l’Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale, Cairo, 1981, pp. 52-53 (Sennefer). EL-ENANY K., Un carré de lin peint au Musée de l’Agriculture du Caire (inv. 893), in Bulletin de l’Institut d’Archéologie orientale, 110, 2010, pp. 35-45 (liste pp. 40 ff.). 95


HAYES W.C., The Scepter of Egypt, New York, 1959, p. 320, fig. 202. Pour les exemplaires plus proches stylistiquement, v. : Mummies & magic. The funerary Arts of Ancient Egypt, New York, 1959, p. 320, fig. 202 (Boston, MFA, inv. 1981.657) (v. aussi http://www.mfa.org/collections/object/painted-coffin-shroud-4463) http://cartelfr.louvre.fr/cartelfr/visite?srv=car_not_frame&idNotice=3726&langue=fr (Louvre). http://www.metmuseum.org/search-results#!/search?q=painted%20linen%20inv.%20 44.2.3&page=1&searchFacet=Art (New York).

7

TABLE POMPEIENNE AVEC TeTES DE LOUP Art gréco-romain, Ier s. av. J.-C. – Ier s. apr. J.-C. Bronze, argent (incrustations) et niello H : 71.1 cm – L : 81.3 cm – P : 52.4 cm

30179

Très peu de tables en bronze de l’époque romaine sont parvenues jusqu’à nous ; parmi celles-ci, la pièce en examen est remarquable, tant par sa taille conséquente que pour sa décoration élaborée. Tout l’équilibre de l’objet est ici basé sur le contraste ingénieux entre la structure géométrique du plateau et des panneaux latéraux, et les formes incurvées et sculptées des pieds. Le plateau rectangulaire est soutenu par quatre pieds fins de composition complexe : en effet, chaque pied est une combinaison d’éléments rectilignes, convexes et concaves. Seule la partie supérieure rappelle un élément architectural (en forme de chapiteau de pilastre, avec une cimaise de feuilles de lierre) ; la partie centrale est une combinaison fantaisiste composée d’une volute d'acanthe de laquelle surgit une tête de loup, placée au-dessus des pattes arrière de l'animal. Les pieds de meubles en forme de pattes d’animaux sont un élément typique des chaises, tabourets, candélabres et trépieds de l’époque grecque et romaine ; dans le cas présent, toutefois, la disposition spatiale des trois parties du pied leur confère presque un statut de sculpture individuelle. Le modelé de la tête de l'animal est extraordinaire. Le bronzier n’a omis aucun détail : les poils de l'épaisse crinière sont rendus plastiquement, les mèches sont indiquées par de fines incisions ; les yeux sont percés, et l'ombre profonde ainsi créée accentue l’expression intense du regard de l’animal ; les crocs sont visibles dans la gueule ouverte. Le loup a un air agressif et féroce, d’où la fonction apotropaïque que l’on attribue aux têtes de ce type. Le loup était associé à Apollon, à Mars et à ses fils, les futurs fondateurs de Rome, Romulus et Remus, qui furent recueillis par une louve. La surface des pieds présente une ornementation supplémentaire : des motifs décoratifs de branches d'olivier. L’avant de la partie supérieure présente la branche d'olivier dans une composition verticale, les feuilles et les fruits sont disposés de façon symétrique. La section médiane présente plusieurs bandes horizontales avec des branches d'olivier. Cette décoration comprenait des incrustations en couleur, aujourd'hui perdues ; on peut imaginer que tous ces éléments contribuaient considérablement à l’effet chromatique de cette table. La surface du plateau et les panneaux latéraux étaient richement gravés et incrustés. Au centre du plateau est gravé un écusson décoré de feuillages ; il se compose d’une guirlande encerclant un motif quadrilobé à palmettes ; la guirlande est encadrée de rubans. Chaque coin du plateau présente une rosette ou une étoile à six pétales. De part et d’autre, les deux longs côtés se terminent 96

par des sections rectangulaires qui contiennent chacune un motif de rosettes à quatre pétales (incrustation en argent). L'argent a été utilisé abondamment sur les bords et sur la frise de grecques qui ornent la partie médiane de chaque côté, tandis que le fond est recouvert de niello : le contraste saisissant produit entre l’éclat de l’argent et le fond noir est un élément majeur de cette décoration raffinée. Seuls quelques autres exemples comportant des incrustations d'argent semblables sont connus : deux tables rectangulaires à support (l’une provenant de Pompéi et conservée au Musée archéologique national de Naples ; l'autre actuellement conservée dans la collection du Metropolitan Museum of Art), un canapé aux musées du Capitole, ainsi que des éléments épars de meubles au Musée archéologique national de Naples et au Metropolitan Museum. Datés de la même période, les exemples précités démontrent bien le goût pour les produits de luxe et pour la décoration exotique qui s’est propagé dans la société romaine après la conquête romaine en Orient. Dès la fin du IIe siècle av. J.-C., les artistes et artisans de l'Orient grec introduisirent toute une variété d’objets de décoration intérieure, d’ameublement et d’arts décoratifs qui n’étaient pas habituels chez les patriciens de la génération précédente. L'étude du mobilier romain distingue cinq types de tables : la table oblongue rectangulaire à trois pieds ; la table rectangulaire à quatre pieds ; la table rectangulaire ou ronde reposant sur un support unique ; la table ronde à trois pieds ; la table rectangulaire sur deux supports transversaux solides. Un type supplémentaire est constitué par la table pliante en bois ou en métal. Dès la fin de l’époque républicaine, les Romains commencent à prendre leur repas allongés sur des divans, selon la coutume grecque du banquet ; les tables sont dressées à côté des convives et, en général, chacun d’eux dispose d’une table individuelle. Il est intéressant de noter que la majeure partie de la décoration complexe à incrustations d'argent ne se trouve pas sur le dessus de la pièce, mais sur les côtés, comme si elle avait été conçue pour être vue par une personne en position couchée. Chez les Romains fortunés, le dîner avait pour cadre différentes pièces ou zones de la maison, ou de la villa, selon le moment de la journée et la météo, l'occasion et le nombre d'invités. C’est pourquoi les tables devaient être de taille relativement petite ou moyenne, afin que l’on puisse facilement les transporter et les enlever une fois le repas terminé. Il existait également des tables spéciales qui étaient placées à proximité des sanctuaires de la demeure, les lararia, et qui étaient utilisées pour stocker la vaisselle destinée aux sacrifices et aux libations. CONSERVATION La table est dans un bon état général. Le plateau et deux des pieds ont été restaurés à partir de fragments. Un pied a été remplacé. PROVENANCE Ancienne collection Luigi Grassi, Florence, le Prof. L. Grassi (1858-1937) était propriétaire d’une galerie d'art renommée à Florence, sur la Via Cavour ; avec Piero Tozzi Galleries, New York, (1882-1974), acquis le 1er août 1946 (documents d’inventaire : no. 760, datés de 1947 et 1953) ; Vente anonyme, Sotheby’s New York, 18 Juin 1991, lot 155. EXPOSE Pompeiana, Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, MA, USA, 18 novembre-15 décembre 1948 (un pied), lot 16. PUBLIE Pompeiana, Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, MA, USA, 18 novembre-15 décembre 1948 (un pied), lot 16 ; Anonymous sale, Sotheby's New York, 18 juin 1991, lot 155. 97


BIBLIOGRAPHIE Pompeii AD 79 : Treasures from the National Archaeological Museum, Naples, with contributions from the Pompeii Antiquarium and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston, 1978, p. 178, nos. 174-176 ; pp. 198199, nos. 245-247. RICHTER G. M. A., The Furniture of the Greeks, Etruscans and Romans, London. 1966, pp. 63-72 ; 93-95 ; 110-113 ; figs. 563-580, 656-657.

8

BIBLIOGRAPHIE GHIRSHMAN R., The Art of Ancient Iran : From its Origin to the Time of Alexander the Great, New York, 1964, pp. 41-82. MOOREY P. R. S., Ancient Bronzes, Ceramics and Seals, The Nasli M. Heeramaneck Collection of Ancient Near Eastern, Central Asiatic, and European art, Los Angeles, 1981, pp. 14-17 ; 57-63, nos. 239, 240-241, 244,250251, 254, 262, 266. The Pomerance Collection of Ancient Art, The Brooklyn Museum, New York, 1966, pp. 40-41, no. 46. MUSCARELLA O. W., Bronze and Iron : Ancient Near Eastern Artifacts in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1998, pp. 146-149, nos. 225-237 ; pp. 151-152, nos. 238-242.

