__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Phoenix Ancient Art S.A. 47 East 66th Street - New York, NY 10021, USA T +1 212 288 7518 - F +1 212 288 7121

www.phoenixancientart.com

PHOENIX ANCIENT ART

Electrum, Exclusive Agent for

PHOENIX ANCIENT ART

6 rue Verdaine - 1204 Geneva, Switzerland T +41 22 318 80 10 - F +41 22 310 03 88

2007 - n째1

Phoenix Ancient Art S.A.


1. AN ALABASTER STATUETTE OF A WORSHIPPER Sumerian, Early Dynastic II, ca. 2700 - 2500 B.C. H: 30.4 cm

2

3


2. AN ALABASTER STATUETTE OF A SEATED MINERVA Roman, 1st - 2nd century A.D. H: 14.6 cm

4

5


3. AN ALABASTER STATUETTE OF A YOUNG WOMAN Mesopotamian, Parthian Period, 1st – 2nd century A.D. L: 19 cm

6

7


4. AN IONIAN BLACK FIGURE AMPHORA Greek Archaic (East Greek), second half of the 6th century B.C. H: 37 cm

8

9


5. AN ALABASTER HEAD OF A WORSHIPPER Sumerian, ca. 2600 - 2400 B.C. H: 10 cm

10

11


6. A BLACK FIGURE JUG WITH OCTOPUS Greek, possibly Sicilian, late 5th century B.C. H: 7.1 cm

12

13


7. A BRONZE STATUETTE IN THE SHAPE OF A TURTLE Greek or Etruscan, end of the 6th - 5th century B.C. L: 8.5 cm

14

15


8. A BRONZE STATUETTE OF A HORSE Etruscan, ca. 500 B.C. H: 10.2 cm

16

17


9. A BRONZE CAULDRON WITH FIGURED HANDLES Orientalizing Period, 7th century B.C. H: 45 cm, D: 65 cm

18

19


10. A BRONZE STATUETTE OF HERMES Hellenistic Greek, 3rd - 2nd century B.C. (the original piece, attributed to Lysippos, could date from the middle of the 4th century B.C., ca. 340 - 330 B.C.) H: 26.8 cm

20

21


22

23


12. A BRONZE FOOT Roman, 1st – 2nd century A.D. L: 11.4 cm

11. A BRONZE ORNAMENT Celtic, 3rd - 2nd century B.C. Dim: 2.9 cm x 6.5 cm

24

25


13. A HAMMERED BRONZE GRIFFON PROTOME Greek, Orientalizing Period, second quarter of the 7th century B.C. H: 23 cm

26

27


14. AN ARCHAIC BRONZE HANDLE WITH LIONS AND PALMETTES Greek, Laconian, first quarter of the 6th century B.C. H: 19.4 cm

28

29


15. AN EGYPTIAN BRONZE MIRROR Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, ca. 1938 - 1758 B.C. H: 30.3 cm

30

31


16. A BRONZE HELMET WITH REPOUSSÉ DECORATION Urartian, 8th century B.C. H: 27.5 cm

32

33


18. A BRONZE WEIGHT REPRESENTING THE BUST OF AN EMPRESS Byzantine, 5th century A.D. H: 17.5 cm

17. AN ENAMELED BRONZE PYXIS Roman, 2nd - 3rd century A.D. H: 6 cm

34

35


19. A CHALCEDONY BUST OF A CHILD Roman, second half of the 2nd century - early 3rd century A.D. H: 6.3 cm

20. A STONE AMULET WITH INLAID EYES Sumerian, Early Dynastic, 3000 – 2500 B.C. H: 2.4 cm

21. A CHALCEDONY PENDANT IN THE SHAPE OF A BULL Assyrian, 6th century B.C. H: 2.2 cm

36

37


22. A COPPER BOWL WITH A PROCESSION OF ANIMALS Sumerian or Elamite, early 3rd millennium B.C. H: 9.2 cm max., D: 16.2 cm max.

38

39


23. A DIORITE STATUE OF THOTH CYNOCEPHALUS Egyptian, 22nd Dynasty, Third Intermediate Period (ca. 945 - 713 B.C.) H: 58 cm

40

41


24. AN ELECTRUM IDOL OF THE KILIA TYPE Anatolian, late 4th - 3rd millennium B.C. H: 4.4 cm

42

43


25. RING MODELED IN THE SHAPE OF A SERPENT Roman (Egypt), 1st century A.D. D: 2.2 cm

44

45


26. A GOLD TORQUE LUNULA European Bronze Age (Spain), 2nd millennium B.C. D: 18.6 cm

46

47


28. AN AUBERGINE GLASS GOBLET Roman, 1st century A.D. H: 10.1 cm

27. A COREFORMED GLASS AMPHORISKOS Greek, 6th - 4th century B.C. H: 11.5 cm

48

49


29. A BLACK GRANITE HEAD OF A MAN Egyptian, 21st – 24th Dynasty, 3rd Intermediate Period (ca. 1080 – 712 B.C.) H: 16 cm

50

51


30. A STONE HEAD OF A ROYAL Egyptian, Saite Period (ca. 664 - 525 B.C.) (?) H: 30 cm

52

53


32. A HAEMATITE AMULET OF A HEAD OF PAZUZU Assyrian, ca. 800 – 600 B.C. H: 3.9 cm

31. A HAEMATITE WEIGHT IN THE SHAPE OF A GRASSHOPPER Babylonian, 18th - 17th century B.C. L: 8.4 cm

54

55


33. AN IVORY HEAD OF A DOG Egyptian, Middle Kingdom (ca. 1938 - 1758 B.C.) H: 2.1 cm

56

57


34. A FRAGMENT OF A STONE RELIEF WITH FOUR HIEROGLYPHS Egyptian, late 25th - early 26th Dynasty (ca. 670 - 650 B.C.) H: 34.3 cm

58

59


35. A MARBLE STATUE OF A LION Greek, early Hellenistic Period, 3rd century B.C. H: 72 cm

60

61


36. A STONE SEAL AMULET IN THE SHAPE OF A LION’S HEAD Protosumerian, Jemdet Nasr Period, ca. 3000 B.C. L: 5 cm

37. A GOLD PLAQUE Greek, 4th or early 3rd century B.C. D: 2.9 x 2.9 cm

62

63


38. AN ALABASTER FIGURINE OF A BOVID Syrian (Habuba Kabira or Tell Brak), late Neolithic, ca. 3300 - 3000 B.C. L: 12.1 cm

64

65


39. A LARGE CYCLADIC MARBLE PLATE Cycladic, middle of the 3rd millennium B.C. D: 38.7 cm

66

67


40. A MARBLE GROUP WITH PRIAPUS AND A MAENAD Roman, 1st - 2nd century A.D. H: 13.4 cm

68

69


41. A MARBLE PORTRAIT OF A ROMAN MAN Roman, ca. 240 - 270 A.D. H: 26.5 cm

70

71


42. A MARBLE STATUETTE OF APHRODITE Roman, 1st – 2nd century A.D. H: 69 cm

72

73


43. A MARBLE KORE Greek, late 6th century - early 5th century B.C. H: 86 cm

74

75


45. A MINIATURE SILVER CUP Greek, late 6th - 5th century B.C. H: 4.7 cm, D: 8 cm

44. AN ONYX CAMEO Roman, 2nd century A.D. H: 2.3 cm

76

77


46. A HEAVY HELLENISTIC RIBBED SILVER PLATE Hellenistic Period, Seleucid Empire, 3rd – 1st century B.C. D: 34 cm

78

79


47. A SPOUTED SILVER CUP WITH A LINEAR INSCRIPTION Elamite, late 3rd millennium B.C. H: 10.3 cm, D: 10.5 cm

80

81


48. TWO SMALL STONE BOWLS Syrian (Tell Bouqras), 7th - 6th millennium B.C. H: 7.9 and 9.9 cm

82

83


49. A LARGE FAIENCE JAR Assyrian, 8th - 7th century B.C. H: 40 cm

84

85


INDEX

86

87


1. AN ALABASTER STATUETTE OF A WORSHIPPER

1. STATUETTE D’ORANTE EN ALBÂTRE

Sumerian, Early Dynastic II, ca. 2700 - 2500 B.C. H: 30.4 cm

Art sumérien, vers 2700-2500 av. J.-C. (époque des Dynasties Archaïques II) Ht: 30.4 cm

In classic Mesopotamian style, this personage is dressed in a kaunakes (an article of clothing made from the fleece of a sheep or goat or from tufts of wool, which takes the form of a tunic or skirt), which descends to just above the ankles ; the left shoulder is covered by the tunic while the right is bare. The kaunakes has a vertical slit to allow for greater ease of movement and to allow freedom of the left arm ; the border of the garment is smooth. The sculptor favored a strictly frontal view : the profile of the piece shows a singular lack of thickness. The equilibrium and stability of this piece is achieved by the counterbalancing effect of the gap between the feet and the calves at the base. This is a very beautiful example of a Near Eastern statuette, characterized by the finesse of the carving but also by the large rounded leaf-shaped contours that make up the kaunakes : this piece feels less rigid and schematic in its dress than many comparable figures. The face is that of a bald, beardless man with young, idealized features : the smile on his face is almost “cheerful” with a remarkable serenity of expression. The eyes were inlaid in shell (?) while the irises may have been in lapis lazuli. The arched brows, which are connected, are indicated by a deep channel, originally filled with black bitumen. Therefore, the face was polychromatic. The dress of this figure is the most difficult element to decipher since generally, Sumerian men wore the kaunakes in the shape of a skirt and left their torsos bare, while the one shouldered tunic was reserved for women or, in rare instances, for “worshippers/bearers of gifts” and some figures of royal rank (cf. for example the figurine of King Lamgi-Mari in the Aleppo Museum). The arms are folded and positioned across the chest, which is lightly modeled, forming a trapezoid with the lines of the shoulders. The folded hands and the crossed thumbs are a typical Sumerian gesture. The general posture of this personage corresponds with that of the “worshipper” (“orant(e)s” in French, Beter in German) one of the most ancient and most famous motifs in all Mesopotamian sculpture. Many Mesopotamian temples were filled with numerous figurines of men and women that the faithful commissioned and dedicated to the different divinities as symbols of their devotion and to assure a constant reverential presence before the god. These ex-votos were left at the foot of the altar or on an offering table ; often they were found in favissae (repositories), where they were deposited so as not to crowd the temple or sanctuary and to create space for new dedications. These statuettes were offered by important court officials or administrators, by cult members, by the well off (for example merchants or high ranking dignitaries), even by members of the royal family. Sometimes they bear inscriptions on the back that give the name and rank of the owner. Figures of worshippers were present throughout Mesopotamia: stylistically, this statuette can be placed in context with a small group of female figures that come from the temple of Sin (the god of the Moon) at Khafaje, a city situated at the entrance to the Diyala Valley, a tributary of the Tigris.

Selon la mode mésopotamienne classique, ce personnage est vêtu d’un kaunakès (vêtement en peau de mouton ou de chèvre et parfois en touffes de laine, qui peut prendre la forme d’une tunique ou d’un jupon), qui descend jusqu’au mollet ; son épaule gauche est couverte par la tunique tandis que la droite est nue. Le kaunakès est fendu verticalement pour laisser une plus ample liberté de mouvement et permettre de dégager le bras gauche ; ses bords sont lisses. Le sculpteur a privilégié une vue strictement frontale : le profil de la pièce manque singulièrement d’épaisseur. L’équilibre et la stabilité de cette pièce sont assurés par le contrefort qui joint les pieds et les mollets à la base. C’est un très bel exemplaire de statuette proche-orientale, caractérisée par la finesse du travail mais aussi par le contour large et arrondi, en forme de feuille, des peaux de moutons, qui composent le kaunakès : la pièce est dans son ensemble moins rigide et schématique que beaucoup de figures comparables. Le visage est celui d’un homme chauve et imberbe, aux traits idéalisés et juvéniles : l’expression qui se dégage est presque «souriante», d’une remarquable sérénité. Les yeux étaient incrustés en coquillage (?) tandis que l’iris était peut-être en lapis-lazuli. Les arcades sourcilières, qui ne sont pas séparées, sont indiquées par une profonde incision, à l’origine remplie de bitume noir. Le visage était donc polychrome. L’habillement de ce personnage est plus difficile à interpréter, puisque les hommes sumériens portent généralement le kaunakès sous forme de jupon qui laisse leur torse nu, tandis que la tunique couvrant une épaule est réservée aux femmes ou, beaucoup plus rarement, aux «orants-porteurs d’offrandes» et à quelques figures de rang royal (cf. par exemple la figurine du roi Lamgi-Mari au Musée d’Alep). Les bras sont pliés et passent devant la poitrine, qui est à peine modelée, et forment un trapèze avec la ligne des épaules. Les mains croisées et les pouces en «x» sont un geste typiquement sumérien. L’attitude générale de ce personnage correspond à celle des «orant(e)s» (Worshipper en anglais, Beter en allemand) qui sont un des types les plus anciens et les plus célèbres de toute la sculpture mésopotamienne. Beaucoup de temples mésopotamiens ont livré de nombreuses figurines d’hommes ou de femmes, que des fidèles ont fait exécuter et ont dédiées aux différentes divinités, comme témoignage de leur dévotion et pour s’assurer une présence constante près du dieu. Ces ex-voto étaient déposés au pied de l’autel ou sur la table destinée aux offrandes ; souvent ils ont été retrouvés dans des favissae (dépôts), où ils étaient emmagasinés lorsqu’il fallait désencombrer le temple ou le sanctuaire, pour créer de la place pour les nouvelles dédicaces. Ces statuettes étaient offertes par des personnages importants de la cour ou de l’administration, par des membres du personnel de culte, par des gens aisés (par exemple des marchands ou des hauts dignitaires), voire par des membres des familles royales. Parfois elles portent sur le dos une inscription qui atteste le nom et le rang de leur propriétaire. Les figures d’orant(e)s sont présentes dans toute la Mésopotamie : stylistiquement, la statuette en examen est à mettre en relation avec un petit groupe de figurines féminines, qui proviennent du temple de Sin (le dieu de la Lune) à Khafaje, une cité située au début de la vallée de la Diyala, un affluent du Tigre.

PROVENANCE Ex-American private collection, pre-1970 ; Ex-English private collection ; Dorotheum Wien, Auktion, 6. Dezember 1997, n. 137.

PROVENANCE

BIBLIOGRAPHY AMIET P., Art of the Ancient Near East, New York, 1980, pp. 359-365, n. 248-297. BRAUN-HOLZINGER E.A., Frühdynastische Beterstatuetten, Berlin, 1977, p. 40, nn. 106-108 (Stilstufe Ib). FRANKFORT H., Sculpture of the Third Millennium from Tell Asmar and Khafajah (OIP 44), Chicago,1939, p. 68, nn. 106-108, pl. 76-77. Highlights of Historic Objects offered by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Sotheby’s New York, 2007, pp.158-163. For the Mari statuette and for the gift bearers, see : AMIET P., Elam, Auvers-sur-Oise, 1966, pp. 181-182, n. 132 (man with an over the shoulder tunic) ; pp. 190-192, n. 141-142 (kid bearers, Louvre). Syrie, Mémoire et civilisation, Paris, 1993, p. 124, n. 107 (King Lamgi-Mari).

88

Ancienne collection particulière américane, avant 1970 ; ancienne collection particulière anglaise ; Dorotheum Wien, Auktion, 6 décembre 1997, n. 137.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE AMIET P., Art of the Ancient Near East, New York, 1980, pp. 359-365, n. 248-297. BRAUN-HOLZINGER E.A., Frühdynastische Beterstatuetten, Berlin, 1977, p. 40, nn. 106-108 (Stilstufe Ib). FRANKFORT H., Sculpture of the Third Millennium from Tell Asmar and Khafajah (OIP 44), Chicago,1939, p. 68, nn. 106-108, pl. 76-77. Highlights of Historic Objects offered by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Sotheby’s New York, 2007, pp.158-163. Pour la statuette de Mari et pour les porteurs d’offrandes, v. : AMIET P., Elam, Auvers-sur-Oise, 1966, pp. 181-182, n. 132 (homme avec tunique jusqu’à l’épaule) ; pp. 190-192, n. 141-142 (porteurs de chevreaux, Louvre). Syrie, Mémoire et civilisation, Paris, 1993, p. 124, n. 107 (roi Lamgi-Mari).

89


2. AN ALABASTER STATUETTE OF A SEATED MINERVA

2. STATUETTE DE MINERVE ASSISE EN ALBÂTRE

Roman, 1st - 2nd century A.D. H: 14.6 cm

Art romain, Ier - IIe s. ap. J.-C. Ht: 14.6 cm

The figure represents a seated woman. She is entirely draped in a long tunic, above which she wears a coat that wraps around her left arm, passes behind her back and covers her legs in a cascade of elaborate and elegant folds. The statue offers a strictly frontal view, but the treatment of the lower part of the body attracts the spectator’s attention towards the left side of the figure (the right knee is a little higher, the legs are slightly off-center, the folds of the coat are oblique). In spite of its reduced size and of the hard stone that it was carved from, this figure shows excellent artistic qualities, in the plastic modeling as well as in the rendering of the drapery with its widely varied and well composed folds. The alabaster surface is smooth and perfectly polished, perhaps imitating the carving of semi-precious stone. The body is in a good state of preservation ; the head, the arms and probably the feet were carved separately and attached by metal tenons. The arms were probably folded and did not touch the body or the legs. The woman wore metal armor (gold sheet, bronze ?), which covered her back and chest (the breasts are bare, a belt or a thin strap tightened the armor around the waist) where the surface of the stone is smooth and without details, except for a medallion just under the décolleté. Below the armor, a belt cinches the tunic and shows the edge of the kolpos (in the Graeco-Roman fashion, the kolpos is the part of the tunic that was folded up at shoulder level, falling down in the back and onto the chest). The presence of the armor allows us to identify this figure : she is Minerva (Athena) wearing a cuirass instead of the aegis (the circular medallion replaces the gorgoneion), as in other Roman representations. The goddess sat on a throne : she belonged to a Capitoline triad, as the hole with the remains of a lead tenon pierced just above the left foot and the general composition slightly turned towards the left (legs, folds of the coat) indicate. In the center stood the most important figure of the group, Jupiter (Zeus), while his wife, Juno (Hera), made a pair with Minerva and completed the composition on the spectator’s right. Minerva might have held a spear or a winged Victory in her hands. The Capitoline triad presented the three most important Roman divinities and was worshipped in the urbs, on Capitoline Hill. Many groups, sculpted in the round or in relief from various areas of the Empire, reproduce this subject.

La figure représente une femme assise entièrement drapée dans une longue tunique au-dessus de laquelle elle porte un manteau qui entoure son bras gauche, passe derrière le dos et couvre les jambes dans une cascade de plis élaborés et raffinés. Bien que la vue de la figure soit strictement frontale, le traitement de la partie inférieure de son corps dirige le regard du spectateur vers sa gauche (le genou droit est un peu plus haut, les jambes sont légèrement désaxées, les plis du manteau sont résolument obliques). Malgré les dimensions réduites de la figure et le type de pierre très dure, le travail plastique ainsi que le rendu des tissus, qui présente des plis extrêmement variés et bien structurés, sont d’une excellente qualité artistique. La surface de l’albâtre est lisse et parfaitement polie, peut-être pour imiter le travail de la pierre semi-précieuse. Le corps est bien conservé ; la tête, les bras et probablement les pieds étaient faits à part et fixés par des tenons métalliques. Les bras étaient probablement pliés et ne touchaient pas le corps ni les jambes. La femme portait une armure en métal (feuille d’or, bronze ?), qui couvrait le dos et la poitrine (les deux seins sont découverts, une ceinture ou une lanière serrait l’armure au-dessus de la taille), où la surface de la pierre est lisse et sans détails, à l’exception d’un médaillon visible juste au-dessous du décolleté. Un peu en dessous de la cuirasse, une ceinture serre la tunique et permet de distinguer le bord du kolpos (dans la mode grécoromaine, le kolpos est la partie de la tunique repliée au niveau des épaules et qui descend dans le dos et sur la poitrine). La présence de l’armure est le seul attribut permettant d’identifier cette figure : il s’agit d’une Minerve (Athéna) portant une cuirasse qui, comme sur d’autres images romaines, remplace l’égide (le médaillon circulaire est situé à l’emplacement du gorgonéion). La déesse, qui était assise sur un trône, faisait partie d’une triade capitoline, comme l’indiquent d’une part le trou avec les restes d’un tenon en plomb percé juste au-dessus du pied gauche et de l’autre la composition générale, légèrement tournée vers la gauche (jambes, plis du manteau). Au centre se trouvait la figure la plus importante du groupe, Jupiter (Zeus) tandis que son épouse, Junon (Héra), faisait le pendant de Minerve et fermait la composition à droite du spectateur. Dans ses mains, Minerve tenait peut-être une lance ou une Victoire ailée. La triade capitoline, qui réunit les trois divinités les plus importantes aux yeux des Romains, était vénérée au cœur de l’urbs, sur le Capitole : de nombreux groupes sculptés en ronde bosse ou en relief, provenant des différentes parties de l’Empire, reproduisent ce sujet.

PROVENANCE Ex-Jacques and Henriette Schumann collection, France.

PROVENANCE

BIBLIOGRAPHY Lexicon iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. II, Zurich, 1984, s.v. Athena/Minerva, pp. 1094-1095 (Capitoline triad). SAUER H., Die kapitolinische Trias, in Archäologischer Anzeiger 1950-51, coll. 73-89.

Ancienne collection Jacques et Henriette Schumann, France.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Lexicon iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. II, Zurich, 1984, s.v. Athena/Minerva, pp. 1094-1095 (triade capitoline). SAUER H., Die kapitolinische Trias, in Archäologischer Anzeiger 1950-51, coll. 73-89.

90

91


3. AN ALABASTER STATUETTE OF A YOUNG WOMAN

3. STATUETTE DE JEUNE FEMME COUCHÉE EN ALBÂTRE

Mesopotamian, Parthian Period, 1st – 2nd century A.D. L: 19 cm

Art mésopotamien (époque parthe), Ier av. - IIe s. ap. J.-C. L: 19 cm

The piece is whole and in an excellent state of preservation, in spite of the surface wear on the back. It represents a grown but still young woman ; she is entirely nude and lies on her left side. The female body is beautifully carved. The frontal view dominates the figure, except for the left forearm, bent and turned towards the viewer. The young woman was probably holding a phiale (cup), in another material. She laid on a banqueting bed - a kline - (see also contemporary terracottas), her elbow probably resting on a cushion or pouf. The right arm is relaxed. The elbow and the fingers are delicately placed on the hip and the thigh, and the right foot points upwards. The shapes of the body are sinuous and well proportioned, although a little soft, and recall those of Hellenistic or Roman period works. The sculptor perfectly rendered the plastic forms of the general anatomy, while the face and the pubis are marked by incisions. The femininity of the figure is strongly accentuated : full breasts with defined nipples, prominent buttocks and hips, and rounded belly. Short hair, in its original black color, frames the round face : engraved and incised locks fall on either side of the forehead and are then piled on top of the head, leaving the ears and the neck uncovered. The woman’s simple jewelry, is composed of circular, stylized gold earrings, a popular type at the time. The skin of the face is smooth and firm, the large eyes - with the iris and the contours painted in black - are almond-shaped and the nose is prominent. A ring of Venus marks the neck and a semi-precious stone might have decorated the deep-set navel. The pointy chin is individualized but, as a whole, the face is relatively idealized : this is a characteristic of Hellenistic art to sculpt female faces without a definite age or personal features, and this can also be seen in larger works. After the conquest of the Persian empire by Alexander the Great, Mesopotamian art came under Hellenic influence from a stylistic point of view as much as an iconographic one : figures of Aphrodite, Eros, Heracles or, like here, of nude reclining women, or ones dressed in the Greek fashion, only appear after the arrival of the Macedonians. In spite of their undeniable charm, these statuettes are not well known today, although they were widespread in Mesopotamia. The exact meaning of these representations (in stone or terracotta) is still unknown. The results of the excavations denote that they often originate from necropoleis and could indicate a relationship with the chthonic sphere : the posture of these figures recalls the theme of the funerary banquet (see, for example, Palmyran funerary sculpture, where this subject appears from the 2nd century A.D. onward), which was very popular throughout the Mediterranean world. However, it is impossible to determine if this figure is a divinity, an image of the deceased, a courtesan, a figure of passage, etc.

La figurine - complète et en un excellent état, malgré l’usure superficielle du dos - représente une femme adulte mais encore jeune ; elle est entièrement nue et étendue sur son côté gauche. Malgré le beau modelage du corps féminin, la vue frontale domine toute la figure ; le seul élément de la composition qui sort de ce schéma est l’avant-bras gauche, plié et dirigé vers le spectateur : dans la main il y avait probablement une phialé (coupe), modelée dans un autre matériau. La jeune femme était allongée sur un lit de banquet - une kliné - où l’on se tient sur le côté (cf. terres cuites contemporaines) : le coude était appuyé sur un coussin ou sur une étoffe. Le bras droit descend le long du corps. Le coude et les doigts sont délicatement posés sur la hanche et sur la cuisse. Le pied droit pointait vers le haut. Les formes du corps, sinueuses et bien proportionnées mais un peu molles, rappellent celles de certaines oeuvres d’art hellénistiques ou romaines. L’anatomie générale est rendue par un remarquable travail plastique, tandis que les détails incisés n’apparaissent que pour le visage et le pubis. Dans l’ensemble les caractéristiques féminines sont fortement accentuées : seins abondants avec mamelons indiqués, fesses bien arrondies, hanches larges, ventre bombé. Le visage rond est encadré par la chevelure courte qui conserve encore sa couleur noire originale. Les cheveux descendent à gauche et à droite du front en mèches gravées et incisées, qui sont ensuite remontées vers le crâne et qui laissent les oreilles et le cou entièrement dégagés. La parure, très simple, est composée uniquement d’une paire de boucles d’oreilles en or circulaires et stylisées d’un type largement répandu à cette époque. La peau du visage est lisse et tendue, les grands yeux - à l’iris et au contour peints en noir - prennent une forme d’amande, le nez est proéminent. Le cou est marqué d’un anneau de Vénus. Une pierre semiprécieuse ornait peut-être le nombril, qui est profondément creusé. Le menton pointu est le seul élément vraiment individuel, mais l’expression est dans son ensemble idéalisée : sculpter les visages féminins sans âge ni traits personnels précis est une des caractéristiques de l’art hellénistique, que l’on retrouve aussi dans les œuvres de plus grande taille. Après la conquête par Alexandre de l’empire perse, l’art mésopotamien subit l’influence hellénique aussi bien du point de vue stylistique que dans le domaine des sujets traités : des figures comme Aphrodite, Eros, Héraclès ou, comme ici, la femme couchée nue ou habillée à la grecque, apparaissent seulement après l’arrivée des Macédoniens. Malgré leur charme indiscutable, ces statuettes sont aujourd’hui peu connues : elles étaient répandues en Mésopotamie. La signification exacte de ces images (en pierre ou en terre cuite) est inconnue. Les données de fouilles indiquent qu’elles proviennent souvent des nécropoles, ce qui les met en relation avec la sphère chtonienne : leur attitude fait indiscutablement penser au motif du banquet funéraire (cf. par exemple la sculpture funéraire palmyrénienne, où ce sujet apparaît dès le IIe s. ap. J.-C.), très répandu dans tout le monde méditerranéen ; mais il est impossible d’établir s’il s’agit d’une divinité, de l’image d’une défunte, d’une hétaïre, d’une figure de passage, etc.

PROVENANCE Ex-Dr. Gönik Collection, Geneva, Switzerland.

BIBLIOGRAPHY BASMACHI F., Treasures of Ancient Iraq Museum, Baghdad, 1975, p. 406, n. 205. Das vorderasiatische Museum Berlin, Mainz on Rhine, 1992, p. 140, n. 82. GHIRSHMAN R., Parthes and Sassanides, Paris, 1962, p. 106, n. 121. Schaetze aus dem Iraq, Von der Frühzeit bis zum Islam, Cologne, 1964, n. 141-144. VAN INGEN W., Figurines from Seleucia on the Tigris, Berlin, 1939, p. 21ss, pl. 89-90 and 91-92. Some terracotta figurines : ZIEGLER C., Die Terrakotten von Warka, Berlin, 1962, p. 108-109, n. 399-402

92

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection Dr. Gönik, Genève, Suisse.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE BASMACHI F., Treasures of Ancient Iraq Museum, Bagdad, 1975, p. 406, n. 205. Das vorderasiatische Museum Berlin, Mayence/Rhin, 1992, p. 140, n. 82. GHIRSHMAN R., Parthes and Sassanides, Paris, 1962, p. 106, n. 121. Schaetze aus dem Iraq, Von der Frühzeit bis zum Islam, Cologne, 1964, n. 141-144. VAN INGEN W., Figurines from Seleucia on the Tigris, Berlin, 1939, pp. 21ss, pl. 89-90 et 91-92. Quelques figurines en terre cuite : ZIEGLER C., Die Terrakotten von Warka, Berlin, 1962, pp. 108-109, n. 399-402

93


4. AN IONIAN BLACK FIGURE AMPHORA

4. AMPHORE IONIENNE À FIGURES NOIRES

Greek Archaic (East Greek), second half of the 6th century B.C. H: 37 cm

Art grec archaïque (Grèce de l’est), deuxième moitié du VIe s. av. J.-C. Ht: 37 cm

This amphora is intact ; in places, the paint was lightly restored. The body is in the shape of a teardrop with a small molding at the base of the neck and a rounded lip ; the handles are thick and ribbed ; the foot, modeled separately and attached after the throwing, has a straight angular edge. Two does with spotted coats are painted onto the shoulders of the vase in the black figure technique : one is simply in the middle of grazing while the other is represented in a surprising, but very naturalistic, gesture, scratching her head with a hind leg while remaining perfectly balanced. The proportions of the animals are very elegant, with long delicate legs, long neck and slender svelte body ; some incisions highlight certain anatomical details of the head, the musculature and the hide. Precise observation of movement and the realism of the posture are typical elements of East Greek art : in addition to the gesture of the doe pawing at her forehead with a hoof, one will also note the detail of the alert ears, portraying the constant vigilance of these animals, who are ready at all times, as if the painter wanted to emphasize that swift escape is the principal mode of defense against attacks from predators. There are also some electrum staters (coins) from Ionia with very similar motifs of does. Even if the style here is very close to that of figures painted on Attic black figure vases, the subject does appear on East Greek ceramics (second half of the 7th century). The rest of the decoration is simple and linear : a banded body – the top line represents the ground on which we find the does – and zones that are completely painted (foot, lip, interior of the neck, handles). This very rare amphora is from the Ionian school of ceramics, the most well known form of which is the kylix, but which also includes, in addition to amphorae, perfume vases like lydia and alabastra ; their decoration is nearly always limited to lines and/or horizontal bands often grouped near the point of maximum diameter of the piece. The term “Ionian” designates an important class of vases largely from the Archaic Period from throughout the Greek world (eastern Greece ; continental Greece, especially Attica ; western colonies) : the origin of these products, which generally come from the coasts of Asia Minor but were imitated in different colonial centers, has not been clearly established, even if archaeologists often think of Samian or Rhodian workshops. Ionian amphorae existed in different shapes and sizes that can essentially be classified into two variants : one very pot-bellied and tall and the other, to which this piece belongs, very elongated and curvy but often of smaller size. The presence of figural motifs is exceptional on this class of vessels, even if East Greek ceramics were traditionally rich in animals motifs that then influenced other regions of the Hellenistic world. The two does painted here certainly maintain a distant resemblance to the famous “Wild Goat Style”, adopted by the workshops of numerous Greek cities on the Anatolian coast and the neighboring islands at the end of the 7th century B.C.

L’amphore est intacte ; la surface a certainement été cirée. Le corps est en forme de goutte avec une petite moulure à la base du col, et la lèvre arrondie ; les anses sont rubanées et épaisses ; le pied, modelé à part et fixé après le tournage, a un bord droit et angulaire. Deux biches au pelage moucheté sont peintes sur l’épaule du vase selon la technique de la figure noire : l’une est simplement en train de brouter tandis que l’autre est représentée dans une attitude plus surprenante mais très naturelle, puisqu’elle se gratte la tête avec une patte postérieure tout en gardant un parfait équilibre. Les proportions des animaux sont très élégantes, avec les pattes fines, le long cou et le corps mince et svelte ; quelques incisions soulignent certains détails anatomiques de la tête, de la musculature ou du pelage. La recherche d’un mouvement précis et le réalisme des positions sont des éléments typiques de l’art gréco-oriental : en plus du geste de la biche qui se frotte le front avec une patte, on notera encore le détail des oreilles tendues, qui traduisent l’attention constante que ces animaux prêtent au milieu dans lequel ils vivent, comme si le peintre avait voulu souligner que la fuite est leur principal moyen de défense contre l’agression d’un prédateur. Même si le style est ici plus proche des figures peintes sur les vases attiques à figures noires, le sujet apparaît bien avant sur les céramiques (deuxième moitié du VIIe s.) ainsi que dans la numismatique (statères en électrum) de Grèce orientale. Le reste de la décoration est simple et linéaire : des bandes sur le corps - la ligne supérieure constitue le terrain sur lequel se trouvent les biches - et des zones entièrement peintes (pied, lèvre, intérieur du col, anses). Cette amphore très rare appartient à la céramique dite «ionienne», dont la forme la plus répandue est la kylix, mais qui comprend aussi, en plus des amphores, des vases à parfum comme les lydia et les alabastres ; leur décoration est presque toujours limitée à des lignes et/ou des bandes horizontales souvent regroupées près du diamètre maximum de la pièce. Le terme «ionien» désigne une importante classe de vases largement documentés à l’époque archaïque dans tout le monde grec (Grèce de l’est ; Grèce continentale, surtout en Attique ; colonies occidentales) : l’origine de ces produits, qui proviennent généralement des côtes de l’Asie Mineure mais qui ont été imités dans différents centres coloniaux, n’est pas clairement établie, même si les archéologues pensent souvent à des ateliers samiens ou rhodiens. Les amphores «ioniennes» existent en différentes formes et dimensions, que l’on peut regrouper essentiellement en deux variantes, l’une plus pansue et haute, et l’autre, à laquelle appartient la pièce en examen, plus élancée et sinueuse mais souvent de plus petite taille. La présence de motifs figurés est exceptionnelle sur cette classe de récipients, même si les céramiques de Grèce orientale sont traditionnellement riches en sujets animaliers qui ont d’ailleurs influencé d’autres régions du monde hellénique : les deux biches peintes ici conservent certainement un lointain souvenir du célèbre «Wild Goat Style», adopté par les ateliers de nombreuses cités grecques de la côte anatolienne et des îles avoisinantes à partir du milieu du VIIe s. av. J.-C..

PROVENANCE Ex-Lord and Lady Plowden Collection, acquired prior to 1944.

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection Lord and Lady Plowden, acquis avant 1944.

BIBLIOGRAPHY COOK R.M. - DUPONT P., East Greek Pottery, London, 1998, pp. 132-134. For the shape, see : Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum München 6, 1968, pp. 49-50, pl. 304. For the decoration, see : Das Tier in der Antike, 400 Werke ägyptischer, griechischer, etruskischer und römischer Kunst aus privatem und öffentlichem Besitz, Zürich, 1974, pl. 40, n. 238 (Attic cup). THIMME J., Antike Meisterwerke im Karlsruher Schloss, Karslruhe, 1986, pp. 89-91. WALTER-KARYDI E., Samische Gefässe des 6. Jahrhunderts v. Chr., Landschaftsstile ostgriechischer Gefässe, Bonn, 1973, p. 79 and 144, pl. 113.

