__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

EXOTICS OF THE CLASSICAL WORLD

P HOE NIX AN C I E NT ART 2007

EXOTICS OF THE CLASSICAL WORLD

L’ exotisme dans le monde classique


Exotics of the classical world

L’ exotisme dans le monde classique

The works of Greco-Roman antiquity are familiar to our vision of the world, dominated by reason, moderation and truth. In essence, the art is naturalistic: based on objective observations of realit y, it responds with a desire to surpass this same reality, resulting in systematic idealization. The human body represents the highest standard of beauty, and it is through the human form that the gods are represented, distinguished only by an exceptional sense of majesty. In the 19t h century, the taste for antiquity, engendered in the neo-classical movement, again reinforced this image of ancient idealism, filled with supreme elegance and nobility. And so, an entirely different side of antiquity was naturally forgotten, one that was on the margins of these grand themes and was considered negligible: the unusual, the strange, the picturesque. These works were seen as trivial and repulsive. This exhibit is one that suggests a change of scenery - one that has a counterpart in the literature of the times - a release of sorts. It is a response to a sort of weariness, caused by an excess of dignity and grandeur.

L’Antiquité gréco-romaine nous a rendu familière sa vision du monde, dominée par la raison, la mesure, la vérité. Si l’art y est naturaliste par essence, c'est-à-dire fondé sur l’observation objective de la réalité, il obéit à une volonté de dépassement de cette même réalité, qui aboutit à une idéalisation systématique. Le corps humain représente l’archétype de la beauté et c’est sous forme humaine qu’on représente les dieux, qui se distinguent seulement par un surcroît de majesté. Au XIXe siècle, le goût de l’Antique, qui a engendré le néo-classicisme, renforce encore cette image d’une Antiquité idéale, à l’élégance et noblesse suprêmes. Et on en est venu tout naturellement à oublier une facette entière de l’art antique qui, en marge des grands thèmes, accorde une place non négligeable à l’insolite, l’étrange, le pittoresque, voire le trivial et le repoussant. On peut considérer cet intérêt pour ce qu’il faut appeler l’envers du décor, lequel a son pendant dans la littérature, comme un exutoire. Il répond à une sorte de lassitude, causée par un trop-plein de dignité et de grandeur.

3


1. A Bronze Statuette of a Nude Dancer Hellenistic, 2nd century B.C. H: 7.8 cm, (enlarged picture)

4

This piece is a beautiful example of Hellenistic realism in art : from a thematic point of view, the bronzesmith chose to represent an image from daily life (a street dancer, suffering from a sickness or deformity) that is very different from the grand mythological scenes or images of famous figures. Technically and stylistically, in spite of the miniature scale of the statuette, the subject is nevertheless treated with a remarkable amount of detail and precision in the pose and in the rendering of the movement and anatomic details. The unnatural, dramatic position of the figure represents the energetic movements of the dance, usually as a result of the rhythm of the jumping : the weight of the body rests on the toes of the left foot, which is the only point at which the man is in contact with the ground ; the legs are bent and crossed ; the torso is bent forward, the shoulders and the head are slightly turned to the left ; in the frenzy of the dance, his enormous phallus has gotten caught between his legs. The man, of an astonishing thinness (the skeleton and the musculature of the back, the chest and

the legs display a rare precision), is a hunchback and has a large deformity on his chest, which is of large circumference : maybe in his youth he was a victim of rickets. The age of the dancer is difficult to estimate, but the large, smooth forehead and the features of the face seem to indicate that he is an older man.

Provenance: Acquired from Elie Boustros, in the early 1980’s. Bibliography : REEDER E. D. (Ed.), Hellenistic Art in the Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore, 1988, pp. 141-143, n. 56-57. SNOWDEN Jr. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Cambridge (Massachusetts) - London, 1991, fig. 297-298. Version en français page 86


2. A Bronze Statuette of a Nude Dancer Hellenistic (Alexandrian ?), 2nd century B.C. H: 10.5 cm, (enlarged picture)

This statuette repeats the typological schema of the preceding piece : the principal difference between the two figures is in the extremity of the style. Essentially, the features of this man are less exaggerated and the anatomical details, which are not as apparent, are more carefully modeled and relate more harmoniously to the body and the movements of the man. The dancer, his head thrown back, almost appears to be in a trance, as if he is concentrating fiercely on the moves that he will execute. He wears a large necklace and what may be a pointed cap with a raised border. He is extremely thin, his back presents a large pointed protrusion between the shoulder blades and his chest is abnormally large : like n. 1, this dancer is sick or even infirm (suffering from rickets ?). In their remarks on hunchbacks in ancient art, M. D. Grmek and D. Gourevitch have noted that their frequency is well above average compared to the number of people who were actually afflicted with this deformity. The two authors explain this phenomenon through the apotropaic significance and good luck that was associated with sufferers of such handicaps.