MASQUE DE DIVINITE Piravend, Ier millénaire av. J.-C. Bronze H : 19.4 cm

30173

La taille importante, la qualité du bronze et l'expressivité de l'image se combinent ici pour faire de cette pièce un travail remarquable de l'art antique proche-oriental et perse. Pour l’oeil du spectateur contemporain, cette oeuvre offre un attrait extraordinaire qui n’est pas sans rappeler les principes esthétiques de l'art moderne et qui trouve des parallèles certains dans les travaux d’Amedeo Modigliani et Alberto Giacometti. Le masque est composé d’une longue partie allongée qui inclut le cou et une partie de la tête (le visage et le front, mais sans cheveux). Les sourcils arqués sont modelés en relief et se rejoignent au-dessus du nez dans une articulation caractéristique qui marque la ligne médiane. Le nez est formé d’un simple triangle étroit, les narines ne sont pas indiquées. Deux trous circulaires percés de part et d’autre du nez représentent les yeux. La petite bouche incisée est placée à mi-chemin entre le nez et le long menton étroit, dont la forme nette et exagérée représentait peut-être une barbe pointue, mais cette question reste à déterminer. Conformément au type du masque, les traits du visage sont très stylisés ; le menton et les pommettes dessinent un contour régulier surmonté par la ligne ininterrompue des sourcils, et par le front haut qui fait presque penser à une couronne. Seules les oreilles arrondies viennent rompre la régularité de la forme ovale : clairement indiquées, elles semblent projetées horizontalement sur les côtés, au niveau des yeux. Chaque oreille a trois trous destinés à recevoir des boucles d'oreilles en or ou en argent lors des consécrations votives. En l'absence de sources écrites, cependant, on ne peut se prononcer plus précisément sur la signification idéologique de cet objet. La surface est propre et lisse. Les trous visibles en haut et en bas de chaque côté de la pièce servaient probablement à la fixer à un manche en bois, comme le haut d'un étendard lors de cérémonies religieuses. Parmi les rares parallèles iconographiques, on peut mentionner le masque en bronze de la collection Pomerance, bien que ce dernier possède également des cornes incurvées. Cet élément relaie l’hypothèse selon laquelle plusieurs types de masques étaient utilisés, chacun ayant un sens propre et représentant différents démons ou divinités fabuleuses. CONSERVATION Excellent état de conservation, belle patine vert foncé. La surface extérieure est propre ; quelques éraflures et éclats du coulage original. Des traces de noyau d'argile sur la surface intérieure. Le trou supérieur droit est abîmé. PROVENANCE Ancienne collection S. Aboutaam, Beyrouth, acquis dans les années 1960 env. ; ancienne collection 98

particulière britannique, 1985 env. ; marché new-yorkais de l’art, fin des années 1980 ; collection particulière américaine, New York, acquis le 13 décembre 1990.

9

OUCHEBTY AU NOM DE IMEN-NEB-NEHEH Art égyptien, Nouvel Empire (fin XVIIIe – XIXe dynastie, vers 1300 s. av. J.-C.) Bois H : 24.8 cm

25478

La figurine a été taillée dans un seul morceau de bois dur et compact, de couleur foncée. Il s’agit d’une œuvre dont la qualité artistique est remarquable, tant du point de vue des proportions, qui sont élancées et élégantes, que par sa plasticité (formes sinueuses et bien modelées). L’iconographie de cet exemplaire est la même que l’on retrouve sur de nombreux ouchebtys contemporains, mise à part la position particulière des bras et des mains qui ne sont pas croisés sur la poitrine, mais que l’homme pose un peu plus bas que d’habitude, avec les mains à peine superposées. Le corps a l’aspect d’une momie entièrement drapée dans le linceul, avec des proportions plutôt allongées ; bien que caché par le tissu, le contour des bras est bien marqué plastiquement. Les mains ressortent d’une fente verticale marquées sur la momie et sont indiquées en relief ; le personnage tient une houe (main gauche) et un petit sac à semence (main droite). Le visage, large et arrondi, esquisse encore une expression légèrement « souriante », typique des sculptures de cette période ; il est encadré d’une coiffure tripartite, présentant de profondes rayures verticales, qui descend comme une natte dans le dos et sur la poitrine en formant deux grandes tresses lisses et simples. Il porte un magnifique collier à plusieurs rangées de petites perles, soutenu par deux têtes de faucon visibles sur les épaules. Le texte en hiéroglyphes était gravé en dix lignes, qui présentent malheureusement d’importantes lacunes dans les lignes inférieures. Comme souvent, il reproduit une partie du chapitre VI du Livre des Morts et indique le nom du défunt qui s’appelait Imen-Neb-Neheh. Selon le texte, il était l’administrateur des étables d’Amon, c’est-à-dire qu’il était responsable du bon fonctionnement des élevages qui faisaient partie des biens du dieu et qui comptaient certainement des dizaines de milliers d’animaux : comme l’indiquent les sources contemporaines (cf. par exemple le papyrus Harris I), il s’agissait des animaux domestiqués, mais aussi des bêtes sauvages. Les statuettes funéraires, que l’on appelle généralement ouchebtys, sont le plus souvent en faïence bleue ; les exemplaires en pierre (stéatite, « albâtre »/calcite, calcaire, grès, rarement quartzite, etc.), en métal (bronze ou autres métaux nobles, généralement à la portée uniquement des classes

99


les plus aisées) ou en bois, sont moins fréquents : ces images accompagnaient le défunt dans la tombe, pour exécuter à sa place tous les travaux quotidiens liés à l’agriculture, au transport, à la construction, etc.

Quatre ateliers principaux sont répertoriés pour l’ensemble de la production laconienne à figures noires qui couvre le VIe siècle av. J.-C. : l’atelier du Peintre de Naucratis, celui du Peintre des Boréades, celui du Peintre des Cavaliers et enfin l’atelier du Peintre de la Chasse.

CONSERVATION Mis à part les pieds, qui sont perdus, la statuette est complète et en excellent état. Quelques lignes de texte sont effacées. Surface du visage partiellement usée (nez).

Le pic de production de l’atelier qui nous concerne se situe dans le troisième quart du VIe siècle av. J.-C. Sur les quelques 131 œuvres qui ont pu être recensées dans l’ensemble de la Méditerranée, la forme qui domine est la coupe, pour environ 80% des vases.

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection Pierre et Claude Vérité, Paris, France, collectionné entre 1930 et 1960.

CONSERVATION Très bon état général de la peinture ; fissure au pied, recollé à partir de plusieurs fragments.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE D’autres exemplaires en bois : ANDREU G. (ed.), Les artistes de Pharaon, Deir-el-Médineh et la Vallée des Rois, Paris, 2002, pp. 292 ff. PAGE-GASSER M. – WIESE A.B., Egypte, Moments d’éternité, Art égyptien dans les collections privées, Suisse, Mainz/Rhine, 1997, pp. 191 ff., nos. 124-125. En général sur les ouchebtys : AUBERT J-F. et L., Statuettes égyptiennes, Chaouabtis, Ouchebtis, Paris, 1974.

10

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière P.C., Nürnberg, Allemagne, collectionné avant 1982 ; collection particulière européenne, acquis en 2012. PUBLIE SIMON E. (ed.), Mythen und Menschen, Griechische Vasenkunst aus einer deutschen Privatsammlung, Mainz/ Rhine, 1997, no. 4, pp. 18-19 avec ill.; STIBBE C. M., Das andere Sparta, Mainz/Rhine, 1996, no. 8, pp. 175-178 avec ill.; STIBBE C. M., Lakonische Vasenmaler des sechsten Jh. V. Chr., Supplement, Mainz/Rhine, 2004, no. 137/15, p. 219, ill. 42.