94

BIBLIOGRAPHIE COOK R.M. - DUPONT P., East Greek Pottery, Londres, 1998, pp. 132-134. Pour la forme, cf. : Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum München 6, Münich, 1968, pp. 49-50, pl. 304. Pour le décor cf. : Das Tier in der Antike, 400 Werke ägyptischer, griechischer, etruskischer und römischer Kunst aus privatem und öffentlichem Besitz, Zürich, 1974, pl. 40, n. 238 (coupe attique). THIMME J., Antike Meisterwerke im Karlsruher Schloss, Karslruhe, 1986, pp. 89-91. WALTER-KARYDI E., Samische Gefässe des 6. Jahrhunderts v. Chr., Landschaftsstile ostgriechischer Gefässe, Bonn, 1973, p. 79 et 144, pl. 113.

95


5. AN ALABASTER HEAD OF A WORSHIPPER

5. TÊTE D’ORANT EN ALBÂTRE

Sumerian, ca. 2600-2400 B.C. H: 10 cm

Art sumérien, environ 2600-2400 av. J.-C. Ht: 10 cm

This head, preserved down to the neck, belonged to a figure whose size was certainly above average (the complete figure was probably 60 cm high). The surface of the stone, delicately crafted, is smooth and in remarkable condition. The face was polychromatic : the eyes (in shell, while the iris was probably inlaid with lapis lazuli) and the eyebrows (in lapis lazuli or bitumen) were made from other materials and inlaid, as proven by the visible traces of bitumen in the left eye (this material was regularly used as an adhesive and/or an insulator). The head has a smooth, elongated shape and rests on a short, powerful neck ; the bald skull is rounded and even ; on the back of the head, between the ears, two modeled grooves probably indicate wrinkles of skin. The sculptor represented a smooth youthful face without any individualized features or wrinkles : it is a grown man, but of indefinite age. His expression, almost “smiling”, is a typical feature of Mesopotamian figures : in reality, it probably was not a smile, but rather a demonstration of inner spirit and joy. In spite of this idealization, one should mention the great formal diversity that characterizes Mesopotamian “worshipper” statues : each figure is unique and can be differentiated without becoming a real physical portrait. The forms consist of large uniform surfaces, finely modeled, without any incisions or engravings : the bone structure and the muscles are rendered by large, smooth, finely nuanced planes ; the skin is firm and without wrinkles. The deep-set eyes are almondshaped, the eyebrows are thick and even, the mouth is horizontal and curvy, the corners of the lips are turned slightly upwards. From a stylistic point of view, the statues found at Mari are this alabaster piece’s best parallels. This head certainly completed a male statue of a well-known Mesopotamian iconographic type : the “worshipper” (orant/e in French, Beter in German), one of the oldest archetypes of Near Eastern sculpture. These figures, men or women, are represented standing or, more rarely, seated ; they are dressed in the kaunakes - traditional Mesopotamian garment of sheep’s skin or wool. The position of the arms and the hands is very characteristic : the arms are folded and positioned in front of the chest, the hands are clasped (often the right over the left) and the thumbs are crossed. Their eyes are often wide open and of a disproportionate size, which is probably an iconographic convention to express the close relationship between the faithful and the divine. According to religious Mesopotamian texts, the faithful must fulfill duties to guarantee the favor of the gods and to prove their submission : offerings of various kinds and dedications of statues in sanctuaries are among the fundamental aspects of these practices. The representations of the faithful, which vary depending on the fortune and social position of the “dedicator” (terracotta figurines play the same role as stone statues) , they were meant to assure the presence of the faithful beside the divinity at the sacred sites and to continue his prayers in his absence. On the classification and the meaning of the “worshipper” statues, see also n. 1, pp. 2-3.

Cette tête, conservée jusqu’à la hauteur du cou, appartenait à une figure dont la taille était certainement plus importante que la moyenne (la figure complète devait avoisiner les 60 cm environ). La surface de la pierre, très finement travaillée, est lisse et dans un état remarquable. Le visage était polychrome : les yeux (en coquillage avec l’iris taillé probablement dans du lapis-lazuli) et les sourcils (en lapislazuli ou en bitume) étaient fabriqués dans un autre matériau et fixés dans les emplacements creusés à cet effet (comme le prouvent les restes de bitume bien visibles dans l’œil gauche, cette matière était souvent utilisée comme colle et/ou comme isolant). La tête au contour doux et allongé s’appuie sur un cou bas et puissant ; la crâne chauve a un contour bien arrondi et très régulier ; à l’arrière de la tête, entre les oreilles deux sillons plastiques indiquent probablement des plis de la peau. Le sculpteur a représenté un visage lisse et juvénile sans trop insister sur des traits ou des rides personnelles : il s’agit d’un homme adulte mais auquel il est impossible de donner un âge précis. Il arbore l’expression presque «souriante» typique des représentations mésopotamiennes : dans la réalité, il ne s’agissait probablement pas d’un sourire, mais plutôt de la manifestation d’une force et d’une joie intérieures. Malgré cette idéalisation, il faut souligner la grande diversité formelle qui caractérise les statues d’«orants» mésopotamiens : chaque figure est unique et se laisse distinguer des autres, sans qu’on puisse parler de véritable portrait somatique. Les formes sont exprimées par de grandes surfaces uniformes et lisses caractérisées par un modelé d’une extrême finesse, où les incisions et les gravures sont entièrement absentes : la structure osseuse et les muscles sont rendus par une suite de plans bien arrondis et nuancés ; la peau est tendue et sans rides. Les yeux, profondément creusés, sont en forme d’amande ; l’arcade sourcilière est un trait épais et régulier ; la bouche est horizontale et sinueuse, les commissures légèrement tournées vers le haut. Stylistiquement, les statues trouvées à Mari constituent les meilleurs parallèles pour cette tête. Cette tête appartenait certainement à une statue masculine d’un type bien connu de l’art mésopotamien : les figures d’«orants» (-es) (worshipper en anglais, Beter en allemand), qui sont un des types les plus anciens de la sculpture proche-orientale. Ces personnages, masculins ou féminins, sont représentés debout ou plus rarement assis ; ils sont habillés du kaunakès - le vêtement mésopotamien traditionnel, en laine ou en peau de mouton. La position des bras et des mains est une de leurs caractéristiques les plus importantes : les bras pliés passent devant la poitrine, les mains sont jointes (souvent la droite tient la gauche) et les pouces se croisent. Une autre originalité des «orants(es)» réside dans la façon de représenter leurs yeux, souvent d’une taille démesurée et grands ouverts : il s’agit probablement d’une convention iconographique pour exprimer le rapport intime entre le fidèle et la divinité. D’après les textes religieux mésopotamiens, le fidèle doit s’acquitter de certains devoirs pour exaucer la volonté des dieux et pour leur montrer sa soumission : faire des offrandes de différentes sortes et dédier des statues dans les sanctuaires sont deux des aspects fondamentaux de ces pratiques. Les images de fidèles, dont la qualité est extrêmement variable et dépend de la richesse et de la fonction du dédiant (les figurines en terre cuite jouent le même rôle que les statues en pierre), avaient pour but de garantir la présence du fidèle auprès de la divinité dans les complexes sacrés et de perpétrer ses prières en son absence. Sur le classement et la signification des statues d’«orants» cf. aussi n. 1, pp. 2-3.

PROVENANCE Ex-M. de Sancey Collection, Switzerland.

BIBLIOGRAPHY BRAUN-HOLZINGER E.A., Frühdynastische Beterstatuetten, Berlin, 1977, p. 50, n. 41 (same as OIP 44, pl. 55) ; p. 51, n. 280 (same as OIP 60, pl. 40, n. 280). SPYCKET A., La statuaire du Proche-Orient ancien, Leiden-Cologne, 1981, pp. 101-102, fig. 36. On sculpture from Mari, see : FORTIN M., Syrie, Terre de civilisations, Montreal, 1999, pp. 280-281. PARROT A. (ed), Au pays de Baal et d’Astarté, 10000 ans d’art en Syrie, Paris, 1983, pp. 75-83. PARROT A., Mari, Neuchâtel-Paris, 1953.

96

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection M. De Sancey, Suisse.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE BRAUN-HOLZINGER E.A., Frühdynastische Beterstatuetten, Berlin, 1977, p. 50, n. 41 (même que OIP 44, pl. 55) ; p. 51, n. 280 (même que OIP 60, pl. 40, n. 280). SPYCKET A., La statuaire du Proche-Orient ancien, Leiden-Cologne, 1981, pp. 101-102, fig. 36. Sur la sculpture de Mari, v. : FORTIN M., Syrie, Terre de civilisations, Montréal, 1999, pp. 280-281. PARROT A. (éd.), Au pays de Baal et d’Astarté, 10000 ans d’art en Syrie, Paris, 1983, pp. 75-83. PARROT A., Mari, Neuchâtel-Paris, 1953.

97


6. A BLACK FIGURE JUG WITH OCTOPUS

6. TASSE À FIGURES NOIRES ORNÉE D’UN POULPE

Greek, possibly Sicilian, late 5th century B.C. H: 7.1 cm

Art grec (Sicile ?), fin du Ve s. av. J.-C. Ht: 7.1 cm

Intact, with a hairline crack below the handle at the rim. Both the shape and decoration of this charming little vase are unusual and exact parallels are wanting. Considering its small size and rounded base, it may have been fashioned as a grave good for use in the afterlife. The clay fabric of the vessel is light reddish-brown and the decoration is all executed in black slip. An undulating ivy wreath circles the neck, and there are double bands around the vessel’s shoulder, mouth, and handle. A highly animated octopus, Octopus vulgaris, is the primary decoration, although it is almost hidden from view when the vase sits on its base. The head of the creature is positioned below the handle. Its eight arms, with coiled ends and clearly defined suction cups, spread radially across the rounded bottom as if gripping the surface. The depiction of the animal is harmonious with the vase’s shape, and the octopus seems to cling to the vase as it would to rocks or a pebbly sea bottom. When seen from the side of the jug, the octopus appears to be extending its tentacles out from what, in nature, would be its hide-away in the crevice of one of the rocky outcroppings commonly found along the shores of the Mediterranean. Incised lines delineate details of the head, eyes, and mouth. Added red color distinguishes the eyes and the unusual spiral added at the end of one of its tentacles. The octopus became a favorite subject of ancient Greek artists, who utilized its unusual biological form and symmetrical anatomy as a decorative device, perfectly adaptable to the curving surfaces of jugs such as this. They were popular motifs in the decorative repertory of Minoan and Mycenaean vase-painters, who developed what is known as known as the Marine Style. In addition, the creature is represented on gold foil relief ornaments from Grave Circle A at Mycenae. Descriptive references and accurate depictions of the octopus in literature and art, such as that painted on this vase, suggest that poets and artists must have had a first-hand knowledge about the appearance and behavior of this marine invertebrate. In antiquity, as today, the Mediterranean was nearly a tideless sea, and its gently sloping, rocky and pebbly beaches would have made it possible to observe the animal in shallow water. The octopus was a favorite food of the ancients, the best fishing grounds for it being located off the coasts of Thasos and Caria. It was admired for its sweet taste and additionally was thought to be an aphrodisiac.

Cette tasse est intacte, à l’exception d’une petite fissure sur le bord de l’anse. La forme, de même que la décoration de ce ravissant récipient sont peu communes et il n’en existe que peu de parallèles. Sa petite base arrondie laisse toutefois supposer qu’il a pu être réalisé dans un but uniquement funéraire, pour l’utilisation dans l’au-delà. La couleur de l’argile est un brun-rouge ; la décoration est entièrement exécutée selon la technique de la figure noire, avec des détails peints en pourpre. Une ondoyante guirlande de lierre orne le cou du récipient et deux bandes sont peintes autour de l’épaule, de l’ouverture et de l’anse. Un poulpe en mouvement constitue la décoration principale de la panse, mais ce motif est difficile à discerner lorsque le vase repose sur sa base. La tête de la créature est placée au-dessous de la poignée. Ses huit bras, aux extrémités enroulées et aux ventouses clairement représentées, se déploient sur la surface arrondie, comme s’ils cherchaient à s’y agripper. Le corps de l’animal épouse harmonieusement la forme du récipient et le poulpe semble s’accrocher à la paroi comme il le ferait sur des rochers ou sur un fond marin. Des lignes incisées soulignent les détails anatomiques de la tête, des yeux et de la bouche. Les yeux se distinguent par des ajouts de couleur rouge et une spirale étrange de cette même couleur a été dessinée sur le bout d’une des tentacules de l’animal. Le poulpe était un des sujets favoris des artistes grecques antiques qui ont utilisé sa forme biologique peu commune et son anatomie symétrique comme une technique décorative qui s’adaptait parfaitement aux surfaces incurvées des récipients de ce type. Les poulpes étaient également des motifs très populaires dans le répertoire décoratif des peintres de vases minoens et mycéniens qui ont développé le style connu sous le nom de «marin». En outre, la créature est représentée sur des ornements à la feuille d’or en relief de la tombe du cercle A à Mycènes. Les références descriptives et les représentations précises du poulpe dans la littérature et dans l’art, comme cette tasse par exemple, suggèrent que les poètes et les artistes devaient avoir d’excellentes connaissances de l’aspect et du comportement de cet invertébré marin. Durant l’Antiquité, comme aujourd’hui, la Méditerranée était une mer quasiment sans marée, et ses plages rocheuses doucement inclinées devaient permettre l’observation de l’animal dans l’eau peu profonde. Le poulpe était un aliment de choix des Anciens, les meilleurs fonds pour sa pêche étant situés au large des côtes de Thassos et de Caria. Le poulpe était apprécié pour sa douce saveur et était de plus considéré comme un aliment aphrodisiaque.

PROVENANCE Ex-L. Mildenberg Collection, Switzerland.

PUBLISHED

IN

KOZLOFF A.P. (ed.), Animals in Ancient Art from the L. Mildenberg Collection, Cleveland, 1981, pp. 147-148, n. 126. MOTTAHEDEH P.E. (ed.), Out of Noah’s Ark : Animals in Ancient Art from the L. Mildenberg Collection, Jerusalem, 1997, p. 16, n. 7. The Painter’s Eye, The Art of Greek Ceramics, Greek Vases from a Swiss Private Collection and other European Collections, Geneva - New York, 2006, pp. 80-81, n. 18 (with complete bibliography).

98

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière L. Mildenberg, Suisse.

PUBLIÉ

DANS

KOZLOFF A.P. (éd.), Animals in Ancient Art from the L. Mildenberg Collection, Cleveland, 1981, pp. 147-148, n. 126. MOTTAHEDEH P.E. (éd.), Out of Noah’s Ark : Animals in Ancient Art from the L. Mildenberg Collection, Jérusalem, 1997, p. 16, n. 7. The Painter’s Eye, The Art of Greek Ceramics, Greek Vases from a Swiss Private Collection and other European Collections, Genève - New York, 2006, pp. 80-81, n. 18 (avec la bibliographie complète).

99


7. A BRONZE STATUETTE IN THE SHAPE OF A TURTLE

7. STATUETTE DE TORTUE EN BRONZE

Greek or Etruscan, end of the 6th-5th century B.C. L: 8.5 cm

Art grec ou étrusque, fin du VIe-Ve s. av. J.-C. L: 8.5 cm

The surface of the metal is very dark, almost black ; areas of green patina partially cover the statuette. This object was made using the lost wax process : the hollow head, the legs and the tail were probably cast separately and soldered to the body. The anatomical details were incised after cooling. The thickness of the bronze is important and the weight of the piece is astonishing considering its size. This statuette is a bit larger than average compared to other turtle figurines. The top of the shell was pierced in order to receive a nail or a rivet, as proven by the small visible disc that allowed it to be affixed on the interior. Considering its weight and low, flat shape, as well as its stability, this turtle was not a simple statuette of an animal but rather was used as a support for an object, now lost. The anatomy of the animal is rendered in a very realistic manner : the convex shape of the shell and the incisions for the claws indicate that the sculptor wanted to reproduce a terrestrial, rather than sea, turtle. From an iconographic point of view, one can notice the same elements that characterize the turtles represented on the famous coins from Aegina from the middle of the 5th century B.C. : the contour of the shell is almost circular, the head, the tail and the legs are laid out evenly. The head is narrow and pointed and circular incisions mark the eyes, while other lines represent the wrinkles of the skin on the head, the legs and the tail. Concentric lines, framed by a horizontal border, delineate the arrangement of the roughly circular plaques of the shell. In Greek mythology, the turtle is closely linked to Hermes and is his animal-attribute (Hermes made the first lyre with a turtle’s shell, see Homeric Hymn to Hermes, 24-61). Otherwise, other divinities, like Apollo, who received Hermes’s lyre, Zeus, Artemis, Hera and Aphrodite can be connected to this animal, even though their mythological connection is not always clear. Images of turtles are frequently offered as ex-votos in many of the sanctuaries of the three above-mentioned female divinities. In the Greek world, this reptile is often seen as a terracotta ex-voto or a child’s toy, while the bronze statuettes are very rare : the majority of metal turtles were directly placed on the ground or riveted on a base, and were used as a support for the handle of a mirror or the rod of a bronze lamp (often modeled in the shape of a young man, a kouros, or of a young girl, a kore). In Etruria, three turtles sometimes support the tripods of candelabra or incense burners. When the object supported by the turtle is lost, it is very difficult to date these figurines precisely ; the known examples can generally be dated between the late 6th and the 4th century B.C.

La surface du métal est très foncée, presque noire ; des taches de patine vert clair recouvrent partiellement la statuette. La technique de fabrication est celle de la cire perdue : la tête, qui est creuse, les pattes et la queue ont probablement été fondues à part et soudées au corps. Les détails anatomiques ont été incisés à froid. La paroi du métal est très épaisse et le poids de la pièce est étonnant par rapport à ses dimensions. Cette pièce est un peu plus grande que la moyenne des autres statuettes de tortue. Le sommet de la carapace était percé et traversé par un clou ou par un rivet, qu’un petit disque bien visible permettait de fixer de l’intérieur. Comme l’indiquent aussi son poids et sa forme basse et plate, difficile à déséquilibrer, cette tortue n’était donc pas une simple statuette d’animal, mais elle servait plutôt comme support pour un objet, aujourd’hui perdu. L’anatomie de l’animal est rendue de manière bien réaliste : la forme bombée de la carapace et les incisions qui indiquent les ongles font penser que le sculpteur a voulu reproduire une tortue ayant appartenu à une espèce terrestre plutôt que marine. Iconographiquement on retrouve les mêmes éléments qui caractérisent les tortues représentées sur les célèbres monnaies d’Egine à partir du milieu du Ve s. av. J.-C. : le contour de la carapace est presque circulaire, avec la tête, la queue et les pattes disposées régulièrement. La tête est étroite et pointue, des cercles incisés indiquent les yeux, d’autres incisions marquent les plis de la peau sur la tête, sur les pattes et sur la queue. La disposition des plaques cornées de la carapace est rendue par groupes de lignes concentriques et vaguement circulaires, qui sont encadrées par un bord horizontal. Dans la mythologie grecque, la tortue est particulièrement liée à Hermès, dont elle est l’animal-attribut (avec sa carapace Hermès a fabriqué la première lyre, cf. Hymne homérique à Hermès, 24-61). Par ailleurs, d’autres divinités, en particulier Apollon, qui a reçu la lyre d’Hermès, Zeus, Artémis, Héra et Aphrodite sont parfois en relation avec cet animal, sans qu’il y ait un rapport mythologique clair. Les images de tortues comptent parmi les animaux offerts comme ex-voto dans de nombreux sanctuaires des trois divinités féminines citées. Dans le monde grec ou de Grande Grèce, ce reptile est souvent attesté comme ex-voto en terre cuite ou comme jouet pour enfants, tandis que les statuettes en bronze sont très rares : appuyées directement sur le sol ou montées sur une base, la plupart des tortues en métal étaient utilisées comme support pour le manche d’un miroir ou pour la tige d’une lampe en bronze (souvent modelés en forme de jeune homme, un kouros, ou de jeune fille, une koré). En Etrurie, trois tortues servent parfois de support pour les trépieds de candélabres ou d’encensoirs. Si l’objet soutenu par la tortue n’est pas conservé, il est très difficile de déterminer la date précise de ces figurines ; les exemplaires connus sont généralement datés entre la fin du VIe et le IVe s. av. J.-C.

PROVENANCE Swiss art market, acquired in 1992.

PROVENANCE

BIBLIOGRAPHY AMANDRY P., Manches de patère et de miroirs grecs, in Monuments et Mémoires de la fondation E. Piot, 47, 1953, p. 50, n. 2 (mirror). DUMOULIN D., Antike Schildkröten, Würzburg, 1993, fig.13-14 (lamp and mirror). HAYNES S., Etruscan Bronzes, London, 1985, p. 265, n. 56 (Etruscan censer). KEENE CONGDOM L.O., Caryatid Mirrors of Ancient Greece, Mainz on Rhine, 1981, n. 2, 6 and 14 (mirrors). An Aegina coin : BLOESCH H. (ed.), Das Tier in der Antike, Zurich, 1974, n. 410.

100

Acquis sur le marché d’art suisse en 1992.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE AMANDRY P., Manches de patère et de miroirs grecs, dans Monuments et Mémoires de la fondation E. Piot, 47, 1953, p. 50, n. 2 (miroir). DUMOULIN D., Antike Schildkröten, Würzburg, 1993, fig.13-14 (lampe et miroir). HAYNES S., Etruscan Bronzes, Londres, 1985, p. 265, n. 56 (encensoir étrusque). KEENE CONGDOM L.O., Caryatid Mirrors of Ancient Greece, Mayence/Rhin, 1981, n. 2, 6 et 14 (miroirs). Une monnaie d’Egine : BLOESCH H. (éd.), Das Tier in der Antike, Zurich, 1974, n. 410.

101


8. A BRONZE STATUETTE OF A HORSE

8. STATUETTE DE CHEVAL EN BRONZE

Etruscan, ca. 500 B.C. H: 10.2 cm

Art étrusque, vers 500 av. J.-C. Ht: 10.2 cm

This solid bronze horse is a masterpiece of Etruscan small statuary from the late Archaic Period : the proportions are harmonious, the animal stands upright in a very naturalistic manner, the anatomical details are finely incised or modeled and are treated like decorative elements ; nevertheless, they harmonize perfectly with the entire body. The state of preservation of this piece is excellent ; the surface is covered with a very beautiful green patina, only the hooves are broken. This animal possesses two parallel statuettes of nearly identical dimensions and style, which are well known to the archaeologists : one belonged to the Hunt collection and the other one to the Bomford collection. In spite of some differences - one can observe that both of the other statuettes are placed on a rectangular base and that the Hunt horse raises its left forefoot - the typological and formal similarities between the three pieces enable us to attribute them to a single bronze workshop, probably located in Vulci. At the time, this city was one of the most famous Etruscan artistic centers, especially for its production of small bronzes and for its black figure ceramics. According to S. Haynes, who published the Bomford statuette, these horses are among the most beautiful representations of animals in all Etruscan art. The purpose of these horses is still unknown : no element allows us to determine whether they were ex-votos (were they part of the same group, the same team, or were they isolated statuettes ?), decorative elements of a tripod, of a brazier, of a cauldron or of a vessel lid (stamnos), etc. Our example presents some new details : on the one hand, the design of the mane presents a notch near the nape of the neck, as if the sculptor had “skipped” a lock ; on the other hand, the surface of the metal was deeply engraved on the animal’s left flank at shoulder level (a large vertical mark and small horizontal incisions) and, to a lesser extent, on the hindquarters. In spite of the absence of other marks on the back and the right flank, one can consider two hypotheses which have yet to be verified : a) a jockey was riding the horse and his forearm, or his hand, rested on the mane while his left leg was placed at the level of the large vertical mark ; b) this statuette was on the right side of a team, and the incisions on the flank could have been left by the chariot’s beam.

Ce cheval en bronze massif est un chef-d’œuvre de la petite statuaire étrusque de la fin de l’époque archaïque : les proportions sont harmonieuses, l’animal est debout dans une position très naturelle, les détails de l’anatomie, incisés ou modelés, sont traités comme des éléments de décoration, mais se fondent parfaitement dans l’ensemble du corps. L’état de conservation est excellent, la surface est recouverte d’une très belle patine verte, seuls les sabots sont cassés. Cet animal possède deux statuettes jumelles pour les dimensions et le style, qui sont bien connues de la critique archéologique : l’une appartenait à la collection Hunt et l’autre à la collection Bomford. Malgré quelques différences - on relèvera que les deux autres statuettes sont posées sur une base rectangulaire et que le cheval Hunt soulève la patte antérieure gauche - les similitudes typologiques et formelles entre les trois pièces sont telles que l’on peut aisément les attribuer à un seul atelier de bronzier, actif probablement à Vulci. A cette période, cette ville était un des centres artistiques étrusques les plus célèbres, surtout pour sa production de petits bronzes et pour la peinture sur céramique à figures noires. Selon S. Haynes, qui a publié l’exemplaire de la collection Bomford, ces chevaux comptent parmi les plus belles représentations animalières de tout l’art étrusque. L’utilisation des ces chevaux pose encore de nombreuses questions : aucun élément ne permet d’établir avec certitude s’il s’agissait d’ex-voto (faisaient-ils partie du même groupe ou du même attelage, ou étaient-ils des monuments isolés ?), d’éléments de la décoration d’un trépied, d’un braseros, d’un chaudron ou d’un couvercle de vase (stamnos), etc. L’exemplaire en examen apporte néanmoins quelques nouveaux détails : d’une part le dessin de la crinière présente un décrochement près de la base du cou, comme si le sculpteur avait «sauté» une mèche, de l’autre, la surface du métal a été profondément gravée sur le flanc gauche de l’animal, au niveau de l’épaule (grosse marque verticale, petites incisions horizontales) et en moindre mesure sur la cuisse. Malgré l’absence d’autres traces sur le dos et sur le flanc droit, on peut envisager deux hypothèses qui seront néanmoins à vérifier : a) que le cheval était monté par un jockey, dont un avant-bras ou une main s’appuyait à la crinière tandis que sa jambe gauche était retenue à la hauteur de la fente verticale, b) que cette statuette était l’élément de droite d’un attelage et que les incisions sur le flanc ont été laissées par le timon du char.

PROVENANCE

PROVENANCE

Ex-N. Koutoulakis Collection, Geneva-Paris, 1970’s ; Ex-English Art Market, early 1990’s ; Ex-American private collection 1980’s-1990’s.

Ancienne collection N. Koutoulakis, Genève-Paris, années 1970 ; marché d’art anglais, début 1990 ; collection particulière américaine, anneés 1980 – 1990.

BIBLIOGRAPHY BOUCHER S., Deux petits bronzes à Malibu, in The P.J. Getty Museum Journal, 10, 1982, pp. 130-132. HAYNES S., Neue etruskische Bronzen, in Antike Kunst 9/2, 1966, pp. 102-103, pl. 23, 1-2. Wealth of the Ancient World, The N. B. Hunt and W.H. Hunt Collections, Fort Worth, 1983, p. 101. On the purpose of such figurines, see : GIGLIOLI G.Q., L’arte etrusca, Milan, 1935, pl. 101-105.

102

BIBLIOGRAPHIE BOUCHER S., Deux petits bronzes à Malibu, dans The P.J. Getty Museum Journal, 10, 1982, pp. 130-132. HAYNES S., Neue etruskische Bronzen, dans Antike Kunst 9/2, 1966, pp. 102-103, pl. 23, 1-2. Wealth of the Ancient World, The N. B. Hunt and W.H. Hunt Collections, Fort Worth, 1983, p. 101. Pour l’utilisation de telles figurines, v. : GIGLIOLI G.Q., L’arte etrusca, Milan, 1935, pl. 101-105.

103


9. A BRONZE CAULDRON WITH FIGURED HANDLES

9. CHAUDRON EN BRONZE AVEC ANSES FIGURÉES

Orientalizing Period, 7th century B.C. H: 45 cm, D: 65 cm

Art orientalisant, VIIe s. av. J.-C. Ht: 45 cm, D: 65 cm

This large cauldron - in spite of a few restorations, the basin is whole and in a good state of preservation - was hammered from a single and extremely thin metal sheet to which two handles modeled in the shape of sirens and placed opposite each other were riveted ; the handles are applied to the vessel’s wall with three nails (under the wings and the tail of the represented figures). An eight-petaled rosette in low relief is soldered to the vase’s interior at the level of the figure’s tail. The cauldron has a spherical, slightly crushed profile, with a small vertical rim and a flat lip. It would have held approximately a hundred liters of liquid. The two solid bronze handles, very similar but not identical, could have been made from the same mold. The figures look like sirens, but they are equipped with bearded janiform male heads (according to ancient mythology, sirens are birds with female heads). The spread wings (with the arms and hands placed over them !) and the tail are flat and soldered to the container’s exterior, while the chest is sculpted in the round and projects over the edge : one face looks in towards the basin, the other one turns outwards. The man is an adult, with long hair and a thick beard ; he is dressed in a short-sleeved tunic with hatched decoration. His head is covered with a bronze helmet topped with a plume of a crescent moon shape, a typical Anatolian headgear known through several bronze examples and also seen on contemporary stone reliefs. Bronze cauldrons - which are among the largest and most impressive of metal containers from Antiquity that have survived until today - were lifted and moved using cords or rods which were slipped into the rings placed behind the handles (on this cauldron, the rings were inserted in the loops situated between the “siren-men’s” wings) ; tripods composed of metal rods were used as stands. They are classified according to the shape of their handles : simple arch shaped handles, ones in the shape of bull protomes, in the shape of sirens, of griffin’s or lion’s heads. From the Near Eastern to the Greek worlds, these containers are often represented in ancient iconography : cult scenes, banquets or symposia utilizing the cauldron as a central element, sportive games offering basins to the prize winner, etc. At the end of the Geometric Period, especially during the second half of the 8th century, the relationships between Near Eastern and Greek worlds intensified. The presence of many Greek “trading posts” on the Syrian shore (Al-Mina, at the mouth of the Orontes is the most famous example) ensured trade contacts for several centuries between Greece and the coastal areas (Syria, Phoenicia, even Egypt), but also with the Syrian and Anatolian frontier civilizations (Assyria, Neo-Hittite kingdoms, Urartu). This does not explain how ideas were transmitted, since Eastern objects found on Greek ground are, to date, very few : in spite of the absence of tangible evidence, archaeologists think that Greek craftsmen travelled towards the East and/or that, vice versa, Eastern craftsmen moved towards the Hellenic world, thus allowing, through their activities, the passing of technical knowledge and of iconographic models to the Western world. This cauldron has a close parallel in the Museum of Florence : a bronze basin found in Vetulonia, to which it was imported from the Oriental or from the Greek world during the 7th century B.C. According to Dr. M. Bennett (Cleveland), its fine modelling and precise incisions would establish that our basin is of Greek production.

Ce grand chaudron - malgré quelques restaurations le bassin est entier et en bon état de conservation - a été martelé dans une seule feuille de métal extrêmement mince à laquelle ont été rivetées deux anses modelées en forme de sirène et disposées antithétiquement ; trois clous les fixent à la paroi du vase (sous les ailes et sous la queue des figures représentées). Une rosette à 8 pétales légèrement en relief est soudée à l’intérieur du vase à la hauteur de la queue des figures. Le profil de chaudron est sphérique, légèrement écrasé, avec un petit bord vertical et une lèvre plate. Il devait contenir environ une centaine de litres de liquide. Les deux anses, très similaires mais pas identiques, pourraient néanmoins avoir été fondues dans le même moule. Elles sont en bronze massif. Les personnages reproduits ressemblent à des sirènes mais ils sont pourvus d’une tête masculine barbue et biface (selon la mythologie antique, les sirènes sont des oiseaux à tête féminine). Les ailes déployées (avec les bras et les mains posés par-dessus !) et la queue sont plates et soudées à l’extérieur du récipient, tandis que le torse se dresse en ronde bosse et dépasse le bord : un visage regarde vers le bassin, l’autre vers l’extérieur. L’homme sculpté est un adulte, portant les cheveux longs et une barbe drue ; il est habillé d’une tunique à manches courtes à décor hachuré. Sa tête est coiffée d’un casque en bronze se terminant par un panache en croissant de lune, d’un type anatolien connu par quelques exemplaires en bronze et également attesté sur des reliefs en pierre contemporains. Les chaudrons en bronze - qui comptent parmi les plus grands et les plus impressionnants récipients métalliques de l’Antiquités arrivés jusqu’à nous - étaient soulevés et déplacés à l’aide de cordes ou de bâtons qui étaient glissés dans les anneaux visibles derrière les anses (pour le chaudron en examen, les anneaux étaient insérés dans les bagues se trouvant entre les ailes des «hommes-sirène») ; des trépieds composés de tiges en métal leur servaient de soutien. Leur classement se base sur la forme de anses : anses simples en forme d’arc, en forme de protomés de taureaux, en forme de sirènes, de têtes de griffons ou de lions. Du monde proche-oriental au monde grec, ces récipients sont souvent représentés dans l’iconographie antique : scènes cultuelles, banquets ou symposia où le chaudron est l’élément central de l’image, jutes sportives avec des bassins comme prix pour les vainqueurs, etc. A la fin de l’époque géométrique, surtout pendant la deuxième moitié du VIIIe s., les rapports entre les mondes proche-oriental et grec se sont intensifiés. L’existence de nombreux «comptoirs» grecs sur le littoral syrien (Al-Mina, à l’embouchure de l’Oronte en est l’exemple le pus célèbre) a assuré pendant plusieurs siècles les échanges commerciaux entre la Grèce et le monde côtier (Syrie, Phénicie voire Egypte) mais aussi avec les civilisations de l’arrière-pays syrien et anatolien (Assyrie, royaumes néo-hittites, Urartu). Le problème des modes de transmission n’est toutefois pas encore résolu, puisque les objets orientaux trouvés sur sol grec sont à ce jour très peu nombreux : malgré l’absence de preuves tangibles, les archéologues pensent que des artisans grecs aient fait le voyage vers l’Orient et/ou, que, vice-versa, des artisans orientaux se soient déplacés vers le monde hellénique, en permettant ainsi, grâce à leurs activités, le passage des connaissances techniques et des modèles iconographiques vers le monde occidental. Ce chaudron possède un excellent parallèle au musée de Florence : un bassin en bronze trouvé à Vetulonia, où il a été importé du monde oriental ou grec au courant du VIIe s. av. J.-C. Selon l’avis du Dr. M. Bennett (Cleveland), la minutie du travail et la précision dans le rendu des incisions seraient une preuve que le bassin en examen est une œuvre grecque.

PROVENANCE Ex-German private collection, 1980’s.

BIBLIOGRAPHY On bronze cauldrons : GHIRSHMAN R., The Arts of Ancient Iran, From its Origins to the Time of Alexander the Great, New York, 1964, pp. 294-297. HERRMANN H.V., Die Kessel der orientalisierenden Zeit, II : Kesselprotomen und Stabdreifüsse (Olympische Forschungen XII), Berlin, 1979. MERHAV R. (ed.), Urartu, A Metalworking Center in the first Millennium B.C.E., Jerusalem, 1991, pp. 226-243. MAXWELL-HYSLOP K.R., Urartian Bronzes in Etruscan Tombs, in Iraq 18, 1956, pp. 150 ss. ROLLEY C., Les bronzes grecs, Fribourg, 1983, pp. 67-76. On the bronze helmet of similar shape : REHM E., Kykladen und alter Orient, Bestandskatalog des Badischen Landesmuseums Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, 1997, pp. 105-108, M12, pl. 405.

104

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière allemande, années 1980.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Sur les chaudrons en bronze : GHIRSHMAN R., The Arts of Ancient Iran, From its Origins to the Time of Alexandre the Great, New York, 1964, pp. 294-297. HERRMANN H.V., Die Kessel der orientalisierenden Zeit, II : Kesselprotomen und Stabdreifüsse (Olympische Forschungen XII), Berlin, 1979. MERHAV R. (éd.), Urartu, A Metalworking Center in the first Millennium B.C.E., Jérusalem, 1991, pp. 226-243. MAXWELL-HYSLOP K.R., Urartian Bronzes in Etruscan Tombs, dans Iraq 18, 1956, pp. 150 ss. ROLLEY C., Les bronzes grecs, Fribourg, 1983, pp. 67-76. Pour le casque en bronze ayant cette forme : REHM E., Kykladen und alter Orient, Bestandskatalog des Badischen Landesmuseums Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, 1997, pp. 105-108, M12, pl. 405.