Published in : Sotheby's New York, June 8th 1994, n.169. Bibliography : Cf. n. 1. For anomalies of the chest and spine, see : GRMEK M. D. - GOUREVITCH D., Les maladies dans l’art antique, Paris, 1998, pp. 209-219. Version en français page 86

7


3. A Terracotta Statuette of a Grotesque Hellenistic or Roman, 1s t century B.C. – 1s t century A.D. H: 13.5 cm, (enlarged picture)

8

In archaeology, the term “grotesque” designates an important class of objects, generally of small size and of ranging artistic quality, that exploit physical deformations and human maladies for the amusement of its viewers : ancient artisans did not always treat these afflictions and deformities in a realistic manner, but they inspired them to create an exaggerated, caricature-like effect. This style developed throughout Asia Minor (Smyrna) and in Egypt (Alexandria), but during the Hellenistic and Roman Periods, grotesques fascinated the entire Mediterranean. The repertoire of “grotesques” is extremely varied : images of men, or even rarer, of women and children, old men, dwarves, Africans, the obese or emaciated etc. One can list a large number of figurines in terracotta and statuettes in bronze, but they also exist in painting, reliefs, mosaics, etc. This piece is a beautiful example of a statuette of a grotesque from the end of the Hellenistic Period : the figure is certainly an old man, indicated by his domed, emaciated back (one can count the ribs and vertebrae), the frail, thin arms, the deeply lined face and his total baldness, which accentuates the irregular contours of his skull. He is probably a street vendor seated on a stool or rock ; the plate or basket (?) for carrying and displaying his wares would have been inserted into the slot clearly visible below his stomach (the rectangular tenon fixed to the right shoulder appears to have been for a strap which would have

helped the man carry his merchandise. The legs of the figure are lost. Behind the neck, the large circular ring would have been used to suspend the statuette from a support whose nature is unknown : this detail is present on few other grotesques. The position and the caricature-like mask of this old man are not without comparison to Attic red figure images of Geras (the personification of age, son of the night), who, in spite of his ugliness and physical weakness plays with the power and superiority of Heracles : thanks to his way with words, he even knows how to run away and avoid the club of the hero.

Provenance : G. Weber Kunsthandel, Cologne, acquired in 2000. Bibliography: BESQUES S., Catalogue raisonné des figurines et reliefs en terre-cuite grecs, étrusques et romains, vol. III: époques hellénistique et romaine, Grèce et Asie Mineure, Paris 1977, pl. 243 ss. NIELSEN A.M. - OSTERGAARD J.S., The Eastern Mediterranean in the Hellenistic Period, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, 1997, pp. 110-111, n. 91. PERDRIZET P., Les terres cuites grecques d’Egypte de la collection Fouquet, Nancy, 1921, pl. 118, n. 449 (statuette with a suspension ring). On images of Geras see : Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. IV, Zürich, 1988, s.v. Geras, pp. 180-182, pl. 100-101. Version en français page 86


4. A Bronze Statuette of a Hunchback Hellenistic or Roman, 1s t century B.C. – 2nd century A.D. H: 7.1 cm, (enlarged picture)

10

The posture of this statuette is remarkable and not often seen : the body seen in a three-quarter view, the face represented in profile and the shoulders sharply angled. The man, who is of thin build, appears to be older : he walks with a perceptible limp to the right. His arched back presents an unusual growth right on the left shoulder blade, clearly visible beneath the fabric of his clothes ; the thin, slightly bent legs take a large, unsteady step forward (he is perhaps in the middle of dancing ?). He is dressed in a short chiton, tied about the waist with a belt, which forms a thick horizontal fold. The right arm, nearly entirely uncovered, is extended and bent : in the right hand, the man may have held a stick to help him walk ; the left arm is wrapped in fabric. Sadly, the condition of the surface of the metal does not allow us to determine if the figure was bald (except for a curl standing up on top of the head) or if the head was covered by a pointed cap, accentuating the elongated shape of the head. His face resembles those of grotesques, even if the features are less exaggerated than usual, notably the absence of wrinkles on the cheeks and on the forehead. The frontal view of the face is very narrow.