Kylix A FIGURES NOIRES ATTRIBUEE AU PEINTRE DE LA CHASSE Art grec (laconien), 550 – 540 av. J.-C. Céramique H : 10.3 cm – D : 14.7 cm

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Sur la production de la céramique laconienne, v. : COUDIN F., Les vases laconiens entre orient et occident au VIe siècle av. J.-C. : formes et iconographie, dans Revue archéologique 48, 2009/2 : https://www.cairn.info/revue-archeologique-2009-2-page-227.htm STIBBE C.M., Lakonische Vasenmaler des sechsten Jahrhunderts v. Chr., Amsterdam, 1972 (vol. 1 texte, vol. 2 pl.), V. Der Jagd-Maler, pp. 121 ff. Pour la coupe éponyme du Louvre, v. : STIBBE C.M., Lakonische Vasenmaler des sechsten Jahrhunderts v. Chr., Amsterdam, 1972, no. 220, ill. 78, 1. ou http://www.photo.rmn.fr/archive/95-000051-2C6NU0N09OAV.html

27234

Très jolie coupe à boire (kylix), de petites dimensions, caractéristique de la production grecque, plus précisément de la Laconie (la région de Sparte, située au sud-est de la péninsule du Péloponnèse). La couleur de l’argile est spécifiquement orangée-jaune, en comparaison à la production attique typiquement orange-rouge. La coupe présente une profonde vasque, deux anses longues et arquées, placées à mi-hauteur entre la lèvre et le bas de la vasque, ainsi qu’un haut pied en trompette. La décoration extérieure de la kylix est simple mais très bien équilibrée, et reprend les formes linéaires du vase (pied affiné et vernissé noir, arêtes rayonnantes au départ de la vasque, succession de lignes plus ou moins épaissies et palmettes stylisées au niveau des anses fines et vernissées). La technique utilisée est celle de la céramique à figures noires. L’ornementation principale se trouve illustrée au cœur de la vasque : deux paires d’oies aux ailes déployées sont représentées par effet de miroir. De nombreuses incisions détaillent harmonieusement les différentes parties corporelles des volatiles. Des lignes ondulées créent d’ailleurs un certain mouvement au niveau des ailes, idéalement accentué par un rehaut de couleur pourpre. Entre chaque couple d’oiseaux se trouve illustrée une composition florale inspirée d’une fleur de lotus. Au centre, on trouve encore un aigle en plein vol. Pour parfaire sa composition symétrique, l’artiste a malheureusement manqué de place et a été contraint de représenter, d’un côté, un bourgeon de lotus, et de l’autre, un simple rond orné d’une croix. Ce vase peut être attribué au Peintre dit de la chasse, dont l’une des coupes éponymes se trouve au Louvre et représente la célèbre scène de la chasse au sanglier de Calydon.

100

11

STATUETTE DE DEDU-AMON Art égyptien, Moyen Empire (XIIIe dynastie, vers 1802 – 1640 av. J.-C.) Serpentine H : 22.9 cm

33560

Cette oeuvre remarquable représente Dedu-Amon, une personnalité de haut rang de sexe masculin. Il s’avance à grands pas, confiant, dans l’attitude égyptienne canonique, la jambe gauche en avant. Ses bras retombent le long de son corps et ses mains, paumes ouvertes, reposent sur ses cuisses. Il porte un long pagne, composé d'une unique pièce de tissu rectangulaire en lin très fin, dont la bordure est ornée d’un liseré. Cette toile de lin est enroulée autour du corps et attachée à la taille, la partie décorée bien en évidence tout autour de la taille. Un des pan de l’étoffe est rentré dans le reste du tissu afin qu’il tienne en place, comme on le fait de nos jours avec une serviette de plage. Jacques Vandier, le grand égyptologue et historien de l'art français, appelle ce type de vêtement la jupe sans apprêt, et souligne qu’il s’agit du costume qui était le plus communément porté par les fonctionnaires de la Cour au Moyen Empire. 101


Dedu-Amon se présente lui-même comme un administrateur respectueux et consciencieux, et comme un fervent fidèle des dieux, raison pour laquelle sa statuette évite tout signe d’ostentation. Il est pieds et torse nus, et ne porte pas d’accessoires tels que colliers ou bracelets. Son crâne est rasé de près. L’expression de son visage traduit une solide détermination. Conformément aux conventions artistiques de l’Egypte ancienne, son torse est légèrement corpulent, un signe extérieur de son statut social et économique privilégié en tant qu’administrateur de haut rang. Ses oreilles, volontairement agrandies et tournées vers l'extérieur, évoquent symboliquement sa capacité à écouter et à prendre en compte les requêtes de ceux qui lui demandent de l’aide. Ses larges mains semblent également suggérer les effets bienveillants de ses actes dans la fonction qu’il occupe. Toutes ces caractéristiques nous permettent de déduire que Dedu-Amon vécut à la fin de la XIIe dynastie. En effet, pendant la première partie de la XIIe dynastie, le devant du pagne est généralement couvert d’une inscription hiéroglyphique sur une ou plusieurs colonnes, et les fonctionnaires représentés portent une perruque, comme l’atteste la statuette d’Amenemhat-Ânkh conservée à Paris. Vers la fin de la XIIe dynastie, les inscriptions sur le devant du pagne tendent à disparaître et les fonctionnaires sont de plus en plus représentés rasés et la tête nue, comme c’est le cas dans la pièce en examen. On retrouve cette typologie au cours de la XIIIe dynastie, comme le démontre la statue assise de Renefsenebdag, aujourd’hui à Berlin, et la statuette en bronze d'un fonctionnaire anonyme, conservée à Paris. Toutefois, la qualité de la sculpture se détériore dans le courant de la XIIIe dynastie et la paléographie, ou dessins des hiéroglyphes, est moins soigneusement sculptée dans la pierre pendant la XIIIe dynastie, comme le révèlent les comparaisons avec les statuettes d’Ameny (Paris) et d’Ankhu, découvertes à Éléphantine et datées de la XIIIe dynastie. Par conséquent, la réussite esthétique de cette œuvre d'art représentant Dedu-Amon et le soin particulier avec lequel les hiéroglyphes ont été sculptés nous amènent à dater cette pièce de la fin de la XIIe dynastie ou du tout début de la XIIIe dynastie. La statuette de Dedu-Amon comporte une seule colonne de hiéroglyphes sur le bas du pilier et deux rangées parallèles sur la partie avant du socle rectangulaire. La forme de ces hiéroglyphes soigneusement exécutés et leur contenu correspondent à l’état linguistique que les archéologues appellent « moyen égyptien », la langue classique par excellence. Aujourd’hui encore, ce type de signes constitue la base des études de la langue égyptienne. On peut traduire l'inscription du pilier arrière comme suit : Un cadeau que le pharaon accorde au dieu Osiris, qui est le Seigneur de Busiris, qui est aussi le grand dieu et Seigneur d'Abydos afin qu’Osiris à son tour puisse accorder une invocation en offrant du pain et de la bière et des bœufs et de la volaille au ka de celui qui est vénéré, qui se nomme Dedu-Amon, né de sa mère, Sat-Montou, juste de voix. et celle du socle, ainsi : le vénéré, Dedu-Amon, né de sa mère, Sat-Montou, juste de voix, la vénérée.

senter avec un crâne en forme d'œuf. Quelques siècles plus tard, celui qu’on appela le pharaon hérétique, Akhénaton, connut des factions rivales similaires dans sa cour. Afin d’établir une distinction claire entre lui-même et les membres de son entourage immédiat, et les autres, il réintroduisit le crâne en forme d'œuf comme indice visuel de sa réforme religieuse révolutionnaire. Le physique légèrement corpulent, presque androgyne d'Akhénaton rappelle également les torses corpulents des fonctionnaires de haut rang du Moyen Empire, comme celui de Dedu-Amon. Le raffinement qui émane de cette image de Dedu-Amon et de ses autres représentations sont emblématiques de l’influence incontestable que le Moyen Empire a exercé sur la prestigieuse période Amarna. CONSERVATION La statuette est intacte et exceptionnellement bien conservée. PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière ; Vente anonyme, Sotheby’s London, 12 décembre 1988, lot 68 ; collection particulière américaine, Californie. PUBLIE Sotheby’s London, 12 Décembre 1988, lot 68. BIBLIOGRAPHIE Pour la jupe sans apprêt, voir : VANDIER J., Manuel d’archéologie égyptienne. III. Les grandes époques. La statuaire, Paris, 1958, pp. 249-250. A propos de la statuette d’Ankhu provenant d'Éléphantine, voir : HABACHI L., The Sanctuary of Heqa-ib [=Elephantine IV], Mainz/Rhine, 1985, no. 71. A propos d’Amememhat-Ânkh, Paris, Musée du Louvre E 11053, voir : DELANGE E., Musée du Louvre. Catalogue des statues égyptiennes du Moyen Empire, 2060-1560 avant J.-C., Paris, 1987, pp. 69-70. A propos de la statuette anonyme en bronze de Paris, Musée du Louvre E 27153, voir : DELANGE E., Musée du Louvre. Catalogue des statues égyptiennes du Moyen Empire, 2060-1560 avant J.-C., Paris, 1987, pp. 211-213. A propos de la statuette d’Ameny, Musée du Louvre AF 460, voir : DELANGE E., Musée du Louvre. Catalogue des statues égyptiennes du Moyen Empire, 2060-1560 avant J.-C., Paris, 1987, p. 219. A propos de la statue assise de Renefsenebdag, Berlin, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Ägyptisches Museum und Papyrussammlung 10115, voir : OPPENHEIM A., et al. (ed.), Ancient Egypt Transformed. The Middle Kingdom, New York, New Haven and London, 2015, pp. 150-151, no. 85. Pour les noms de Dedu-Amon [littéralement, « celui à qui le dieu Amon a donné »] et Sat-Montou [littéralement, « la fille du dieu Montou »], voir : RANKE H., Die ägyptischen Personennamen, Glückstadt, 1935, p. 401, respectivement no. 8 et 289, 9.