105


10. A BRONZE STATUETTE OF HERMES

10. STATUETTE DU DIEU HERMÈS EN BRONZE

Hellenistic Greek, 3rd - 2nd century B.C. (the original piece, attributed to Lysippos, could date from the middle of the 4th century B.C., ca. 340-330 B.C.) H: 26.8 cm

Art hellénistique, IIIe -IIe s. av. J.-C. (l’original attribué à Lysippe daterait du milieu du IVe s. av. J.-C., env. 340-330 av. J.-C.) Ht: 26.8 cm

The statuette, cast using the lost wax process, is in excellent condition ; the wonderfully preserved surface allows one to fully appreciate all of the modeled and incised details of this figure ; the eyes were inlaid in silver, which was also used on the modeled wings. Only the left forearm, the left foot, one of the wings and the attributes of the god are missing. Hermes is represented seated on a boulder, in a moment of repose that one can imagine as a short respite between two missions : along with Hebe, his feminine counterpart, Hermes was the messenger of the Olympian gods. His left leg is extended forward, the right is bent and rests on the rock on which the god places his bare feet ; his torso is slightly turned and oriented towards the left in a very smooth movement of rotation that elegantly continues through the neck and the head ; the left arm is held low and the hand was probably placed on top of a rock ; the right forearm rests on the thigh. In spite of his apparently relaxed and calm posture, the bust of this young man is subjected to a twisting towards the left, which makes this work particularly complex and well structured. The dramatic distribution of weight (the entire left half of the body is in repose, while the right leg and arm are bent) and the frontality of pose typical of Classical works, were from the Classical period on not only about providing interest from a number of angles, of which the best is undoubtedly the three-quarter view from the left : perfectly equilibrated and clear with a studied correctness of the depth and the position and excellent separation and placement of the limbs. The torsion of the body, rendered in a very natural fashion, balances the disequilibrium created by the upsetting of the chiasmus. Contrary to the norm (Hermes was usually presented as a young man, slim with normally developed musculature), in this statuette, the body of the god is treated like that of an athlete, with the musculature well modeled and at the same time extremely forceful, as proven by the rendering of the anatomy of the chest and thoracic cage, of the back and also of the legs. The face is oval and slightly bearded like that of an adolescent, with fine, nuanced features. The preserved wing was attached with a cubic tenon directly into the hair (this statuette does not wear the petasus, the winged helmet of Hermes) that covers the skull like a cap with undulating incisions marking the curls. Just above the forehead, the face is framed by a series of thick curls, which encircle the entire head. On a typological note, this head does not refer to the original Lysippean work : perhaps it represents a portrait of a personage of the highest order, for example a Greek prince. The idea of using a well-known sculptural type for the body, together with the head of a historical character is already known by the 3rd century B.C. with the famous Pompeian bronze of Demetrios Poliorcetes. Although the ancient authors are mute on this subject, contemporary archaeological criticism is generally unanimous on an attribution to Lysippos – the most famous Greek sculptor from the second half of the 4th century B.C. – for this image of Hermes. The original, which may have been larger than life (cf. the marble statue of Merida and the head from the Barracco Museum in Rome), is lost, but it can be recreated, especially through some small bronzes, of which none attain the extremely rarified level of quality of this piece. A statuette from the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna (inv. VI 420, 3rd century B.C.) is certainly the best known replica of this type: the god, represented as a bearded young man, with short hair and without the petasus, seated on a boulder with his torso leaning strongly forward and his feet bare; in his right hand he holds the caduceus while the left rests on a rock. The contour of the tumescent ears is slightly deformed on the example in Vienna (which recall those of boxers) allowing, among certain savants, an identification of this Hermes as the Enagonios type, the protector of stadiums and palestrae. The elaborations of the Imperial Period, of which there are three principal types, are joined by other attributes from the original figure: the beggar’s purse in the left hand, the winged petasus, the chlamys, the sandals, a well known pose, and at times, very strong musculature. Artistically and typologically, this statuette undoubtedly reproduces the original type, like the figure in Vienna, measuring half its size. The only notable variations from the Vienna figure are the presence of the wings, the slightly more rigid position of the torso and especially the type of head, which is very different from Lysippan creations.

La statuette, fondue à la cire perdue, est dans d’excellentes conditions ; le très bon état de la surface permet encore d’apprécier tous les détails plastiques et incisés ; les yeux sont incrustés en argent, les ailes sont modelées en argent. Seuls l’avant-bras et le pied gauche, une des ailes et les attributs du dieu sont perdus. Hermès est représenté assis sur un rocher, dans un moment de repos que l’on peut imaginer comme une courte pause entre deux missions : avec Hébé, son correspondant féminin, Hermès était en effet le messager des dieux de l’Olympe. La jambe gauche est étendue vers l’avant, la droite est pliée et ramenée vers le rocher, sur lequel le dieu pose son pied nu ; le torse est légèrement tourné et ouvert vers la gauche dans un mouvement de rotation très régulier et élégant que prolongent le cou et la tête ; le bras gauche est tendu vers le bas et la main était probablement posée sur le sommet du rocher ; l’avant-bras droit est appuyé sur la cuisse. Malgré la position apparemment détendue et calme, le buste du jeune homme subit donc une torsion vers la gauche, qui rend l’œuvre particulièrement élaborée et bien structurée. Le schéma en chiasme (ici toute la partie gauche du corps est au repos, tandis que la jambe et le bras droit sont pliés) et la frontalité, typiques des œuvres classiques, sont désormais dépassés au profit d’une pluralité de vues, dont la meilleure est sans doute celle de trois-quarts gauche, qui est parfaitement équilibrée et claire, avec une étude correcte de la profondeur et une position bien dégagée des membres. La torsion du corps, rendue de façon très naturelle, compense le déséquilibre dû à la dissolution du chiasme. Contrairement à l’habitude (Hermès est généralement présenté comme un jeune homme élancé, à la musculature normalement développée), dans cette statuette, le corps du dieu est traité comme celui d’un athlète, avec la musculature bien modelée et en même temps extrêmement puissante, comme le prouve le rendu de l’anatomie de la poitrine et de la cage thoracique, du dos ainsi que des jambes. Le visage est ovale et imberbe comme celui d’un adolescent, avec des traits fins et bien nuancés ; l’homme représenté est jeune et imberbe, ses yeux sont marqués par des petits cercles gravés, son profil est linéaire et très «grec». L’aile conservée est fixée directement dans la chevelure par un tenon cubique (cette statuette n’est pas coiffée du pétase, le couvre-chef ailé d’Hermès) ; les cheveux couvrent le crâne comme une calotte, où des incisions ondulées marquent les mèches : elles sont disposées très régulièrement en trois cercles avec une étoile au centre. Juste au-dessus du front, le visage est encadré par une série d’épaisses boucles, qui font ensuite le tour de toute la tête. Il faut souligner que typologiquement cette tête ne correspond pas à la tête de l’original lysippéen : peut-être s’agit-il du portrait d’un personnage de premier plan, comme par exemple un prince hellénistique. L’idée d’utiliser des types sculpturaux connus comme corps pour une statue reproduisant un personnage historique est attestée déjà au III s. av. J.-C. par la célèbre image pompéienne en bronze de Démétrios Poliorcète. Bien que les sources écrites antiques soient muettes sur ce sujet, la critique archéologique contemporaine est généralement unanime sur l’attribution à Lysippe - le plus célèbre sculpteur grec de la deuxième moitié du IVe av. J.-C. - de cette image d’Hermès. L’original, qui était peut-être grandeur nature (cf. statue en marbre de Mérida et la tête du Musée Barracco à Rome), est perdu mais il peut être reconstitué surtout à partir de quelques petits bronzes, dont la qualité n’atteint que très rarement celle de cette pièce. Une statuette du Kunsthistorisches Museum de Vienne (inv. VI 420, IIIe s. av. J.-C.) constitue certainement la meilleure réplique connue de ce type : le dieu, représenté comme un jeune homme imberbe, avec les cheveux coupés court et sans pétase, est assis sur le rocher avec le torse bien penché en arrière et les pieds nus ; dans la main droite il tenait le caducée tandis que la gauche était appuyée sur le rocher. Le contour des oreilles tuméfiées et un peu déformées de l’exemplaire viennois (qui rappellent celles des boxeurs) permettrait, selon certains savants, d’identifier cet Hermès avec le type Enagonios, le protecteur des stades et des palestres. Les élaborations d’époque impériale, que l’on peut classer en trois types principaux, ont ajouté d’autres attributs à la figure originale : la besace dans la main gauche, le pétase ailé, la chlamyde, les sandales, une position plus stéréotypée, la musculature parfois plus puissante. Artistiquement et typologiquement, la statuette en examen reproduit sans doute le type original, comme la figurine de Vienne, qui ne mesure pourtant que la moitié de sa taille. Les seules variantes notables par rapport à la figurine viennoise, sont la présence des ailes, la position un peu plus rigide avec le torse plus droit et surtout le type de tête très différent des conceptions de Lysippe.

PROVENANCE Ex-American private collection 1980-1990.

PUBLISHED

IN

CHAMAY J. in Artpassions, Revue d’art et de culture, Geneva, September 2007.

BIBLIOGRAPHY BESCHI L., I bronzetti romani di Montorio Veronese, Venice, 1962, pp. 31-60, pl. VI-X. Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. V, Zurich, 1990, pp. 369-370, nn. 962-966. Lisippo, L’arte e la fortuna, Rome, 1995, pp. 130-139, n. 4.16 ; pp. 402-404, n. 6.18. MORENO P., Vita e arte di Lisippo, Milan, 1987, pp. 65-68.

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière américaine, années 1980-1990.

PUBLIÉ

DANS

CHAMAY J. dans Artpassions, Revue d’art et de culture, Genève, septembre 2007.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE BESCHI L., I bronzetti romani di Montorio Veronese, Venise, 1962, pp. 31-60, pl. VI-X. Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. V, Zurich, 1990, pp. 369-370, nn. 962-966. Lisippo, L’arte e la fortuna, Rome, 1995, pp. 130-139, n. 4.16 ; pp. 402-404, n. 6.18. MORENO P., Vita e arte di Lisippo, Milan, 1987, pp. 65-68. 106

107


11. A BRONZE ORNAMENT

11. DÉCORATION EN BRONZE

Celtic, 3rd - 2nd century B.C. Dim: 2.9 cm x 6.5 cm

Art celte, IIIe-IIe s. av. J.-C. Dim: 2.9 cm x 6.5 cm

This cast bronze ornament is surprising because of its significant weight. It is rectangular with the lower part cut striaght and pierced by a square opening in its center. The object is hollow : two cylindrical rivets with flattened heads, which also pierce the anterior part of the ornament, are inserted into the center of the hollow space ; on the back, the piece was probably covered by a small flat sheet. Finished with a slightly curved decorative nail with a spherical head which extended from the opening under the piece, this pin was used to prevent a wheel from sliding off the axle of a chariot : it was threaded through a hole drilled at the ends of the axles so that the wheel could not fall off. Linchpins in the shape of curved nails are hallmarks of the Celtic World : the known examples, which are very few, generally present a rectangular ornament like this one, while others are surmounted by triangular or hemispherical decorations. Three heads of animals in relief decorate the surface of the piece : two canines (wolves ?) seem to surround a ram’s head. As is often the case in Celtic animal art, forms are stylized and abstract patterns and subjects are melded and mixed in an unnatural, although always original and varied way : thus, even on an small object like this one, the lower jaw of the wolves turns into a large volute with a bud in the center, a sort of fish tail extends from the ram’s head, a horse tail replaces the wolves’ neck (the wolves’ teeth look like a dotted bulge, the ram’s horn turns into an arch and the ears into buds in relief, etc.

Cette applique en bronze fondu est surprenante à cause de son poids important. Elle est rectangulaire avec la partie inférieure coupée droit et percée d’une ouverture carrée en son centre. L’objet est creux : deux rivets cylindriques à têtes aplaties, qui percent également la partie antérieure de l’applique, sont plantés au centre de l’espace évidé ; à l’arrière l’applique était probablement fermée par une petite feuille plate. Complétée par un clou légèrement recourbé et à tête sphérique qui sortait de l’ouverture sous l’applique, cette clavette servait à empêcher un char de perdre les roues : la clavette était en effet enfilée dans un trou percé aux extrémités des essieux de façon que la roue ne pouvait plus sortir de son emplacement. Les chevilles à clou courbé sont typiques du monde celte : les exemplaires connus, qui sont peu nombreux, présentent généralement une applique rectangulaire comme celle-ci, d’autres sont surmontées par une décoration triangulaire ou hémisphérique. Trois têtes d’animaux en relief ornent la surface de l’applique : deux canidés (des loups ?) entourent peut-être une tête de capriné. Comme souvent dans l’art animalier celte, les formes sont stylisées et abstraites, les motifs et les sujets sont dissous et mélangés de manière non naturelle, mais toujours originale et variée : ainsi, même sur un objet de petite taille comme celui en examen, la mâchoire inférieure des loups se transforme en une grande volute avec un bouton au centre, une sorte de queue de poisson prolonge la tête du capriné, une queue de cheval remplace le cou des loups, dont la dentition ressemble à un bourrelet avec des petits traits incisés, la corne du bélier devient un arc et les oreilles des boutons en relief, etc.

PROVENANCE German art market, acquired in 2005.

PROVENANCE Acquis sur le marché d’art allemand en 2005.

BIBLIOGRAPHY DUVAL P.M., Les Celtes, Paris, 1977, pp. 113-117. JACOBSTAHL P., Early Celtic Art, Oxford, 1968, pl. 101-103, n. 159-164.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE DUVAL P.M., Les Celtes, Paris, 1977, pp. 113-117. JACOBSTAHL P., Early Celtic Art, Oxford, 1968, pl. 101-103, n. 159-164.

12. A BRONZE FOOT

12. PIED EN BRONZE

Roman, 1st - 2nd century A.D. L: 11.4 cm

Art romain Ier -IIe s. ap. J.-C. L: 11.4 cm

This bronze foot was cast using the lost wax process ; it is filled (until the level of the ankle) with a large and heavy lump of lead to stabilize the statue on its stone base. It certainly belonged to a human statue that was slightly larger than life-size ; in the absence of any attribute or of other elements that could lead to its identification, it is not possible to determine with surety if the statue represented a man or a woman, nor any other details (seated or standing figure, nude or draped…). The technique of filling entirely, or partially, a cast bronze statuette or figurine with lead is very old (see for example ancient decorative animals on cauldrons which are sometimes filled with lead). As for larger statues, like in our case, the weight of the lead fixed the statue to its base : the metal was poured directly into the feet (which did not have a bottom) and passed through the holes previously drilled in the base, in order to give the piece balance and maximum stability. From an artistic point of view, one may notice the fine modeling of the foot’s surface and its precise anatomical rendering (see the toes with wrinkles on the well-formed joints and the toenails). The slender shape with the well-modeled bone structure and some light veins in relief could indicate that this foot belonged to a statue of a teenager or a young athletic man.

Ce pied en bronze, fondu selon la technique de la cire perdue, contient à l’intérieur (jusqu’à la hauteur de la cheville) une importante et lourde masse de plomb, qui servait à stabiliser la statue dans sa base en pierre. Il appartenait certainement à une statue humaine mesurant un peu plus que la moitié de la taille naturelle ; en l’absence de tout attribut ou autre élément aidant à son identification, il n’est plus possible d’établir avec sûreté s’il s’agissait d’une figure masculine ou féminine, assise ou debout, nue ou drapée, etc. La technique de remplir entièrement ou partiellement avec du plomb une statuette ou une figurine en bronze fondu est très ancienne (cf. par exemple les animaux archaïques ornant les chaudrons qui sont parfois remplis de plomb) : dans les statues de plus grandes dimensions comme celle en examen, le poids du plomb permettait de fixer la statue dans sa base. Le métal était coulé directement dans les pieds (qui n’avaient pas de fond) et passait dans le(s) trou(s) creusé(s) auparavant dans la base, de façon à équilibrer l’œuvre et à lui donner le maximum de stabilité. Du point de vue artistique, on notera l’excellent modelage de la surface du pied et son rendu anatomique très précis (cf. les orteils avec les plis sur des phalanges et les ongles bien formés). La forme élancée avec la structure osseuse bien modelée et quelques légères veines en relief pourraient indiquer que ce pied appartenait à une statue d’adolescent ou de jeune homme au physique athlétique.

PROVENANCE German art market, acquired in 2000.

PROVENANCE

BIBLIOGRAPHY On ancient bronzes and bronzeworking techniques, see : BOL P.C., Antike Bronzetechnik, Kunst und Handwerk antiker Erzbilder, Munich, 1985, p. 160ss. (fixing processes) ; fig.120-121.

Acquis sur le marché d’art allemand en 2000.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Sur les bronzes antiques et la techniques des bronziers, v. : BOL P.C., Antike Bronzetechnik, Kunst und Handwerk antiker Erzbilder, Münich, 1985, p. 160ss. (procédés de fixation) ; fig.120-121.

108

109


13. A HAMMERED BRONZE GRIFFON PROTOME

13. PROTOMÉ DE CHAUDRON EN BRONZE REPRÉSENTANT UN GRIFFON

Greek, Orientalizing Period, second quarter of the 7th century B.C. H: 23 cm

Art grec archaïque (orientalisant), deuxième quart du VIIe s. av. J.-C. Ht: 23 cm

This spectacular and extremely rare hammered bronze griffon protome is one of the finest examples of its type known. It is in an excellent state of preservation : whole and completely intact except for a small hole at the tip of the upper beak where the bronze has been crushed a bit. Small pierced holes are visible around the base of the neck : they would have been used to rivet the griffon onto the rim of a large bronze cauldron. The entire work is covered in a perfectly smooth, even, deep emerald green patina. This head would have been part of a group of identical griffon protomes (decorative elements in the shape of heads, usually animal, sometimes human) that would have been placed around the edge of a circular bronze cauldron. Hammered from a single sheet of bronze in a display of technical virtuosity, this griffon features all of the elements of the canonical Orientalizing type : scaly head and neck, tall narrow ears and wide-open sharply curved beak with protruding tongue. Long spiral curls engraved with short horizontal strokes along their length fall to either side of the S-curved neck. Stylized wrinkles adorn the lids of wide elegant eyes that were left hollow for the addition of inlays in stone or glass, and a topknot crowns the head. This griffon sports additional circular protrusions on the center of the forehead and at the temples as well as a rosette at the back of the neck. Numerous details of the face and anatomy have been engraved : hatching and pinpricks to highlight the contours of the eyes, beak and tongue and U-shaped incisions to further highlight the shape of the lightly modeled scales, which alternate between being smooth and dotted with pinpricks. Both the hammered and cast variety of griffon protomes usually measure under 30 cm tall, with this particular example being slightly larger than average. The griffon was a mythological beast – lion’s body, snake’s neck and tongue, eagle’s head and hare’s ears – with apotropaic properties thought to have originated in the Near East. First introduced to the Greeks during the Orientalizing period, the griffon enjoyed prolonged popularity, even into Medieval times. The hammered bronze technique was brought to mainland Greece during the 8th century B.C. at the end of the Geometric Period through trade contacts with the Levant and Asia Minor. Many theories exist as to how exactly this occurred. Archaeologists still know relatively little about the Orientalizing Period, but most believe that through the development of trade in goods and raw materials, particularly tin, Greek artisans came into contact with Near Eastern iconography, techniques and materials and assimilated them into their own culture. G. Kopke has even suggested that Orientalizing bronzes were the result of Phoenician or North Syrian craftsmen living in Greece as traveling artisans from whom the Greeks then learned new methods and motifs. A model for the protome would have been carved first, probably out of wood, with the sheet bronze then being applied and hammered onto it. This mode of construction would help to explain the generally rounder shapes present in the few hammered griffon protomes known ; it would have been much easier to hollow cast sharp, thin forms with the use of a mold rather than dealing with how to remove a wood model from the insides of such small crevices. To create the smaller elements such as the topknot and the ears, the bronzesmith may have hammered those areas first onto segmented models to allow for easier removal before completion of the rest of the head. Jantzen, in his seminal study of griffin vessels, Griechische Greifenkessel, categorized griffon protomes into groups based on chronology and technique : our example belongs to Group 3, dating from ca. 700 – 670/50 B.C. which includes both hammered or cast griffons, with the hammered examples originating mostly from mainland Greece, notably Olympia. The modeling of our griffon shows much greater finesse than the earliest hammered works - mostly from the islands, such as Samos or Rhodes - while the elaborate cold engraving of the scales is a precursor to their more extensive treatment on the later cast examples. The hammered protomes from Group 3, including our griffon, seem to be almost exclusively from Olympia, the site of one of the most important bronze workshops from antiquity (thanks to the thriving sanctuary complex that existed to feed the demand for luxury goods for dedication). Although Samian hammered protomes from this period exist, they tend to be more streamlined in shape, while the Olympian examples display a more robust sense of volume, as well as the small cranial protrusions, which do not always appear on the Samian types. For comparison, there is a nearly identical Olympian Group 3 griffon from the Athenian art market from the 1950’s now in private hands. This magnificent griffon and the vessel that it was attached to would undoubtedly have been commissioned by a wealthy and/or high-ranking individual, probably as an offering to the gods or as a diplomatic gift between dignitaries.

Ce spectaculaire, et très rare, protomé de griffon en bronze martelé est un des plus beaux exemplaires connus. Il est dans un état de conservation excellent: entier et complètement intact, excepté un petit trou au bout du bec supérieur où le bronze a été un peu écrasé. Des petits trous ont été percés et sont visibles à la base du cou: ils ont peut-être servi à riveter le griffon sur le bord d’un grand chaudron en bronze. La pièce est entièrement recouverte d’une patine lisse, d’un profond vert émeraude. Cette tête faisait sans doute partie d’un ensemble de protomés de griffon identiques (les protomés sont des éléments décoratifs en forme de têtes d’animaux le plus souvent, parfois aussi de têtes humaines) qui aurait été placé sur la bordure d’un chaudron circulaire en bronze. Martelé dans une seule feuille de bronze avec une grande maestria, ce griffon présente tous les éléments caractéristiques du style orientalisant: tête et cou écailleux, longues oreilles fines, bec incurvé, largement ouvert, révélant la langue saillante. Des boucles en spirale, gravées de petits traits horizontaux, descendent le long du cou en forme de S. Les grands yeux élégants, aux paupières finement plissées, sont évidés, probablement pour recevoir une incrustation en pierre ou en verre, et sa tête est couronnée d’une crête. De plus, ce griffon présente des appendices circulaires au milieu du front et sur les tempes, ainsi qu’une rosette à l’arrière du cou. Le visage et l’anatomie du griffon sont soigneusement ciselés: des hachures et des points soulignent le contour des yeux, du bec et de la langue, et des incisions en forme de U mettent en valeur les écailles finement modelées. Habituellement, les protomés de griffon martelés ou coulés mesurent moins de 30 cm de long; ce spécimen est légèrement plus grand que la moyenne. Le griffon était une créature mythologique - corps de lion, cou et langue de serpent, tête d’aigle et oreilles de lièvre - aux propriétés apotropaïques, sans doute originaire du Proche-Orient. Il est apparu dans l’art grec pendant la période orientalisante et a joui d’une grande popularité jusqu’au Moyen-Age. La technique du bronze martelé a été importée en Grèce continentale au cours du VIIIe s. avant J.-C., à la fin de la période géométrique, par le biais d’échanges commerciaux avec le Levant et l’Asie mineure. De nombreuses théories coexistent quant à la façon dont ceci s’est exactement produit. Aujourd’hui encore, les connaissances des archéologues à propos de l’époque orientalisante sont relativement lacunaires, mais bon nombre d’entre eux pense qu’à travers le développement du commerce des marchandises et des matières premières, en particulier l’étain, les artisans grecs sont entrés en contact avec l’iconographie, les techniques et les matériaux proche-orientaux et les ont assimilés dans leur propre culture. G. Kopcke a même suggéré que les bronzes orientalisants pouvaient être l’oeuvre d’artisans-voyageurs phéniciens ou nord-syriens ayant enseigné de nouvelles techniques aux Grecs, et leur ayant fait découvrir de nouveaux motifs. Dans un premier temps, un modèle du protomé était réalisé, probablement en bois, puis la feuille de bronze était appliquée, puis martelée par-dessus. Ce mode de construction pourrait expliquer les formes généralement arrondies des quelques protomés de griffon martelés connus; il aurait été plus simple toutefois de couler des formes fines et nettes à l’aide d’un moule, plutôt que de chercher le moyen de retirer le modèle en bois par de minuscules fissures. Pour réaliser les petits éléments tels que la crête ou les oreilles, le bronzier a peut-être d’abord martelé ces parties sur des modèles segmentés, ceci afin de les retirer plus facilement avant d’achever le reste de la tête. Jantzen, dans son étude séminale sur les récipients ornés de griffons, Griechische Greifenkessel, a classé les protomés de griffon en différents groupes en se basant sur la chronologie et la technique utilisée: la pièce en examen appartient au groupe 3, qui inclut des griffons martelés ou coulés datant environ de 700 - 670/50 avant J.-C., et dont les exemplaires martelés proviennent la plupart du temps de Grèce continentale, notamment d’Olympie. La pièce en examen montre une finesse d’exécution plus grande que les spécimen martelés précédemment - provenant la plupart du temps des îles, par exemple Samos ou Rhodes -, de même que le rendu raffiné des écailles, incisées à froid, est précurseur du travail qui sera réalisé plus tard sur les pièces coulées. Les protomés martelés du groupe 3, y compris notre griffon, semblent venir presque exclusivement d’Olympie, qui était un centre de production d’objets en bronze parmi les plus prestigieux de l’Antiquité (grâce à la prospérité du sanctuaire, la demande d’objets de luxe objets et d’ex-voto était très forte). Les protomés samiens qui datent de la même période présentent souvent une forme plus rationnelle, alors que les exemplaires olympiens dénotent un sens plus développé du volume, comme le montre les protubérances du crâne, qui n’apparaissent pas toujours sur les modèles samiens. Le meilleur parallèle de cette pièce est un griffon olympien presque identique appartenant au groupe 3, sur le marché d’art athénien depuis les années 50, actuellement dans une collection privée. Ce magnifique griffon, ainsi que le récipient auquel il était attaché, a sans doute été commandité par un personnage aisé et/ou de haut rang, probablement en vue d’une offrande aux dieux ou comme cadeau diplomatique entre des dignitaires.

PROVENANCE PROVENANCE

Ex-private collection.

Ancienne collection particulière.

BIBLIOGRAPHY For the privately owned parallel, see : JANTZEN U., Griechische Greifenkessel, Berlin, 1955, taf. 6, 8.1. On bronze griffons in general, see : HOPKINS C., The Origin of the Etruscan-Samian Griffon Cauldron in American Journal of Archaeology 64, 1960, pp. 368-370, pl. 110-112. JANTZEN U., Griechische Greifenkessel, Berlin, 1955. KOPKE G., “What Role for Phoenicians ?” in Kopcke G. et al., Greece between East and West : 10th- 8th Centuries B.C., New York, 1992, p. 106. On Group 3 griffons, see : AKURGAL E., Zur Entstehung des greichischen Greifenbildes in Kotinos, Festschrift für Erika Simon, Mainz, 1992, pp. 40-42. HERRMANN H.-V., Die Kessel der orientalisierenden Zeit. III. Kesselprotomen und Stabdreifüsse, Berlin, 1979, pp. 155-167. YU TREISTER M., The Role of Metals in Ancient Greek History, New York, 1996, p. 129.

110

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Sur l’exemplaire parallèle conservé dans une collection privée, v. : JANTZEN U., Griechische Greifenkessel, Berlin, 1955, taf. 6, 8.1. Sur les griffons en bronze en général, v : HOPKINS C., The Origin of the Etruscan-Samian Griffon Cauldron dans American Journal of Archaeology 64, 1960, pp. 368-370, pl. 110-112. JANTZEN U., Griechische Greifenkessel, Berlin, 1955. KOPKE G., What Role for Phoenicians ? dans Kopcke G. et al., Greece between East and West : 10th- 8th Centuries B.C., New York, 1992, p. 106. Sur les griffons du Groupe 3, v. : AKURGAL E., Zur Entstehung des greichischen Greifenbildes in Kotinos, Festschrift für Erika Simon, Mainz, 1992, pp. 40-42. HERRMANN H.-V., Die Kessel der orientalisierenden Zeit. III. Kesselprotomen und Stabdreifüsse, Berlin, 1979, pp. 155-167. YU TREISTER M., The Role of Metals in Ancient Greek History, New York, 1996, p. 129.

111


14. AN ARCHAIC BRONZE HANDLE WITH LIONS AND PALMETTES

14. ANSES EN BRONZE AVEC LIONS ET PALMETTES

Greek, Laconian, first quarter of the 6th century B.C. H: 19.4 cm

Art grec (Laconie), premier quart du VIe siècle avant J.-C. Ht: 19.4 cm

This decorative bronze vessel handle is in an excellent state of preservation. Cast out of heavy bronze using the lost wax method, it is intact and is covered by a smooth, dark brownish-green patina with areas of deeper red. The finely modeled figures of the lions were later cold-worked to sharpen the anatomical details, such as the mane and the features of the muzzle and face. This handle would have originally connected the neck and shoulder of a hydria, a spouted Greek vessel shape specifically used for carrying and dispensing water, hence the name from the Greek hydros (water). This vertical handle facilitated the pouring of the water from the vessel, while two smaller horizontal handles on either side of the shoulder would have been used to lower the hydria into the well. A smooth, curved surface for easier attachment to the vase can be seen on the back of the handle. The base of the handle terminates in a large palmette flanked by two reclining lions symmetrically positioned one on either side. The gently rounded curves of the palmette, which spiral off diagonally from the central axis, sprout from a base that is finely incised with cross-hatching. The two lions are nearly identical and display the robust, slightly stylized modeling that is a hallmark of Archaic Greek art. Their slender bodies are stretched out with their hindquarters drawn in and their forelegs extended, their bellies to the ground. The forepaws are overlarge and display an impressive volume, as do the massive heads. In contrast to the linear orientation of the body, the heads are turned to confront the observer with their strong gaze. The heads are characterized by circular forms (ears, eyes, mane and muzzle), and the details of the mane and the whisker pads have been incised in short strokes. The tails curve onto the vertical handle and are held erect, ending in tufts that show the fur finely incised. This position, along with the erectness of the head and ears and the prominent modeling of the eyes in their almond-shaped sockets, give these two lions an air of ferocity and alertness. The thick vertical handle is of elliptical cross-section with ribs running down its legth, two of which have short diagonal incisions running down their length to create a variation in texture, At its apex, the upper pair of lions - again nearly identical to the bottowm two and symmetrically posed perpendicular to the handle on either side of a small projection that separates them - seem to look down on the observer in the same manner that the bottom two look up : their heads are oriented straight ahead, and this, coupled with their smaller, less prominent ears and relaxed tails give a gentler, more docile impression. The corpus of Greek bronze vessels with modeled handles is quite large, having come into fashion during the Archaic period and continuing well into Classical and Hellenistic times. The closest parallels to this particular handle are Laconian in origin, displaying the same vigorous and somewhat stylized modeling as our piece. With Sparta as its capital, Laconia was home to a number of major bronze workshops that rose to artistic prominence during the Archaic Period. Influenced by contemporary Attic works, Laconian bronzesmiths were able to achieve very high levels of craftsmanship, as evidenced in this handle, which would have undoubtedly belonged to a very large and ornate vessel from a wealthy and/or high-ranking household - one notes the heaviness of the handle and how much bronze would have been needed to cast such a piece, marking its status as a luxury good. A very close parallel, especially in the treatment of the lions, can be found at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (1989.11.1).

Cette anse en bronze est dans un excellent état de conservation. Elle est recouverte d’une belle patine d’un brun-vert profond, avec quelques taches de rouge foncé ; elle a été fondue à la cire perdue. Les figures des lions, finement modelées, ont été travaillées à froid pour affiner les détails anatomiques, tels que la crinière et les traits du museau et du visage. Cette anse devait, à l’origine, relier le cou et l’épaule d’une hydrie, une forme de récipient grec spécifiquement employée pour contenir et distribuer de l’eau, d’où son nom qui provient du mot hydros (eau). Cette anse verticale permettait d’incliner le vase pour verser de l’eau ; les deux plus petites poignées horizontales placées de chaque côté de l’épaule étant probablement utilisées pour transporter et soulever l’hydrie. Au dos de la poignée, une partie lisse et incurvée facilitait la soudure au vase. La base de la poignée est décorée d’une grande palmette flanquée de deux lions couchés, placés symétriquement de part et d’autre du motif. La palmette, qui naît à la base de l’anse, est composée de cinq pétales et deux spirales, jaillissant d’une demi-lune finement hachurée. Les deux lions sont presque identiques et présentent le trait vif et stylisé qui caractérise l’art grec archaïque. Leurs corps minces sont étendus, les pattes arrière repliées, les pattes avant tendues, leurs ventres touchent le sol. Les pattes avant sont démesurées et d’un volume impressionnant, de même que les têtes massives. les deux fauves tournent leur têtes vers le spectateur : elles se caractérisent par l’utilisation de formes plastiques circulaires (oreilles, yeux, crinière et museau) et par les détails de la crinière et des moustaches, marqués par de courtes incisions. Les queues roulent autour de l’anse verticale et s’érigent, droites, pour finir en touffes à la fourrure finement incisée. La position avec les pattes postérieures pliées, prêtes à la détente et les traits farouches du museau donnent aux deux lions un air féroce et alerte. L’épaisse anse verticale à section elliptique est pourvue de nervures parcourant toute sa longueur, dont deux présentent de courtes incisions diagonales qui créent une alternance avec les parties lisses. Au sommet de cette anse, deux autres lions - presque identiques à ceux de la partie inférieure - sont placés symétriquement et perpendiculairement à la poignée ; ils regardent vers le bas en direction du spectateur, contrairement aux fauves de la partie inférieure, qui dirigent leurs regards plutôt vers le haut. Leurs têtes sont droites, et ce détail, ajouté à leurs petites oreilles et à leurs queues relâchées, leur donne une expression plus douce et docile. Ce type de vase grec avec les anses modelées, est largement répandu à partir de la période archaïque ; sa popularité dure jusqu’aux périodes classique et hellénistique. Les meilleurs comparaisons pour cette anse, qui présentent également un modelé vif mais stylisés, sont d’origine laconienne. Un parallèle très étroit, particulièrement dans le traitement des lions, peut être établi avec une pièce conservée au Metropolitan Museum of Art de New York (1989.11.1). A l’époque archaïque, Sparte, capitale de la Laconie, accueillait un grand nombre important d’ateliers de bronziers : influencés par les travaux contemporains de l’Attique et de l’Ionie (Samos en particulier), les artisans laconiens étaient à même de réaliser des pièces d’une qualité artistique remarquable, à l’instar de cette anse. L’hydrie à laquelle était fixée cette anse était certainement un vase important, qui devait appartenir à un personnage aisé et/ou de haut rang ; en effet, le poids de cette anse et la quantité de bronze nécessaire pour la modeler en font indéniablement un objet de luxe.

PROVENANCE Ex-Japanese private collection, 1980’s - 1990’s.

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière japonaise, années 1980 - 1990.

BIBLIOGRAPHY For the parallel in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, see : STIBBE C., Sons of Hephaistos : Aspects of the Archaic Greek Bronze Industry, Rome, 2000, pp. 111-115, fig. 68-70. On Archaic bronze handles in general, see : KENT HILL D., A Class of Bronze Handles of the Archaic and Classical Periods in American Journal of Archaeology 62, 1958, pp. 193-201. ROLLEY, C. Greek Bronzes, London, 1986, pp. 142-144.