Neugebauer has published some very precise parallels for this piece (originating in Egypt) : he interprets them as images of a clown who entertains at a banquet for the amusement of the guests. He bases his hypothesis on a text by Lucien (Symposion XVIII). Whether one interprets the figure as physically handicapped or as a dancing clown, this statuette is nevertheless a very attractive example of Hellenistic realism being applied to the minor arts : in spite of the less than “noble” subject and a certain wearing of the surface, this is still evidently a piece of remarkable quality.

Provenance : Ex-Hatch-Conrad Collection, Rhineland, Germany, collected in the early 1970’s. Bibliography : NEUGEBAUER K. A., Die griechischen Bronzen der klassischen Zeit und des Hellenismus, Berlin, 1951, pp. 89-91, pl. 40, n. 73-74. On realism in the Hellenistic minor arts, see : HIMMELMANN N., Alexandria und der Realismus in der greichischen Kunst, Tübingen, 1983. Version en français page 87


5. A Bronze Head of a Grotesque with a Wart Hellenistic or Roman, 1s t century B.C. – 1s t century A.D. H: 4.2 cm, (enlarged picture)

This small head – which probably belonged to a complete statuette, or less likely, to an appliqué – was made using the techniques of hollow casting (the lost wax process) and then filling with lead to prevent cracks. In spite of some formal differences (the shape of the nose, an unwrinkled face, etc.) the typology corresponds to those of numerous Hellenistic and Roman grotesques (cf. nn. 3, 6, 7, etc.), but the head presents two new elements that are rarely seen : the deformation of the cartilage of the nose, which forms a large irregular knob between the eyes whose cause is impossible to determine, and the wart that is clearly visible on the left side of the bald crown. There are a limited number of figures characterized by the presence of a small dermatological protrusion : usually, they are portraits of individuals.

Bibliography : For figures with warts : GRMEK M. D. GOUREVITCH D., Les maladies dans l’art antique, Paris, 1998, pp. 51-56, pp. 245-246. SNOWDEN Jr. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Cambridge (Massachusetts) - London, 1991, pp.188-192, Version en français page 88

13

fig.239.


6. A Black Jet Pendant Amulet of a Head of a Grotesque Roman, 1s t – 2nd century A.D. H: 2.1 cm, (enlarged picture)

This pendant amulet represents a head of a grotesque with very lively features, nearly an individual compared to other stereotypical images from this genre : the two halves of the face are clearly differentiated, the enormous nose is also more hooked and bent than usual and the wrinkles on the forehead, the brows and the cheeks are asymmetrical. The suspension hole is pierced through a lock of hair carved at the top of the head ; the back of the head is flat.

15

Black jet (a variety of lignite with a brilliant color) was a material that was rarely used in Antiquity : when it was used, it was always carved in the eastern parts of the Roman Empire (Syria) and was crafted into jewelry or gems (pendants, bracelets, etc.). Often associated with gold, (this pendant would have been mounted on a small gilded plaque) this material could create a very elegant bi-chrome effect and was particularly well adapted to goldwork, which contrasted the brilliant black with the shine of the metal.

Provenance : Acquired from Elie Boustros, in the early 1980’s. Bibliography : For terracotta heads of grotesques that are typologically similar : BURN L. - HIGGINS R., Catalogue of Greek Terracottas in the British Museum, Vol. III, London 2001, pl. 71-72. LEYENAAR-PLAISIER P. G., Les terres cuites grecques et romaines, Cat. de la collection du Musée National des Version en français page 88

Antiquité à Leyden, Leyden, 1979, pl. 87-91.


7. An Agate Cameo with a Profile of a Grotesque Roman, 1s t – 2nd century A.D. H: 1.5 cm, (enlarged picture)

16

Carved from a gray and white agate, this cameo depicts the head of a grotesque bent slightly back and seen in profile : the general impression and the caricature-like traits are the same as for n. 8. In spite of its miniature scale, the precision of the workmanship is remarkable : the brows, the curls of hair at the nape of the neck, even the teeth are all details that are visible upon close examination of the piece.