Hormis ces considérations chronologiques, cette statuette de Dedu-Amon revêt une importance certaine dans l’histoire de l’art égyptien. Lorsqu’on observe la tête du personnage de profil, on constate qu’elle a une forme légèrement allongée que l’on serait tentés de qualifier, à tort, de difforme. Il n’est pas nécessaire de s’attarder ici sur la question des luttes de pouvoir qui ont jalonné l'administration du Moyen Empire. Il suffit de rappeler que la tension qui existait entre le pharaon et ses administrateurs de haut rang contraignit ces deux factions rivales à adopter des caractéristiques stylistiques qui indiquaient de la façon la plus évidente possible leurs divergences politiques. Pour exprimer leur désaccord, les membres de la haute administration choisirent de se faire repré102

103


12

STELE AVEC UN HOMME ET UN GARÇON Art grec (style sévère), deuxième quart du Ve s. av. J.-C. Marbre Dim. : 63 x 32 x 5.5 cm

30514

Cette extrêmement rare et importante stèle est ornée d’une magnifique scène où les deux personnages ressortent très en relief, par rapport au fond plat et lisse ; elle est encadrée par un bord épais, finement travaillé et arrondi. Une palmette, aux feuilles légèrement creuses et soutenue par deux volutes, décore la partie supérieure de l’ensemble : elle est flanquée par deux éléments au contour sinueux, qui rappellent la tête d’un dauphin. La face postérieure est plate et simplement piquetée, tandis que les côtés ainsi que les bords de la palmette sont lisses et bien achevés. Malgré le fait qu’aucune trace ne soit actuellement visible, il est certain que de nombreux détails étaient à l’origine rendus ou rehaussés par de la peinture. Au niveau des jambes de l’homme, sous son manteau, on voit deux séries de trous percés au foret ainsi qu’un traitement moins bien achevé de la surface : des éléments faits à part (en marbre ou en plâtre) étaient probablement fixés à cet endroit. La scène, qui se caractérise par sa grande douceur et par la forte intimité des deux personnages, est certainement en rapport avec le monde funéraire : l’homme, le défunt, est habillé par un long manteau drapé autour de son corps et sur son épaule gauche. Ses cheveux sont courts et sa barbe très bien soignée. Sa coiffure, dite krobilos (elle se termine par deux longues tresses qui se croisent derrière la nuque), est d’un type particulier, élaborée et riche : comme l’attestent de nombreuses représentations (grande sculpture, peinture sur vase), elle était très à la mode dans les premières décennies du Ve siècle av. J.-C. dans le monde grec. L’homme s’appuie sur un bâton (on entrevoit son extrémité dans l’angle inférieur droit de la stèle) et baisse sa tête vers un garçon, un jeune serviteur, entièrement nu, qui se trouve devant lui. En levant à son tour la tête vers l’homme et en croisant ainsi son regard, l’enfant souligne l’étroit rapport qui existe entre les deux figures. Mais l’interaction est aussi physique, puisque de sa main droite, le défunt caresse la tête de l’enfant, qui, à son tour, touche le corps de l’homme avec son avant-bras gauche levé et posé sur la draperie, au niveau de la hanche. Il est possible que le garçon ait tenu dans sa main droite un attribut comme un strigile ou un aryballe, qui étaient simplement peints. De plus, comme sur d’autres stèles contemporaines, on peut imaginer qu’un chien se trouvait aux pieds de l’homme (là où la surface est travaillée différemment et où il y a les trous signalés) : l’animal aurait symbolisé plus qu’un simple compagnon, il aurait été son accompagnateur dans le voyage vers le fleuve infernal.

enrichies de nombreuses nuances, les détails anatomiques sont précis et réalistes : cette perfection formelle traduit, avec grande finesse, l’intensité psychologique de la scène. Un des plus importants ensembles de sculpture tectonique du monde grec, le temple de Zeus à Olympie, fournit d’excellents parallèles pour l’œuvre en examen. La comparaison de la tête du propriétaire de la stèle avec certaines des têtes de l’Héraklès présenté sur les métopes de ce temple (voir en particulier Héraklès avec les oiseaux du lac Stymphale, avec le taureau de Crète, avec Atlas, dans les écuries d’Augias) montre une étroite parenté typologique et surtout stylistique ; de même, tous ces personnages sont caractérisés par leur expression « sévère », terme utilisé par la critique moderne pour définir l’art grec de la première moitié du Ve siècle av. J.-C. On notera, en particulier, le traitement doux et nuancé des visages, le rendu de la barbe et la moustache clairement délimitées et présentant un modelage superficiel légèrement bombé, sans détails pour des mèches, qui devaient être peintes. Il est donc probable que l’atelier qui a produit cette stèle se trouvait en Grèce continentale (Péloponnèse). La datation du relief est à fixer entre 470 et 450 av. J.-C. environ. CONSERVATION Excellent état de conservation, mais partie inférieure perdue ; la stèle est composée de deux gros fragments recollés (fracture centrale, en diagonale). Quelques éclats et petits rebouchages. Surface en très bonne condition, malgré quelques usures et quelques dépôts calcaires. PROVENANCE Ancienne collection J. Lions, St-Tropez – Genève, acquis au début des années 1970. BIBLIOGRAPHIE Sur les stèles funéraires grecques de cette période : CLAIRMONT C. W., Classical Attic Tombstones, Kilchberg, 1993. PFUHL E. – MÖBIUS H., Die ostgriechischen Grabreliefs, T. 1, Mainz/Rhine, 1977, pp. 8-37. Quelques stèles avec petits serviteurs et chiens : BOARDMAN J., Greek Sculpture, The Classical Period, London, 1985, fig. 58 (Egine). HAMIAUX M., La Sculpture grecque, t. I, Paris, 2001, no. 152, p. 158 (Louvre, Attique). PFUHL E. – MÖBIUS H., Die ostgriechischen Grabreliefs, T. 1, Mainz/Rhine, 1977, nos. 10, 12, 37 (Grèce de l’est). Sur les sculptures d’Olympie : STEWART A., Greek Sculpture, A Exploration, New York – London, 1990, pp. 142 ff. (avec bibliographie antérieure).