112

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Sur le parallèle du Metropolitan Museum of Art, v. : STIBBE C., Sons of Hephaistos : Aspects of the Archaic Greek Bronze Industry, Rome, 2000, pp. 111-115, fig. 68-70. Sur les anses en bronze de l’époque archaïque en général, v. : KENT HILL D., A Class of Bronze Handles of the Archaic and Classical Periods dans American Journal of Archaeology 62, 1958, pp. 193-201. ROLLEY, C. Greek Bronzes, Londres, 1986, pp. 142-144.

113


15. AN EGYPTIAN BRONZE MIRROR

15. MIROIR EN BRONZE

Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, ca. 1938-1758 B.C. H: 30.3 cm

Art égyptien, Moyen Empire (env. 1938-1758 av. J.-C.) Ht: 30.3 cm

This is a beautiful example of an Egyptian mirror that also presents some interesting characteristics. The mirror is a well-known object from as far back as the Middle Kingdom with its round shape referring to the solar disc. The handles are generally Hathorshaped or, like here, papyriform. Some think that the representation of the goddess Hathor (goddess of love, among others) confers an erotic value to this mirror. On the other hand, the papyriform column can be related to the hieroglyph’s meaning, i.e. ‘green’, as a reference to rebirth. Nevertheless, other connections can be brought out : the goddess Hathor herself refers to vegetation and to the papyrus stalk, elements that can be linked to rebirth of the deceased. Mirrors appeared in sarcophagi during the Middle Kingdom and were placed in the funeral trousseau for the afterlife. The handle is in calcite (Egyptian alabaster), which is surprising because the most precious examples are usually in ivory ; it may therefore not be the original handle, especially if this artifact was the possession of one of Sesostris’s royal daughters, as a fragmentary inscription in ink on the side of the disc would suggest. Only a few parallels are known from this period, and in a royal sphere, the only reference is the trousseau of one of Amenemhat III’s daughters, excavated by D. Arnold in the early ‘80s. Still, this handle was finely crafted, as seen in the rendering of the capital. The whole piece may be compared to other examples and is certainly worthy of interest.

Il s’agit ici d’un bel exemplaire de miroir égyptien qui présente aussi quelques particularités intéressantes. Le miroir est bien connu dès le Moyen Empire avec une forme ronde, qui fait penser au disque solaire. Les manches sont généralement de forme hathorique ou, comme ici, papyriforme. Certains ont voulu voir dans la représentation de la déesse Hathor (déesse entre autres de l’amour) une valeur érotique de cet objet. Par contre la colonne papyriforme est mise en relation avec le hiéroglyphe signifiant «vert», donc en référence à la renaissance de la vie. C’est oublier cependant d’autres rapports : la déesse Hathor elle-même est en étroit contact avec la végétation et les fourrés de papyrus, en relation avec la renaissance du défunt. Le fait est que le miroir apparaît dans les sarcophages du Moyen-Empire dans la frise du trousseau de l’au-delà. Le manche est ici en calcite (albâtre égyptien), ce qui est surprenant, car normalement il est en ivoire dans les spécimens les plus précieux ; on peut donc se demander s’il s’agit du manche d’origine, surtout si l’objet a appartenu à une fille royale de Sésostris, comme le laisserait deviner une inscription fragmentaire à l’encre sur un des côtés du disque. Il est vrai que les points de comparaison pour l’époque et le milieu royal sont rares : la seule référence étant un trousseau d’une fille de Aménemhat III trouvé par D. Arnold au début des années 80. Ce manche est cependant d’un travail soigné, comme le montre le rendu du chapiteau. Le tout forme un ensemble comparable à quelques autres attestations. L’objet est donc digne d’intérêt.

PROVENANCE

PROVENANCE

Ex-N. Koutoulakis Collection, Geneva-Paris ; R. Bigler, Zürich.

Ancienne collection N. Koutoulakis, Genève-Paris ; R. Bigler, Zürich.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BIBLIOGRAPHIE

LILYQUIST C., Ancient Egyptian Mirrors from the Earliest Times through the Middle Kingdom, 1979, n. 31, 55.

LILYQUIST C., Ancient Egyptian Mirrors from the Earliest Times through the Middle Kingdom, 1979, n. 31, fig. 55.

114

115


16. A BRONZE HELMET WITH REPOUSSÉ DECORATION

16. CASQUE EN BRONZE AVEC DÉCOR REPOUSSÉ

Urartian, 8th century B.C. H: 27.5 cm

Art ourartéen, VIIIe s. av. J.-C. Ht: 27.5 cm

This large helmet is in a remarkable state of preservation, in spite of a slight dent on the lower edge : it is probably the largest and most decorated Urartian helmet known. This headgear of high conical shape presents a sinuous profile with a slightly convex lower part and was hammered from a single bronze sheet. Two groups of paired holes pierced near the rim served to attach either the cheekguards (for the ears and the cheeks) and/or for a chinstrap. The decoration, in repoussé and incised, is structured in three illustrated friezes (one was on the browband while the others were superimposed on the back of the helmet) and in two groups of four “arches”, whose ends are modeled in the shape of wild cats’ heads seen in profile ; these patterns frame a long central ridge rising to the apex of the helmet, which is decorated with a protome of a beast seen from above. The main frontal scene, framed by two series of “arches”, has a cult significance : standing and kneeling figures are making offerings, and they venerate a male divinity seated on a throne ; to enhance the importance of the figure, the latter’s seat is placed on the back of a seated bovid (a young bull ?). According to recent investigations, this figure would be a specific god from the Urartian pantheon : the bearded man is dressed in a short sleeved tunic, open at the legs, and wears a horned hat decorated with a circle (a solar disc ?) ; his waist is belted with a large winged buckle. Both friezes represent two subjects from the everyday life of Near Eastern kings and dignitaries : a war scene (warriors fighting on chariots, the corpses of killed soldiers strewn on the ground) and, just above the helmet’s rim, a lion hunting scene with men on chariots and hunters on horseback. In spite of some variations, the structure of both friezes is similar : they repeat small groups moving from the outside towards the center of the image and represent a) two warriors on chariots and a corpse between the legs of the horses of the team, and b) two hunters in their vehicle preceded by a rearing lion defending itself. Lines of leaves, incised and linked by small curved stems, frame each frieze. On an iconographic note, religious, military and hunting scenes frequently appear in Urartian art in the 7th century B.C. The conical and pointed helmets are known elements of the Near Eastern warrior’s armor as seen on many contemporary Anatolian and Assyrian representations. E. Rehm thinks that the bronze examples, which are more elaborated, may have been utilized as exvotos or parade helmets : their decoration could also have prophylactic (snakes with lion’s heads) and propitiatory (cult scenes) properties.

Cet important casque est dans un état remarquable, malgré une légère déformation du bord inférieur : il s’agit probablement de l’exemplaire le plus grand et le plus amplement décoré parmi les casques ourartéens répertoriés. Martelé dans une seule feuille de bronze, ce couvre-chef de forme conique et haute présente un profil sinueux, avec la partie inférieure légèrement bombée. Deux groupes de deux trous percés près du bord servaient certainement pour fixer les protections latérales (pour les oreilles et les joues) et peut-être aussi pour un lacet qui se nouait sous la mâchoire du guerrier. La décoration, obtenue au repoussé de l’intérieur et incisée, est structurée en trois frises figurées (une se trouvait au-dessus du front du guerrier, les deux autres, superposées, à l’arrière du casque) et deux groupes de quatre «arcs», aux extrémités modelées en forme de tête de fauves vus de profil, qui flanquent une longue arête centrale, montant jusqu’à la pointe du casque, elle-même ornée d’une protomé de fauve vue de haut. La scène frontale principale, entourée des deux séries d’ «arcs», est à caractère cultuel : de nombreux personnages debout et agenouillés sont en train de faire des offrandes et de vénérer une divinité masculine assise sur un trône ; pour renforcer l’importance de la figure, son siège est lui-même posé sur le dos d’un bovidé assis (un jeune taureau ?). Selon des études récentes, ce personnage serait un dieu propre au panthéon urartéen : habillé d’une tunique à manches courtes et ouverte sur les jambes, il porte une longue barbe et un couvre-chef à cornes orné d’un cercle (le disque solaire ?) ; sa taille est entourée d’un grand anneau ailé. Les deux frises postérieures reproduisent deux sujets de la vie quotidienne des rois et hauts dignitaires proche-orientaux : une scène de guerre (guerriers combattant sur des chars, les cadavres de soldats tués jonchent le sol) et, juste au-dessus du bord du casque, une chasse aux lions avec des hommes sur des chars et des chasseurs à cheval. Malgré quelques variations, la structure des deux frises est la même : elles sont composées de façon répétitive par des petits groupes se dirigeant de l’extérieur vers le centre de l’image et comprenant a) deux guerriers sur les chars et un cadavre entre les pattes des chevaux composant l’attelage, et b) deux chasseurs dans leur véhicule précédé du lion cabré se défendant. Des lignes de feuilles incisées et reliées par des petites tiges courbées délimitent chaque frise. Les scènes à caractère religieux, militaire ainsi que les chasses apparaissent fréquemment dans l’iconographie urartéenne du VIIIe s. avant notre ère. Les casques coniques et pointus font régulièrement partie de la panoplie du guerrier proche-oriental, comme l’attestent de nombreuses représentations contemporaines anatoliennes et assyriennes. E. Rehm pense que les exemplaires en bronze les plus élaborés étaient probablement utilisés comme ex-voto ou comme casques de parade : leur décoration avait peut-être aussi un caractère prophylactique (serpents à tête de lions) et propitiatoire (scènes cultuelles).

PROVENANCE Ex-Swiss private collection, acquired in 1992.

BIBLIOGRAPHY MERHAV R. (ed.), Urartu, A Metalworking Center in the First Millennium B.C.E, Jerusalem, 1991, pp. 123-133. REHM E., Kykladen und alter Orient, Bestandskatalog of Badischen Landesmuseums Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, 1997, pp. 211-214, U22. On the male divinity : MERHAV R. (ed.), Urartu, A Metalworking Center in the First Millennium B.C.E, Jerusalem, 1991, p. 101, 79-80.

116

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière suisse, acquis en 1992.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE MERHAV R. (éd.), Urartu, A Metalworking Center in the First Millennium B.C.E, Jérusalem, 1991, pp. 123-133. REHM E., Kykladen und alter Orient, Bestandskatalog of Badischen Landesmuseums Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, 1997, pp. 211-214, U22. Sur la divinité masculine : MERHAV R. (éd.), Urartu, A Metalworking Center in the First Millennium B.C.E, Jérusalem, 1991, p. 101, fig. 79-80.

117


17. AN ENAMELED BRONZE PYXIS

17. PYXIDE EN BRONZE À DÉCOR D’ÉMAIL

Roman, 2nd - 3rd century A.D. H: 6 cm

Art romain, Ier-IIIe s. ap. J.-C. Ht: 6 cm

The vessel is practically intact. Even though it was subject to some small repairs, all of the elements that make up recipients of this type are preserved here : the body, the handle, the lid and the small chain that links the lid to the handle. With the exception of some broken inlays, the enamel is very well preserved. The metal, the surface of which is a deep brown, is covered for the most part in a pretty green patina. The hexagonal body is composed of six rectangular panels that are soldered to one another. A thin bronze chain linking the handle to the lid assures that the latter will not be lost. The decoration, executed in the champlevé technique, is very elaborate and rich in polychromy (enamel in white, red and blue - to imitate the color of lapis lazuli) : it is composed of square plaquettes and friezes of horizontal millefiori glass fixed to the metal. This technique is well known thanks to various examples. Their production is generally attributed to Gallo-Roman workshops, like those archaeologists have discovered at the Villa d’Anthée near Dinant in modern day Belgium. Although objects decorated in this technique are quite rare, they are found over a very wide area, bordered by the northern Alps, Italy, Eastern Europe, Thessaly, Southern Russia and Asia Minor : they certainly seemed to be highly prized vessels. Aside from pyxides, the shape found most often is the hexagonal and conical bottle. Archaeologists generally think that small containers of such remarkable artistic and technical merit were used specifically for holding luxury goods such as perfume or incense. Only five other pyxides with complete enamelled decoration are actually known: an example in the Römisches Germanisches Museum in Cologne, another in New York (Metropolitan Museum of Art), a third was sold in Paris in 1987 (Drouot, 19-20 May 1987, n. 426; cf. infra THIERRY N., pl. 24), the fourth belonged to the N.B. and W.H. Hunt Collection (cf. infra Wealth of the Ancient World, n. 53; cf. also Sotheby’s 19 June 1990, n. 53), while the last pyxis was discovered in northwest Essex and is found today at the British Museum in London.

Cette pyxide est pratiquement intacte. Malgré quelques petites réparations, tous les éléments de la forme sont conservés : le corps, la poignée, le couvercle, ainsi que la petite chaîne en bronze reliant le couvercle à la poignée. A l’exception de quelques fragments de panneaux cassés, l’émail est très bien préservé. Le métal, dont la surface est brun foncé, est en grande partiellement recouvert d’une belle patine verte. Le corps hexagonal est composé de six éléments rectangulaires en bronze, soudés les uns aux autres : la chaînette évite que le couvercle du récipient soit perdu. La décoration, exécutée selon la technique du champlevé, est extrêmement élaborée et frappe par la richesse de sa polychromie (l’émail est blanc, rouge et bleu afin d’imiter la couleur du lapis-lazuli) : de petites plaques carrées et des frises horizontales en verre «millefiori» sont agencées sur le métal. Cette technique, bien connue à travers de nombreux objets en bronze contemporains, consiste à loger de la poudre d’émail dans des alvéoles creusées à cet effet à la surface du métal, avant de cuire la pièce et ensuite de polir la surface de l’émail vitrifié. La production des récipients en bronze à décor d’émail est généralement attribuée aux ateliers Gallo-Romains, comme celui que les archéologues ont découvert à la Villa d’Anthée, près de Dinant (Belgique actuelle). Bien que les pièces décorées dans cette technique soient relativement rares, on les retrouve dans une zone géographique très étendue qui couvre les Alpes du Nord, l’Italie, l’Europe de l’Est, la Thessalie, la Russie méridionale et l’Asie Mineure : leur indéniable qualité artistique en faisait certainement des objets de luxe. Hormis les pyxides, la forme la plus souvent rencontrée est la bouteille hexagonale et conique. Les archéologues pensent généralement que les petits récipients aux qualités techniques et artistiques si remarquables servaient uniquement pour contenir des produits de luxe comme les parfums ou les encens. Seules cinq autres pyxides complètes à décor d’émail sont actuellement répertoriées : un exemplaire est conservé au Römisches Germanisches Museum de Cologne, un autre se trouve à New York (Metropolitan Museum of Art), un troisième à été vendu à Paris en 1987 (Drouot,19-20 mai 1987, n. 426 ; cf. infra THIERRY N., pl. 24), le quatrième appartenait à la collection N. B. Hunt et W. H. Hunt (cf. infra Wealth of the Ancient World, n. 53 ; cf. aussi Sotheby’s, 19 juin 1990, n. 53) tandis que la dernière pyxide a été découverte dans le North West Essex et se trouve actuellement au British Museum de Londres.

PROVENANCE Ex-American private collection.

BIBLIOGRAPHY On the production techniques of objects in bronze and enamel, see : THIERRY N., A propos d’une nouvelle pyxide d’époque romaine à décor d’émail «millefiori», in Antike Kunst 5, 1962, p. 65-68, pl. 24. For other objects executed following this technique : Aus den Schatzkammern Eurasiens, Meisterwerke antiker Kunst, Zurich, 1993, p. 188, n. 97. A Passion for Antiquities, Ancient Art from the Collection of B. and L. Fleischman, Malibu, 1994, p. 289-291, n.150 ; pp. 318-19, n. 165. The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, Fall 2001, Recent Acquisitions, A Selection, p. 11. Wealth of the Ancient World, The N.B. Hunt and W.H. Hunt Collections, Fort Worth, 1983, n. 53.

118

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière américaine.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Sur les techniques de production des objets en bronze et en émail, v. : THIERRY N., A propos d’une nouvelle pyxide d’époque romaine à décor d’émail «millefiori», dans Antike Kunst 5, 1962, p. 65-68, pl. 24. Pour d’autres objets exécutés selon cette technique, v. : Aus den Schatzkammern Eurasiens, Meisterwerke antiker Kunst, Zurich, 1993, p. 188, n. 97. A Passion for Antiquities, Ancient Art from the Collection of B. and L. Fleischman, Malibu, 1994, p. 289-291, n.150 ; pp. 318-19, n. 165. The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, Fall 2001, Recent Acquisitions, A Selection, p. 11. Wealth of the Ancient World, The N.B. Hunt and W.H. Hunt Collections, Fort Worth, 1983, n. 53.

119


18. A BRONZE WEIGHT REPRESENTING THE BUST OF AN EMPRESS

18. POIDS EN BRONZE REPRÉSENTANT LE BUSTE D’UNE IMPÉRATRICE

Byzantine, 5th century A.D. H: 17.5 cm

Art byzantin, Ve s. ap. J.-C. Ht: 17.5 cm

This bronze weight is in the shape of a bust of an empress ; a hook would allow for suspension and movement along a ruled steelyard to measure the weight of goods hung on the opposite side. The gradation of the steelyard is usually precise and corresponds exactly to the weight indicated. However, the steelyard only works if the weight that counterbalances the goods is the same ; if not, the system doesn’t work anymore. This could explain the high importance given to the weight and the particular ornamentation it received. Weights are often illustrated. During the Roman period, they often featured female divinities. From the late 4th century until the 7th century, only weights in the shape of Athena are still copied, since representations of sovereigns largely replace those of gods. The Byzantine empress and/or emperor are then represented as busts or as figures seated on thrones. There are different examples of weights in the shape of an empress, but it is difficult to consider these figures as portraits, since the imprecise and coarse features do not allow for precise identification. Still these pieces could eventually be dated through the analysis of the hairstyle and the jewelry. This bronze weight represents a small bust of an empress ; it was cast, then polished and finely engraved. The weight is whole and well preserved. Only the foot is slightly damaged. The headdress, high and square, is decorated with lozenges. It was topped with a ring for the hook. A crown, decorated with jewels, separates the headdress from the hair band. Pendants (perpendulia) fall from the crown in front of the ear where a large pearl is visible. The figure wears a cloak wrapped around her shoulders. The left hand starts a gesture, unless the movement is intended to grasp a fold of the coat. The right hand carries a cylindrical object that has been interpreted as a mappa or a rotulus, sign of an official charge. The oval foot is delicately modeled. A similar weight is on display in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It was published during the exhibition Age of Spirituality in 1977 (n°328). The weight is part of a steelyard, which still has hooks and chains. The whole piece dates to the early 5th century. A second one exists in the Archeological Museum of Istanbul (inv. 5415). It is also composed of a straight-beam balance, of hooks and chains. It is dated to the middle of the 5th century.

Poids en bronze en forme de buste d’impératrice, destiné à être suspendu par un crochet à une balance à levier en bronze. Le levier était gradué. Les marques indiquaient l’emplacement du poids. Au bout du levier une ou des chaînes terminées par un grand crochet soutenait la marchandise à peser. Le poids est entier et bien conservé. Le pied montre un léger enfoncement sur l’avant. Le positionnement des marques est en général très précis. Il correspond avec exactitude au poids qu’il indique. Cependant la balance ne fonctionne que si le poids qui contrebalance la marchandise est toujours le même. Si le propriétaire perd le poids qui correspond à la balance, celle-ci ne fonctionne plus. Le poids a donc une grande importance et c’est peut-être la raison pour laquelle celui-ci reçoit une ornementation particulière. Le poids a très souvent une forme figurée. A l’époque romaine, il prenait l’image d’une divinité féminine. Plus tard, dès la fin du IVe siècle et jusqu’au VIIe siècle, seuls les poids en forme d’Athéna sont encore reproduits. Les représentations des souverains remplacent en effet largement les déesses. L’impératrice ou l’empereur byzantin prennent la forme d’un buste ou d’une figurine assise sur un trône. Il existe différents exemples de poids en forme d’impératrice. Il est difficile de parler de portrait. Certains ont voulu identifier les poids à des impératrices en se basant sur des représentations officielles. Les traits schématiques et parfois grossiers de ces figures découragent souvent ces tentatives. La coiffure, ainsi que les bijoux sont cependant des éléments permettant de dater ces pièces. Le petit buste de ce poids représente une impératrice. Il est coulé, puis poli et soigneusement ciselé pour relever les détails. La coiffe, haute et carrée, est surmontée d’un anneau auquel on suspendait un crochet. Elle est gravée de losanges. Une couronne ornée de joyaux sépare la coiffe du bandeau de cheveux, soigneusement gravé. Des pendeloques (perpendulia) tombent de la couronne vers l’arrière de l’oreille où une grosse perle est visible. La figure porte un manteau drapé sur les épaules. La main gauche semble faire un geste accompagnant la parole, à moins qu’elle ne tente de retenir un pan du manteau. La droite porte un objet cylindrique interprété par certains comme étant une mappa ou un rotulus, signe d’une charge officielle. Le pied est ovale, travaillé en moulure. Un poids identique est conservé au Metropolitan Museum of Fine Art. Il a été publié lors de l’exposition Age of Spirituality en 1977 (n°328). Le poids fait partie d’une balance qui a conservé ses crochets et ses chaînes. L’ensemble est daté du Ve siècle. Un second se trouve au musée Archéologique d’Istanbul (inv. 5415), lui aussi conservé avec la hampe de la balance, les crochets et les chaînes. Il est daté de la première moitié du Ve siècle.

PROVENANCE Acquired on the German Art Market in 2001.

BIBLIOGRAPHY ATASOY S. - PARMAN E., The Anatolian Civilizations, vol. II, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Istanbul, 1983, pp. 192-193, C102, C103. DURAND J. - AGHION I. et al., Byzance, l’art byzantin dans les collections publiques françaises, Paris, 1992, pp. 122-123, n. 70. Land of Civilizations, Turkey, Tokyo, 1985, n. 273. WAMSER L., Die Welt von Byzanz-Europas östliches Erbe, Glanz, Krisen und Fortleben einer tausendjährigen Kultur, Munich, 2004, p. 42, nn. 10 and 11. WEITZMANN K., Age of Spirituality, Late Antique and Early Christian Art, Third to Seventh Century, New York, 1977, nn. 13, 327 and 328.

PROVENANCE Acquis sur le marché d’art allemand en 2001.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE ATASOY S. - PARMAN E., The Anatolian Civilizations, vol. II, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Istanbul, 1983, pp. 192-193, C102, C103. DURAND J. - AGHION I. et al., Byzance, l’art byzantin dans les collections publiques françaises, Paris, 1992, pp. 122-123, n. 70. Land of Civilizations, Turkey, Tokyo, 1985, n. 273. WAMSER L., Die Welt von Byzanz-Europas östliches Erbe, Glanz, Krisen und Fortleben einer tausendjährigen Kultur, Munich, 2004, p. 42, nn. 10 et 11. WEITZMANN K., Age of Spirituality, Late Antique and Early Christian Art, Third to Seventh Century, New York, 1977, nn. 13, 327 et 328.

120

121


19. A CHALCEDONY BUST OF A CHILD

19. BUSTE D’ENFANT EN CALCÉDOINE

Roman, second half of the 2nd century - early 3rd century A.D. H: 6.3 cm

Art romain, deuxième moitié du IIe s. - début du IIIe s. ap. J.-C. Ht: 6.3 cm

The bust, carved from a small block of bluish gray chalcedony, is intact ; it represents a child sculpted in the round, even if the back is flat and smooth. The nature of the stand that supported this piece is unknown ; nevertheless, an even groove situated between the figure and the bottom of the piece allowed for the setting of the bust, which was certainly viewed frontally, within a purposelyprepared frame. It may have belonged to a sort of family picture along with other similar busts. The boy is in early childhood, as evidenced in the round shapes of the chubby face, the plump chin, and the smooth, high forehead. Yet his expression is sad with a melancholy gaze : the small eyes with incised pupils are circular and slant downwards, the nose is rounded and the upper lip is prominent, the corners of the lips frown slightly. His mid-length hair entirely hides his ears ; the wavy locks fall symmetrically on both sides of a central braid that forms a thick double plait. The neck, which is never really developed in a child’s body, is here completely surrounded by a cloak that also hides the shoulders and the top of the bust, falling in long and linear V-shaped folds. There are few chalcedony portraits of small children. Archaeologists attribute most of them (see the examples on display in the Louvre and in the National Library in Paris, and those from Saint-Petersburg and Dumbarton Oaks) to Annius Verus (163-170 A.D), Marcus Aurelius’s son who died at the age of seven. In spite of some common features, our statuette’s serious, sad face can hardly be identified with the same figure. Still the work shows artistic skills that can be compared to those of a carver of precious stones, and the selected material indicated that the young person represented probably belonged to a prominent family of the Roman nobility.

Le buste, taillé dans un petit bloc de calcédoine gris-bleuté est intact ; il représente un enfant sculpté en ronde bosse, même si la partie postérieure est plate et lisse. La nature du support qui était orné de cette pièce est inconnue, mais entre la figure et le fond il y a une incision régulière qui permettait de fixer précisément le buste, qui était certainement vu de face, dans un cadre préparé exprès. Peut-être appartenait-il à une sorte de tableau de famille où d’autres bustes similaires étaient affichés. L’enfant représenté est en bas âge, comme le prouvent les formes arrondies du visage aux joues potelées, au menton bien grassouillet et au front lisse et haut. Mais son expression est triste et son regard mélancolique : les petits yeux aux pupilles incisées sont cernés et taillés vers le bas, le nez est arrondi et la lèvre supérieure proéminente, les commissures des lèvres descendent légèrement. Ses cheveux sont coupés à mi-hauteur juste pour cacher entièrement les oreilles ; les mèches ondulées descendent symétriquement à gauche et à droite d’une raie médiane qui forme une natte double et plus épaisse. Le cou, qui dans le corps d’un enfant n’est jamais très développé, est ici complètement entouré par un manteau qui cache en même temps le épaules et le haut du buste, en formant de longs plis linéaires en «V». Il n’existe qu’un nombre très limité de petits portraits d’enfant en calcédoine. La plupart parmi eux (les exemplaires conservés au Louvre et à la Bibliothèque Nationale à Paris et ceux de Saint-Pétersbourg et de Dumbarton Oaks) sont attribués par la critique archéologique à Annius Verus (163-170 ap. J.-C.), le fils de Marc Aurèle décédé à l’âge de sept ans. Malgré quelques traits communs, le visage sérieux et triste de la figure d’enfant en examen paraît difficile à identifier avec le même personnage. Mais la qualité du travail, comparable à celui d’un tailleur de pierres précieuses, et le matériau choisi indiquent que le jeune représenté appartenait probablement à une famille très en vue de la haute noblesse romaine.

PROVENANCE PROVENANCE

Ex-Jacques and Henriette Schumann collection, France.

Ancienne collection Jacques et Henriette Schumann, France.

BIBLIOGRAPHY Other chalcedony children’s portraits : RICHTER G.M.A., Catalogue of Greek and Roman Antiquities in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection, Cambridge, 1956, pp. 14-15, n. 10, pl. V. VOLLENWEIDER M. - L. et al, Camées et intailles, Tome II : Les portraits romains du Cabinet des médailles, Catalogue raisonné, Paris, 19, p. 148, n. 176, pl.102.

20. A STONE AMULET WITH INLAID EYES

BIBLIOGRAPHIE D’autres portraits d’enfants en calcédoine : RICHTER G.M.A., Catalogue of Greek and Roman Antiquities in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection, Cambridge, 1956, pp. 14-15, n. 10, pl. V. VOLLENWEIDER M. - L. et al, Camées et intailles, Tome II : Les portraits romains du Cabinet des médailles, Catalogue raisonné, Paris, 19, p. 148, n. 176, pl.102.

20. AMULETTE EN PIERRE AUX YEUX INCRUSTÉS EN LAPISLAZULI

Sumerian, Early Dynastic, 3000 – 2500 B.C. H: 2.4 cm

Art sumérien, époque des Dynasties archaïques, 3000-2500 av. J.-C. Ht: 2.4 cm

This small head was probably used as an amulet and suspended around the neck by a string that passed through the vertically pierced hole between the chin and the top of the skull. It is almost intact : only the pupils and a part of the right eye are lost. In spite of its miniature size, this piece is remarkable for its structural and stylistic qualities. The face is structured in a rigid, symmetrical manner : the horizontal lines of the forehead, the eyebrows, the eyes and the mouth intersect the vertical axis, marked by the nose. The surface is delicately modeled. The arched and deeply incised eyebrows, the wide-open and polychromatic eyes, the high cheekbones, the large prominent nose and the curved mouth - as if in a smile - are typical Sumerian artistic conventions. The figure may have human features, but it still represents a hybrid half-man half-bull. The head has a pair of small, blunt horns, and at the temples, two triangular and pointed ears that reproduce those of bulls. This hybrid probably refers to the bull-man (called kusarikku in Akkadian, gud-alim in Sumerian), even if a long curly beard, and thick, undulating hair, which contrast with the youthful and fresh look of this face, usually characterize the latter. The bull-man frequently appears in Mesopotamian art ; it was considered a protective demon, helping people to fight evil, especially from the 2nd millennium B.C. on.

Cette petite tête était très probablement utilisée comme amulette et suspendue au cou par une ficelle qui passait dans le trou vertical percé entre le menton et le sommet du crâne. Elle est presque intacte : seules les pupilles et une partie de l’œil droit sont perdues. Malgré sa taille miniature, cette pièce est d’une remarquable qualité, aussi bien du point de vue structurel que stylistique. En effet, la construction rigide de la tête - rythmée par les lignes horizontales du front, des sourcils, des narines et de la bouche et par l’axe vertical qui passe au centre du visage (arête du nez) - est parfaitement équilibrée par la délicatesse de la surface, rendue toute en nuances. Le visage, caractérisé par les sourcils arqués et profondément gravés, par les yeux énormes, grands ouverts et polychromes, par les pommettes saillantes, par le grand nez proéminent et par la bouche aux commissures surélevées - comme si le masque esquissait un «sourire» - s’insère parfaitement dans les canons artistiques sumériens. Même si elle est sculptée sous des traits humains, la figure représentée est un hybride mi-homme, mi-taureau : en effet, la tête est pourvue d’une paire de petites cornes aux extrémités émoussées et, au niveau des tempes, de deux oreilles triangulaires et pointues qui reproduisent celles des bovins. L’être hybride représenté est vraisemblablement à assimiler au taureau à tête humaine (appelé kusarikku en akkadien, en sumérien gud-alim), même si celui-ci est généralement caractérisé par une longue barbe bouclée et par une chevelure drue et ondulée, qui contrastent avec l’aspect juvénile et frais de ce visage. Démon parmi les plus fréquents de tout l’art mésopotamien, le taureau à tête humaine fut considéré comme un démon bienfaisant, protégeant hommes et édifices des forces néfastes, surtout à partir du IIe millénaire av. J.-C.

PROVENANCE Bonham’s, London, September 30, 1999, no. 1.

BIBLIOGRAPHY GOODNICK WESTENHOLZ J. (ed.), Dragons, Monster and Fabulous Beasts, Jerusalem, 2004, p. 26-27. WOOLLEY C.L and al., Ur Excavations II, The Royal Cemetery, Oxford, 1934, pl. 121, p. 301 (bull protome with beardless human head).

PROVENANCE Bonham’s Londres, 30 septembre 1999, n. 1.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE GOODNICK WESTENHOLZ J. (éd.), Dragons, Monster and Fabulous Beasts, Jérusalem, 2004, p. 26-27. WOOLLEY C.L et al., Ur Excavations II, The Royal Cemetery, Oxford, 1934, pl. 121, p. 301 (protomé de taureau à tête humaine imberbe).

122

123


21. A CHALCEDONY PENDANT IN THE SHAPE OF A BULL

21. PENDENTIF EN CALCÉDOINE TAILLÉ EN FORME DE TAUREAU

Assyrian, 6th century B.C. H: 2.2 cm

Art assyrien, VIe s. av. J.-C. Ht: 2.2 cm

The cylindrical hole pierced between the forefeet and the tail of this pendant was probably used to string it as a simple bead on a necklace rather than as an amulet (suspended from a string, the animal’s head would be turned downward) : it is almost intact, but the tip of the horn is lost. The animal is seated on a small, thin rectangular base with the four legs folded up under his body in a perfectly natural pose, which contrasts with the style adopted by the carver. Perhaps because of the hardness of the stone, only the general forms are modeled (curve of the back, shoulders, thighs, ears), while the other details are rendered in a very stylized way with incisions or small ridges (legs, hooves). Incisions on the back and hatching on the flanks could indicate the fur of the animal. The head is triangular, the muzzle linear ; the jaw is not marked, nor are the nostrils. As in the first phases of Urartian art, the eyes are not engraved. In spite of reduced size and simple shape, this pendant attracts the modern eye, probably because of its elegance and the quality of the stone. This figurine can be compared with an amulet in lapis lazuli, now at the Walters Art Gallery in Baltimore, which is treated in a more naturalistic manner. The animal’s posture also recalls one that was often adopted by Persian artists when they represented sitting bovids, as on the monumental bull capitals of the large palaces of the Achaemenid kings (Persepolis, Susa).

Ce pendentif, traversé par un trou cylindrique percé entre les pattes antérieures et la queue, était probablement utilisé comme simple perle de collier plutôt que comme amulette (suspendu à une ficelle, l’animal se trouve la tête tournée vers bas). Il est pratiquement intact, mais l’extrémité des cornes est perdue. L’animal est assis sur une petite base rectangulaire et mince ; son attitude, avec les quatre pattes repliées sous le corps, est parfaitement naturelle, ce qui contraste avec le style adopté par le tailleur de pierre. En effet, peut-être aussi à cause de la dureté du matériau, seules les formes générales sont modelées (courbure du dos, épaules, cuisses, oreilles), tandis que les autres détails sont rendus de manière très stylisée, par des incisions ou de petites arêtes (pattes, sabots). Des traits incisés sur le dos et hachurés sur les flancs pourraient désigner librement le pelage du taureau. La tête est triangulaire, le museau coupé droit ; il n’y a aucune indication de la mâchoire, des narines ni, comme dans les premières phases de l’art urartéen, des gravures marquant l’emplacement des yeux. Malgré la petite taille et la simplicité formelle, ce pendentif attire l’œil du spectateur moderne, probablement à cause de son élégance et de la qualité de la pierre. Cette figurine peut être comparée à une amulette en lapis-lazuli, conservée à la Walters Art Gallery de Baltimore, qui est néanmoins traitée de façon plus naturaliste. Par ailleurs, il faut rappeler que cette position a souvent été adoptée par les artistes perses, lorsqu’ils ont représenté des bovidés assis, comme par exemple sur les chapiteaux monumentaux bicéphales des grands palais des rois achéménides (Persépolis, Suse).

PROVENANCE Ex-L. Mildenberg collection, Switzerland.

PUBLISHED

IN

KOZLOFF A. (ed.), Animals in Ancient Art from the L. Mildenberg Collection, Cleveland, 1981, n. 28, p. 40.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection L. Mildenberg, Suisse.

SCHMANDT-BESSERAT D., Ancient Persia : The Art of an Empire, Austin (Texas), 1978, p. 73, n. 85. Susa and Persepolis capitals : POPE A.U., A Survey of Persian Art, From Prehistoric Times to the Present, Vol. IV, Oxford, 1938, pl. 101. TRÜMPELMANN L., Persepolis, Ein Weltwinder der Antike, Mainz on Rhine, 1988, p. 25, 17.

PUBLIÉ

DANS

KOZLOFF A. (éd.), Animals in Ancient Art from the L. Mildenberg Collection, Cleveland, 1981, n. 28, p. 40.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE SCHMANDT-BESSERAT D., Ancient Persia : The Art of an Empire, Austin (Texas), 1978, p. 73, n. 85. Les chapiteaux de Suse et Persépolis : POPE A.U., A Survey of Persian Art, From Prehistoric Times to the Present, Vol. IV, Oxford, 1938, pl. 101. TRÜMPELMANN L., Persepolis, Ein Weltwinder der Antike, Mayence/Rhin, 1988, p. 25, fig. 17.