Bibliography : BABELON E., Introduction au catalogue des camées antique et modernes de la Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, 1897, p. 175, n. 320, pl. 38. WALTERS H.B., Catalogue of the Engraved Gems and Cameos, Greek, Etruscan and Roman in the British Museum, London, 1926, n. 2223-25, 2599-2600, 3347 (without photos). Version en français page 88


8. An Agate Cameo with A Frontal Head of a Grotesque Roman, 1s t – 2nd century A.D. Dim : 1.7 x 1.1 x 1 cm, (enlarged picture)

During Roman times, grotesques were so popular that even jewelers and carvers of precious stones used them to decorate their gems. In spite of their rarity in comparison to mythological themes or scenes from daily life, the figure of the grotesque (either on foot or as only a head) is known from gems and cameos. Their presence on such objects can probably be explained by their apotropaic qualities : a ring or a pendant with a grotesque would have served as an amulet or a good-luck charm. This oval intaglio in bluish and white agate (the setting is modern) is intact : rendered in very high relief – practically in the round (a testament to the extraordinary technical abilities of the stone carver) – is a head of a grotesque with a melancholy expression on his face. This is in marked contrast with the often irreverent and mocking spirit of works from this genre. The old man, in a rare instance seen facing forward, is carved with a remarkable strength of presence and detailed precision. The bald, rounded crown of the head is topped by a small tuft of hair, the cheeks and the forehead are wrinkled, the eyes are deeply carved with pupils that fix the observer with their gaze and the nose is bent and aquiline. The asymmetry of this face and the sadness in its eyes express a much more human emotion than what is usually seen on grotesque figures, almost as if this were a portrait of an individual.

19

No other examples of a cameo with a head of a grotesque depicted frontally are known.

Provenance : Ex-Feuardent Frères Collection, collected in the late 19th century. Bibliography : Cf. n. 7. Version en français page 89


9. A Silver Skull Hellenistic (Asia Minor), end of the 1s t century B.C. H: 1.8 cm, (enlarged picture)

Hollow and composed of many elements, this skull was probably part of an entire articulated skeleton, as suggested by the shape of the opening at the neck and the two small holes in the lower jaw, where one could insert the cervical vertebrae. At the back of the head, there is a small cylindrical tenon whose purpose is not clear. The proportions and the rendering are full of realism and prove yet again that during this period, knowledge of anatomy was widely known by artists : one notes especially the articulation of the jaw - allowing it to open and close - the differences in the shape and size of the teeth (molars, incisors) and the joins of the cranial plaques. This skull was found with a coin bearing the image of Labienus, a general of Julius Caesar : it is therefore dated to the end of the Republican Period or the beginning of the Imperial Period. During the Hellenistic and Roman periods, representations of skeletons were a fashionable subject : they appeared not only in the minor arts (toreutic, glyptic, relief ceramics, non-articulated bronze statues) but also on polychrome or black and white mosaics. As in the later medieval Christian tradition, their significance is in relation to death and its most direct, but sometimes simplistic, approach ; they are most often used by the epicurean philosophers. Thus, skeletons of ancient authors identified by Greek inscriptions, which appear on the famous modioli (goblets) at the Louvre (the Boscoreale treasure), pronounce maxims such as “enjoy yourself while you are alive”, “life is a theater”, “tomorrow is uncertain”, “pleasure reigns supreme”, etc. The burial ground of a wealthy family, the Quintiliens, discovered on the Via Appia in Rome, is ornamented by a black and white mosaic that presents a scene of a reclining skeleton, pointing out a Greek inscription with his index finger whose

philosophic character is immediately evident : “know thyself”. Another mosaic – probably from a symposium room from a villa destroyed by the eruption of Vesuvius – represents a black skeleton on a white ground holding two pitchers of wine. Its simple presence and fixed gaze, with large, black-rimmed eyes, represents all guests and how even at the height of the party, the presence of death is inescapable (memento mori in latin). A skeleton in relation to the world of the symposium also appears in Latin literature, in the Satiricon of Petronius (34, 8) : during the banquet, Trimalcion shows all the guests an articulated silver skeleton that he lets fall onto the table many times, before delivering a short discourse whose message is : Carpe diem. The scene from the polychrome mosaic, found at Pompeii, is more elaborate : a death’s head is suspended from the wheel of fortune and the butterfly of Psyche. In the background, one finds a scale that carries on its left arm the symbols for wealth and royalty (a scepter and a purple toga) and on the other side a beggar’s staff and a pauper’s purse, to indicate that after death, the all are equal (omnia aequat mors).

Provenance : Acquired on the European art market, 1995. Bibliography : ADRANI A., Appunti su alcuni aspetti del grottesco alessandrino in Gli archeologi italiani in onore di Amedeo Maiuri, Cava dei Tirreni, 1965, pp. 39-62. ANDREAE B., Antike Bildmosaiken, Mayence/Rhin, 2003, pp. 258-265. BARATTE F., Le trésor d’orfèvrerie romaine de Boscoreale, Paris, 1986, pp. 64-67. Some small skeletons in bronze : DE RIDDER A., Bronzes antiques du Louvre, T. I, Les figurines, Paris, 1913, p. 98, n. 710, pl. 49. Version en français page 89

21


10. A Silver Gilt Cup with Dancing Satyrs Hellenistic, end of the Hellenistic Period, 1s t century B.C. H: 3.6 cm, D : 17.8 cm

This phiale, ornamented with a medallion that was completely gilded, was hammered ; the relief scene of the medallion was achieved through repoussĂŠ, probably using a wooden model.