La représentation du défunt dans un cadre familier (ici, le propriétaire de la stèle est une figure d’âge mûr, accompagnée par son jeune esclave) est un thème fréquent sur les stèles funéraires grecques de toutes les régions, qui, pendant toute la période classique (Ve et IVe siècles av. J.-C.) utilisent régulièrement des motifs conventionnels aussi bien pour les monuments commémorant une femme que pour ceux dédiés à des hommes. Même si en général les stèles funéraires grecques sont assez répétitives, cette œuvre sort de l’ordinaire grâce à ses qualités artistiques et techniques remarquables. Le sculpteur a bien su rendre la profondeur, en travaillant la surface des personnages pratiquement en ronde bosse et en creusant profondément leur bord. Les formes plastiques sont modelées avec une belle sensibilité et

104

105


13

PORTRAIT MASCULIN (PRETRE OU L’EMPEREUR GORDIEN II) Art romain, env. 230 – 250 apr. J.-C. Bronze H : 33 cm

Tête au col arrondi pour être inséré dans un buste ou une statue. L’homme a un nez fort et busqué. Ses yeux, creusés en forme de lunule, ont une expression calme et intense. Sa coiffure plate, aux mèches ressemblant à un fin plumage, est découpée sur le front en trois parties. Sur l’occiput, les cheveux vont dans tous les sens. Quant aux sourcils, ils sont figurés par des incisions en forme de chevrons. Le personnage se distingue par le port d’un bandeau, qui s’amincit à l’arrière de la tête, où il se ferme par « un nœud d’Héraclès ». De fines rayures donnent à penser qu’il avait été préparé pour recevoir une dorure. Deux trous dans le crâne servaient pour la fixation d’un autre ornement. Des réparations antiques se remarquent à l’oreille gauche et dans le cou. Le style de cette tête, d’une facture assez rude, est difficile à préciser. Une datation vers le milieu du IIIe siècle apr. J.-C. semble la plus vraisemblable, si l’on considère surtout le traitement de la chevelure courte et peu épaisse, où les cheveux ne sont indiqués que par des petites incisions irrégulières. Pour ce qui est de l’identité du personnage, on pense à un prêtre, à cause de cette sorte de bandeau : il était attaché au service d’une divinité particulière, actuellement impossible à identifier, peut-être d’origine orientale. Prêtre se dit en latin sacerdos, « celui qui rend sacré ». A Rome, comme dans les sociétés païennes en général, les prêtres n’avaient pas de mission spirituelle particulière. Ils étaient seulement les garants du culte dans lequel ils officiaient. Ils n’appartenaient pas à une caste et leur rôle n’était pas incompatible avec la participation à la vie civile : nombre d’entre eux exerçaient d’ailleurs une magistrature ou une autre charge publique. Ainsi, par exemple, l’orateur Cicéron fut augure et Jules César grand pontife. On notera également une similitude typologique du profil de cette tête avec les portraits monétaires de Gordien II, qui fut empereur pendant seulement trois semaines entre mars et avril 238 apr. J.-C. : malheureusement, ce personnage, fils du sénateur et empereur Gordien Ier (les deux ont régné en même temps, le père, trop âgé, ayant associé son fils à sa principauté), n’a pas de portraits officiels et unanimement reconnus.

14

CAMEE AVEC MINERVE/ATHENA Art romain, période julio-claudienne, Ier s. apr. J.-C. Sardoine Dim. : 4.8 x 2.9 cm

22635

Splendide camée de forme elliptique, sculpté sur quatre couches successives. Dans la glyptique (l’art de la gravure des pierres fines), le camée constitue la technique inverse de l’intaille, qui présente un décor gravé en creux apparaissant à l’envers une fois son empreinte réalisée en relief (sceau). Par opposition, tout l’art du camée est donc de proposer une ornementation en relief, qui dans l’exemplaire présent est portée à son apogée. La pierre sculptée est ici une sardoine (une variété de calcédoine), qui permet d’obtenir une magnifique alternance de couches brunes et blanches. Si ce chef d’œuvre de glyptique correspond, typologiquement parlant, à la période romaine et plus précisément à l’ère julio-claudienne (Ier siècle apr. J.-C.), la broche en or sur laquelle la pierre a été montée doit être datée de l’époque moderne. Le personnage féminin, représenté de profil, peut fort aisément être identifié comme une Minerve/ Athéna : son casque attique, à long panache, ou encore son égide (peau de chèvre recouverte d’écailles de serpent et dont les têtes de serpent surgissent de la bordure extérieure, avec la tête de la Gorgone/Méduse bien reconnaissable au centre de la poitrine) ne laisse aucun doute sur son identification.

CONSERVATION Complet, excellent état ; plaquettes rectangulaires témoignant de finitions ou réparations antiques exécutées à froid. Belle patine verte uniforme.

Sur le haut du casque, on trouve encore la fine représentation de la déesse Victoire, ailée, conduisant un char, le fouet relevé au dessus de deux chevaux (en partie disparus) dont elle maintient les rênes. Enfin, une tête de lion (de profil, la gueule ouverte) est visible sur la partie basse qui protège la nuque de la déesse.

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection ambassadoriale, début des années 1960 ; puis par descendance, collection de Mme Pilate, Vienne, Autriche ; ancienne collection H. K., Vienne, Autriche, acquis en 1976 ; collection particulière européenne, acquis en Suisse en 2000.

La grande qualité et finesse de ce camée fait penser aux chefs d’œuvre bien connus que sont le Grand Camée de France (actuellement conservé au Cabinet des médailles de la Bibliothèque nationale de France) ou encore la Gemma Augustea (actuellement au Kunsthistorisches Museum de Vienne).

PUBLIE Imago, Four Centuries of Roman Portraiture, Genève - New York, 2007, no. 12. BIBLIOGRAPHIE JOHANSEN, F., Roman Portrait III, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhague, 1995, nos. 50, 51, 57, pp.123-126, 136-137. INAN, J. - ROSENBAUM E., Roman and early Byzantine Portrait Sculpture in Asia Minor, London, 1966, no. 252, pl. 139 ; no. 291, pl. 165 et no. 292 (pour les photographies de la tête no. 292 cf. 106

INAN J.-ROSENBAUM E., Römische und frühbyzantinische Porträtplastik aus der Türkei, Neue Funde, Mainz/Rhine, 1979, pl. 189). Sur Gordien et ses portraits, v. : Histoire Auguste, Les trois Gordiens, VI, 1-2. VON HEINTZE H., Studien zu den Porträts des 3. Jahrhunderts n. Chr., in Mitteilungen des deutschen archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung 63, 1956, pp. 62 ff, pl. 31-32. WIGGERS H.B. – VON WEGNER M., Das römische Herrscherbild, Band 3, vol. 1, Caracalla bis Balbinus, Berlin, 1971, pp. 236 ff., pl. 73.

15766

Le premier, aux dimensions exceptionnelles, illustre le triomphe de Germanicus, qui prend congé de l’Empereur Tibère et de sa femme Livie ; l’Olympe étant visible sur le registre supérieur. Le décor du second se rapporte à l'un des triomphes germaniques de Tibère ; on y voit Auguste divinisé, sous les traits de Jupiter. Tous deux datent du premier quart du Ier siècle apr. J.-C. et certains suggèrent (mais beaucoup contredisent) qu’il puisse s’agir de créations du célèbre tailleur de pierres fines de l’époque,

107


Dioscorides (cité dans les sources par Pline l’Ancien, comme celui qui grava une effigie très ressemblante du dieu Auguste, reprise ensuite par les empereurs comme cachet). A titre de pièces similaires auxquels on peut rapprocher l’exemplaire ici présenté, on peut citer plusieurs camées du Cabinet des médailles de la Bibliothèque nationale de France. Soit il s’agit de portraits d’Agrippine, mère et fille, ou belle-mère et épouse de l’Empereur Claude, parfois sous les traits de Minerve ; soit il s’agit de portraits de princesses de la Cour de Claude voir de Néron : dans tous les cas, les traits physionomiques se rattachent à cette période historique romaine que constitue la première dynastie des Empereurs, les Julio-Claudiens. CONSERVATION Etat général bon, mais partie antérieure du casque cassée ; quelques ébréchures. A l’arrière (lisse et plat), sont conservées deux lettres : AP (« ap » ou « alpha rhô » : s’agit-il des initiales de l’artiste ou du propriétaire ? Nous ne pouvons le dire avec certitude). PROVENANCE Ancienne collection Melvin Gutman ; Parke-Bernet, New York, 3 avril 1970, partie VI, partie du lot 26 ; ancienne collection particulière américaine. Publie Parke- Bernet, The Melvin Gutman Jewelry, Part VI, New York, 3 avril 1970, partie du lot 26. BIBLIOGRAPHIE VOLLENWEIDER M.-L. – AVISSEAU-BROUSTET M., Camées et intailles, Tome II, Les Portraits romains du Cabinet des médailles, Paris, 2003 (2 vol., texte + planches), nos 109-110 (profil d’Agrippina I and II), nos 116-117 (buste de Minerve similaire) et no. 275 (Grand Camée de France). ZWIERLEIN-DIEHL E., Magie der Steine, Die antiken Prunkameen im Kunsthistorischen Museum, Wien, 2008, no. 6 (Gemma Augustea) pp. 98ff et 263 ff. Pour la citation exacte de Pline l’Ancien, v. : PLINE L’ANCIEN, Histoire naturelle, Tome second, Livre XXVII (traitant des pierres précieuses), Chapitre IV : http://remacle.org/bloodwolf/erudits/plineancien/livre37.htm