22. A COPPER BOWL WITH A PROCESSION OF ANIMALS

22. BOL EN CUIVRE AVEC PROCESSIONS D’ANIMAUX EN RELIEF

Sumerian or Elamite, early 3rd millennium B.C. H: 9.2 cm max., D: 16.2 cm max.

Art sumérien ou élamite, début du IIIe mill. av. J.-C. Ht: max. 9.2 cm, D: max. 16.2 cm

On a technical note, this piece was cast in a mold ; the relief animals could have been made separately and soldered onto the surface of the cup. According to the species represented, they come from the same model ; the small differences between them depend on the final incisions of the bronzesmith. The container is whole, although slightly cracked at the edge. The external surface has been cleaned and is in a remarkable state of preservation - all the details of the decoration are visible - while the interior metal is covered with a thick, rough green patina. The body of the vessel suffered some pressure, therefore the edge is elliptical rather than circular. Arsenical copper objects (containers, but also statuettes) are quite common from as far back as the 4th millennium B.C. : this alloy has a lower melting point and is more fluid than copper or bronze. It is thus frequently employed for the making of precisely detailed molded objects. The bowl has an impressive weight and the thickness of the metal is important. It was perfectly hemispherical and is placed on a small disc base that balances the piece. The edge is flat and cut straight across. The decoration is organized in two stacked friezes of animals going towards the right (upper frieze) and towards the left (lower frieze) : the upper register is composed of three bulls separated by lions, while the lower register contains two ibexes alternating with spotted panthers. The size of this piece, its artistic merit, and the selected material as well as the subject (oxen and ibexes were important animals in Mesopotamian economy, while the wild beasts were the favorite targets of hunters) indicate that it belonged to a temple treasure or to the display plate of a Mesopotamian dignitary. This shape (with or without a foot) is well known in Mesopotamia throughout the third millennium ; however, decorated examples with animal friezes are very rare and are never preserved as well as this one.

Techniquement, cette pièce a probablement été fondue dans un moule ; les animaux en relief pourraient avoir été faits à part et soudés à la surface du gobelet. Suivant les espèces représentées, ils proviennent d’un seul moule ; les petites différences entre les exemplaires s’expliquent par les finitions que le bronzier a incisées à la fin de son travail. Le récipient est entier mais il présente des fissures sur le bord. La surface extérieure est nettoyée et dans un état remarquable - la décoration est visible dans les moindres détails - tandis qu’à l’intérieur le métal est recouvert d’une patine verte, épaisse et granuleuse. Le corps du vase a subi une déformation suite à laquelle le bord n’est pas circulaire mais elliptique. Il n’est pas rare de voir, dès le IVe millénaire av. J.-C., des objets (récipients mais aussi statuettes) en cuivre à l’arsenic : cet alliage possède en effet une température de fusion plus basse et une fluidité plus importante que le cuivre ou le bronze. Ces qualités le rendent particulièrement apte à la fabrication d’objets moulés très précis et détaillés. Le bol est impressionnant à cause de son poids et de l’épaisseur de la paroi. Il était parfaitement hémisphérique et s’appuie sur une petite base discoïde qui lui confère un bon équilibre. Le bord est plat et coupé droit. La décoration est organisée en deux frises superposées d’animaux marchant vers la droite (frise supérieure) et vers la gauche (frise inférieure) : en haut il y a trois taureaux séparés par des lions, en bas deux bouquetins alternent avec des panthères tachetées. L’importance de cette pièce, sa qualité artistique, le matériau choisi ainsi que le sujet représenté (bœufs et bouquetins sont des animaux fondamentaux pour les économies mésopotamiennes tandis que les fauves étaient les victimes de prédilection des chasseurs) laissent penser qu’elle faisait partie du trésor d’un temple ou du service d’un haut dignitaire mésopotamien. Cette forme (avec ou sans pied) est bien attestée en Mésopotamie pendant tout le troisième millénaire ; les exemplaires décorés avec des frises animalières sont en revanche très rares et jamais aussi bien conservés que celui-ci.

PROVENANCE PROVENANCE

Ex-M. de Sancey Collection, Switzerland.

Ancienne collection M. de Sancey, Suisse.

BIBLIOGRAPHY MÜLLER-KARPE M., Metallgefässe im Iraq I (Von den Anfängen bis zur Akkad-Zeit), Stuttgart, 1993, p. 86 ss. (forme 11, I “Bodenschale”), pp. 235-237, n. 1588, pl. 142. VAN ESS M. - PEDDE F., Uruk, Kleinfunde II, Mainz on Rhine, 1992, p. 18, n. 109, pl. 19.

124

BIBLIOGRAPHIE MÜLLER-KARPE M., Metallgefässe im Iraq I (Von den Anfängen bis zur Akkad-Zeit), Stuttgart, 1993, pp. 86 ss. (forme 11, I «Bodenschale»), pp. 235-237, n. 1588, pl. 142. VAN ESS M. - PEDDE F., Uruk, Kleinfunde II, Mayence/Rhin, 1992, p. 18, n. 109, pl. 19.

125


23. A DIORITE STATUE OF THOTH CYNOCEPHALUS

23. STATUE DE CYNOCÉPHALE EN DIORITE

Egyptian, 22nd Dynasty, Third Intermediate Period (ca. 945-713 B.C.) H: 58 cm

Art égyptien, XXIIe dynastie (env. 945-713 av. J.-C.) Ht: 58 cm

This statue represents a baboon, a well-known animal in Egyptian statuary. This piece was probably consecrated in El-Ashmounein, Hermopolis Magna, site of the most important sanctuary of Thoth, where a complete example can be seen along with two statues erected by Amenophis III. One of those baboons also wears a pectoral with a royal cartouche in the middle. The pelt of the animal is fuller on top ; the hands emerge at this level, forming the break in our statue. The complete example presents legs and genitals as well. The god Thoth is either represented in the shape of an ibis, like on the pectoral where he has the head of the bird with a human body, or in the shape of a baboon, which could be a remnant of a connection with the primitive god Hedj-our (the Great White One). This animal also refers to the rising sun, because it utters cries at dawn, as revealed in the group representation on top of the temple at Abu Simbel or at the base of the Luxor obelisks. It is also related to the lunar god Khonsou, which could explain its link with lunar god Thoth, who is associated with the return of the Eye of Horus to its Master. As usual in polytheism, there are various reasons for the multiple relationships. In any case, the pectoral was a well-known shape in the New Kingdom and during the period immediately preceding it. According to the most common interpretation, it reproduces a temple pylon or monumental door with an Egyptian cornice or a low wall between the entry columns of the first hypostyle hall of the same temple where scenes of worship and purification are represented. One can observe that the son of the First Prophet of Amun, figured here, possesses a similar pectoral to Thoth. The dedicator is already well documented in Egyptian history (see K. Kitchen, Mr. Bierbrier, H. Ranke) : he is known through five other ancient monuments. This statue is especially important in so far as it testifies that the 22nd Dynasty’s royal family was controlling the Theban pontificate again. As a matter of fact, our priest is the son of king Osorkon I and must have continued his function under his successor Takelot I (ca. 889-874 B.C.). Our man’s name has been transcribed in various manners, for example Iouwelot or Aourat. The five other monuments related to him are : the marks of the Nilometer at Karnak ; the Apanage Stele ; the support of an offering table ; the Statuette of Cairo ; Stele BM 1224. On this sixth example, the man is represented kneeling, holding a statuette of the goddess Maat (Justice and Order) in front of the god Thoth seated on a throne. The following text is finely carved : “Thoth, Master of the divine words” and “The First Prophet of Amun Iouaret judged”. The end of the text is above his head because of lack of space. The god seems to hold a long object in his left hand, at the same time he seizes the Ouas-scepter. In our man’s name, the sign of the “canal” is a curious addition, unless one reads it like a phonetic complement iou, a confusion of the word “island”. This piece is remarkable for its aesthetic value, as well as for its historical testimony.

Cette statue représente un animal bien connu dans la statuaire égyptienne, le babouin cynocéphale. Pour voir un exemplaire complet, il faut se référer aux deux statues dressées par Aménophis III à El-Ashmounein, Hermopolis Magna, ville consacrée au dieu Thot, où probablement était dédié l’exemplaire décrit ici. Sur un de ces deux exemplaires, le cynocéphale porte également un pectoral à corniche égyptienne avec, au milieu de celle-ci, le cartouche royal. L’animal a la partie haute de son pelage plus abondante, d’où sortent ses mains, c’est la ligne de cassure de notre pièce. Plus bas, les pièces complètes représentent les jambes et les organes génitaux. Le dieu Thot est représenté soit sous la forme d’un ibis, comme ici dans le pectoral où il a la tête de cet oiseau sur un corps humain, soit sous la forme d’un singe cynocéphale. Il s’agirait pour ce dernier d’un syncrétisme avec le dieu primitif Hedj-our (le grand blanc). Cet animal est aussi assimilé au soleil levant, car il pousse des cris à l’aube, comme le démontre la représentation en groupe en haut du temple d’Abou Simbel ou encore à la base des obélisques de Louxor. Il est également en rapport avec le dieu lunaire Khonsou, ce qui pourrait aussi expliquer son assimilation au dieu lunaire Thot, lui-même en rapport avec la restitution de l’œil de Horus à son maître. Comme toujours, les raisons des assimilations multiples sont diverses dans un polythéisme. Le pectoral a une forme bien attestée en tout cas depuis le Nouvel Empire et aussi pour la période immédiatement précédente. Il reproduit un pylône ou une porte monumentale de temple, avec une corniche égyptienne selon l’interprétation la plus fréquente, ou un mur-bahut entre les colonnes de façade de la première salle hypostyle du même temple, où effectivement sont représentées des scènes de culte et de purification. Notons que le fils du premier prophète d’Amon représenté ici possédait un pectoral semblable également avec Thot. Le personnage dédicataire est déjà bien attesté dans l’histoire égyptienne (cf. K. Kitchen, M. Bierbrier, H. Ranke) : il est en effet connu par cinq autres monuments antiques. Cette statue tire son importance historique surtout grâce à son témoignage selon lequel la famille royale de la XXIIe Dynastie contrôlait de nouveau le pontificat thébain. En effet, notre prêtre est le fils du roi Osorkon Ier et a dû exercer sa fonction sous son successeur Takeloth Ier (env. 889-874 avant notre ère). Le nom de notre homme a été transcrit de différentes manières : Iouwelot, Aourat, par exemple. Les sources qui le concernent sont : Marques du Nilomètre de Karnak ; Stèle de l’apanage ; Support de table d’offrande ; Statuette du Caire ; Stèle BM 1224. Sur cette sixième attestation, l’homme est représenté agenouillé tenant une statuette de Maat (la Justice et l’Ordre) devant le dieu Thot assis sur un trône. Le texte est le suivant : «Thot, maître des paroles divines» et «Le premier prophète d’Amon Iouaret justifié». Remarquons que la gravure est très fine et que la fin du texte, par manque de place, est au-dessus de sa tête. Le dieu semble tenir de sa main gauche un objet long en même temps qu’il saisit le sceptre Ouas. Dans le nom de notre homme, le signe du canal semble être un rajout curieux, à moins de le lire comme un complément phonétique iou par confusion avec le mot île. Cette pièce est donc remarquable non seulement par sa valeur esthétique, mais aussi comme témoignage historique.

PROVENANCE Ex-French private collection, Paris, before 1960.

BIBLIOGRAPHY BIERBRIER M., The Late New Kingdom in Egypt, Warminster, 1975, p. 80 et 155. BUDGE W., A Guide to the Egyptian Galleries, London, 1909, p. 215 and pl. XXVIII. DAUMAS F., Valeurs phonétiques, Montpellier, 1990, p. 630. GAUTHIER H., Livres des Rois (Mémoires de l’Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale du Caire), 1912, Cairo, p. 331. KITCHEN K., The Third Intermediate Period, Warminster, 1973, p. 121, 195. LEGRAIN G., Textes gravés sur le quai de Karnak, in Zeitschrift für Aegyptische Sprache und Altertumskunde, 34, 1894, p. 113. LEGRAIN G., dans Zeitschrift für Aegyptische Sprache und Altertumskunde 35, 1897, p. 13. LEGRAIN G., Statues et Statuettes vol. III (Catalogue Général du Caire), Cairo, 1914, p. 38. NICHOLSON SHAW-P. I., British Museum Dictionary of Ancient Egypt, London, 1996, p. 188. PETRIE F., Scarabs and Cylinders, London, 1917, pl. 51/K. RANKE H., Personennamen, vol. I, Glückstadt, 1935, p. 18/10. SPENCER A. J., Excavations at el-Ashmounein, vol. II, London, 1989, pl. 93. Tanis, L’or des Pharaons, Paris, 1987, p. 211. VON BECKERATH J., The Nile Level Records at Karnak, in Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt V, 1966, p. 46.

126

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière française, Paris, avant 1960.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE BIERBRIER M., The Late New Kingdom in Egypt, Warminster, 1975, pp. 80 et 155. BUDGE W., A Guide to the Egyptian Galleries, Londres, 1909, p. 215 et pl. XXVIII. DAUMAS F., Valeurs phonétiques, Montpellier, 1990, p. 630. GAUTHIER H., Livres des Rois (Mémoires de l’Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale du Caire), 1912, Le Caire, p. 331. KITCHEN K., The Third Intermediate Period, Warminster, 1973, p. 121, 195. LEGRAIN G., Textes gravés sur le quai de Karnak, in Zeitschrift für Aegyptische Sprache und Altertumskunde, 34, 1894, p. 113. LEGRAIN G., dans Zeitschrift für Aegyptische Sprache und Altertumskunde 35, 1897, p. 13. LEGRAIN G., Statues et Statuettes vol. III (Catalogue Général du Caire), Le Caire, 1914, p. 38. NICHOLSON SHAW-P. I., British Museum Dictionary of Ancient Egypt, Londres, 1996, p. 188. PETRIE F., Scarabs and Cylinders, Londres, 1917, pl. 51/K. RANKE H., Personennamen, vol. I, Glückstadt, 1935, p. 18/10. SPENCER A. J., Excavations at el-Ashmounein, vol. II, Londres, 1989, pl. 93. Tanis, L’or des Pharaons, Paris, 1987, p. 211. VON BECKERATH J., The Nile Level Records at Karnak, dans Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt V, 1966, p. 46.

127


24. AN ELECTRUM IDOL OF THE KILIA TYPE

24. IDOLE DE TYPE KILIA EN ÉLECTRUM

Anatolian, late 4th – 3rd millennium B.C. H: 4.4 cm

Art anatolien, fin du IVe - IIIe mill. av. J.-C. Ht: 4.4 cm

This piece is the only known example of a Kilia type statuette in metal, the others being carved out of marble ; there also exists a shell pendant in the shape of an idol of this type. It represents a nude, standing female figure of schematic design : the large elliptical head is slightly tilted back ; the ears, the nose and the eyes are plastically modeled ; the neck resembles a long, thin cylinder. The body is in the shape of a long, thin leaf with rounded shoulders and a deep groove at the level of the hips that designates the position of the arms ; the hands are not indicated. The closed legs narrow towards the bottom, where an incision separates the left from the right ; the pointed shape of the feet does not allow the figurine to stand by itself. Structurally, it is necessary to emphasize the strong left-right symmetry, the contrast between the plasticity of the head and the thin, geometric design of the body and the size of the neck, which is longer than the legs. These idols are named after a figurine from a site near Gallipoli, in the Chersonese, on the European banks of the Strait of the Dardanelles. Their form is very homogenous and the differences in size are not terribly extreme (ca. 6 to 23 cm). The typology is characterized by a great stability of schema – contrary to the examples of Cycladic statuettes that are somewhat temporally and geographically close to Kilia idols – and the “longevity” of these idols is surprising : according to known scholarship, Kilia idols began to appear towards the end of the 5th millennium B.C. and were not totally abandoned until the second half of the 3rd millennium ; they were known in central-western Anatolia (the most eastern site was Kirsehir, in Cappadocia), in the Troades and perhaps also in Thrace. The significance of Kilia statuettes is hypothetical : like many other Neolithic and/or Bronze Age idols, they are generally associated with religious and magical beliefs related to fertility and fecundity. This piece, which has been known for over half a century, was part of a very important find – from Kirsehir (central Anatolia) – which also consisted of five other well known marble idols (ex-Schindler collection, Guennol collection, Levy collection, ex-Schimmel collection, ex-Rockefeller collection).

Cette pièce est le seul exemplaire connu de statuette de type Kilia en métal, les autres sont taillées dans le marbre ; il existe aussi un pendentif en coquillage reproduisant une idole de ce type. Elle représente une figure féminine nue et debout, aux formes schématisées : la tête est ellipsoïdale et large, légèrement rejetée vers l’arrière ; les oreilles, le nez et les yeux, sont indiqués plastiquement ; le cou ressemble à un cylindre long et mince. Le corps a la forme d’une feuille élancée et mince, aux épaules arrondies et pourvues d’une profonde entaille au niveau des hanches qui désigne la position des bras ; les mains ne sont pas indiquées. Les jambes serrées s’amincissent vers le bas, où une incision sépare la gauche de la droite ; la forme pointue des pieds ne permet pas à la figurine de se tenir debout. Structurellement il faut souligner la forte symétrie gauche-droite, le contraste entre la plasticité de la tête qui s’oppose au corps mince et géométrique, et la taille du tronc, qui est plus long que les jambes. Ces idoles sont nommées d’après une figurine provenant d’un site près de Gallipoli, dans le Chersonèse, sur le rivage européen du détroit des Dardanelles. Leur forme est très homogène et les différences de taille ne sont pas très marquées (environ de 6 à 23 cm). La typologie, caractérisée par une grande stabilité du schéma - contrairement par exemple aux statuettes cycladiques qui sont partiellement contemporaines et géographiquement proches - et la «longévité» de ces idoles sont surprenantes : d’après les données actuellement connues, les statuettes Kilia seraient apparues vers la fin du Ve millénaire et n’auraient été totalement abandonnées que pendant la deuxième moitié du IIIe millénaire ; elles étaient répandues en Anatolie centro-occidentale (le site le plus à l’est serait Kirsehir, en Cappadoce), en Troade et peut-être aussi en Thrace. La signification des statuettes de type Kilia est hypothétique : comme beaucoup d’autres idoles néolithiques et/ou de l’Age du Bronze, elles sont généralement mises en relation avec les croyances religieuses et magiques liées à la fertilité et à la fécondité. Cette pièce, qui est connue depuis plus d’un demi-siècle, aurait fait partie d’un lot très important - provenant de Kirsehir (Anatolie centrale) - qui comprenait aussi cinq idoles en marbre bien connues (ex-coll. Schindler, coll. Guennol, coll. Levy, ex-coll. Schimmel, ex-coll. Rockefeller).

PROVENANCE

PROVENANCE

Ex-J.J. Klejman, New York ; Ex-G. and F. Schindler Collection, New York, 1965.

Collection J.J. Klejman, New York ; ancienne collection G. et F. Schindler, New York, 1965.

PUBLISHED

PUBLIÉ

OR MENTIONED IN

GETZ PREZIOSI P., Stone Figurines in JOUKOWSKY M.S., Prehistoric Aphrodisias, vol. 1, Providence, 1986, p. 220, n. 126 Mask and Sculptures from the Collection of G. and F. Schindler, New York, 1966, n. 112. SEEHER J., Die kleinasiatischen Marmorstatuetten vom Typ Kiliya, dans Archäologischer Anzeiger, 1992/2, p. 161, no. 27. VON BOTHMER D. (ed.), Glories of the Past from the L. Levy and S. White Collection, New York, 1990, p. 9 (with the details of the Kirsehir group).

BIBLIOGRAPHY CASKEY J. L., The Figurine in the Roll-top desk in American Journal of Archaeology 76, 1972, pp. 192-193, pl. 44. SEEHER J., Die kleinasiatischen Marmorstatuetten vom Typ Kiliya, dans Archäologischer Anzeiger, 1992/2, p. 153-170. ZIMMERMANN, Poèmes de marbre : sculptures cycladiques du Musée Barbier-Müller, Geneva, 1994, p. 148, n. 37.

128

OU MENTIONNÉ DANS

GETZ PREZIOSI P., Stone Figurines dans JOUKOWSKY M.S., Prehistoric Aphrodisias, vol. 1, Providence, 1986, p. 220, n. 126 Mask and Sculptures from the Collection of G. and F. Schindler, New York, 1966, n. 112. SEEHER J., Die kleinasiatischen Marmorstatuetten vom Typ Kiliya, dans Archäologischer Anzeiger, 1992/2, p. 161, no. 27. VON BOTHMER D. (éd.), Glories of the Past from the L. Levy and S. White Collection, New York, 1990, p. 9 (avec les détails sur l’ensemble de Kirsehir group).

BIBLIOGRAPHIE CASKEY J. L., The Figurine in the Roll-top desk in American Journal of Archaeology 76, 1972, pp. 192-193, pl. 44. SEEHER J., Die kleinasiatischen Marmorstatuetten vom Typ Kiliya, dans Archäologischer Anzeiger, 1992/2, p. 153-170. ZIMMERMANN, Poèmes de marbre : sculptures cycladiques du Musée Barbier-Müller, Genève, 1994, p. 148, n. 37.

129


25. RING MODELED IN THE SHAPE OF A SERPENT

25. BAGUE EN OR MASSIF MODELÉE EN FORME DE SERPENT

Roman (Egypt), 1st century A.D. D: 2.2 cm

Art d’Asie occidentale, IIe mill. av. J.-C. D: 2.2 cm

This ring is intact, and all of the decoration is perfectly preserved ; some marks on the body indicate that the jewel was actually worn in antiquity. The body is twisted into a single spiral, and the design is open and modeled, so that one end represents a snake’s head and the other its tail. The body is tubular and, for the most part, smooth ; scales appear near either end and are indicated by crosshatched, incised lines that seem to form a thin net. Just after these scaly areas are small geometric decorations consisting of chevrons and engraved points. The snake’s head is diamond-shaped with a pointed muzzle. The cheeks and the bottom of the jaw display incised scales, while the top of the head is ornamented with many small plaques in relief, which are smooth and separated from one another by deep incisions. Two prominent, bulging globes represent the eyes ; the mouth is marked by a deep groove that follows the contours of the diamond ; and there is no sign of fangs. The naturalistic posture of the coiled serpent—a form that is particularly well suited to rings and bracelets—was a frequent subject for ancient jewelers. Pieces modeled in the shape of serpents, including earrings, rings, and bracelets, were already long known in Greek art by the eighth century B.C.. But it was at the end of the fourth century B.C., especially during the Hellenistic period and the beginning of the Imperial period, that this motif became very popular. Open bracelets in one or more coils, and featuring the head and tail of a serpent, were known in all major centers of the ancient world, including Greece, southern Italy, Egypt, and Syria, and were represented in statues, paintings, terracottas, and other art objects. This ring is very similar to a well-known type of serpent bracelet, which it echoes in small details such as the geometric motifs ; those bracelets are often attributed to Egyptian workshops from the beginning of the Roman period. In Egypt the serpent was often associated with the cult of Isis, but it is impossible to demonstrate the exact connection between Isis and these jewels. The similarities—in dimensions, proportions, the shape of the head and scales, undulations of the tail, subsidiary decorations, and so on—between these pieces from Roman Egypt are such that one can reasonably ask if these gems were not in fact from a single workshop.

La bague est intacte et tout le décor parfaitement bien conservé ; quelques marques de coups démontrent que ce bijou a été porté dans l’Antiquité. Elle est en forme de serpent dont le corps s’enroule en une seule spire : elle est ouverte et modelée de façon qu’une extrémité représente la tête et l’autre la queue, toute ondulée, du reptile. Le corps est tubulaire et pour la plupart lisse. Les écailles sont représentées uniquement peu avant les extrémités et sont indiquées par des traits incisés qui se croisent et forment ainsi un épais filet. Juste avant ces parties avec les écailles, se trouvent des petites décorations géométriques (chevrons, points gravés). La tête est en forme de losange, avec le museau pointu. Le dessous de la mâchoire ainsi que les joues présentent des écailles incisées, tandis que plusieurs plaquettes en relief ornent la partie supérieure du crâne : elles sont lisses et séparées par des incisions profondes. Deux globes fortement proéminents représentent les yeux du reptile ; la bouche est marquée par une profonde gravure qui suit le contour du losange ; il n’y a aucune indication des crocs. L’attitude naturelle du serpent qui se love - une forme qui s’adapte particulièrement bien à la fabrication de bagues et de bracelets - est un sujet repris fréquemment par les orfèvres antiques ; des bijoux modelés en forme de serpent (boucles d’oreilles, bagues, bracelets) sont communs dans l’art grec déjà depuis longtemps (VIIIe-VIIe s. av. J.-C.). Mais c’est à partir du IVe s. et surtout pendant toute la période hellénistique et au début de l’époque impériale que ce motif devient très populaire. Les bracelets ouverts, à une ou plusieurs spires, avec indication de la tête et de la queue de reptile étaient répandus dans tous les plus importants centres du monde antique (Grèce, Italie méridionale, Egypte, Syrie, etc.) et furent souvent même représentés sur des objets d’art (statues, peintures, terres cuites, etc.). Cette bague s’apparente de très près à un type bien connu de bracelet-serpent - dont elle reproduit à l’échelle réduite tous les petits détails, y compris les motifs géométriques incisés avant la zone avec les écailles - que l’on attribue souvent à des ateliers égyptiens du début de l’époque romaine. Dans cette région, le serpent a souvent été associé au culte isiaque mais il n’est pas possible de démontrer le rapport précis entre Isis et ces parures. Les similitudes parmi certaines pièces de l’Egypte romaine sont telles (dimensions, proportions, forme de la tête et des écailles, ondulations de la queue, décorations subsidiaires, etc.), qu’on peut se demander si ces parures ne sont pas sorties d’un seul atelier.

PROVENANCE Ex collection H., Zürich ; collected in 1960’s.

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière H.,Zurich ; années 1960.

BIBLIOGRAPHY For the Egyptian bracelets most similar to this one, see : A Passion for Antiquities : Ancient Art from the Collection of Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman (1994), pp. 327–28, no. 170 (also published in J. OGDEN, Ancient Jewellery (1992), pp. 8–9, fig. 1. H. LANDENIUS, “Two Spiral Snake Armbands,” Medelhavsmuseet Bulletin 13 (1978), pp. 37–40. For other Egyptian pieces, see : O. W. MUSCARELLA, (ed.), Ancient Art : The Norbert Schimmel Collection (1974), no. 71. C. RANSOM WILLIAMS, Gold and Silver Jewelry and Related Objects, New York Historical Society Catalogue of Egyptian Antiquities 1–160 (1924), pp. 109–110, pl. XIV, nos. 40–41. For pieces from Italy and the Greek world, see : H. HOFFMANN and P. DAVIDSON, Greek Gold : Jewellery from the Age of Alexander (1966), p. 174, no. 65. R. SIVERIO, Jewelry and Amber of Italy : A Collection in the National Museum of Naples (1959), nos. 154–70.

130

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Pour les bracelets égyptiens les plus proches, v. : A Passion for Antiquities, Ancient Art from the Collection of B. and L. Fleischman, Malibu, 1994, pp. 327-328, n. 170 (le même dans J. OGDEN, Ancient Jewellery, Londres, 1992, pp. 8-9, fig. 1). LANDENIUS H., Two Spiral Snake Armbands in Medelhavsmuseet Bulletin 13, 1978, p. 37-40. D’autres pièces provenant d’Egypte dans : MUSCARELLA O. W. (éd.), Ancient Art : The N. Schimmel Collection, Mayence/Rhin, 1974, n. 71. RANSOM WILLIAMS C., Gold and Silver Jewelry and Related Objects, (The New York Historical Society, Catalogue of Egyptian Antiquities, Numbers 1- 160), New York, 1924, pp. 109-110, pl. XIV, nn. 40-41. Pour des pièces dans le monde grec ou italien, v. : HOFFMAN H. - DAVIDSON P., Greek Gold: Jewellery from the Age of Alexander, 1966, p. 174, n. 65. SIVERIO R., Jewelry and Amber of Italy, A Collection in the National Museum of Naples, Naples, 1nn. 154-170.

131


26. A GOLD TORQUE LUNULA

26. TORQUE EN OR LUNULE

European Bronze Age (Spain), 2nd millennium B.C. D: 18.6 cm

Age du Bronze européen (Espagne), IIe mill. av. J.-C. D: 18.6 cm

The jewel is whole and in excellent condition. The external edge is slightly bent and the surface of the lower part is partially cracked because of over-intense hammering. This torque, fashioned as a single piece, shows great artistic and technical skill ; the design, simple and linear, looks very contemporary and reflects modern artistic tastes. The torque has the shape of a full, ribbon ; the ends are thicker and modeled in the shape of a “T” ; seen in profile, the lunula follows the line of the shoulders, since it curves forward. Decoration is extremely restrained : two delicate moldings are incised along the internal edge, three others enhance the external edge. Since the 18th century, archaeologists usually called these types of jewels “lunulas” because of their circular shape (in Latin, lunula means small moon or crescent of the moon). Today, a rather significant number of these objects have been brought to light, originating from a vast area including the British Isles (mostly Ireland, but also Cornwall, England, Scotland) and the European Atlantic coasts (from Portugal to Denmark). The torques were probably used as ornaments, however there are several examples where the thinness of the object suggests that they would have been used as ex-votos ; other pieces were intentionally folded and twisted, while others (like this one) are almost intact and may have been made for burial. Lunulas typically belong to the Early Bronze Age and can be dated to the first half of the 2nd millennium B.C. Nevertheless, stylistic reasons could shift the dating of this piece to the Late Bronze Age, i.e. around 1200 B.C.

La parure est entière et en d’excellentes conditions. Le bord externe est par endroits un peu plié, la surface de la partie inférieure est partiellement craquelée, à cause d’un martelage un peu trop intensif. Ce bijou, qui est fait d’un seul tenant, est une pièce d’une grande qualité artistique et technique, que la conception simple et linéaire rend très contemporaine et proche du goût artistique moderne. Elle a la forme d’un ruban ample et circulaire, qui s’amincit aux extrémités. Celles-ci sont modelées en forme de «T» ; vue de profil, la lunule épouse la forme des épaules puisqu’elle est légèrement courbée vers l’avant. La décoration est extrêmement simple : deux filets sont incisés le long du bord interne, trois autres soulignent le bord extérieur. Depuis le XVIIIe s. déjà, les archéologues ont pris l’habitude d’appeler ces bijoux du nom de «lunules» à cause de leur forme circulaire (latin lunula - petite lune, croissant de lune). Aujourd’hui, nous en connaissons un nombre assez important : ils proviennent d’une vaste région comprenant les Iles britanniques (Irlande, où les lunules sont les plus nombreuses, Cornouaille, Angleterre, Ecosse) et les côtes atlantiques de l’Europe (du Portugal jusqu’au Danemark). Leur utilisation comme parure apparaît très probable ; la minceur de certains exemplaires est telle qu’on peut imaginer leur utilisation comme des ex-voto ; d’autres pièces ont été pliées et tordues intentionnellement, d’autres encore (comme celle-ci) sont pratiquement intactes et ont peut-être été fabriquées pour la sépulture. Les lunules sont des parures typiques de l’Age du Bronze Ancien et sont généralement datées de la première moitié du IIe millénaire avant notre ère, mais des raisons d’ordre uniquement stylistique pourraient faire descendre la datation de la pièce en examen de quelques siècles, jusqu’à l’Age du Bronze Récent, c’est-à-dire vers 1200 av. J.-C.

PROVENANCE American art market, acquired in 1997.

PUBLISHED

PROVENANCE

IN

SCHULTZ F., Plain Geometry, Armament and Adornment in Pre-classical Europe, New York, 1997, n. 8

Acquis sur le marché d’art américain en 1997.

PUBLIÉ

Scientific analysis by Dr. J. Ogden (Hildesheim), 1996.

DANS

SCHULTZ F., Plain Geometry, Armament and Adornment in Pre-classical Europe, New York, 1997, n. 8.

BIBLIOGRAPHY DEMAKOPOULOU K. et al, Gods and Heroes of the European Bronze Age, Copenhagen, 1999, pp. 168-171. ELUERE C., L’or des Celtes, Freiburg, 1987, 36-37. ELUERE C., Les ors préhistoriques, Paris, 1982, pp. 58-64. MÜLLER-KARPE H., Handbuch der Vorgeschichte, IV : Bronzezeit, Berlin, 1980, pl. 483 (Ireland), pl. 491 (Germany).

132

Analyse scientifique du Dr. J. Ogden (Hildesheim), 1996.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE DEMAKOPOULOU K. et al., Gods and Heroes of the European Bronze Age, Copenhague, 1999, pp. 168-171. ELUERE C., L’or des Celtes, Fribourg, 1987, fig. 36-37. ELUERE C., Les ors préhistoriques, Paris, 1982, pp. 58-64. MÜLLER-KARPE H., Handbuch der Vorgeschichte, IV : Bronzezeit, Berlin, 1980, pl. 483 (Irlande), pl. 491 (Allemagne).

133


27. A COREFORMED GLASS AMPHORISKOS

27. AMPHORISQUE EN VERRE

Greek, 6th - 4th century B.C. H: 11.5 cm

Art grec, VIe - IVe s. av. J.-C. Ht: 11.5 cm

This core-formed glass amphoriskos with an opaque white body is adorned with thick aubergine threads of zigzag pattern. The surface of this vase, which was certainly used for perfumes or cosmetic oils, is slightly incised on the diagonal. The technique of core-formed vessels is very old and was already widespread in Mesopotamia and Egypt by the early 2nd millennium. In the Greek world, this process was initially used in Rhodian workshops (6th century B.C.), later spreading to Italy and Alexandria ; it was progressively abandoned around the end of the Hellenistic period and gave way to the blown glass technique. The overall form of the vessel is obtained while modeling a lump of sand or clay in the desired shape. This core is then fixed to a bronze or iron rod and immersed in molten glass ; the shape is made by rolling and drawing the glass out on a plank. The malleability of the glass is retained through continuous warming of the mass. The characteristic patterns of such containers are executed while blending glass threads of various colors into the hot surface ; these threads can be drawn out with a point to create zigzag and feather motifs. The clay core is eliminated after the cooling of the vase. This amphoriskos is intact. It is indeed a remarkable example of this type of perfume vessel, which reproduces the same shape as the terracotta examples : a teardrop-shaped body with a small circular foot, made separately, which does not ensure the stability of the container ; a cylindrical flared neck with a thin lip ; the handles, thin and irregular in cross-section, were modeled separately and soldered to the lip and the shoulder.

Cet amphorisque en verre de couleur blanc opaque, orné d’épaisses lignes et de zigzags aubergine, a été moulé sur un noyau d’argile ; le corps de ce récipient, qui servait certainement pour le transport de parfums ou d’huiles cosmétiques, est sillonné de traits légèrement incisés en diagonale. La technique des vases modelés sur noyau d’argile, qui est très ancienne, était déjà connue en Mésopotamie et Egypte au début du IIe millénaire ; dans le monde grec, ce procédé est appliqué d’abord par des ateliers rhodiens (VIe s. av. J.-C.) et plus tard en Italie et à Alexandrie ; son abandon progressif vers la fin de l’époque hellénistique est dû à la concurrence du verre soufflé. La forme générale du récipient est obtenue en modelant de l’argile grossièrement épurée. Fixé à une canne, ce noyau est plongé dans le verre en fusion, puis la mise en forme est assurée par le roulement et/ou l’étirement sur une planche ; la malléabilité du verre est maintenue grâce à un réchauffement constant de la masse. La décoration caractéristique de ces récipients est obtenue en incorporant à la surface des fils de verre de couleurs différentes, qui peuvent être étirés à l’aide d’une pointe pour créer les motifs en zigzags ou en plumes. Le noyau en argile est éliminé mécaniquement après le refroidissement du vase.Cet amphorisque est un très bel exemple de cette classe de vases à parfums, qui reproduisent la morphologie des exemplaires en terre cuite : corps en forme de goutte avec un petit pied circulaire fait à part et qui n’assure pas la stabilité du récipient ; col cylindrique et évasé avec une petite lèvre ; anses allongées à section irrégulière, modelées à part et soudées à la lèvre et à l’épaule.