22

In spite of the miniature size of the scene and the complicated movements of the dancers, the proportions and details are incised and modeled in a very natural and realistic manner : the musculature and forms of the bodies are well differentiated to express the ages of the two figures ; miniscule incised lines indicate the curls of the hair ; the facial features of the silenos are concentrated on the moves of the dance ; the twisted contour of the torso, the bark and leaves of the tree, etc. are extremely realistic. Thanks to his masterful technique, the artist has rendered to perfection the joy of this dance, which is also connected to the cup’s purpose as a drinking vessel used during the s y mposia. The scene unfolds near a sanctuary of Priapus in a natural setting characterized by the rocky ground and the tree clad in triangular serrated leaves (a plane tree ?). An older person (probably a silenos), bald but bearded and dressed in a short loincloth, dances with a young satyr, recognizable thanks to his small tail ; in their energetic movements, they are in the middle of hopping on one foot while holding hands. A hare, caught in the hunt, may be a gift between lovers ; the animal is wrapped in a scarf and hung from a branch. Between the dancers and the tree, a Priapic herm is set on a tall pedestal. The torso of the god is nude, his phallus limp ; he holds a thyrsus in his right

hand ; on his head he wears a sort of headscarf, the mitra.

Herms sculpted in the shape of Priapus appear in Greek art around the beginning of the 3rd century B.C. They were often placed in woodland or rural settings and, as in this case, were related to the cults of wild nature divinities like Dionysos, satyrs and/or silenoi, Pan, Artemis and the nymphs, etc. At the end of the Hellenistic period, representations of the thiasos, the dance of the satyrs and maenads, and fights between satyrs and nymphs regularly took place in the presence of a Priapic herm. Priapus was a god originally from Lampsaque, a city on the Dardanelles, and was the son of Aphrodite and Zeus (according to another version of the myth, of Dionysos). His deformity - Priapus was born with an enormous phallus – was the result of a curse from Hera, who thus intended to punish the extramarital affair of her husband. Abandoned by his mother, he was raised by shepherds, who started a cult to his virility ; this would explain why Priapus was essentially a rural and rustic god, the protector of gardens, vineyards, herders and of vegetation in general. Iconographically, the posture of the two dancers has numerous parallels that appear from the Classical Period onward (wrestlers painted on Attic red figure ceramics, images of satyrs attac-


king a nymph, etc.), but one also finds this position in Roman representations : for example, among the figures that ornament a fulcrum (a small bronze element used to decorate a bed) at the Palazzo dei Conservatori in Rome, there is a group of two figures, one male and one female, that dance in a rural setting and pick grapes next to a Priapic herm. Their movements are identical to those of the silenos and satyr on this medallion. The shape, which was used less often during the Roman Period, the style of the figures and the grouping of the composition, which is filled with a Greek spirit, allows us to assign a date for this phiale around the end of the Hellenistic Period, probably between the end of the 2nd and the 1s t century B.C.

25

Provenance : Ex-de Chambrier Collection (Neuchâtel, Switzerland), collected in the nineteenth century. Published in : Phoenix Ancient Art, 2006 - n. 1, n. 9. Bibliography : On Priapus in general, see : Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. VIII Suppl., 1997, s.v. Priapos. For other representations of dancers in a sanctuary of Priapus, see : FAUST S., Fulcra, Figürlicher und ornamentaler Schmuck an antiken Betten, p. 69, 206 and pl. 23 (fulcrum). OLIVER Jr. A. - LUCKNER K.T., Silver for the Gods : 800 Years of Greek and Roman Silver, Toledo, 1977, n.142-143. For phialai of the same type, see : KARABELNIK M., Aus der Schatzkammern Eurasien : Meisterwerke antiker Kunst, Version en français page 90

Zürich, 1993, pp. 182ss. POZZI E. (ed.), Le collezioni del Museo Nazionale di Napoli, vol. I, 1, Naples, 1989, p. 206, n. 14.