15

Dinos A FIGURES ROUGES ATTRIBUE AU PEINTRE DU LOUVRE MNB 1148 Art italiote (apulien), 340 – 320 av. J.-C. Céramique H : 28.6 cm – D : 32 cm

25327

Magnifique vase dont la forme particulière est grande ouverte et ronde ; il était utilisé pour mélanger le vin et l’eau lors des banquets. Un petit pied annulaire permet à ce dinos d’être posé et stabilisé, mais ce type de vase, arrondi et sans pied, était généralement accompagné d’un support à longs pieds qui permettait de le présenter à bonne hauteur. L’un des exemplaires les plus connus est le dinos et son support à figures noires du Peintre de Sophilos, actuellement exposé au British Museum. La scène illustrée, dans la plus pure tradition de la technique à figures rouges, court ici tout autour de la panse du vase, dans son intégralité, pour épouser harmonieusement toute la surface à disposition. On reconnaît aisément un thiase ou cortège dionysiaque, composé des traditionnels 108

acolytes du dieu Dionysos, des satyres (nus et parés de couronnes et/ou de guirlandes végétales ou de pampres de vigne) et des ménades dont les plis des vêtements accentuent le mouvement de farandole ; ces dernières sont parées de coiffures élaborées et de bijoux. De gauche à droite, on reconnaît une jeune femme tenant une double flûte (il pourrait s’agir d’Ariane), assise sur un coin d’une kliné (sorte de lit ou canapé) où se trouve étendu, en position semi inclinée appuyé sur un coude, le dieu Dionysos couronné de pampres de vigne ; il est, vu de trois-quarts, pratiquement nu, une phialé à la main ; derrière lui se trouve un jeune satyre portant une torche et une situle ; puis suit un silène accroupi sur le dos d’un âne qui est orné d’une guirlande ; le silène brandit une brochette avec des mets ainsi qu’un grand skyphos ; derrière eux on trouve un jeune satyre qui tient un thyrse, un alabastron ainsi qu’un petit sac en peau ; il est suivi d’une jeune femme qui apporte un thyrse, des grappes de raisin ainsi qu’un plat agrémenté de gâteaux divers, un jeune homme tenant une torche ainsi qu’un thyrse, une jeune femme qui tient des fleurs (partiellement effacées) ainsi qu’un tambourin, et enfin un jeune homme portant un thyrse ainsi qu’une ciste (tous ceux-ci se déplacent vers la gauche) ; derrière eux, dans le sens inverse (en direction de la droite), il y a un jeune satyre qui porte une torche ; il est accompagné d’une chèvre (elle aussi parée d’une guirlande) ; puis vient une ménade tenant un thyrse ainsi qu’une situle, et enfin un jeune satyre qui se retrouve juste sur la gauche du lit où se trouve Dionysos. Le caractère dionysiaque de cette scène est souligné par de nombreux éléments spécifiques à cet univers. Ainsi trouve-t-on encore des bandelettes sacrées qui agrément le décor de fond de ce cortège, différents éléments végétaux ou floraux ainsi que des arbres et des pampres de vigne. Les cultes de Dionysos, divinité de l’ivresse et de l’extase que procure le vin, se pratiquaient en effet dans le cadre de cérémonies cachées et initiatiques qui se tenaient dans la nature et de préférence la nuit, la musique y occupant une place importante. Le dinos présente, pour le reste de son ornementation structurelle, différents éléments décoratifs caractéristiques répartis en différentes frises, composées de méandres, des oves alternant avec des points, des languettes, etc. Il est intéressant de relever que le lien entre le décor et l’emploi de cette forme de vase spécifique au banquet ne s’arrête pas à la scène principale de la panse, mais est accentuée par la présence d’une guirlande présentant des feuilles de vignes sur tout le pourtour du col. Il existe un autre dinos qui présente une scène extrêmement similaire (il fait partie d’une autre collection privée et a également été publié dans Trendall et Cambitoglou, opus cité ci-dessous). Mais la qualité du dinos ici présenté est bien supérieure et laisse à penser que l’autre vase n’en serait qu’une pâle copie. Ces deux vases démontrent des caractéristiques picturales évidentes et peuvent par conséquent être facilement attribués à la main du Peintre du Louvre MNB 1148 (son vase éponyme est une loutrophore de grandes dimensions actuellement au Louvre). Ce peintre a œuvré au cours de la deuxième moitié du IVe siècle avant J.-C. CONSERVATION Vase recollé à partir de plusieurs fragments ; quelques rebouchages et retouches. PROVENANCE Anciennement sur le marché londonien de l’art, années 1970 ; Christie’s New York, 14 juin 1993, lot 47 ; marché new-yorkais de l’art ; ancienne collection particulière américaine, New Jersey. PUBLIE TRENDALL A.D. and CAMBITOGLOU A., First Supplement to the Red-Figured Vases of Apulia, London, 1983, p. 101, no. 278b, pl. XX, 1-2 (dinos similaire en no. 278c, pl. XX, 3-4); Christie's New York, 14 juin 1993, lot 47.  109


BIBLIOGRAPHIE TRENDALL A.D. and CAMBITOGLOU A., First Supplement to the Red-Figured Vases of Apulia, London, 1983, pp. 98 ff. (10. The Painter of Louvre MNB 1148 and the De Santis Group). Pour le dinos et son support du Peintre de Sophilos au British Museum, v. : http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details. aspx?objectId=399358&partId=1 Pour le vase éponyme du Peintre du Louvre MNB 1148, v. : http://www.louvre.fr/oeuvre-notices/loutrophore-figures-rouges

16

" IDOLE " ABSTRAITE A YEUX VERTICAUX Proto-sumérien, fin du IVe – IIIe mill. av. J.-C. (vers 3000 – 2500) Pierre calcaire rose H : 23.5 cm

15806

L’« idole » est taillée dans un monolithe de calcaire rose, une pierre relativement peu exploitée par les artisans proche-orientaux. Le contour est légèrement asymétrique. Le fond est plat et parfaitement achevé, le bord inférieur est arrondi. C’est un objet particulier, qui se compose de deux éléments distincts : a) la base en forme d’ogive avec le fond vaguement rectangulaire et les épaules au contour arrondi et b) la partie supérieure, composée de deux anneaux superposés, de taille différente (celui qui est situé plus près de la base est le plus grand). Comme le prouvent les traces régulières bien visibles dans chacun des cercles, les trous ont été percés à l’aide d’un instrument dont le fonctionnement était certainement proche de celui du foret. Des lignes horizontales profondément gravées marquent le passage entre le corps et les anneaux et entre les deux anneaux. Même si dans ce cas les cercles sont disposés verticalement, la forme générale de cette pièce fait indiscutablement penser aux « idoles » à lunette (spectacle-idols) et aux « idoles » à yeux : dès la fin du IVe millénaire avant notre ère, de tels objets ont été produits et utilisés dans de nombreux sites préhistoriques du Proche-Orient (Tepe Gawra, Tell Braq, etc.). Malgré l’existence d’importantes différences (les « idoles à yeux » présentent des yeux incisés à la place des anneaux qui caractérisent les « idoles à lunette »), certains archéologues pensent qu’il s’agit de nombreuses variantes d’un objet ayant la même signification. Il n’existe qu’un nombre très limité d’« idoles » comparables à celle-ci : le meilleur parallèle est certainement la « pièce votive suméro-élamite » (selon la définition de P. Amiet), façonnée dans du bitume solidifié, qui est conservée au Louvre. Malgré quelques différences morphologiques évidentes (dimensions un peu plus importantes, base presque cubique, trous plus petits, absence des lignes horizontales de séparation), la conception de ces objets est la même ; il est raisonnable de penser que leur utilisation aussi était identique. Une « idole » en stéatite du musée de Berlin reprend aussi un schéma comparable, mais les cercles sont d’une part montés sur une longue tige conique et de l’autre ils sont disposés horizontalement ; de plus, le corps de cette pièce est décoré de motifs « architecturaux », reproduisant probablement une construction en nattes de roseaux ou de palmier.