PROVENANCE

PROVENANCE

Ex-French private collection.

Ancienne collection particulière, France.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BIBLIOGRAPHIE

GOLDSTEIN S., Pre-Roman and Early Roman Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass, New York, 1979, n. 260, p. 125-126. GROSE D.F., Early Ancient Glass, Core-Formed, Rod-Formed, and Cast Vessels and Objects from the Late Bronze Age to the Early Roman Empire, 1600 B.C to A.D. 50, Toledo-New York, 1989, n. 94-95, p. 143.

GOLDSTEIN S., Pre-Roman and Early Roman Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass, New York, 1979, n. 260, pp. 125-126. GROSE D.F., Early Ancient Glass, Core-Formed, Rod-Formed, and Cast Vessels and Objects from the Late Bronze Age to the Early Roman Empire, 1600 B.C to A.D. 50, Toledo-New York, 1989, n. 94-95, p. 143.

28. AN AUBERGINE GLASS GOBLET

28. GOBELET EN VERRE AUBERGINE

Roman, 1st century A.D. H: 10.1 cm

Art romain, Ier s. ap. J.-C. Ht: 10.1 cm

This large goblet is in a perfect state of preservation. It was cast and pressed in transparent aubergine glass. Its shape is simple and elegant, with a flat bottom and straight, thick walls. The body flares slightly at the rim, the angular lip was carved. Several lines of varying thickness are incised on the middle of the body and under the lip, composing the decoration : the precision and sharpness of these lines lead us to think that they were engraved on a pottery wheel. This shape of vessel was very popular until late Antiquity, surviving almost without any morphological variations (except for the height-diameter proportion, which was not fixed), especially because they were simple and easy to use. The technique (many glass drinking vessels in aubergine, dark green, yellow or blue are modeled and decorated like this one : cups, footed cups, bowls, etc.), the absence of a foot or a base, the type of lip and the horizontal incisions are elements that allow us to date this goblet to the 1st century A.D.

Ce gobelet de grande taille est dans un état de conservation impeccable. Il a été fabriqué dans un verre aubergine transparent, moulé et pressé. La forme est tout aussi simple qu’élégante : le fond est plat, la paroi, droite et épaisse, est légèrement évasée vers le haut ; la lèvre angulaire a été taillée. La seule décoration consiste en plusieurs lignes de différentes épaisseurs incisées au milieu du corps et sous la lèvre : elles sont tellement précises et nettes qu’elles ont certainement été gravées sur le tour. A cause de sa simplicité et de sa facilité d’emploi, cette forme a connu un grand succès qui lui a permis de traverser les âges, jusqu’à l’Antiquité tardive, pratiquement sans variations morphologiques importantes, exception faite pour le rapport taille-diamètre, qui n’était pas fixe. La technique (de nombreuses formes de vases à boire en verre de couleur aubergine, vert foncé, jaune, bleu, etc. sont modelées et décorées comme celle-ci : des coupes, des coupes à pied, des bols, etc.), l’absence de pied ou de base, le type de lèvre, les incisions horizontales sont des éléments qui, combinés, permettent de dater le gobelet en examen du premier siècle de notre ère.

PROVENANCE Acquired on the Swiss art market in 1999.

BIBLIOGRAPHY MATHESON S.B., Ancient Glass in the Yale University Art Gallery, Yale, 1980, n. 116-117, pp. 42-43. Vitrum, Il vetro tra arte e scienza nel mondo romano, Florence, 2004, p. 239, n. 2.38 ; p. 314, n. 4.24.

PROVENANCE Acquis sur le marché d’art Suisse en 1999.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE MATHESON S.B., Ancient Glass in the Yale University Art Gallery, Yale, 1980, n. 116-117, pp. 42-43. Vitrum, Il vetro tra arte e scienza nel mondo romano, Florence, 2004, p. 239, n. 2.38 ; p. 314, n. 4.24.

134

135


29. A BLACK GRANITE HEAD OF A MAN

29. TÊTE MASCULINE EN GRANIT NOIR

Egyptian, 21st – 24th Dynasty, 3rd Intermediate Period (ca. 1080 - 712 B.C.) H: 16 cm

Art égyptien, IIIe période intermédiaire (env. 1080-712 av. J.-C, XXIe-XXIVe dyn.) Ht: 16 cm

This beautiful head probably belonged to a smaller than life-size male figure. The oval shaped face is finely carved and characterized by delicate features : large almond-shaped eyes, a straight slender nose, full sensuous lips, arched eyebrows defined in relief, pierced earlobes indicating the presence of earrings, maybe in gold. This idealized and timeless face shows neither wrinkles, nor any expression, making it difficult to precisely date this statue. The man wears a double wig : the upper tier, with the locks engraved in deep linear incisions, covers the head like a thick skullcap ; on the forehead, the wig forms a horizontal line that falls diagonally from the temples to the shoulders, hiding the upper half of the ears. This typical masculine headpiece appeared in the early New Kingdom, but became fashionable especially in the time of the Ramessids and during the Late Period. The absence of attributes or other royal or divine elements indicate that this man was a private individual, probably an Egyptian high dignitary of the early 1st millennium : it is impossible to determine if the head belonged to a standing or a seated figure, or even to a block statue (block, or cube statue : an Egyptian statue, almost always male, introduced in the Middle Kingdom but widespread during the New Kingdom and Late Period ; the figure sits on the ground with knees up and arms folded, so that the arms and legs are wholly contained within the cubic form, the hands and feet alone discretely protruding). A high ranking dignitary, who could thus participate in daily divine offerings even after his death, generally dedicated block statues at a sanctuary. The delicate and precise, rather stylized execution of this work recalls figures of the 3rd Intermediate Period, especially the golden masks proceeding from the Tanis tombs. Stone sculpture was very rare in Egypt during that era, so this piece is a remarkable example of the artistic and creative skills of the sculptors workshops.

Cette belle tête appartenait vraisemblablement à une figure masculine plus petite que nature. Le visage, de forme parfaitement ovale, est travaillé de façon harmonieuse et avec beaucoup de douceur dans le rendu des traits : les grands yeux sont en forme d’amande, le petit nez est droit, les lèvres sont charnues et sensuelles, les sourcils sont arqués et en léger relief, les oreilles sont percées pour recevoir des boucles d’oreilles qui étaient peut-être en or. Sans aucune ride d’expression, ce visage est idéalisé et intemporel, ce qui rend plus difficile la datation de la statue. L’homme est coiffé d’une double perruque : la partie supérieure, aux mèches marquées par de profondes incisions linéaires, couvre le crâne comme une épaisse calotte ; sur le front, elle forme une ligne horizontale qui, à la hauteur des tempes, descend en diagonale vers les épaules en cachant la moitié supérieure des oreilles. Deux autres masses de cheveux, rangés en petites perles rectangulaires, parcourent les côtés du visage et se terminaient vraisemblablement sur les épaules. Cette coiffe typiquement masculine, apparue au début du Nouvel Empire, est devenue très à la mode surtout à l’époque des ramessides et à la Basse Epoque. L’absence d’attributs ou d’autres caractéristiques royales ou divines indique que l’homme représenté était un privé, très probablement un haut dignitaire égyptien du début du Ier millénaire : il est impossible d’établir si la tête appartenait à une figure qui se tenait debout ou assise ou même à une statue-cube (statue-cube ou cuboïde : type de statue égyptienne masculine né au Moyen Empire mais très répandu surtout au Nouvel Empire et à la Basse Epoque : le personnage est assis par terre, les jambes relevées devant lui, de façon que l’ensemble formait une sorte de bloc cubique dont seuls la tête et les pieds ressortaient. Les statuescube étaient généralement dédiées dans un sanctuaire par un haut dignitaire, qui pouvait ainsi participer aux offrandes divines quotidiennes même après sa mort). L’exécution de cette œuvre, extrêmement délicate et précise, mais en même temps un peu stylisée, rappelle les figures de la IIIe période intermédiaire, en particulier les masques en or des tombes de Tanis. A une période où la sculpture en pierre est très rare en Egypte, cette pièce fournit un très bel exemple de la vitalité et des capacités artistiques des ateliers de sculpteurs.

PROVENANCE Ex-Wertheimer collection, Paris ; Galerie Merrin, New York, 1992 ; ex-American private collection 1980-1990.

BIBLIOGRAPHY Entdeckungen, Aegyptische Kunst in Süddeutschland, Mainz on Rhine, 1985, p.105, n. 87. Tanis. L’or des Pharaons, Paris, 1987, pp. 85-96 and 270-272, n. 104. Through Ancient Eye : Egyptian Portraiture, Birmingham (Alabama), 1988, n. 35, pp. 106-107. On the headpiece, see : VANDIER J., Manuel d’archéologie égyptienne, t. III, Les grandes époques, La statuaire, Paris, 1958, pp. 484-485, pl. CXL, 5 ; pl. CLI 3, 6 ; pl. CLIV, 1 ; pl. CLXXIV, 1.

136

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection Wertheimer, Paris ; Galerie Merrin, New York, 1992 ; ancienne collection particulière américaine, années 1980-1990.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Entdeckungen, Aegyptische Kunst in Süddeutschland, Mayence/Rhin, 1985, p.105, n. 87. Tanis. L’or des Pharaons, Paris, 1987, pp. 85-96 et 270-272, n. 104. Through Ancient Eye : Egyptian Portraiture, Birmingham (Alabama), 1988, n. 35, pp. 106-107. Pour la coiffure v. : VANDIER J., Manuel d’archéologie égyptienne, t. III, Les grandes époques, La statuaire, Paris, 1958, pp. 484-485, pl. CXL, 5 ; pl. CLI 3, 6 ; pl. CLIV, 1 ; pl. CLXXIV, 1.

137


30. A STONE HEAD OF A ROYAL

30. TÊTE ROYALE EN PIERRE NOIRE

Egyptian, Saite Period (ca. 664 - 525 B.C.) (?) H: 30 cm

Art égyptien, époque saïte (env. 664 - 525 av. J.-C.) (?) Ht: 30 cm

This life-size head has a particular charm, although it raises many questions. It represents a figure wearing the striped royal scarf, the nemes ; the two large flaps, which hung down behind the ears, are missing. The ears are also damaged. A royal uraeus, whose tail is horizontally rolled up, crowns the nemes. The eyebrows are marked by a simple incised line and not wholly rendered by sunken carving or in relief, an important detail. The cheekbones are prominent and wide bags appear under the eyes. The emaciated and oval face, with its half moon-shaped mouth, expresses a certain satisfaction. It is difficult to determine if this figure is a man or a woman ; the high placement of the eyes in comparison with the nose and the prominent cheekbones can be seen as specifically feminine characteristics. This would not be impossible during the Ptolemaic Period, because the queens who actually reigned were sometimes represented with the uraeus. The uraeus with the rolled up tail appears during the 23rd Dynasty on the blue crown and not over the nemes (VANDIER, 1958, pl. CIII and CV), a lasting type throughout the following Dynasty. The same shape of uraeus is attested to once on Amenophis III’s double crown during the 28th Dynasty (BONNET, 2005, p. 178). For the later periods, pharaohs of the 25th Dynasty wore a double uraeus over a kind of skullcap (BONNET, 2005, chap. III). Later, this royal snake appears on Apries and Nectanebo (BOTHMER, 1960, pl. 50 and 69) but over a white and blue crown. Finally, the same type of snake is widespread during the Ptolemaic Period (BOTHMER, 1960, pl. 96.101.115), but on these examples, hair locks fall from under the headband, as opposed to our statue. However, there are examples of nemes with a large band and an uraeus with a tail rolled up in the shape of a figure eight that covers the hair completely (STEINDORFF, 1946, n. 304, 305 and Turin n. 1399), but these attestations are partially dated. Among the curled types, two heads of Ptolemy V with an emaciated face can be mentioned. The Ptolemaic queens wear the uraeus over a wig (DONADONI, 1981, n. 3 ; STEINDORFF, 1946, n. 225 ; STEINDORFF, 1989, n. 59.), and sometimes the snake is double. This vast documentary review enabled us to eliminate some possible interpretations. A last determining element can be added thanks to a statue dated between the late 25th and the early 26th Dynasty (Liebighaus Museum, 1993, p. 193). This latter represents a sovereign with a white crown with a uraeus with a linear and vertical tail, but his eyebrows are rendered in the same manner as on our statue, which is rare. The shape of the prominent mouth against the emaciated cheeks is also worthy of notice. One can also refer to an Amasis head, with deep-set eyebrows and a half moon-shaped smiling mouth (HODJACHE, 1971, pl. 67). This head could thus represent a new style in refined Saite statuary.

Cette tête, de grandeur nature, est d’un charme particulier, mais soulève en même temps de nombreuses questions. Il s’agit d’un personnage qui porte le foulard royal rayé, le némès, dont il manque les deux ailes latérales derrière les oreilles, elles-mêmes abîmées. Sur ce némès, se dresse l’ureus royal, dont la queue est enroulée de manière horizontale. Les sourcils sont marqués par un simple trait et non rendus entièrement en creux ou en relief, il s’agit d’un détail important. Les pommettes sont saillantes et laissent apparaître un large creux sous les yeux. La figure est ovale et émaciée, ce qui reste de la bouche semble indiquer une forme en demi-lune, exprimant un certain contentement. La première question qui se présente est celle de savoir s’il s’agit d’un homme ou d’une femme, les yeux hauts par rapport au nez et les pommettes saillantes pouvant être des caractères féminins. Nous reviendrons sur cela, la chose n’étant pas impossible pour l’époque ptolémaïque, car les reines qui ont effectivement régné peuvent être représentées avec l’uréus. Pour l’instant, analysons la coiffe. L’uréus avec la queue enroulée apparaît à la XVIIIe dynastie sur la couronne bleue et pas sur le némès (VANDIER, 1958, pl. CIII et CV), cela continue à la dynastie suivante. La même forme d’uréus se retrouve une fois sur la double couronne pour Aménophis III à la XVIIIe dynastie (BONNET, 2005, p. 178). Pour les époques plus récentes, les pharaons de la XXVe portent un double uréus sur une sorte de calotte (BONNET, 2005, chap. III). Plus tard, cette forme du serpent royal apparaît chez Apriès et Nectanébo (BOTHMER, 1960, pl. 50 et 69), mais sur couronne blanche et bleue. Enfin, le même type de serpent est commun sous cette forme à la période ptolémaïque (BOTHMER, 1960, pl. 96.101.115), mais cette fois il est usuel de laisser apparaître les boucles des cheveux qui dépassent du bandeau, contrairement à notre exemplaire. Il existe cependant quelques exemples de coiffe némès à bandeau large, uréus à la queue enroulée en forme de 8 couché qui ne laissent pas apparaître les cheveux (STEINDORFF, 1946, n. 304, 305 et Turin n. 1399). Ces attestations sont pourtant mal datées. Parmi les formes à bouclettes, deux têtes de Ptolémée V donnent un visage émacié. Les reines ptolémaïques portent l’uréus sur une perruque (DONADONI, 1981, n. 3 ; STEINDORFF, 1946, n. 225 ; STEINDORFF, 1989, n. 59.), parfois le serpent est double. Cette vaste revue documentaire nous a permis d’éliminer un certain nombre de possibilités. Il reste donc à trouver un élément déterminant. Il nous semble avoir trouvé celui-ci dans une statue attribuée à la fin du XXVe - début XXVIe dynastie (LIEBEGHAUS, 1993, vol. III, p. 193). Cette statue représente un souverain à couronne blanche avec un uréus à queue droite et verticale, mais dont les sourcils sont rendus de la même manière que sur notre statue, chose rare. La forme de la bouche, proéminente sur des joues émaciées est aussi à remarquer. On peut également se référer à une tête d’Amasis, dont les sourcils sont creusés et le sourire remonte en demi-lune (HODJACHE, 1971, pl. 67). Sans arriver à des certitudes, il est possible que cette tête représente une nouvelle attestation de la belle statuaire saïte.

PROVENANCE Ex-M. Gimond Collection, France ; Ex-P. Lévy collection, France.

BIBLIOGRAPHY BAYER-NIEMEIER E. and al., Skulptur, Malerei, Papyri und Särge, Liebighaus Museum Alter Plastik, Ägyptische Bildwerke, vol. III, 1993. BOTHMER B.V., Sculpture of Late Period, New York, 1960. DONADONI S., L’Egitto, Turin, 1981. HOSDJACHE S., Les Antiquités égyptiennes du Musée Pouchkine, Moscow, 1971. STEINDORFF G., Catalogue of Egyptian Sculpture, Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore, 1946. Kleopatra, Aegypten um die Zeitwende, Munich, 1989, n. 59. VANDIER J., Manuel d’archéologie égyptienne, vol. III, Paris, 1958.

138

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection M. Gimond, France ; ancienne collection P. Lévy, France.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE BAYER-NIEMEIER E. et al., Skulptur, Malerei, Papyri und Särge, Liebighaus Museum Alter Plastik, Ägyptische Bildwerke, vol. III, 1993. BOTHMER B.V., Sculpture of Late Period, New York, 1960. DONADONI S., L’Egitto, Turin, 1981. HOSDJACHE S., Les Antiquités égyptiennes du Musée Pouchkine, Moscou, 1971. STEINDORFF G., Catalogue of Egyptian Sculpture, Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore, 1946. Kleopatra, Aegypten um die Zeitwende, Munich, 1989, n. 59. VANDIER J., Manuel d’archéologie égyptienne, vol. III, Paris, 1958.

139


31. A HAEMATITE WEIGHT IN THE SHAPE OF A GRASSHOPPER

31. POIDS EN FORME DE SAUTERELLE EN HÉMATITE

Babylonian, 18th - 17th century B.C. L: 8.4 cm

Art babylonien, XVIIIe-XVIIe s. av. J.-C. L: 8.4 cm

This haematite weight in the shape of a grasshopper may be unique. The insect is represented in a very realistic way while at the same time showing great abstraction and finely modeled volumes. It holds its legs against the length of its body ; the hairs are incised and the eyes cross-hatched. Two long grooved wings cover and extend past the body. This piece can be linked to the Babylonian production of zoomorphic haematite weights that display a great diversity of shapes : ducks and frogs, but also shells, wild boars or baboons. The duck is the most common type of weight. The Louvre has a whole set of these weights, while eight of them representing various animals are now in the Ortiz collection. Other weights of this period are on display in the British Museum and in the Archaeological Museum of Istanbul. In Egypt, grasshoppers are regularly represented. However, Egyptian craftsmen never use haematite, whereas this gray and smooth stone is frequently utilized in Babylonian production. This insect has a long tradition in Near Eastern World : for example, it is considered a severe crop destroyer, as attested to in the episode of the Seven Plagues of Egypt. It is also commonly consumed as a dish in the form of skewers (see King Sennacherib’s Palace relief at Nineveh). It also appears on the cylindrical seals and in the production of small chalcedony Assyrian figurines between the 6th and the 3rd century B.C.

Ce poids en hématite en forme de sauterelle est peut-être unique. L’insecte est représenté de façon très réaliste, tout en montrant une grande abstraction et un volume finement modelé. Il tient les pattes serrées contre son corps allongé ; les poils sont incisés et les yeux hachurés. Deux longues ailes rainurées, plus longues que l’insecte, couvrent entièrement son corps. Cette pièce est à rattacher à la production babylonienne de poids zoomorphes en hématite. Leurs formes varient du canard, à la grenouille, en passant par le coquillage, le sanglier et le babouin, etc. Le canard est le poids le plus courant. Le Louvre possède un groupe entier et la collection Ortiz conserve huit poids représentant divers animaux. Le British Museum, Le Musée Archéologique d’Istanbul ainsi que d’autres grandes institutions, conservent d’autres poids de cette période. En Egypte les sauterelles sont couramment représentées. Cependant, les artisans égyptiens n’emploient presque jamais l’hématite, alors que cette pierre grise et lisse est fréquemment attestée pour la production babylonienne. Cet insecte à une longue tradition dans le monde proche-oriental : il est par exemple connu pour être un grand ravageur de cultures, comme nous le rappelle l’épisode des sept plaies d’Egypte. Il est aussi communément consommé comme plat sous forme de brochettes (cf. relief du palais du roi Sennacherib à Ninive). Il apparaît encore dans les sceaux cylindriques et dans la production de petites figurines assyriennes en calcédoine entre le VIe et le IIIe siècle avant J.-C.

PROVENANCE

PROVENANCE

Ex-Swiss private collection, 1980’s.

Ancienne collection particulière suisse, années 1980.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BIBLIOGRAPHIE

BRENTJES B., Zur Typology, Datierung und Ableitung der Zikadenfibeln, in Wissenschaftliche Zeitschrift der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 5, 1953-1954, pp. 901-914. In Pursuit of the Absolute, Art of the Ancient World, The George Ortiz Collection, 1994, Bern, n. 18. SOUTZO M.C., Etude des Monuments pondéraux de Suse, Chalon-sur-Saône. Tierbilder aus vier Jahrtausenden, Antiken der Sammlung Mildenberg, Cleveland, 1981.

BRENTJES B., Zur Typology, Datierung und Ableitung der Zikadenfibeln, dans Wissenschaftliche Zeitschrift der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 5, 1953-1954, pp. 901-914. In Pursuit of the Absolute, Art of the Ancient World, The George Ortiz Collection, 1994, Berne, n. 18. SOUTZO M.C., Etude des Monuments pondéraux de Suse, Chalon-sur-Saône. Tierbilder aus vier Jahrtausenden, Antiken der Sammlung Mildenberg, Cleveland, 1981.

140

141


32. A HAEMATITE AMULET OF A HEAD OF PAZUZU

32. AMULETTE EN HÉMATITE REPRÉSENTANT LA TÊTE DU DÉMON PAZUZU

Assyrian, ca. 800 – 600 B.C. H: 3.9 cm

Art assyrien, VIIIe-VIIe s. av. J.-C. Ht: 3.9 cm

This precious haematite amulet of the Assyrian demon Pazuzu is in perfect condition. Haematite, indigenous to and widely used in the region of Mesopotamia, is a very hard stone to carve, which accounts for its durability. While it is common to find weights of simple, rounded form carved from haematite, it is unusual to see such a small and intricately detailed head such as this one carved from such a difficult stone. The head is carved with great finesse in a very lively fashion and displays the fierce features that are the hallmarks of the demon : square-shaped head, furrowed brow, snarling lion-like face, wrinkled cheeks, small rounded ears, fringed beard and lined neck. The finely incised beard and the lines on the neck are typical of Assyrian depictions of Pazuzu from the first half of the 1st millennium B.C., as opposed to earlier Babylonian versions, which are somewhat simpler. A small vertical hole carefully drilled through the head would have allowed the owner to wear the piece strung on a string or leather thong as an amulet. A parallel for this amulet, also in haematite, can be found at the Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University (L2001.17.4). Pazuzu was thought to bring fever and sickness on the wind, but in a duality that is not uncommon in Near Eastern mythology, he is also thought to be the nemesis of Lamashtu, the demonness of pestilence, especially for women in childbirth and children. Therefore, heads of Pazuzu such as this one would have been worn as amulets, especially by pregnant women, and his apotropaic properties are attested to in the magical and medicinal texts of the times : «Make the bust of a statue of a Pazuzu. If the patient carries (the figurine) in his two hands, or if it is placed on the patient’s head, Whatever Evil which has attacked him will look and not approach him ; that patient will be healed.» (ND 5488/2).

Cette précieuse amulette en hématite du démon assyrien Pazuzu est parfaitement conservée. L’hématite était fréquemment utilisée en Mésopotamie, d’où elle provient, surtout pour la fabrication des poids en forme d’animal : c’est une pierre difficile à travailler, mais qui grâce à sa dureté, se conserve de façon remarquable. Il est commun de rencontrer des poids de forme simple et arrondie taillés en hématite, mais beaucoup plus rare de voir des petites pièces aussi richement détaillées que cette tête dans une pierre si dure. La tête, très finement exécutée, est taillée de manière vive et présente les traits caractéristiques de ce démon : tête de forme carrée, sourcils marqués, visage de lion rugissant, joues ridées, petites oreilles arrondies, barbe hachurée et cou ligné. La barbe est finement incisée et les lignes sur le cou sont typiques des images assyriennes de la première moitié du Ier millénaire avant J.-C. de Pazuzu, par opposition à des versions babyloniennes antérieures qui sont plus simplifiées. Un petit trou vertical soigneusement percé dans la tête permettait au propriétaire de l’attacher à une lanière en fibre ou en cuir et de la porter comme amulette. Un parallèle pour cette pièce, également en hématite, est conservé au Musée de Michael C. Carlos à l’Université d’Emory (L2001.17.4). Pazuzu était supposé apporter la fièvre et la maladie par le vent, mais dans une dualité toute caractéristique de la mythologie proche-orientale, il est également connu pour être le Némésis de Lamashtu, la démone des fléaux, notamment à l’égard des femmes qui accouchaient et des enfants : les têtes de Pazuzu telles que celle-ci auraient donc été portées comme amulettes, surtout par les femmes enceintes. Ses propriétés apotropaïques sont d’ailleurs certifiées dans les textes magiques et médicinaux de l’époque: «Réalisez le buste d’une statue de Pazuzu. Si le patient porte (la figurine) dans ses deux mains, ou si elle est placée à la tête du patient, le Mal qui l’a attaqué quel qu’il soit verra le démon et n’approchera pas ; ce patient sera guéri.» (ND 5488/2).

PROVENANCE Swiss art market, acquired in 1999.

PROVENANCE

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Acquis sur le marché d’art suisse en 1999.

For bronze and stone parallels, see : FRANK C., Lamastu, Pazuzu und andere Dämonen : ein Beitrag zur babylonisch-assyrischen Dämonologie, Leipzig, 1941, taf. III, pp.15. STRONACH D., Tepe Nush-I Jan : A Mound in Media in Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, vol. 27, no. 3 (November 1968), pp. 185-6, fig. 14. For the medical uses of Pazuzu amulets, see : GELLER M.J., Fragments of Magic, Medecine, and Mythology from Nimrud in Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, London, 2000, pp. 335 - 336.

142

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Sur les parallèles en bronze et en pierre, v. : FRANK C., Lamastu, Pazuzu und andere Dämonen : ein Beitrag zur babylonisch-assyrischen Dämonologie, Leipzig, 1941, taf. III, pp.15ss. STRONACH D., Tepe Nush-I Jan: A Mound in Media dans The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 27, n. 3, novembre 1968, pp. 185-186, fig. 14. A propos de l’utilisation médicale des amulettes de Pazuzu, v. : GELLER M.J., Fragments of Magic, Medecine, and Mythology from Nimrud dans Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, Londres, 2000, pp. 335 - 336.

143


33. AN IVORY HEAD OF A DOG

33. TÊTE DE CHIEN EN IVOIRE ET OR

Egyptian, Middle Kingdom (ca. 1938-1758 B.C.) H: 2.1 cm

Art égyptien, Moyen Empire (env. 1938-1758 av. J.-C.) Ht: 2.1 cm

This ivory piece displays traces of gold foil, which represented the animal’s collar. It would have been the upper part of one of the ten pegs from the Egyptian “Game of 60 Holes”. This object has remarkable artistic and technical qualities (see the rendering of the eyes or the whiskers) and is exceptionally rare. J. Vandier explains that the ends of these pegs are composed of five animals with pointed ears and five with folded ears, as in our case, where the ear is partially damaged. Each player had thirty holes to move his five pegs. Generally, canines with pointed ears were interpreted as jackals and those with bent ears as dogs, from which we get the modern game of “Dogs and Jackals”. Vandier observes rightly that they could be two different breeds of dogs. The example cited by this author shows longer pegs for the pointy eared animals than for the ones with the falling ear, which could be an indication of the nobility of the first species. At last, Vandier adds that all the examples of this game date to the Middle Kingdom, except for one piece that is dated to the New Kingdom, in this form of course, since the game was also known in Coptic Egypt. W. Hayes informs us that the oldest known example dates to the 11th Dynasty and that the game was widely known in Palestine and Persia ; however, he does not give precise chronological details. The Lexicon der Ägyptologie indicates that the dog is represented from the beginning of history in the Game of the Snake, and later with the lion in the Game of Thieves. Lastly, the Egyptian language distinguishes two types of dogs : Iou or Iouniou, which would be the common dog with the falling or folded ears, and Tjesem, the Libyan greyhound with pointed ears, just like the jackal. This difference can be observed in the signs until the end of hieroglyphic history.

Cette pièce en ivoire présente des traces d’une feuille d’or qui représentait le collier de l’animal. Il s’agirait de la partie supérieure d’une des dix chevilles du jeu égyptien des soixante trous. La rareté même de ce type d’objet et la précision des détails, comme le traitement des yeux ou de la moustache, font de cette pièce un objet exceptionnel. J. Vandier nous indique que ces chevilles se terminent avec cinq animaux aux oreilles pointues et autant avec des oreilles repliées, comme c’est le cas ici, où l’oreille est en partie abîmée. Il nous indique que chaque joueur disposait de trente trous pour déplacer ses cinq chevilles. Généralement, on a interprété les canidés à oreilles pointues comme des chacals et ceux à oreilles tombantes comme des chiens, d’où le nom du jeu du chien et du chacal attribué par les modernes. Vandier nous fait remarquer à juste titre qu’il pourrait s’agir de deux races de chiens différentes. L’exemplaire reproduit par cet auteur nous montre des chevilles plus longues pour l’espèce à l’oreille droite que pour celui à l’oreille tombante, ce qui pourrait être une indication sur la noblesse de la première espèce. Enfin, Vandier nous dit que tous les exemplaires datent du Moyen Empire à l’exception d’un seul du Nouvel Empire, bien entendu sous cette forme, car le jeu est connu encore dans l’Egypte copte. W. Hayes nous informe que le plus ancien exemplaire connu est de la XIe Dynastie et que le jeu s’est répandu en Palestine et en Perse, sans donner de précisions chronologiques. Le Lexicon der Ägyptologie nous fait remarquer que le chien est représenté dès les débuts de l’histoire dans le jeu dit du serpent et plus tard avec le lion dans celui des voleurs. Enfin, la langue égyptienne distingue deux types de chiens : le Iou ou Iouniou, qui serait le chien commun avec les oreilles tombantes ou repliées, et le Tjesem, lévrier libyen, à oreilles dressées, tout comme le chacal. Cette différence existe jusque dans les singes de la fin de l’histoire hiéroglyphique.

PROVENANCE Ex-Bela Hein collection, France, before 1931.

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection Béla Hein, France, avant 1931.

BIBLIOGRAPHY DAUMAS F., Valeurs phonétiques, Montpellier, 1988, p. 237 and 239. HAYES W., The Sceptre of Egypt, vol. I, New York, 1953, p. 250. Lexicon der Ägyptologie, Wiesbaden, 1980, vol. III, col. 77-82. VANDIER J., Manuel d’archéologie égyptienne, vol. IV, Paris, 1964, p. 508, 275 and 277.

34. A FRAGMENT OF A STONE RELIEF WITH FOUR HIEROGLYPHS

BIBLIOGRAPHIE DAUMAS F., Valeurs phonétiques, Montpellier, 1988, p. 237 et 239. HAYES W., The Sceptre of Egypt, vol. I, New York, 1953, p. 250. Lexicon der Ägyptologie, Wiesbaden, 1980, vol. III, col. 77-82. VANDIER J., Manuel d’archéologie égyptienne, vol. IV, Paris, 1964, p. 508, fig. 275 et 277.

34. RELIEF EN CALCAIRE AVEC QUATRE HIÉROGLYPHES GRAVÉS ET PEINTS

Egyptian, late 25th - early 26th Dynasty (ca. 670 - 650 B.C.) H: 34.3 cm

Art égyptien, fin de la XXVe début de la XXVIe dynastie (env. 670 - 650 av. J.-C.) Ht: 34.3 cm

This piece is very finely carved and probably originates from an important monument. Known for several years,it bears four very lightly carved hieroglyphs : a sun god, a scarab - which is read as khepri -, and r and i, two phonetic complements. The presence of the scarab leads to the following interpretations : it could be the scarab-beetle god Khepri, but this hypothesis is unconvincing in so far as the solar divinity precedes the scarab and does not follow it like a determinative (the column texts are always read from top to bottom) or, more probably, it could be the verb “to become”, “to be”. The expression Kheper-dkesef (selfcreated) often follows the name of solar deities. From a stylistic point of view, this fragment might have belonged to the tomb of the Fourth Prophet of Amun, Montuemhat, like the other reliefs on display at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

La gravure est très soignée et prouve la provenance d’un monument important. Cette pièce, qui est connue depuis plusieurs années, montre quatre hiéroglyphes très légèrement creusés : une divinité solaire, le scarabée qui se lit khepri et les deux compléments phonétiques r et i. La présence du scarabée peut être interprétée de deux façons : il pourrait s’agir du dieu scarabée Khepri (mais l’hypothèse paraît peu probable parce que la divinité solaire précède le scarabée et ne le suit pas comme un déterminatif, les textes en colonne se lisant toujours du haut vers le bas) ou plus probablement du simple verbe devenir, être. Le nom de divinités solaires est souvent suivi de l’expression Kheper-dkesef (qui se crée lui-même). Stylistiquement, on peut établir que ce relief appartenait à la tombe du quatrième prophète d’Amon, Mentuemhat, comme d’autres reliefs, aujourd’hui conservés au Musée de Cleveland.

PROVENANCE Peter Sharrer, New York, 1991 ; Ex-American private collection from the West Coast.

PROVENANCE Peter Sharrer, New York, 1991 ; collection particulière américaine de la côte ouest.

BIBLIOGRAPHY LECLANT J., Montouemhat, in Bibliothèque d’Etude Institut Français d’Archéologie orientale du Caire, 35, 1961, p. 181. LECLANT J., Recherches sur les monuments thébains de la XXVème Dynastie, Cairo, 1961, p. 306-307. On the other Cleveland fragments, see : BERMAN L., The Cleveland Museum of Art, Catalogue of Egyptian Art, Cleveland, 1999, pp. 393ss.

144

BIBLIOGRAPHIE LECLANT J., Montouemhat dans Bibliothèque d’Etude de l’Institut Français d’Archéologie orientale du Caire, 35, 1961, p. 181. LECLANT J., Recherches sur les monuments thébains de la XXVème Dynastie, Le Caire, 1961, pp. 306-307. Sur les autres fragment de Cleveland : BERMAN L., The Cleveland Museum of Art, Catalogue of Egyptian Art, Cleveland, 1999, pp. 393ss.

145


35. A MARBLE STATUE OF A LION

35. STATUE DE LION EN MARBRE

Greek, early Hellenistic Period, 3rd century B.C. H: 72 cm

Art grec, début de l’époque hellénistique (IIIe s. av. J.-C.) Ht: 72 cm

This lion was probably seated on its hindquarters, a rare occurrence, while its front legs stood on the ground, supporting the weight of the body. The animal is represented frontally positioned, but its head turns slightly to the right. The cat is rendered with great realism and skill : the sculptor worked large surfaces where the anatomical details are marked by very fine carving of forms (especially for the rendering of the muscles and the muzzle) and by numerous incisions (the mane, the hide, the eyes, etc.). An impressive mane covers the neck and head and frames the circular muzzle, the curls being irregular and asymmetrical ; some other locks are sculpted in low relief on the paws and on the shoulders. The power of the animal is well displayed in the precision of the modeling and highlighted by the bone structure of the skull. The skin of the muzzle is wrinkled in many folds that accentuate the aggressive expression of the wild cat ; as indicated by the open mouth, it was probably in the midst of a roar. In Greek iconography, the lion was introduced from the Orient, since from the Classical Period onward, there were no lions living in Greece. Along with the horse, the lion is one of the favorite subjects of Greek art : in all periods, the iconography is rich in lions, whether in painting (ceramics) or sculpture (bronze, terracotta, stone). They appeared in relation to different gods or heroes in the most famous myths (see, for example, Herakles and the Nemean Lion, etc.). Typologically, Greek art had four principal types of lion statues : standing lions, reclining lions, lions about to pounce, and in the rarest circumstances, sitting lions, such as this example. Lions can represent majesty, ferocity and courage, but also the wildness of nature, with all its elements that cannot be controlled by man. In the Hellenistic world, statues of lions were regularly associated with funerary monuments : posed on the tomb or sculpted in relief on a stele, the lion became a guardian, a figural and apotropaic protector (who chased away evil spirits) but also, more concretely, to prevent tomb robbers. Funerary monuments guarded by lions were found throughout the Greek world : from Tarentum to Attica, from Boeotia to Asia Minor. Among these, one can cite examples from the “Tomb of the Lions” at Didyma, the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus or the monument at Amphipolis.