11. A Bronze Hooded Silenos (?) Roman, 1s t century A.D. H: 9.3 cm, (enlarged picture)

26

The statuette is solid cast, except for the top of the hood, which is lost. The image represents an older bearded man entirely enveloped in a cloak (paenula) whose hood is pulled over the head of the figurine : only the oval face and the lower part of the arms are visible. He is clad in small leather shoes with laces. Under the thick fabric of the cloak, one can make out the shape of the prominent belly and the contours of the arms, which are folded and placed over the stomach. The cloak falls vertically, forming even, well modeled folds. The face emerges from under the hood as if the figure is wearing a mask. Even though it is impossible to see the shape of the ears and the strangely somber expression, with its frowning brows and narrowed eyes, the general typology seems to identify this person as a silenos : the proportions of the body are stocky and rounded, the head is very big, the forehead is high and rounded (silenoi are bald), the large moustache curls around the full lips, and the nose is broad and upturned. The chin is covered by a pointed, well groomed beard. Hooded silenoi are rare, but the type is known through some other Roman bronzes. This interpretation does present some difficul-

ties, however, mostly because of the serious expression of the statuette, in contrast with the habitual gaiety of silenoi. In the ancient iconography, some other figures wear a long cloak with a pointed hood : one thinks in particular of Telesphoros (the little spirit of healing, characterized as a cheerful infant, most often associated with Asclepius), of actors, or of simply old men.

Provenance: Kunstwerke der Antike, Münzen und Medaillen A.G., Auktion 34, May 6th 1967, Basel, 1967, p. 19, n. 35. Bibliography: NEUGEBAUER K. A., Antike Bronzestatuetten, Berlin, 1921, pp. 109-110, fig. 62. VON SACKEN E., Die antiken Bronze des k.k. Münz- und Antiken Cabinetes in Wien, Vienna, 1871, pp. 68ss, pl. 33, 4. For other figures with hoods : BABELON E. - BLANCHET J.-H., Bronzes antiques de la Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, 1895, pp. 172-173, n. 382-383. BESQUES S., Cat. raisonné des figurines et reliefs en terrecuite grecs, étrusques et romains, vol. IV-II, Epoque hellénistiques et romaine, Cyrénaïque, Egypet Ptolémaïque et romaine, Afrique du Nord et Proch-Orient, Paris, 1992, p. 73-74, pl. 40. Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), Vol. VII, Zürich, 1994, s. v. Telesphoros, pp. 870-878. Version en français page 91


12. A Marble Relief with a Head of Pan Roman, 3rd century A.D. Dim : 40.6 cm x 31.4 cm

This marble fragment of roughly triangular form preserves the remains of a very finely and subtly sculpted head of a man in relief, represented in left profile. Above and below the head, one sees a slightly rounded relief border. The man is characterized by prominent features that are almost caricature-like : his brows are arched and frowning, the nose is large and bulbous, the lips are fleshy, the prominent rounded chin is covered in a small pointed beard, the jaw is strong and straight, the apples of the cheeks and the cheeks themselves are well modeled. He sports a short, thick hairstyle that is arranged in small, tousled curls separated by deep incisions. The tip of the ear is broken, but it probably ended in a point. In spite of the absence of precise and defining attributes, the general iconography allows us to identify this head as an image of the sylvan god Pan : it is possible that one of the features sculpted above the hair was a goat’s horn, a usual attribute of Pan. Identification as a satyr is less probable. Pan, whose cult was known throughout Greece, and also throughout the Roman world during the Imperial Period, is the god of shepherds and her-

ders. His sanctuaries were often immersed in nature, even situated within grottos. He is represented as a cross between a man and an animal with a human head, pointed ears and a pair of goat’s horns sprouting from his forehead. His nearly grotesque appearance and his sly expression are at times disturbing. The torso is human but hairy, while the lower half of the body is that of a goat with cloven hooves instead of feet. Typologically, this relief is very similar to a sculptural head of Pan in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Provenance : Ex-C. Kempe Collection, Sweden, collected prior to 1967. Bibliography : COMSTOCK M. B. - VERMEULE C. C., Sculpture in Stone, The Greek, Roman and Etruscan Collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston, 1976, p. 130, n. 201. OSTERGAARD J. S., Catalogue Imperial Rome, NyCarlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, 1996, pp. 196-197, n. 100. On Pan, see: Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), Vol. VIII suppl., Zürich, 1997, s. v. Pan, pp. 923-941. Version en français page 92