l’« idole » en examen ; les motifs gravés sur ces deux sceaux reproduisent un objet qui ressemble fort à une « spectacle-idol » ou à l’« idole » de Berlin. En plus ils sont posés sur un socle rectangulaire au décor gravé, que l’on pourrait supposer être un autel. La signification et/ou utilisation des « idoles » de ce type sont un sujet débattu depuis la découverte des premiers exemplaires par M. Mallowan (archéologue anglais, mari de l’écrivain Agatha Christie) : pour certains savants, il s’agit de formes reproduisant l’anatomie humaine stylisée et certainement en rapport avec la sphère religieuse, tandis que d’autres cherchent plus leur explication dans le domaine de la vie quotidienne (des poids, des pesons pour métier à tisser, des instruments pour la fabrications de fils textiles, etc.). La multiplicité des lieux de découvertes (sanctuaires, habitations, nécropoles, favissae, etc.) ne peut éclaircir le problème. Il faut probablement admettre que des formes similaires, sur une région aussi étendue et pendant un laps de temps aussi long, ont eu différentes significations. Certains exemplaires plus grossiers, en terre cuite sommairement modelée, étaient peut-être de simples outils, tandis que pour ceux plus élaborés, de facture raffinée avec des incisions et des formes parfaitement symétriques, comme l’objet en examen, il faut certainement chercher une signification plus symbolique, dans le cadre des croyances religieuses ou magiques, dont la nature précise est peu connue. Même si aucune divinité n’a comme symbole les yeux, il faut souligner l’importance iconographique de cet organe dans le domaine religieux, puisque si d’un côté les yeux caractérisent cette classe d’« idoles » abstraites, de l’autre ils seront aussi un des traits les plus évidents des visages des célèbres statuettes d’orants(-es) du IIIe mill. av. J.-C. : leurs yeux grands ouverts, surdimensionnés et/ ou polychromes, exprimaient probablement une forme d’émerveillement du fidèle devant la divinité. CONSERVATION Complet et en excellent état ; petites ébréchures. La surface est parfaitement polie. PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière européenne, collectionné pendant les années 1970 . BIBLIOGRAPHIE Les meilleurs parallèles dans : AMIET P., Elam, Auvers-sur-Seine, 1966, p. 159, no. 113 (Louvre). DU RY C.J., Art of the Ancient Near and Middle East, 1969, New York, pp. 40 ff. MALLOWAN M.A.E. in IRAQ 9, 1947, pl. XXVI, 1-2, pp. 156-157 (sceaux). Sur les « idoles à yeux » de Tell Brak et leur interprétation, v. par ex. : BRENIQUET C., Du fil à retordre : réflexions sur les « idoles aux yeux » et les fileuses de l’époque d’Uruk, in GASCHE H. – HROUDA B., Collectanea orientalia, Histoire, arts de l’espace et industrie de la terre, Etudes offertes en hommage à Agnès Spicket, Neuchâtel-Paris, 1996, pp. 31-53. CAUBET A., Des idoles et des lunettes, in Syria 83, 2006, pp. 177-181. FORTIN M. (ed.), Syrie, terre de civilisation, Montréal, 1999, p. 29.

Il existe aussi deux cachets - provenant l’un du temple dit « à l’oeil » de Tell Brak et l’autre probablement d’Alep (Oxford, Ashmolean Mus.) - dont la représentation semble être en rapport avec

110

111


17

PORTRAIT DU FAYOUM Art égyptien, époque romaine, première moitié du IIe s. apr. J.-C. Bois peint Dim. : 36.4 x 25.8 cm

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière américaine, New York, années 1940 ; ancienne collection particulière suisse, Genève.

30950

PUBLIE PARLASCA K., Ritratti di mummie, in A. ADRANI, Repertorio d’arte dell’Egitto greco-romano, vol. 1, Palermo, 1969, p. 83, no. 212, pl. 52.4; PAGE-GASSER M. – WIESE A.B., Egypte, Moments d’éternité. Art égyptien dans les collections privées, Suisse, Mainz/Rhine, 1997, pp. 317318, no. 220.

Le portrait, peint à l’encaustique (le terme désigne une peinture à base de cire d’abeille, utilisée chaude ou froide, comme probablement ici) sur un mince panneau en bois, était certainement enchâssé dans le linceul en cartonnage qui ornait la partie supérieure d’une momie : plusieurs détails, le prouvent, comme les angles arrondis du panneau et le teint plus clair du bord de la peinture.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Sur le sujet la bibliographie est abondante, v. : DOXIADIS E., Portraits du Fayoum, Paris, 1997, p. 24, nos. 18-19 ; p. 52, no. 35 ; pp. 76-77, nos. 67-70. WALKER S. – BIERBRIER M., Ancient Faces. Mummy Portraits from Roman Egypt, London, 1997.

A l’intérieur du panneau, le bois est légèrement concave juste à l’emplacement qui correspondait au visage du défunt. Malgré les traits du visage, qui paraissent fortement idéalisés, il est évident que le portrait représente un homme adulte d’âge mûr : sa tête est vue de face tandis que ses épaules semblent à peine tournées vers la gauche. Au-dessus d’une tunique, il porte une toge blanche dont on voit le grand repli descendant de l’épaule, à gauche du cou. Des lignes actuellement peintes en marron indiquent le bord des tissus et dessinent un sorte de swastika ; d’épais coups de pinceaux aux nuances gris-blanc marquent les plis créant un bel effet de clair-obscur. Le visage, mince et allongé, est empreint d’une expression mélancolique, typique de ce genre de portraits. L’utilisation de plusieurs teintes de rose plus ou moins clair, que le peintre a savamment distribuées sur la surface, permettent de différencier les parties du visage et de lui donner des volumes et de la vivacité (front, pommettes, nez). Les muscles du cou sont indiqués par de gros coups de pinceau. L’homme porte une barbe courte, partiellement effacée, et une moustache aux mèches bien détaillées ; les cheveux, bouclés et coupés courts, recouvrent la tête comme une calotte régulière qui dégage les oreilles. La conquête de l’Egypte par Octave (suite à la bataille d’Actium en 30 av. J.-C.) fait de cette région une province romaine placée sous le pouvoir impérial et dirigée par un préfet choisi par Rome. A partir de ce moment, les influences d’origine italiques dans l’art égyptien sont évidentes surtout dans le domaine funéraire, où on assiste à un mélange de traditions romaines et locales : en effet, les portraits individualisés peints, comme celui en examen, remplacent progressivement les masques en cartonnage idéalisés et standardisés de l’époque ptolémaïque. Exécutés généralement du vivant de leur propriétaire, ils sont posés directement sur le visage de la momie et intégrés dans l’enveloppe de celle-ci : l’identification du personnage ne se fait désormais plus uniquement à travers son nom (comme selon la tradition égyptienne) mais aussi grâce à son image réaliste, le portrait de dérivation italique. Les premiers exemplaires de ces portraits ont été mis au jour dans l’oasis du Fayoum (dans la littérature archéologique ils sont désignés comme « portraits du Fayoum ») vers la fin du XIXe siècle, mais d’importantes découvertes ont aussi été faites à Saqqarah, Thèbes, Antinopolis, Arsinoé, etc. CONSERVATION Panneau en bon état malgré quelques ébréchures près des bords. Peinture en général en bon état mais formant par endroit une croûte épaisse. Nombreuses lacunes et restaurations modernes.