Le lion était probablement assis sur ses pattes postérieures, tandis que les pattes antérieures étaient tendues vers le sol et soutenaient le poids du corps. L’animal est représenté droit et son regard se dirige vers l’avant, mais sa tête pivote légèrement vers la droite. Le fauve est rendu avec beaucoup de réalisme et d’adresse : le sculpteur a travaillé des grandes surfaces où les détails anatomiques sont marqués par un fin travail plastique (surtout pour le rendu des muscles et du museau) et par de nombreuses incisions (crinière, pelage, yeux, etc.). Une imposante crinière recouvre le cou et la tête et encadre le museau circulaire, les mèches sont irrégulières et asymétriques ; d’autres poils sont sculptés en léger relief sur les pattes et sur les épaules. La puissance de l’animal est bien décrite par le modelage précis et insisté de la structure osseuse du crâne. La peau du museau présente beaucoup de plis, qui accentuent l’expression agressive du fauve ; comme l’indique la gueule ouverte, il est probablement prêt à pousser un rugissement. Dans l’iconographie grecque, ce fauve est introduit de l’Orient, puisqu’au premier millénaire av. J.-C. plus aucun lion ne vivait en Grèce. Avec le cheval, le lion est un des sujets favoris de l’art grec : à toute époque, l’iconographie est très riche en lions, que ce soit dans la peinture (céramique) ou dans la sculpture (bronze, terre cuite, pierre). Ils apparaissent en relation avec différents dieux ou héros dans des mythes très connus (voir par exemple Hérakles et le lion de Némée, etc.). Typologiquement l’art grec a connu 4 types principaux de statues de lions : les lions debout, les lions couchés, les lions prêts à bondir et les lions assis, comme l’exemplaire en examen. Le lion peut représenter la majesté, la férocité, le courage mais aussi la nature sauvage, avec tous ses éléments indomptables pour l’homme. Dans le monde hellénique, les statues de lions sont régulièrement associées aux monuments funéraires : posé sur la tombe ou sculpté en relief sur une stèle, le lion en devient le gardien, avec une valeur figurée et apotropaïque (qui éloigne les mauvais esprits) mais aussi plus concrète, pour empêcher les pilleurs d’agir. Des monuments funéraires gardés par des lions se retrouvent dans tout le monde grec : de Tarente à l’Attique, de la Béotie à l’Asie Mineure. Parmi ceux-ci on peut citer par exemple la «tombe des lions» à Didyme, le Mausolée d’Halicarnasse ou le monument d’Amphipolis.

PROVENANCE Ex-German private collection.

PUBLISHED

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière allemande.

IN

Christie’s Antiquities, New York, 5-6 December 2001, lot 502.

PUBLIÉ

DANS

Christie’s Antiquities, New York, 5-6 décembre 2001, n. 502.

BIBLIOGRAPHY On lions, see : BERGER E. and al., Antike Bildwerke der Sammlung Ludwig, Bâle, 1990, p. 233, n. 239. BOL P.C. and al., Liebighaus - Museum alter Plastik, Antike Bildwerke I, 1983, p. 41ss, n. 12. In Pursuit of the Absolute, Art of the Ancient World, The G. Ortiz Collection, London, 1996, n. 160. RICHTER G. M. A., Animals in Greek Sculpture, Oxford, 1930, pp. 3ss. VEDDER U., Untersuchungen zur plastischen Ausstattung attischer Grabanlagen des 4. Jhs. vor Chr., Frankfort, 1985, p. 115ss. VERMEULE C., Greek Funerary Animals, 450-300 B.C. in American Journal of Archaeology, 76, 1972, p. 50 ss.

146

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Sur les lions, v. : BERGER E. et al., Antike Bildwerke der Sammlung Ludwig, Bâle, 1990, p. 233, n. 239. BOL P.C. et al., Liebighaus - Museum alter Plastik, Antike Bildwerke I, 1983, pp. 41ss, n. 12. In Pursuit of the Absolute, Art of the Ancient World, The G. Ortiz Collection, Londres, 1996, n. 160. RICHTER G. M. A., Animals in Greek Sculpture, Oxford, 1930, pp. 3ss. VEDDER U., Untersuchungen zur plastischen Ausstattung attischer Grabanlagen des 4. Jhs. vor Chr., Francfort, 1985, pp. 115ss. VERMEULE C., Greek Funerary Animals, 450-300 B.C. dans American Journal of Archaeology, 76, 1972, pp. 50 ss.

147


36. A STONE SEAL AMULET IN THE SHAPE OF A LION’S HEAD

36. SCEAUAMULETTE EN PIERRE MODELÉ EN FORME DE PROTOMÉ DE LION

Protosumerian, Jemdet Nasr Period, ca. 3000 B.C. L: 5 cm

Art protosumérien (Djemdet Nasr), vers 3000 av. J.-C. L: 5 cm

This seal amulet is in the shape of a lion’s head ; it is pierced vertically to accommodate a cord for suspension. The right side of the lion’s head is perfectly rendered with a three-dimensional representation of the animal while the back is flat. The simple, linear features coupled with naturalistic anatomical details are among the principal characteristics of animal representations during the Jemdet Nasr Period. In the case of this piece, the structure of the lion’s skull is solidly carved, and the eye socket is filled with a bitumen disc with a pupil in white stone (?). The ears are prominent, the mouth is half-open, the jaws and the folds of skin are incised ; the mane frames the muzzle in a hemispherical mass unmarked by details. Geometric shapes, that may represent four seated animals with long tails (a wild cat ?), decorate the flat surface of the back of the seal : their bodies, probably engraved with a type of drill, consist of a set of hollows of different diameters grouped together ; linear features indicate their legs and tails. This object belongs to a well-known type of seal from the late 4th millennium, which is known from Mesopotamia and all over the Elamite world ; they are sometimes considered amulets. They are carved in the shape of animals or of parts of animals, and their eyes are often inlaid. With their plastic forms, they contrast with the rather stylized and abstract engraved decoration, which is the true seal. Among the common figures, one especially sees domesticated animals like sitting bulls and rams, but also birds of prey, monkeys, wild boars, hares, lion’s heads, etc.

Ce cachet-amulette, percé verticalement par un trou où passait la ficelle de suspension, est taillé en forme de demi-protomé de lion : le côté droit de la tête du fauve est parfaitement rendu en trois dimensions, tandis que l’arrière est plat. Les traits linéaires et simples, couplés à un rendu précis et détaillé de l’anatomie, sont une des caractéristiques principales des représentations d’animaux à l’époque de Djemdet Nasr : ici, par exemple, la structure du crâne du fauve est solidement sculptée, le bulbe oculaire est rempli d’une rondelle en bitume avec la pupille en pierre blanche (?), les oreilles sont proéminentes, la gueule est entrouverte, les babines et les plis de la peau sont incisés ; la crinière encadre le museau comme une masse hémisphérique et sans détails. Des signes géométriques reproduisant probablement quatre animaux assis avec une longue queue (des fauves ?) ornent la surface plate au dos du sceau : leurs corps, gravés probablement avec un instrument comparable à la bouterolle, sont un ensemble de coupelles de différents diamètres que le graveur a sommairement rassemblées ; des traits linéaires indiquent les pattes et les queues de ces animaux. Cette pièce appartient à une classe bien connue de cachets de la fin du IVe millénaire, qui sont attestés dans toute la Mésopotamie et dans le monde élamite et auxquels on attribue parfois une valeur de talisman : ils sont taillés en forme d’animal ou de partie d’animal, souvent avec les yeux incrustés. Leur traitement plastique contraste avec le rendu stylisé et abstrait du décor gravé qui constitue le véritable sceau. Parmi les figures les plus fréquentes on dénombre surtout des animaux domestiques, comme des taureaux et des caprinés assis, mais on trouve aussi des oiseaux de proie, des singes, des sangliers, des lièvres, des têtes de lions, etc.

PROVENANCE Acquired on the European Art Market in 2001.

PROVENANCE

BIBLIOGRAPHY Animaux d’art et d’histoire, Bestiaire des collections genevoises, Geneva, 2000, p. 195, n. 21. POPE A.U., A Survey of Persian Art, From Prehistoric Times to the Present, Vol. IV, Oxford, 1938, pl. 75, c. REHM E., Kykladen und alter Orient, Bestandskatalog des Badischen Landesmuseums Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, 1997, p. 110, M18, pl. 46. Schaetze aus dem Irak, Von der Frühzeit bis zum Islam, Cologne, 1964, n. 36. On this type of seal-amulet, see : AMIET P., La glyptique mésopotamienne archaïque, Paris, 1980, p. 24, pl. 8. JAKOB-ROST L. and al., Die Stempelsiegel im vorderasiatischen Museum Berlin, Mainz on Rhine, 1997, p. 12ss.

148

Acquis sur le marché d’art européen en 2001.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Animaux d’art et d’histoire, Bestiaire des collections genevoises, Genève, 2000, p. 195, n. 21. POPE A.U., A Survey of Persian Art, From Prehistoric Times to the Present, Vol. IV, Oxford, 1938, pl. 75, c. REHM E., Kykladen und alter Orient, Bestandskatalog des Badischen Landesmuseums Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, 1997, p. 110, M18, pl. 46. Schaetze aus dem Irak, Von der Frühzeit bis zum Islam, Cologne, 1964, n. 36. Sur ce type de sceau-amulette, v. : AMIET P., La glyptique mésopotamienne archaïque, Paris, 1980, p. 24, pl. 8. JAKOB-ROST L. et al., Die Stempelsiegel im vorderasiatischen Museum Berlin, Mayence/Rhin, 1997, p. 12ss.

149


37. A GOLD PLAQUE

37. PLAQUETTE EN OR

Greek, 4th or early 3rd century B.C. D: 2.9 x 2.9 cm

Art grec, IVe ou début du IIIe s. av. J.-C. Dim: 2.9 x 2.9 cm

The plaque was hammered from a small square gold sheet onto which a refined decoration of goldwork was soldered : granulated wires, twisted wires and plain wires form a frieze of small squares that might have been adorned with glass paste or polychromatic enamel, now gone. Enclosed within these geometrical motifs is a circular medallion of a youthful human head with wavy, richly detailed locks that seem to float in the wind : unfortunately no other attributes allow us to identify this figure with its square face and pointy chin ; the neck is furrowed with horizontal folds called “rings of Venus”. The eyes were inlaid with semi-precious stones or enamel. At the back, two small, nearly flat suspension rings are soldered vertically onto the smooth surface of the sheet gold : this plaque thus served as an adornment for a garment or, more probably, as an element of a horse’s trappings. Comparison with similar objects found in Thracian tumuli (in modern day Bulgaria) is very instructive in this sense : the excavators think that this kind of adornment could have decorated horses’ pectorals or the foreheads of bridles. Contemporary Thracian iconography (wall paintings, goldwork) may confirm this hypothesis.

La plaquette a été martelée dans une petite feuille d’or carrée sur laquelle une riche décoration d’orfèvrerie a été soudée : fils en granulation, fils torsadés, fils lisses formant une frise de petits carrés peut-être ornés de pâte de verre ou d’émail polychrome, aujourd’hui disparu. A l’intérieur de ces motifs géométriques, il y a un médaillon circulaire orné d’une tête humaine, très juvénile, portant une chevelure ondulée et richement détaillée, avec des mèches incisées qui semblent flotter au vent : malheureusement aucun attribut ne permet d’identifier ce personnage au visage carré et au menton pointu ; son cou est sillonné de quelques lignes horizontales que l’on nomme des «anneaux de Vénus». Les yeux de cette figure étaient rapportés en pierre semi-précieuse ou faits en émail. A l’arrière, deux petites bélières presque plates sont soudées verticalement sur la surface lisse de la feuille : cette plaquette servait donc d’applique pour orner un tissu ou, plus probablement, des éléments de l’harnachement d’un cheval. La comparaison avec des objets similaires trouvés dans les tumuli thraces (dans l’actuelle Bulgarie) est très instructive dans ce sens : les fouilleurs pensent que ce genre de décoration pouvait orner le pectoral ou les brides sur le front des chevaux. L’iconographie thrace contemporaine (peintures murales, orfèvrerie) confirme cette hypothèse.

PROVENANCE Ex-Neil F. Phillips Collection, Canada.

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection Neil F. Phillips, Canada.

BIBLIOGRAPHY Ancient Gold : The Wealth of the Thracians, Treasures from the Republic of Bulgaria, New York, 1998, p. 120, n. 40 (Kravelo’s gold plaques) ; pp. 160-171, n. 90-101 (Letnitsa’s silver gilt plaques). REHO M. - ILIEVA P., Thracian Treasures from Bulgaria, Sofia, 2006, pp. 68-69. On the iconography, see : REHO M. - ILIEVA P., Thracian Treasures from Bulgaria, Sofia, 2006, pp. 56-57 (wall painting), pp. 126-127 and 139-141 (metal vessels).

38. AN ALABASTER FIGURINE OF A BOVID

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Ancient Gold : The Wealth of the Thracians, Treasures from the Republic of Bulgaria, New York, 1998, p. 120, n. 40 (plaquettes en or de Kralevo) ; pp. 160-171, n. 90-101 (plaquettes en argent doré de Letnitsa). REHO M. - ILIEVA P., Thracian Treasures from Bulgaria, Sofia, 2006, pp. 68-69. Pour l’iconographie, v. : REHO M. - ILIEVA P., Thracian Treasures from Bulgaria, Sofia, 2006, pp. 56-57 (peinture murale), pp. 126-127 et 139-141 (vases en metal).

38. FIGURINE DE BOVIDÉ EN ALBÂTRE

Syrian (Habuba Kabira or Tell Brak), late Neolithic, ca. 3300 - 3000 B.C. L: 12.1 cm

Art syrien (Habuba Kabira ou Tell Brak), fin du néolithique, (environ 3300 - 3000 av. J.-C.) L: 12.1 cm

The sculpture is nearly intact ; the smooth surface shows the many tool marks left by the artist while carving. Under the belly, there is a cylindrical hole, probably ancient, which was used to fix the statuette to its pedestal. The carver represented the quadruped with simple and expressive features : hooked horns, a short muzzle and a squat, cylindrical body are enough to easily identify the species that the statuette represents. Rounded volumes (legs, shoulders) and incisions or ridges (see the muzzle with the ears, the eyes, the nostrils and the mouth, as well as the hooves and the tail) indicate the anatomical details. This piece finds its originality and strength in its linear and precise, though naive, shapes. It does not seem to have precise parallels in Near Eastern sculpture, except for figurines or receptacles in the shape of animals, generally representing rams - domesticated earlier than the bovids - or other species, like rabbits, hedgehogs, birds, etc. This figure was found as part of an important set of alabaster objects, including four containers with lug handles, a well known type, and eye idols : this could indicate that the animal belonged to a funerary setting or was dedicated as an ex-voto in a sanctuary. The stylistic and formal simplicity of the statuette certainly attracts the eye of the modern spectator.

La sculpture est pratiquement intacte ; la surface lisse présente de nombreuses traces des outils utilisés par le sculpteur. Sous le ventre, il y a un trou cylindrique très probablement antique, qui devait servir pour fixer la statuette à son socle. Des moyens expressifs très simples ont suffi au sculpteur pour représenter un quadrupède : les cornes en crochet, le museau tronqué, le corps cylindrique et trapu sont autant de caractéristiques qui permettent de comprendre à quelle espèce appartient cet animal. Par ailleurs, de nombreux autres détails anatomiques sont clairement indiqués soit par un léger modelage (cuisses, épaules) soit par des incisions ou par des arêtes, comme sur le museau (oreilles, yeux, narines, bouche), pour les sabots ou pour la queue. Les formes linéaires et précises mais en même temps un peu naïves font toute l’originalité et toute la force de cette pièce, qui n’a pas de vrais parallèles dans le panorama de la sculpture néolithique proche-orientale, hormis des figurines ou des récipients en forme d’animaux, qui représentent le plus souvent des caprinés - animaux que l’homme a domestiqués bien plus tôt que les bovins - ou d’autres espèces, comme des lapins, des hérissons, des oiseaux, etc. Cette figure a été trouvée avec un important ensemble d’objets en albâtre, comprenant quatre récipients avec anses en forme de tenon d’un type bien connu et des idoles à yeux : ceci pourrait indiquer que cet animal appartenait à un mobilier funéraire ou qu’il avait été dédié dans un sanctuaire comme ex-voto. C’est certainement aussi la simplicité formelle et stylistique de cette statuette qui attire l’œil du spectateur moderne.

PROVENANCE Ex-American private collection 1980-1990.

PROVENANCE

BIBLIOGRAPHY AMIET P., Art of the Ancient Near East, New York, 1980, p. 352, n. 190-192. FORTIN M., Syrie, Terre de civilisations, Montreal, 1999, p. 177, n. 105-106. HARPER P.O. (ed.), The Royal City of Susa, Ancient Near Eastern Treasures in the Louvre, New York, 1992, p. 32-33, 36, n. 1-2, 4-5. KEEL O. - STÄUBLI T., Les animaux du 6ème jour, Freibourg, 2001, p. 30, n. 2.

150

Ancienne collection particulière américaine, années 1980-1990.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE AMIET P., Art of the Ancient Near East, New York, 1980, p. 352, n. 190-192. FORTIN M., Syrie, Terre de civilisations, Montréal, 1999, p. 177, n. 105-106. HARPER P.O. (éd.), The Royal City of Susa, Ancient Near Eastern Treasures in the Louvre, New York, 1992, pp. 32-33, 36, n. 1-2, 4-5. KEEL O. - STÄUBLI T., Les animaux du 6ème jour, Fribourg, 2001, p. 30, n. 2.

151


39. A LARGE CYCLADIC MARBLE PLATE

39. GRAND PLAT CYCLADIQUE EN MARBRE

Cycladic, middle of the 3rd millennium B.C. D: 38.7 cm

Art cycladique, milieu du IIIe mill. av. J.-C. D: 38.7 cm

This piece is remarkable for its size, which is well above average (the diameter is usually about 15-20 cm), and its excellent state of preservation ; it was carved from a white marble block with gray veins and grayish-black spots on the interior. The external profile is convex and even and a slight groove underlines the horizontal, rounded edge. The bottom of the plate presents a wide depression, which forms the base and balances the piece. The interior edge stills shows traces of tool marks from the carving of the vessel. Owing to its precise, fine shape, as well as its depth, this plate is an outstanding example of its type. Along with kandiles, low, wide plates - which resemble modern fruit platters- are one of the most distinctive forms of Cycladic vessels. The purpose of these plates is unclear, but most of the examples whose provenance is known were found in necropoleis, often along with marble figurines ; this might suggest that they could have served as cult vessels during funerary banquets.

Les dimensions, qui sont bien supérieures à la moyenne (env. 15-20 cm de diamètre) et l’excellent état de conservation font de ce plat une pièce extraordinaire ; il a été sculpté dans un bloc de marbre blanc qui présente quelques veinures grises et des taches gris-noir à l’intérieur. Le profil extérieur est convexe et régulier, et le bord horizontal et arrondi est souligné par un léger sillon creusé à l’intérieur. Pour mieux stabiliser l’équilibre de la pièce, le fond du plat présente une petite dépression, dans laquelle le marbrier a creusé un léger disque. A l’intérieur, il reste des traces de frottement, laissées lors de la fabrication du récipient. La précision et la finesse de la forme ainsi que sa profondeur font de ce plat une pièce d’une qualité difficilement égalable. Avec les kandiles, les plats bas et larges - qui rappellent nos plats à fruits - sont une des formes les plus caractéristiques de la vaisselle cycladique en pierre. Il est malheureusement impossible d’en connaître l’utilisation précise, mais la plupart des exemplaires dont la provenance est connue ont été trouvés dans des nécropoles, souvent en association avec des figurines en marbre ; ils faisaient peut-être partie de la vaisselle rituelle utilisée lors des banquets funéraires.

PROVENANCE Sotheby’s London, July 8th 1993, n. 179.

BIBLIOGRAPHY GETZ-GENTLE P., Stone Vessels of the Cyclades in the Early Bronze Age, Madison (Wisconsin), 1996. THIMME J.(ed.), Art and Culture of the Cyclades, Karlsruhe, 1976, pp. 318-319, fig. 295-305 (for the dimensions, see especially n. 303).

PROVENANCE Sotheby’s Londres, 8 juillet 1993, n. 179.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE GETZ-GENTLE P., Stone Vessels of the Cyclades in the Early Bronze Age, Madison (Wisconsin), 1996. THIMME J.(éd.), Art and Culture of the Cyclades, Karlsruhe, 1976, pp. 318-319, fig. 295-305 (cf. surtout n. 303 pour les dimensions).

40. A MARBLE GROUP WITH PRIAPUS AND A MAENAD

40. PETIT GROUPE EN MARBRE AVEC PRIAPE ET MÉNADE

Roman, 1st - 2nd century A.D. H: 13.4 cm

Art romain, Ier - IIe s. ap. J.-C. Ht: 13.4 cm

The group is carved from a small block of white marble with a yellowish tint. It is composed of two figures ; in spite of the many breaks (the heads, the hands and the lower parts of both bodies are lost), the carving is careful and precise, as if it were the work of a carver of semiprecious stones : the posture of the figures is graceful and natural, and the rendering of the drapery is very fine. The man and the woman look youthful ; they are standing upright and holding each other in their arms. The male figure is draped in long a himation (the garment covers the back, the side and the right arm, and goes up towards the left shoulder) ; his left arm rests on the woman’s shoulders, while she passes her right arm under the shoulder of her companion and places her hand on his back. She wears a chiton casually open on her chest ; between the two figures, one sees an animal’s head, which belongs to a panther skin that the maenad wears over her chiton. This group represents two well-known figures from Greek mythology : the man is Priapus, a god from the Asian city of Lampsacus, while the woman is a maenad. A son of Dionysus and Aphrodite, Priapus is a divinity related to fertility, especially of vineyards and orchards : he is generally represented as a bearded and ithyphallic man. Regarding his relationship with vegetation, he was part of the Dionysiac procession, especially since he resembles a satyr or Silenus. Therefore, his presence beside a maenad is not surprising. The existence of similar examples supports the identification of these figures, in particular another fragmentary group with the bearded head of the god now in the National Museum of Athens. According to the experts, the original piece might date back to the Hellenistic Period (2nd century B.C. ?).

Le groupe est taillé dans un petit bloc de marbre blanc aux reflets jaunes ; il est composé de deux personnages qui, malgré les nombreuses mutilations actuelles (les têtes, les mains et le bas des corps sont perdus), ont été sculptés avec soin et précision, presque comme s’il s’agissait d’un travail de tailleur de pierre semi-précieuses : la position des deux figures est souple et naturelle, le rendu des draperies est minutieux. Deux personnages debout, un homme et une femme adultes mais apparemment jeunes, sont en train de s’enlacer : la figure masculine (drapée dans un long himation qui couvre son dos, son flanc et le bras droit avant de remonter vers l’épaule gauche) pose son bras gauche sur les épaules de la femme, qui passe son bras droit sous l’épaule de son acolyte et pose sa main sur le fond de son dos. Elle est habillée d’un chiton, qui laisse une partie de sa poitrine négligemment découverte ; entre les deux figures on voit une tête d’animal qui appartient à une peau de panthère que la ménade porte au-dessus du chiton. Ce groupe représente deux personnages bien connus de la mythologie grecque : l’homme est Priape, dieu originaire de la ville asiatique de Lampsaque, tandis que la femme est une ménade. Fils de Dionysos et d’Aphrodite, Priape est une divinité préposée à la fertilité, en particulier aux vignobles et aux vergers : on le représentait le plus souvent comme un homme barbu et ithyphallique. En tant que dieu préposé à la végétation, il était inclus dans le cortège dionysiaque, d’autant plus que son aspect rappelle celui d’un satyre ou de Silène : sa présence à côté d’une ménade n’est donc pas étonnante. L’identification de cette pièce est assurée par l’existence de quelques répliques, en particulier d’un autre groupe fragmentaire du musée National d’Athènes, qui conserve la tête barbue du dieu. D’après les spécialistes, l’original de cette composition remontait certainement à l’époque hellénistique (IIe s. av. J.-C. ?).

PROVENANCE Ex-Denyse Bérend Collection, Paris and London.

PROVENANCE Ancienne collection particulière de Madame Denyse Bérend, Paris et Londres.

BIBLIOGRAPHY COMSTOCK M. B. - VERMEULE C.C., Sculpture in Stone, The Greek, Roman and Etruscan Collections of the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, Boston, 1976, p. 127, n. 196. On Priapus, see : Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. VIII Suppl., Zurich. 1997, s.v. Priapos, p. 1028 ss. (see n. 110).

152

BIBLIOGRAPHIE COMSTOCK M. B. - VERMEULE C.C., Sculpture in Stone, The Greek, Roman and Etruscan Collections of the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, Boston, 1976, p. 127, n. 196. Sur Priape v. : Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. VIII Suppl., Zürich. 1997, s.v. Priapos, pp. 1028 ss. (cf. n. 110).

153


41. A MARBLE PORTRAIT OF A ROMAN MAN

41. PORTRAIT D’UN HOMME ROMAIN EN MARBRE

Roman, ca. 240-270 A.D. H: 26.5 cm

Art romain, vers 240-270 ap. J.-C. Ht 26.5 cm.

A life-size individual portrait of an adult man with distinctive features : the forehead and the upper part of his nose show wrinkles, the right eyebrow is raised, the cheeks are slightly hollow and his gaze is asymmetrical. The head, broken at the nape of the neck, is in a very good state of preservation ; only superficial chips are lost. The upper part of a support pillar, carved in a single piece as part of the figure, appears behind the head between the neck and the nape : this element, which was also used to reinforce the fragile parts of stone statues, is frequently seen in portraits from Asia Minor and the Near East and was regularly attested to as far back as the 3rd century A.D. The intent glance and the severe expression of the figure characterize him as a determined man, probably familiar with commanding and ordering : he might have been a military chief or a senior official as part of the Imperial administration. The head is oval but elongated with precise contours and finely carved features that are slightly stylized. The eyes look slightly towards the right ; the iris is incised as a crescent moon shape with a circular engraved pupil. Hair covers the rounded skull and is fairly flat ; in the same way, the beard, the moustache and the eyebrows are carved onto the face, without any sort of modeling. The hair and beard are treated in a similar way : small, irregular incisions furrow the surface of the marble. This head is a representation of a private citizen and can be dated to between the late 2nd and the 3rd quarter of the 3rd century A.D. (the period of the emperor-generals). At that time, the Empire was experiencing grave political and military instability and was governed by a series of army generals who were often appointed emperor by their troops but were subsequently assassinated by rival groups. Realistic portraits of men dated from this period take on a similarly military, strict character. Whether of an emperor or political leader, the first function of a portrait was to represent the soldier within the man.

Il s’agit du portrait individuel et grandeur nature d’un homme adulte au visage très typé : son front et le haut de son nez sont ridés, le sourcil droit est surélevé, les joues sont légèrement creuses et son regard est asymétrique. La tête, qui est cassée au niveau du cou, est dans un très bon état ; seuls quelques éclats superficiels sont perdus. La partie supérieure d’un pilier de soutien, sculpté d’un seul tenant avec la figure, est bien visible derrière la tête, entre le cou et la nuque : cet élément, qui servait également pour renforcer les statues en pierre à un endroit particulièrement fragile, est fréquent surtout dans les portraits exécutés en Asie Mineure et au Proche-Orient. Il est régulièrement attesté à partir du IIIe s. de notre ère. Le regard fixe et l’expression sévère de ce personnage contribuent à le caractériser comme un homme résolu, qui avait probablement l’habitude de commander et de diriger : peut-être s’agissait-il d’un chef militaire ou d’un haut fonctionnaire de l’administration impériale. La tête, de forme ovale mais allongée, a un contour précis et des traits nets mais un peu stylisés. Les yeux regardent légèrement vers la droite ; l’iris est incisé en forme de croissant de lune avec la pupille circulaire gravée. La chevelure, dont le contour suit la forme arrondie du crâne comme un tapis à peine en relief, manque de volume ; de même, la barbe, la moustache et les sourcils sont taillés directement dans la surface du visage, sans aucune forme de modelage. Le traitement des mèches de la chevelure et de la barbe est identique : des petits traits incisés et rapprochés sillonnent minutieusement mais irrégulièrement la surface du marbre. Cette tête - qui représente un citoyen privé - date de la période dite des empereurs-soldats et est à placer entre la fin du deuxième et le troisième quart du IIIe siècle ap. J.-C. A cette époque l’Empire, qui connaissait une grande instabilité politique et militaire, a été gouverné par de nombreux généraux de l’armée souvent nommés empereur par leurs troupes, mais aussitôt assassinés par des factions rivales. Le caractère rigide et militaire de cette époque se reflète dans le style réaliste et essentiel des portraits masculins, dont les traits sont souvent exagérés ; même lorsqu’il s’agit d’un empereur, l’image représente avant tout un soldat plutôt qu’un homme politique.

PROVENANCE Ex-French private collection.

PUBLISHED

IN

PROVENANCE

Sotheby’s Antiquities, New York, 13 june 1996, n. 89.

Ancienne collection particulière française.

BIBLIOGRAPHY On Roman portraits of the 3rd century A.D., see : BERGMANN M., Studien zum römischen Porträt des 3. Jahrhunderts n. Chr., Bonn, 1977. Some similar heads : INAN J. - ROSENBAUM E., Roman and Early Byzantine Portrait Sculpture in Asia Minor, London, 1966, n. 89, p. 99 ; n. 236, p. 176 ; n. 252, p. 186. INAN J. - ALFÖLDI-ROSENBAUM E., Römische und frühbyzantinische Porträtplastik aus der Türkei, Mainz on Rhine, 1979, n. 336, p. 336. JOHANSEN F., Catalogue Roman Portraits III, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, 1995, p. 120-121, n. 49. On the support in the back, see : BERGMANN M. in BERGER E. (ed.), Antike Kunstwerke aus der Sammlung Ludwig, vol. III : Skulpturen, Basel, p. 383, 387 and pl. 44, 45.

154

PUBLIÉ

DANS

Sotheby’s Antiquities, New York, 13 juin 1996, n. 89.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Sur les portraits romains du IIIe s. ap. J.-C., cf. : BERGMANN M., Studien zum römischen Porträt des 3. Jahrhunderts n. Chr., Bonn, 1977. Quelques têtes comparables : INAN J. - ROSENBAUM E., Roman and Early Byzantine Portrait Sculpture in Asia Minor, Londres, 1966, n. 89, p. 99 ; n. 236, p. 176 ; n. 252, p. 186. INAN J. - ALFÖLDI-ROSENBAUM E., Römische und frühbyzantinische Porträtplastik aus der Türkei, Mayence/Rhin, 1979, n. 336, p. 336. JOHANSEN F., Catalogue Roman Portraits III, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhague, 1995, p. 120-121, n. 49. Pour la bosse dans le dos, v. : BERGMANN M. in BERGER E. (éd.), Antike Kunstwerke aus der Sammlung Ludwig, vol. III : Skulpturen, Bâle, pp. 383, 387 et pl. 44, 45.

155


42. A MARBLE STATUETTE OF APHRODITE

42. STATUETTE D’APHRODITE EN MARBRE

Roman, 1st – 2nd century A.D. H: 69 cm

Art romain, Ier - IIe s. ap. J.-C. Ht: 69 cm

The statuette, whose scale is a bit under half life size, represents a young standing woman who is completely nude. Her body has a sinuous profile with sensual curves and rounded forms : the smooth, fine modeling is dominated by large surfaces and full volumes. The young woman can certainly be identified as Aphrodite, one of the most famous and most widely represented goddesses from Greek art, especially at the end of the Hellenistic period and in Roman art. The head of the statue would have been slightly turned to the left ; some locks of hair are still visible on the shoulders. The right leg is slightly bent while the left leg supports the weight of the body ; this posture creates a graceful swaying of the hips that the sculptor took full advantage of, especially in the rear view. The right arm, broken above the elbow, is bent and partially covers Aphrodite’s chest from the gaze of the observer ; the left, preserved nearly to the wrist, descends diagonally with the hand passing in front of the pubic triangle of the goddess, hiding it. To the right of the young woman appears a support whose contours correspond to a figure of a vertically positioned dolphin ; the sea mammal, whose snout rests on a boulder, is tamed and ridden by a winged Eros, who holds onto its dorsal fin (dolphins were among the favorite animals of these gods). The pose of this Aphrodite, who hides her private parts as well as her breasts, corresponds to a type known as the “Aphrodite pudique” or “modest Aphrodite”. This gesture appears during the middle of the 4th century B.C. with the Aphrodite of Cnidos, one of the most famous works of Praxiteles. As indicated by ancient sources, (Pliny, Nat. Hist. 36, 20), the Praxitelian Aphrodite was the first entirely nude image of the goddess : this was an important iconographical innovation, one that would influence many of his contemporaries. Following this “invention”, other images of nude Aphrodite were created during the Hellenistic Period, as seen by the copies, which the wealthy Romans of the Imperial Period commissioned to ornament their villas and gardens, a practice that continued up to modern times. Among these, it is necessary to mention the two principal types that repeat this modest pose : the Capitoline Aphrodite and the Medici Aphrodite, which differ from each other in the formal details. This statuette, which is a very high quality copy, undoubtedly belongs to this series, and even combines traits of one (the hairstyle and the position of the feet of the Capitoline Aphrodite) with the other (the elongated proportions and the presence of the dolphin of the Medici statue).

La statuette, dont la grandeur devait dépasser de peu la moitié de la taille naturelle, représente une jeune femme debout, entièrement nue. Son corps a un profil sinueux, avec des courbes sensuelles et des formes arrondies : le modelage, doux et fin, est dominé par des larges surfaces aux volumes éclatants. La jeune femme doit certainement être identifiée avec Aphrodite, qui est l’une des déesses les plus célèbres et les plus représentées de l’art grec, surtout à partir de l’époque hellénistique, et de l’art romain. La tête de la statue était légèrement tournée vers la gauche ; quelques mèches de la chevelure sont encore visibles sur les deux épaules. La jambe droite était à peine pliée tandis que la gauche soutenait tout le poids du corps ; cette attitude crée un gracieux déhanchement que le sculpteur a bien su exprimer, surtout dans la vue arrière. Le bras droit, cassé avant le coude, était plié et couvrait partiellement la poitrine d’Aphrodite à la vue du spectateur ; le gauche, conservé presque jusqu’au poignet, descendait en diagonale, avec la main qui passait devant le pubis de la déesse, en le cachant. A droite la jeune femme s’appuie à un tronc dont le contour se confond avec une figure de dauphin dressé verticalement ; le mammifère, dont le museau est posé sur un rocher, est dompté et chevauché par Eros ailé, qui se tient à sa nageoire dorsale (les dauphins sont parmi les animaux favoris de ces deux divinités). L’attitude de cette d’Aphrodite, qui se cache les parties génitales ainsi que le sein, correspond à la définition du type appelé «Aphrodite pudique». Ce geste apparaît déjà au milieu du IVe s. av. J.-C. dans l’Aphrodite de Cnide, une des oeuvres les plus célèbres de Praxitèle. Comme l’indiquent aussi les sources antiques (Pline, Nat. Hist. 36, 20), l’Aphrodite de Praxitèle fut la première image entièrement nue de la divinité : il s’agissait d’une importante nouveauté iconographique, qui a étonné un grand nombre de contemporains. A la suite de cette «invention» d’autres images d’Aphrodite nue ont été exécutées pendant l’hellénisme, comme en témoignent les copies, que les riches romains de l’époque impériale ont commanditées pour orner leurs villas et leurs jardins et qui sont arrivées jusqu’à l’époque moderne. Parmi celles-ci, il faut mentionner les deux principaux types qui répètent la même attitude pudique : l’Aphrodite du Capitole et l’Aphrodite Medici, qui diffèrent uniquement par des détails formels. La statuette en examen, qui est une copie d’un très bon niveau, appartient incontestablement à cette série, puisqu’elle réunit des traits de l’une (la chevelure et la position des pieds de l’Aphrodite du Capitole) et de l’autre (les proportions plus élancées et la présence du dauphin pour la statue Medici).