29


13. An Attic Red Figure Skyphos with Two Dancing Dwarves Greek, second half of the 5t h century B.C. H: 7 cm

A small skyphos with hemispheric body and ring base, a vertical ribbon handle and a horizontal handle of circular profile. With the exception of the two figures of dwarves, the surface of the vessel is completely black ; the background of the scene is designated by an undulating line that probably represents the earthen ground. The two dwarves, who each hop on a single leg, are probably in the middle of dancing : one is seen frontally (he bends his head and holds his left hand to his forehead) while the other, seen in profile, places his left hand on his hip. They are bald and have small, pointed beards, details that characterize them as adults. Their dwarfism is apparent through their very short legs and the size of their heads, which are very large. There exist some other images of pairs of dwarves painted on Attic red figure ceramics, but the connection between these two figures is never easy to define : are the two figures executing the same dance or is it the same person represented two times ? A fragmentary cup in Hamburg with a restored tondo, an excellent space for decoration that is more focused than the two exterior sides of the skyphos, features a pair of dwarves whose movements correspond perfectly to those on this vessel : there are definitely two separate figures that are represented – maybe brothers, or even

31

twins –dancing together. During the Archaic Period, Greek monuments only represented Pygmies – a mythical race to the Greeks – who were considered ethnic dwarves, while the pathological dwarf did not appear until much later in the 5t h century B.C. on red figure vases.

Provenance : Ex-Nicolas Koutoulakis, Geneva and Paris, acquired in the early 1970’s. Bibliography : For representations of dwarf couples on Attic red figure ceramics, see : DASEN V., Dwarfs in Ancient Egypt and Greece, Oxford, 1993, pp. 288-289, pl. 42. HORNBOSTEL W., Aus Gräber und Heligtümern, Die Antikensammlung W. Kropatschek, Mayence/Rhin, 1986, p.142, n. 83. On their interpretation as twins, see : DASEN V., Jumeaux, jumelles dans l’Antiquité grecque et romaine, Zurich, 2005, pp. 221-223. Version en français page 92


14. A Bronze Statuette of a Dwarf Boxer Roman, early Imperial Period (1s t – 2nd century A.D.) H: 9.8 cm, (enlarged picture)

This piece was solid cast using the lost wax technique ; the eyes of the figure were inlaid in silver (only the right inlay is preserved). The top of the head, the hands and the feet are pierced by circular holes, whose presence cannot be explained in a precise manner : this dwarf was attached to another object, but the nature of the piece within its original group is lost to us : it may have been a vessel with a figural handle, a candelabra with a figural foot, part of a group of statuettes of dwarves, etc. The feet, positioned one in front of the other, as if the dwarf was walking along a balance beam, do not provide the balance necessary for the statuette to stand on its own. 32

The proportions of the figurine are typical of ancient representations of dwarves. Although the Ancients did not have the scientific means to differentiate between the types of deformaties known under the term dwarfism, they categorized them according to their most evident physical symptoms : disproportionate limbs, very large heads, flat faces, prominent stomachs, malformation of the spine, a tendency towards obesity, etc. Among the different types known under this affliction, disproportionate dwarfism (achondroplasy) is the one that appears most frequently in nature as well as in Greco-Roman iconography : images of dwarves are generally distinguished by very short legs or arms and by an unusually large head, while the torso is often of normal size. Another frequent anomaly, although one that has no scientific basis, is the disproportionately large size of the genitals, which may simply have symbolized apotropaic power. Only two characteristics of dwarfism are evident-

ly apparent in this statuette : the short legs with prominent, rounded buttocks, and the very long phallus. The dwarf is represented standing, on the tips of his toes ; his arms are raised to the sides and slightly to the left ; his body is completely nude, but he seems to be wearing a cap ; his hands and his fists are protected by three leather straps, which ancient boxers used instead of gloves. The torso features very well developed musculature, of the back as well as of the abdominals. All these highly realistic anatomic details are rendered with a remarkable three-dimensionality to the modeling, which alternates with the precision of the well-modeled volumes and the small depressions. Contrary to representations of dwarves executed by artisans of Alexandrian origin or from Asia Minor, who are often characterized by caricaturelike traits, this statuette is very serious : the deformity of this man is rendered with realism and respect. Typologically, the posture of this dwarf is closest to the fighters painted on Panathenaic amphorae. He is in the middle of hopping on the tips of his toes to avoid the blows of his opponent, and he is about to throw a punch. In spite of some variations (arms crossed in self defense, a slightly twisted torso, etc.), the same iconography is followed by other Roman images of dwarves. Chronologically, it is necessary to date this statuette to the first centuries of the Common Era.