112

18

AMPHORE A FIGURES NOIRES AttrIBUEE au Peintre de LysippidEs Art grec (Attique), vers 530 – 510 av. J.-C. Céramique H : 61.6 cm

31552

Face A : Apothéose d’Héraclès Face B : Guerriers au combat Cette magnifique amphore tient une place importante dans l'histoire de la peinture grecque sur vase, du point de vue de la mythologie comme de la littérature épique. Selon la norme traditionnelle, les scènes figuratives décorent les zones délimitées sur les deux faces du récipient, séparées par les poignées. Les détails soulignés en rehauts rouges et blancs sont bien conservés, l’espace figuratif est surmonté d’une frise de palmettes et de fleurs de lotus. Les ornements accentuent l'effet esthétique de l'ensemble : des rayons s’élèvent depuis la zone située au-dessus du pied et une branche de feuilles de lierre stylisée agrémente les côtés des poignées ; d’étroites bandes rouges embellissent le pourtour du vase et le bas des anses. La décoration ornementale est identique des deux côtés du vase. Face A : La procession d’Héraclès vers le Mont Olympe représente le héros grec, sa massue sur l’épaule, accompagné de sa protectrice, la déesse Athéna, vêtue d’un chiton et d’un casque à haute crête, armée de son égide bordée de serpents. Elle monte dans un char, dont elle tient les rênes des deux mains ; dans sa main droite, on peut également voir une lance. Dionysos, chargé de pieds de vigne, se tient du côté le plus éloigné des chevaux, la tête tournée vers l’arrière. Il porte un chiton et une himation, tandis qu’une couronne de lierre encercle sa tête. A sa suite, Apollon, vêtu d’un chiton et d’une himation à motifs joue de la cithare ; une couronne de laurier retient ses longs cheveux. Le cortège est mené par un jeune homme, peut-être Iolaos, le neveu d’Héraclès, coiffé d’un filet et enveloppé d’une ample himation ; il tient deux lances sur son épaule. Face B : Achille, à gauche, et Memnon, à droite, se disputent le corps d’Antiloque en présence de leurs mères, Thétis et Éos. Le corps sans vie d’Antiloque, débarrassé de son armure, gît sur le dos, le visage tourné vers le haut, le bras gauche posé sur sa tête ; ses doigts sont repliés et du sang coule de ses blessures. Achille et Memnon sont vêtus d’un chitoniskos (chiton court), d’un casque 113


corinthien à panache, d’une cuirasse et de cnémides. Les deux guerriers ont une épée suspendue à leur baudrier, et tiennent chacun une lance dans leur main droite levée et un bouclier béotien à leur bras gauche. Le bouclier du guerrier de droite est décoré d'un motif composé d'une grande rosette entourée de deux serpents qui ondulent. Un aigle s’envole vers la gauche, entre les guerriers. La scène est encadrée, à gauche, par Thétis, la mère d'Achille, et par Éos, la mère de Memnon, à droite. Les scènes de lutte pour le corps d'un guerrier mort au combat sont nombreuses dans la peinture sur vase à l’époque grecque archaïque. Toutefois, il est relativement rare que le défunt soit représenté nu (sans armure ni aucune protection) ; ce trait accentue le caractère particulièrement touchant et émotionnel de cette image, déjà rendu perceptible par l’agitation des mères des héros de part et d’autre de la scène principale. Les peintres de vases grecs puisaient très certainement leur inspiration dans les épisodes de la littérature ancienne et de l'Iliade d'Homère, qui regorgeaient de tels scénarios déchirants. La façon dont Antiloque est représenté ici, mortellement blessé aux pieds d’Achille et de Memnon - le sang coulant de ses blessures, la bouche ouverte, l’oeil fermé et la tête tournée vers l’arrière, le bras gauche replié sur le visage, le bras droit étendu vers l'aine et couvrant ses parties génitales - traduit parfaitement l’émotion qui se dégage de cette scène peinte selon la technique de la figure noire tardive, peut-être sous l'influence de scènes similaires (et contemporaines) décorées à la figure rouge. Dans l’Illiade, les scènes de lutte pour le corps d'un guerrier tombé sur le champ de bataille sont décrites avec autant de passion et de détails que les combats eux-mêmes, car la mort ne représentait pas la fin pour un guerrier vaincu. S’il était capturé par l'ennemi, son corps était dépouillé de son armure et ses armes étaient offertes au vainqueur. L'ennemi pouvait encore plus gravement déshonorer le défunt en laissant son cadavre sans sépulture. Les guerriers pouvaient également conserver le cadavre d'un ennemi pour obtenir une rançon qui, selon l'importance et le statut de ce dernier, était constituée de divers objets de grande valeur, comme en témoignent les offrandes que Priam fit à Achille pour pouvoir récupérer le corps d'Hector.

cription, Lysippides kalos - « Lysippidès est beau » -, que l’on trouve sur une amphore à col du British Museum (Londres B 211, ABV 256,14). CONSERVATION Entièrement conservée, aucune partie manquante ; cassée et réparée à partir de grands fragments ; petits rebouchages et réparations ; quelques rayures ; pigment noir légèrement effrité ; petits éclats sur le bord et la base. PROVENANCE Anciennement dans une collection particulière américaine, New York ; Vente anonyme, Christie’s New York, 11 Juin 2003, lot 102 ; ancienne collection particulière américaine. PUBLIE Christie’s New York, 11 juin 2003, pp. 91-93, lot 102. Minerva, International Review of Ancient Art and Archaeology 14.5, septembre-octobre 2003, p. 28, fig. 7. Beazley Archive (BA) no. 9022317. MUTH S., Gewalt im Bild, Das Phanomen der medialen Gewalt im Athen des 6. und 5. Jahrhunderts vor Chr., Berlin, 2008, p. 183, fig. 100. BIBLIOGRAPHIE BURKERT W., Greek Religion, Cambridge MA, 1985, pp. 121-122. MUTH S., Gewalt im Bild, Das Phanomen der medialen Gewalt im Athen des 6. und 5. Jahrhunderts vor Chr., Berlin, 2008, pp. 183-185. SCHEFOLD K. Gods and Heroes in Late Archaic Greek Art, Cambridge, 1992, pp. 268-270, figs. 322-325. WESCOAT B., Poets and Heroes : Scenes of the Trojan War, Atlanta, 1986, pp. 32-33, no. 7.

Les guerriers représentés sur l’amphore en examen s’inscrivent dans l’illustre lignée de héros similaires bien connus de la littérature antique : Diomède et Enée pour le corps de Pandare (Illiade 5.297ss.), Agamemnon et Koon pour le corps d’Iphidamas (Illiade 11.218ss.), Ménélas et Hector pour le corps d’Euphorbe (Illiade 17.1-113), ou encore Glaucos, Enée et Hector combattant Patrocle et Ajax pour le corps de Sarpédon (Illiade 16.563ss.). Dans l'une des plus importantes luttes épiques, les Grecs mené par Ajax, fils de Télamon, affrontent les Troyens dirigés par Hector pour reprendre le corps du bien-aimé Patrocle (Illiade 17.319ss.). Et l’un des exploits inoubliables d'Ajax est le sauvetage du corps d'Achille mort sur le champ de bataille (Éthiopide et Petite Iliade). Ici, c’est la présence des deux femmes sur la scène de bataille qui nous permet d’identifier le conflit comme étant celui d'Achille luttant contre Memnon auprès du corps d’Antiloque, tandis que leurs deux mères divines, Thétis et Éos, les observent. A mesure que l’on avance vers le dénouement tragique du récit, chacune des mères plaide auprès de Zeus pour qu’il épargne la vie de son fils. Antiloque, célèbre pour avoir fait le sacrifice de sa vie afin de sauver son père Nestor, était le camarade le plus proche d'Achille après que Patrocle ait été tué. Cette pièce possède un excellent parallèle dans la remarquable amphore à figures noires du peintre de Lysippidès, conservée au Vatican (Museo Gregoriano Etrusco 357, côté B), dont le décor figuratif représente également Achille et Memnon se disputant le corps d’Antiloque en présence d’Eos et Thétis. J. D. Beazley considérait le peintre de Lysippidès comme le digne successeur et disciple d’Exekias, le célèbre peintre de vases à figures noires. Le peintre de Lysippidès doit son nom à l'ins114

115


creditS & contactS

Selection of objects Ali Aboutaam and Hicham Aboutaam Research Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva Antiquities Research Center, New York Aaron J. Paul, New York Graphic design mostra-design.com, Geneva Photography Stefan Hagen, New York André Longchamp, Geneva Olivier Pasqual, Geneva Atsuyuki Shimada, Japan Printing CA Design, Wanchai, Hong Kong Print run 1'200 English – French

Geneva Ali Aboutaam Michael C. Hedqvist Phoenix Ancient Art S.A. 6, rue Verdaine – P.O. Box 3516 1211 Geneva 3, Switzerland T +41 22 318 80 10 F +41 22 310 03 88 E paa@phoenixancientart.com New York Hicham Aboutaam Alexander Gherardi Alexander V. Kruglov Electrum, Exclusive Agent for Phoenix Ancient Art S.A. 47 East 66th Street New York, NY 10065, USA T +1 212 288 7518 F +1 212 288 7121 E info@phoenixancientart.com

ISBN: 978-0-9856289-8-7 www.phoenixancientart.com

©2016 Phoenix Ancient Art SA

Phoenix Ancient Art - PAD + Frieze Masters - 2016 No 4  

Phoenix Ancient Art is pleased to celebrate the 10th-anniversary of its publishing history. With this current catalogue, the first of its 20...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you