PROVENANCE Ex-P. Lêvy Collection, France.

PROVENANCE

PUBLISHED

Ancienne collection P. Lévy, France.

Hôtel Drouot, 4-5 May 1965 (Expert Maître Albinet - André la Veel), no. 97.

PUBLIÉ

BIBLIOGRAPHY BRINKERHOFF D.M., Hellenistic Statues of Aphrodite : Studies in the History of their Stylistic Development, New York, 1978. Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. 2, Zurich, 1986, pp. 52-53, n. 409-421 ; pp. 61ss., n. 498ss. SMITH R.R.R., Hellenistic Sculpture, London, 1991, pp. 79-83.

156

DANS

Hôtel Drouot, 4-5 mai 1965 (Experts Maître Albinet - André la Veel), no. 97.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE BRINKERHOFF D.M., Hellenistic Statues of Aphrodite : Studies in the History of their Stylistic Development, New York, 1978. Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. 2, Zurich, 1986, pp. 52-53, n. 409-421 ; pp. 61ss., n. 498ss. SMITH R.R.R., Hellenistic Sculpture, Londres, 1991, pp. 79-83.

157


43. A MARBLE KORE

43. KORÉ EN MARBE

Greek, late 6th century - early 5th century B.C. H: 86 cm

Art grec, fin du VIe - début du Ve s. av. J.-C. Ht: 86 cm

This statue, slightly smaller than life-size, represents a standing young girl (a kore). She steps forward on her left foot, her right arm is bent and rests at the level of her stomach while the left one is outstretched along her side. Her small breasts indicate that she has barely passed puberty. In a caressing gesture, she holds a bird to her chest (probably a dove, Aphrodite’s sacred bird). The kore holds the bird in her right hand and seems to gently stroke its beak. She is dressed in the Ionian fashion with a himation (a cloak, probably out of wool, that covers the shoulders and drapes in half-circles in relief over the chest and back) worn over a long chiton in a thinner fabric (linen), as proven by the treatment of the thin, transparent pleats on the legs, revealing the contour of the knee. To aid herself in her walking, the kore raises a corner of her dress and holds it up with her left hand where it forms a large fold of drapery on the thigh before falling straight down. The back of the figure is divided in two by a long, thick fold of the chiton, probably purposefully arranged. The presence of the dove certainly reflects the strong, persistent relationship between children and animals : in Greek iconography, young girls holding birds (pigeons, quails, partridges, etc.) are also frequently seen on funerary steles. From a typological and stylistic point of view, this statue can be linked with the korai that have been found in Eastern Greece (Samos, Miletos and especially Didyma), as indicated by the general proportions, the young girl’s posture, her clothes, the rendering of the folds and the presence of the bird. Nevertheless the composition and form of this statue display the conventions of Archaic art ; it can thus be dated to the end of this period, to the late 6th, or even the early 5th century B.C.

De taille un peu plus petite que nature, cette statue représente une jeune fille debout (une koré). Elle avance la jambe gauche, son bras droit est plié et appuyé à la hauteur de l’estomac, alors que le gauche descend le long du flanc. Ses seins peu développés prouvent que son âge dépasse à peine la puberté. Dans un geste plein d’affection, la jeune fille serre contre sa poitrine un oiseau (il s’agit probablement d’une colombe, l’oiseau sacré d’Aphrodite). La koré tient le volatile dans sa main droite et, du pouce, elle semble caresser doucement son bec. Elle est habillée selon la mode ionienne, avec un himation (manteau probablement en laine qui couvre ses épaules et qui dessine des demi-cercles en relief sur la poitrine et sur le dos) porté sur un chiton long, en tissu plus fin (lin), comme l’indique le traitement transparent et léger des plis sur les jambes, qui laisse même deviner le contour des genoux. Pour faciliter sa marche, la jeune fille tient de la main gauche un coin de tissu, qui forme ainsi une large courbe sur la cuisse avant de descendre sur le côté. La partie postérieure de la figure est partagée en deux par un pli du chiton très épais et long, sans doute ajusté artificiellement. La présence de la colombe reflète certainement un rapport quotidien très fort et habituel des enfants avec les animaux : dans l’iconographie grecque, les représentations de jeunes filles tenant des oiseaux (pigeons, cailles, perdrix, etc.) sont fréquentes aussi sur des stèles funéraires. Typologiquement et stylistiquement, cette statue se rapproche de la série des koraï mises au jour en Grèce orientale (Samos, Milet et Didyme en particulier), comme l’indiquent les proportions générales et l’attitude de la jeune fille, son vêtement, le rendu des plis et la présence de l’oiseau. Chronologiquement, il faut placer cette statue, qui reste archaïque dans sa conception et dans sa forme, vers la fin de cette période, dans les dernières décennies du VIe s. ou même au tout début du Ve s. av. J.-C.

PROVENANCE Acquired on the German art market in 1999.

PROVENANCE

BIBLIOGRAPHIE On archaic sculpture in general, see : BOARDMANN J., Greek Sculpture : the Archaic Period, London, 1978. On the korai type, see especially : KARAKASI K., Archaischen Koren, Munich, 2001. RICHTER G.M.A., Korai, Archaic Greek Maidens, New York - London, 1982. On Ionian sculpture, several monographs exist, see especially : FREYER-SCHAUENBURG B., Samos XI : Bildwerke der archaischen Zeit und des strengen Stils, Berlin, 1974. RAMAZAN ÖZGAN M.A., Untersuchungen zur archaischen Plastik Ioniens, Berlin, 1978.

158

Acquis sur le marché d’art allemand en 1999.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Sur la sculpture archaïque en général, cf. : BOARDMANN J., Greek Sculpture : the Archaic Period, Londres, 1978. Sur le type des koraï, v. surtout : KARAKASI K., Archaischen Koren, Munich, 2001. RICHTER G.M.A., Korai, Archaic Greek Maidens, New York - Londres, 1982. Sur la sculpture ionienne, il existe plusieurs monographies, v. entre autres : FREYER-SCHAUENBURG B., Samos XI : Bildwerke der archaischen Zeit und des strengen Stils, Berlin, 1974. RAMAZAN ÖZGAN M.A., Untersuchungen zur archaischen Plastik Ioniens, Berlin, 1978.

159


44. AN ONYX CAMEO

44. CAMÉE EN ONYX

Roman, 2nd century A.D. H: 2.3 cm

Art romain, IIe s. ap. J.-C Ht: 2.3 cm

This cameo, carved from an elliptical onyx in two layers of white on black, was probably set in a ring or gold pendant. The white part of the stone represents an animal scene in high relief : a lion, turned towards the left, holds in its mouth the head (or the skull ?) of a bovid or caprid. The meaning of this scene, well known in Roman glyptic art of the early Imperial Period, is not clear. A horizontal line indicates the ground. This piece shows remarkable artistic finesse, especially in details that are only visible with the aid of a magnifying glass, an instrument that was invented much later, during the Middle Ages !

Ce camée, taillé dans un onyx elliptique au fond noir avec le motif en blanc, était probablement serti dans une bague ou dans un pendentif en or. La partie blanche de la pierre est taillée de façon à représenter une scène animalière en haut relief : un lion tourné vers la gauche tient dans sa gueule la tête (ou le crâne ?) d’un bovidé ou d’un capriné. La signification de cette scène, qui est bien attestée dans le panorama de la glyptique romaine du début de l’Empire, n’est pas claire. Une ligne horizontale indique le sol. Il faut souligner l’excellente qualité artistique de cette intaille, dont les détails ne sont visibles qu’à un examen minutieux à la loupe, qui était un instrument inconnu dans l’Antiquité et n’a été inventée qu’au Moyen Age !

PROVENANCE Acquired on the English art market, London, in 2001.

PROVENANCE Acquis sur le marché d’art anglais, Londres, en 2001.

BIBLIOGRAPHY Camées antiques de la collection de l’Ermitage, St Petersburg, 1988, pp. 103-104. (in Russian). SENA CHIESA G., Gemme del Museo Nazionale di Aquileia, Padova, 1966, pl. LVIII, nn. 1142-1161.

45. A MINIATURE SILVER CUP

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Camées antiques de la collection de l’Ermitage, St. Petersbourg, 1988, pp. 103-104. (en russe). SENA CHIESA G., Gemme del Museo Nazionale di Aquileia, Padova, 1966, pl. LVIII, nn. 1142-1161.

45. COUPE MINIATURE EN ARGENT

Greek, late 6th - 5th century B.C. H: 4.7 cm, D: 8 cm

Art grec, fin du VIe - Ve s. av. J.-C. Ht: 4.7 cm, D: 8 cm

Greek cups made of precious metals from this period are very rare, especially in such a remarkable state of preservation : except for some superficial holes and a slight dent, this piece is intact. Traces of a yellowish material, mostly on the lip, suggests that the cup was partially gilded. From a technical point of view, it is composed of two extremely thin hemispherical hammered silver sheets : the inner sheet is simply conical and smooth, while the outer one, whose profile is interrupted by a neck that is offset from the shoulder, rests on a small circular base with a relief molding. The two sheets are soldered together under the lip (the edge of the inner cup, superimposed over the external one, is visible in places). The surface of the cup is decorated with a frieze of eleven gorgoneia displaying the distinctive monstrous features from the Greek Archaic period (frontal face, eyes wide open, flat pug nose and open mouth revealing fangs with tongue extended), which were hammered onto a model in repoussé and then soldered at the level of maximum diameter ; below this frieze, the decoration is composed of vertical flutes that radiate from the base. The gorgonn masks placed on this cup probably have the same significance as the ones often represented on Attic ceramics from the late Archaic Period : in the mythological tradition, the gorgon’s glance turned the viewer to stone, but its monstrous face carved or painted on an object or has prophylactic and apotropaic properties. This type of cup, probably originating in the Near East, has only a few parallels from the Archaic and Classical periods, among which one can mention a gold example from Praenestus (7th century), and a silver one from Cyprus, dated to the 5th century B.C. and decorated with a frieze of ducks ; over the following centuries (4th and 3rd especially), similar-size cups without handles were manufactured or imported in Thrace, but their profile, more flattened, is more similar to that of phialai.

Les coupes grecques en métal noble de cette époque et dans un état de conservation aussi remarquable sont très rares : mis à part quelques trous superficiels et une légère déformation, cette pièce est intacte. Des traces d’une matière jaunâtre, conservées surtout sur la lèvre, pourraient laisser supposer que la coupe était au moins partiellement dorée à la feuille. Techniquement, elle est composée de deux feuilles extrêmement minces de forme hémisphérique en argent martelé : la feuille intérieure est simplement conique et lisse, tandis que l’extérieure, dont le profil est cassé par un décrochement séparant le col de l’épaule, s’appuie sur une petite base circulaire, délimitée par un filet en relief. Les deux éléments sont soudés sous la lèvre (le bord de la partie interne superposé à l’externe est par endroits visible). L’extérieur de la coupe est orné d’une frise de 11 gorgoneia du type monstrueux communs en Grèce à l’époque archaïque (visage de face, yeux grands ouverts, nez plissé et épaté, gueule ouverte montrant des crocs, langue tirée vers le bas), qui ont été martelés au repoussé sur une matrice et soudés à la hauteur du diamètre maximum ; sous cette frise, la décoration se limite à des languettes verticales qui irradient de la base. La présence des masques de gorgone a probablement un sens similaire à ceux qui apparaissent sur la céramique attique de la fin de l’archaïsme : dans la tradition mythologique, le regard de la gorgone pétrifie celui qui le croise ; mais son visage monstrueux peint sur un objet ou sculpté a une action prophylactique et écarte les puissances malfaisantes du propriétaire de l’objet où l’image est représentée. Cette forme de coupe, d’origine probablement proche-orientale, n’est représentée à l’époque archaïque et classique que par peu de spécimens, parmi lesquels on peut mentionner un exemplaire en or de Préneste (VIIe s.) et un autre, chypriote, en argent, daté du Ve s. av. J.-C. et orné d’une frise de canards ; pendant les siècles suivants (IVe et IIIe s. surtout), des coupes sans anses de dimensions similaires ont été fabriquées ou importées en Thrace mais leur profil, plus aplati, est désormais assimilable à celui des phialaï.

BIBLIOGRAPHY Silver for the Gods, 800 Years of Greek and Roman Silver, Toledo, 1978, n. 1, p. 24. On the Praenestus cup, see : VON HASE W. -F., Die frühetruskische Goldschale aus Praeneste in Victoria und Albert Museum, in Archäologischer Anzeiger 89, 1974, pp. 86-87. On ancient silver vessel, see : STRONG D.E., Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate, London, 1966.

160

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Silver for the Gods, 800 Years of Greek and Roman Silver, Toledo, 1978, n. 1, p. 24. Pour la coupe de Preneste : VON HASE W. -F., Die frühetruskische Goldschale aus Praeneste in Victoria und Albert Museum, dans Archäologischer Anzeiger 89, 1974, pp. 86-87. Sur la vaisselle antique en argent v. : STRONG D.E., Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate, Londres, 1966.

161


46. A HEAVY HELLENISTIC RIBBED SILVER PLATE

46. PLAT EN ARGENT

Hellenistic Period, Seleucid Empire, 3rd – 1st century B.C. D: 34 cm

Art hellénistique (Séleucie), IIIe-Ier s. av. J.-C. D: 34 cm

This large and impressive silver plate is in excellent state of preservation : aside from a small dent on the flat side of the plate, it is in perfect condition. The weight of the plate - considering that it is solid silver - and its skillfully executed dramatic ribbed decoration are its two most conspicuous features. This elegant plate was first cast out of solid silver and then finished through cold-work and annealing. The design follows a style made popular during the 3rd century B.C. when relatively simple silver vessel shapes (plates, hemispherical bowls, etc.) were covered in thick, raised ribs with rounded edges. For this example, the design is on the bottom of the plate : a series of ribs, flare outward from an undecorated circular central area. The ribs are skillfully formed, being evenly shaped and slightly convex. Their wider, rounded ends are carefully finished and bent outwards a bit so that they stand out in relief from the surface of the plate. The area from the end of the ribs up to the rim is smooth and undecorated, as is the upper surface of the plate. The closest parallels for this plate are small bowls or cups of the same type : one is at the Louvre, another in the Ashmolean Museum, one in the J.P. Morgan collection, and yet another pair in the Fleischman collection. They all share the thick, ribbed design, but the level of finesse of our plate firmly places it among the finest examples of its type. The Seleucid Empire, named after Seleucus, one of Alexander’s top generals, followed on the heels of the Hellenistic conquest of the east. The wealth of the region led to rather extravagant tastes, and heavy silver vessels such as this plate came into fashion among society’s elite. The silver is very pure and of very high quality, indicating that it may have come from areas of Afghanistan or the Indus Valley, which produced naturally purer alloys than western mines. The design also reflects eastern influences, especially in the large rosette pattern formed by the ribs, a motif that has a long history in Persian art. The quality of the silver out of which this plate was cast suggests that rather than being created for domestic use, plates and vessels such as this one were purposely made to represent coinage and served as a method of storage and currency. This theory is further supported by the fact that the weight of the plate is equivalent to even multiples of the standard coin weights of the time : it is equivalent to between 450 – 470 Persian sigloi, which ranged in weight from 5.45, 5.55 or 5.69 grams. However, due to the excesses of the empire, very little Seleucid silver survives to this day, since during periods of political instability, much of the existing silver was melted down for basic coinage, making this strikingly refined example very rare.

Ce plat en argent, qui est impressionnant à cause de son poids et de son diamètre, est dans un excellent état de conservation : à l’exception de quelques petites bosselures, il est intact. Son poids - compte tenu du fait qu’il est en argent massif - et la finesse d’exécution de la magnifique décoration à nervures sont des traits remarquables. Cette forme très élégante a d’abord été moulée, travaillée à froid et ensuite achevée grâce à un nouveau réchauffement. La composition suit un modèle qui a été rendu populaire pendant le IIIe siècle avant J.-C., lorsque la mode d’orner les récipients en argent (plats, bols hémisphériques, etc.) de simples nervures linéaires aux bords arrondis s’est imposées aux orfèvres. Sur ce spécimen par exemple, la décoration est exécutée sur le fond du plat : une série de nervures irradie à partir d’un élément central circulaire sans décoration vers l’extérieur : les nervures sont habilement modelées voire légèrement convexes. Leurs extrémités plus larges et arrondies sont soigneusement achevées et sensiblement courbées vers l’extérieur de sorte qu’elles dépassent en relief la surface du plat. La partie située entre l’extrémité des nervures et le bord est lisse et sans décoration, de même que le dos du plat. Les meilleurs parallèles qui peuvent être établis pour cet objet sont de petits bols ou coupes : une pièce est conservée au Musée du Louvre, une autre se trouve à l’Ashmolean Museum, une autre appartient à la collection J.P. Morgan et une paire est dans la collection Fleischman. Tous ces objets ont en commun une décoration à nervures, mais le degré de finesse du plat en examen le place sans conteste parmi les modèles les plus raffinés de ce type. L’empire séleucide, du nom de Séleucos, un des diadoques d’Alexandre, s’établit sur les territoires orientaux des conquêtes hellénistiques. La richesse de la région entraîna des goûts relativement dispendieux, et de nombreux objets en argent massif, tels que ce plat, devinrent très à la mode parmi l’élite de la société. L’argent est très pur et de haute qualité, ce qui indique qu’il pouvait provenir des régions de l’Afghanistan ou de la vallée de l’Indus qui produisaient des alliages naturellement plus purs que les mines occidentales. La composition reflète également de fortes influences orientales : le grand motif avec la rosette constituée par les nervures est un ornement qui a une longue histoire dans l’art persan. La qualité de l’argent est telle que l’on peut écarter l’idée d’un usage concret pour les pièces comme celles-ci : certains archéologues pensent que ces pièces ont été spécialement utilisés comme unité monétaire et qu’ils ont servi de mode de stockage et de devise. Cette théorie est soutenue par le fait que le poids du plat correspond aux multiples des poids des pièces de monnaie de compte de l’époque : il équivaut à environ 450 - 470 sigles perses, qui étaient classés en poids de 5.45, 5.55 ou 5.69 grammes. Malheureusement, en raison des nombreux excès, très peu d’argent est parvenu jusqu’à nous : pendant les périodes d’instabilité politique, une grande partie de l’argent à disposition était fondu pour fabriquer la monnaie de compte. La pièce en examen est donc à considérer comme exceptionnelle.

PROVENANCE Ex-Dr. Atanasov Collection, Germany ; T. Arakji, London and Hamburg, 1990.

PUBLISHED

IN

Galerie Blondeel-Deroyen, Paris, 1999.

PROVENANCE

Scientific analysis by Dr. P. Northover, Oxford University, 1994.

Ancienne collection du Dr. Atanasov, Allemagne ; T. Arakji, Londres et Hambourg, 1990.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

PUBLIÉ

For the Louvre parallel, see : BYVANCK-QUARLES van UFFORD L., Un bol d’argent hellénistique en Suède, in Bulletin Antieke Beschaving 48, 1973, p. 122, fig. 2. For the Ashmolean parallel, see : SYMES R., Ancient Art, London, 1971, p. [29], no. 31. For the Morgan parallel, see : HERZFELD E., The Hoard of the Kâren Pahlavs, in The Burlington Magazine, Vol. 52, No. 298. (January 1928), pp. 21 – 23, 27, plate D,E. For the Fleischman parallel, see : A Passion for Antiquities : Ancient Art from the Collection of Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman, Malibu, 1994, pp 227 – 231, no. 115 A-B. On the Seleucids and their plate, see : BEVAN E.R., House of Seleucus, London, 1902, p. 282. On plate as coinage, see : VICKERS M., Persian gold in the Parthenon inventories in Revue des Etudes Anciennes, 91 (2), 1989, 249 – 257.

Galerie Blondeel-Deroyen, Paris, 1999.

162

DANS

Analyse scientifique du Dr. P. Northover, Université d’Oxford, 1994.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE Pour le parallèle du Louvre, v. : BYVANCK-QUARLES van UFFORD L., Un bol d’argent hellénistique en Suède, in Bulletin Antieke Beschaving 48, 1973, p. 122, fig. 2. Pour le parallèle d’Ashmolean, v. : SYMES R., Ancient Art, Londres, 1971, p. [29], n. 31. Pour le parallèle de la collection Morgan, v. : HERZFELD E., The Hoard of the Kâren Pahlavs, dans The Burlington Magazine, vol. 52, n. 298. (Janvier 1928), pp 21 - 23, 27, D, E. Pour le parallèle de la collection Fleischman, v. : A Passion for Antiquities : Ancient Art from the Collection of Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman, Malibu, 1994, pp 227 – 231, n. 115 A-B. Sur les Séleucides et leurs plats, v. : BEVAN E.R., House of Seleucus, Londres, 1902, p. 282. Sur les plats comme système monétaire, v. : VICKERS M., Persian gold in the Parthenon inventories in Revue des Etudes Anciennes, 91 (2), 1989, pp. 249 - 257.

163


47. A SPOUTED SILVER CUP WITH A LINEAR INSCRIPTION

47. COUPE À BEC EN ARGENT AVEC INSCRIPTION EN LINÉAIRE ÉLAMITE

Elamite, late 3rd millennium B.C. H: 10.3 cm, D: 10.5 cm

Art élamite, fin du IIIe mill. av. J.-C. Ht: 10.3 cm, D: 10.5 cm

The vessel, including the spout, was skillfully and evenly hammered from a single sheet of silver whose thickness does not exceed 1-2 mm. In spite of some slight deformation and some vertical chips on the edge, the vase is whole and in an excellent state of preservation. The bottom is circular and slightly convex, the walls are straight, the plain rim without a lip. The long spout is triangular in section : its singular shape allowed the user to pour out measures with precision and to pour the liquid right into the desired spot. The surface of the metal is covered by a long inscription ; the characters are engraved with a fine point : the scribe first divided the available area into squares by tracing five horizontal lines, which frame the four and a half lines of text. The characters, clearly separated from each other, resemble the writing called linear Elamite, which was used around the late 3rd millennium to transcribe the Elamite language (especially under the reign of King Puzur-Inshushinak of Susa) ; this king is also known and identified through a statue at the Louvre with a linear Elamite text. Very few inscriptions with these characters are preserved today (a little over twenty), so much so that the deciphering of this writing is still taking place, even though it had already started in the early 20th century. In the Near Eastern world, the manufacture of metal vessels was well known during the 3rd millennium B.C. : bronze and copper were the most common metals, while silver and gold appeared very rarely. They were often part of temple treasures, palace goods or of very particular sites, like the royal tombs of Ur.

The vessel, including the spout, was skillfully and evenly hammered from a single sheet of silver whose thickness does not exceed Le vase, y compris le bec, a été obtenu en martelant avec beaucoup de maîtrise et de régularité une seule feuille d’argent dont l’épaisseur ne dépasse pas 1-2 mm. Malgré une légère déformation et quelques fractures verticales au niveau du bord, le vase est entier et en d’excellentes conditions. Le fond est circulaire et légèrement convexe, la paroi droite et le bord simple, sans lèvre. Le long bec verseur a une section triangulaire : sa forme plutôt singulière servait à doser avec précision et à verser le liquide juste à l’endroit voulu. La surface du métal est recouverte par une longue inscription en caractères incisés avec une pointe : le scribe a d’abord quadrillé l’espace à disposition en traçant cinq traits horizontaux, qui délimitent les quatre lignes et demi du texte. Les caractères, bien séparés les uns des autres, ressemblent à l’écriture appelée élamite linéaire, qui était utilisée vers la fin du IIIe millénaire pour transcrire la langue élamite, surtout sous le règne de Puzur-Inshushinak de Suse ; ce roi est connu et identifié aussi grâce à une statue du Louvre portant un texte en élamite linéaire. Peu d’inscriptions ayant adopté ces caractères sont arrivées jusqu’à nous (un peu plus d’une vingtaine), au point que le déchiffrement de cette écriture est encore en cours, même s’il a commencé déjà au début du XXe s. Dans le monde proche-oriental, la fabrication de vases en métal est bien attestée pendant tout le IIIe millénaire av. J.-C : le bronze et le cuivre sont les métaux les plus utilisés, tandis que l’argent et l’or n’apparaissent que très rarement. Ils devaient appartenir le plus souvent au trésor d’un temple ou d’un palais ou des ensembles très particuliers, comme les tombes royales d’Ur.

PROVENANCE Acquired on the English art market in 1992.

PROVENANCE Acquis sur le marché d’art anglais en 1992.

BIBLIOGRAPHY Other texts in linear Elamite script : CAUBET A. (ed.), La cité royale de Suse, Trésors du Proche-Orient ancien au Louvre, Paris, 1994, p. 8, fig. 9 ; pp. 263-264, n. 182-183. On Near Eastern metal vessels : CAUBET A. (ed.), La cité royale de Suse, Trésors du Proche-Orient ancien au Louvre, Paris, p. 109, fig. 35. ZETTLER R.L and al., Treasures from the Royal Tombs of Ur, Philadelphia, 1998, pp. 125-140.

164

BIBLIOGRAPHIE D’autres textes en élamite linéaire : CAUBET A. (éd.), La cité royale de Suse, Trésors du Proche-Orient ancien au Louvre, Paris, 1994, p. 8, fig. 9 ; pp. 263-264, n. 182-183. Sur les vases proche-orientaux en métal : CAUBET A. (éd.), La cité royale de Suse, Trésors du Proche-Orient ancien au Louvre, Paris, p. 109, fig. 35. ZETTLER R.L et al., Treasures from the Royal Tombs of Ur, Philadelphie, 1998, pp. 125-140.

165


48. TWO SMALL STONE BOWLS

48. DEUX PETITS BOLS EN PIERRE

Syrian (Tell Bouqras), 7th - 6th millennium B.C. H: 7.9 and 9.9 cm

Art syrien (Tell Bouqras), VIIe-VIe mill. av. J.-C. Ht: 9.9 et 7.9 cm

The two small containers, nearly intact, are carved from a yellowish stone with reddish-brown veins, a typical feature of the early stone vessels from Tell Bouqras (Northern Syria) : the sculptor(s) certainly chose the stone blocks very carefully in order to utilize the veining and their polychromy as a natural and unique mode of decorating his work. Small vessels like our example are among the oldest examples of the new technique of polishing stone, which gradually replaced the carved or cut stone of the early Neolithic Period. In spite of their ancient date, the vessels from Tell Bouqras already illustrate the great skill of the sculptor : as a matter of fact, the small vases, while sometimes being a little asymmetrical, are carved and polished in a surprisingly even manner. This means that techniques involving the stone’s turning and polishing were already in use : a tool similar to a drill was used to hollow out the interior, a wheel to round the external shape, and very patient polishing for the smooth finish. The creation of these objects thus necessitated a lot of time, a detail that certainly gave them the status of luxury goods. These two vessels are of average size : one is teardrop-shaped, with a rounded bottom and slightly flared lip ; the many horizontal veins neatly cross the surface of the stone. The other bowl, smaller and globular in shape with a rounded but stable bottom, has a narrow mouth with a small flared neck : it is “adorned” with thick yellowish-red veining, which crosses the body diagonally, and its marbling.

Les deux petits récipients, qui sont pratiquement intacts, sont taillés dans une pierre jaunâtre veinée de brun-rouge typique des premiers vases en pierre de Tell Bouqras (Syrie septentrionale) : le sculpteur a certainement prêté une attention particulière au choix des blocs de pierre de façon à utiliser les veinures et leur polychromie comme décoration naturelle et unique de son œuvre. Les petits récipients comme ceux en examen sont parmi les plus anciens témoignages de la nouvelle technique de la pierre polie, qui, dès le début du néolithique, a progressivement remplacé le procédé de la pierre taillée ou éclatée. Malgré leur ancienneté, les vases de Tell Bouqras attestent déjà d’une grande maîtrise dans ce domaine : en effet les petits vases tout en étant parfois un peu asymétriques sont sculptés et polis d’une façon étonnamment régulière. Ceci veut dire que des techniques impliquant le tournage et le frottement de la pierre étaient désormais couramment utilisées : un instrument comme le foret servait pour évider l’intérieur, un tour pour arrondir la forme extérieure, un très patient polissage pour l’aspect lisse. Le temps très long qu’il fallait pour la production de ces récipients en faisait certainement des objets très importants, voire de luxe. Ces deux pièces sont de taille correspondant à la moyenne : l’un est en forme de goutte, avec le fond arrondi et la lèvre légèrement évasée ; les nombreuses veinures horizontales sillonnent régulièrement la surface de la pierre. L’autre, plus petit et globulaire, au fond arrondi mais bien équilibré et stable, présente une embouchure étroite avec un petit col évasé : il est «orné» d’une épaisse veinure jaune-rouge qui coupe le corps en diagonale et de quelques marbrures.

PROVENANCE

PROVENANCE

Acquired on the German art market in 2004.

Acquis sur le marché d’art allemand en 2004.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BIBLIOGRAPHIE

FORTIN M., Syrie, Terre de civilisations, Montreal, 1999, pp. 143-145, p. 188, n.141. PARROT A. (ed.), Au pays de Baal et d’Astarté, 10000 ans d’art en Syrie, Paris, 1983, p. 45, n. 50-53.

FORTIN M., Syrie, Terre de civilisations, Montréal, 1999, pp. 143-145, p. 188, n.141. PARROT A. (éd.), Au pays de Baal et d’Astarté, 10000 ans d’art en Syrie, Paris, 1983, p. 45, n. 50-53.

166

167


49. A LARGE FAIENCE JAR

49. GRANDE JARRE EN FAÏENCE

Assyrian, 8th - 7th century B.C. H: 40 cm

Art assyrien, VIIIe - VIIe s. av. J.-C. Ht: 40 cm

In spite of many breaks, this piece is remarkable for its weight and size (the walls are very thick), which is practically unparalleled due to the difficulty of working with this material. The surface is partially worn but preserves the sky-blue and glazed white colors : the general composition and all the decorative details are still very clear. This large, oval faience jar has a very smooth profile that rises from a circular, slightly concave bottom ; a small bulge visible on the upper part of the shoulder could indicate the location of a handle. The ornamentation is very rich : bands of geometric patterns (water clocks, volutes, triangles) frame the principal frieze along the center of the body consisting of the same scene repeated twice. A standing female figure, frontally oriented and dressed in a short tunic that leaves the breasts bare, holds two sphinxes by their tails : the two winged monsters with lion’s bodies but female heads are represented heraldically. They each rest one of their forefeet on a date palm and turn their heads towards the central figure ; a high cylindrical tiara covers the sphinx’s head. This scene is probably related to the mythological and/or cult sphere : the woman dominating the wild beasts and the monsters is a well-known figure in Near Eastern art, the mistress of animals and of the uncontrollable forces of nature. One also notes the presence, on the bottom of the scene, of circular rosettes of various sizes, whose centers recall the symbols of the star (the goddess Ishtar) or even of the sun (god Shamash) - without exactly reproducing them. Although large faience containers of similar size and decoration were found in many of the private houses at Assur, sometimes later dated to the Assyrian Period, the archaeologists believe that these objects were manufactured for religious use in temples or that they belonged to a group of royal household goods.

Malgré les nombreuses lacunes, cette pièce est extraordinaire pour ses dimensions et son poids (la paroi est très épaisse), difficilement égalables à cause de la difficulté de façonnage de ce matériau. La surface, partiellement usée, conserve encore les couleurs bleu ciel et blanc de la glaçure : la composition générale et tous les détails de la décoration sont encore est très clairs. Il s’agit d’une grande jarre ovale au profil très régulier, qui s’appuie sur un fond circulaire et légèrement concave ; une petite protubérance conservée en haut de l’épaule pourrait indiquer l’emplacement d’une anse. L’ornementation est très riche : des bandes de motifs géométriques (clepsydres, volutes, triangles) encadrent la frise principale, située au centre du corps et composée de la même scène répétée deux fois. Une figure féminine debout, vue de face et habillée d’une tunique courte qui laisse entrevoir les seins, tient deux sphinges par la queue : les deux monstres ailés au corps de lion mais à tête féminine sont représentés en position héraldique. Ils appuient une des pattes antérieures à un palmier à dattes et tournent la tête vers la figure centrale ; une haute tiare cylindrique leur coiffe la tête. Vraisemblablement cette scène a un caractère mythologique et/ou cultuel : la femme dominant les bêtes sauvages et les monstres est une figure bien connue de l’art proche-oriental, la maîtresse des animaux et de la nature sauvage. On notera également la présence, sur le fond de la scène, de nombreuses rosettes circulaires de différentes dimensions, dont la décoration interne rappelle les symboles de l’étoile (déesse Ishtar) ou même du soleil (dieu Shamash) - sans les reproduire à l’identique. Bien que de gros récipients en «faïence» de taille et décorations similaires aient été découverts dans de nombreuses maisons privées d’Assur, datant parfois d’après l’époque assyrienne, les archéologues pensent plutôt que ces objets ont tout d’abord été façonnés pour le service religieux des temples ou qu’ils appartenaient à l’inventaire des palais royaux.

PROVENANCE

PROVENANCE

Acquired on the art market in the 1960’s.

Acquis sur le marché de l’art pendant les années 1960.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BIBLIOGRAPHIE

ANDRAE W., Farbige Keramik aus Assur und ihre Vorstufen in altassyrischen Wandmalereien, Berlin, 1923. Das Vorderasiatischen Museum Berlin, Mainz on Rhine, 1992, p. 190, n. 128. On ancient faience in general, see : Faïences de l’Antiquité, De l’Egypte à l’Iran, Paris, 2005.

ANDRAE W., Farbige Keramik aus Assur und ihre Vorstufen in altassyrischen Wandmalereien, Berlin, 1923. Das Vorderasiatischen Museum Berlin, Mayence/Rhin, 1992, p. 190, n. 128. Sur les faïences antiques en général, v. : Faïences de l’Antiquité, De l’Egypte à l’Iran, Paris, 2005.

168

169


Selection of Objects

Ali Aboutaam and Hicham Aboutaam

Project Manager

Hélène Yubero, Geneva

Research

Bibiane Choi, New York and Brenno Bottini, Geneva

Graphic Concept

Olivier Stempfel Fornerod, Geneva soma-creative.com, Geneva

Photography

Hughes Dubois, Paris and Brussels Jeffrey Suckow, Geneva Maggie Nimkin, New York Stefan Hagen, New York

Printing

Atar Roto Presse SA, Geneva

In Geneva

Ali Aboutaam Michael C. Hedqvist Phoenix Ancient Art S.A. 6, rue Verdaine - P.O. Box 3516 1211 Geneva 3, Switzerland Tel : +41 22 318 80 10 Fax : +41 22 310 03 88 E-mail : paa@phoenixancientart.com www.phoenixancientart.com

In New York

Hicham Aboutaam Bibiane Choi Electrum, Exclusive Agent for Phoenix Ancient Art S.A. 47 East 66th Street at Madison Avenue New York, NY 10021 Tel : +1 212 288 7518 Fax : +1 212 288 7121 E-mail : info@phoenixancientart.com www.phoenixancientart.com

© Phoenix Ancient Art S.A.

170

171

CREDITS AND CONTACTS


Profile for emyphoenix

Phoenix Ancient Art 2007 No 1  

Phoenix Ancient Art 2007 No 1  

Advertisement