Provenance : Christian Niederhuber, Vienna, 1998. Bibliography : In general, on dwarves in Antiquity, see : DASEN V., Dwarfs in Ancient Egypt and Greece, 1993. Some statuettes of dwarf-boxers, see : COMSTOCK M.VERMEULE C., Greek, Etruscan and Roman Bronzes in Version en français page 93


15. A Mosaic Representing a Dwarf Wrestling a Crane Roman, 2nd century A.D. Dim : 104 x 80.5 cm

This rectangular panel probably decorated the floor of a banqueting room in a wealthy Roman villa. The name inscribed to the upper right may be that of the dwarf, while the long phrase at the bottom reproduces in large part the cries of the bird during the struggle.

34

The dwarf, who is designated as such by short, yet muscular legs and by the disproportionate size of his genitals, grasps the crane by its long neck, which is twisted and bent back. The bird is still standing and seems to beat its wings in an attempt to free himself : his posture and coloration with light gray plumage resembles that of a heron. During the Hellenistic and Roman Periods, images of dwarves often presented features typical of “grotesque” figures : on this mosaic, one notes that the curvature of the back of the dwarf is too accentuated, his head is too large and his nose is too long and pointed. The position of this figure is very similar to that of a “good luck” dwarf on a contemporary mosaic found at Antioch. The battle between the Pygmies and the cranes is a very popular legend in Greco-Roman literature and art : in the Archaic Period, the Pygmies, represented as strong and fierce men of small size, fought against the cranes, which would regularly eat their crops, as seen on the foot of the famous François Krater in Florence. But at the end of the 5 t h century B.C., an important change occurred in the iconography of this myth : the small men

who had been Pygmies were more and more often replaced by dysplasic dwarves with short legs. On the Roman mosaics and paintings that represent this scene (cf. especially the grand scenes that take place in Egypt in luxurious waterfront settings, known as nilotic scenes) the “Pygmies” are not differentiated at all from contemporary images of achondroplasic dwarves, although they sometimes have darker skin.

Provenance : Acquired on the European art market, 1990. Bibliography : Some Roman parallels : CIMOK F., Antioch Mosaics, A corpus, Istanbul, 2000, p. 36-37. DUNBABIN K.M.D., Mosaics of the Greek and Roman World, Cambridge, 1999, pp. 146-147, fig.152. On Pygmies in Antiquity, see : Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. VII, Zürich, 1994, s.v. Pygmaioi, pp. 594-601. Version en français page 93


16. A Bronze Boy Dwarf Hellenistic or Roman, 2nd century B.C. – 2nd century A.D. H: 6 cm, (enlarged picture)

The solid cast statuette has lost its feet. It represents a standing child with his right leg forward ; the left arm is posed on the stomach while the right is bent so that the boy touches his eye (or his cheek) with his index finger. He is dressed in a short, short-sleeved tunic bound about the waist by a belt. His physical development has not been composed in a very harmonious fashion : the head is too large, the legs and arms are too short and the hands are disproportionate ; in addition, he has a large, rounded stomach. This figurine, for which there are no parallels, is enigmatic : the infant probably suffers from a disease or deformity whose exact nature it is impossible to determine. The dimensions of his head, arms and legs identify him as a dwarf, but the size of his hands and stomach are more difficult to explain.

37

The gesture of the right hand towards his face is not common : one finds for example a terracotta statuette of an actor from the 4t h century B.C. who is lamenting. Here the small melancholy child appears to be crying ; perhaps he is an orphan living in the street, like those from certain poor quarters of Rome, Antioch, Alexandria or other ancient cities ?

Provenance : Acquired on the European art market, 2002. Bibliography : On dwarves, cf. : DASEN V., Dwarfs in Ancient Egypt and Greece, Oxford, 1993. GRMEK M. D. - GOUREVITCH D., Les maladies dans l’art antique, Paris, 1998, pp. 198-209. The statuette of the actor lamenting : COURTOIS C., Le Version en français page 94

théâtre antique, masque et figurines en terre cuite, Geneva, 1991, p. 27, n. 3.


17. A Plastic Aryballos Modeled in the Shape of a Head of an African Attic, early 5t h century B.C. (500-490 av. J.-C.). H: 9.6 cm, (enlarged picture)

Except for two repaired fragments on the neck, this aryballos is practically intact. It has a funnel-shaped neck reinforced by two small, reattached handles. With the exception of the reserved base, the surface is painted entirely black ; traces of red paint (?) are preserved on the lips and on the hair, and the eyes were probably white. The figure is clearly characterized as an African as illustrated by the black painted skin but also thanks to the realistic modeling that precisely imitates the features of an African, as if the coroplast was an anthropologist who wished to depict an unfamiliar population : the face presents a rather prominent jaw, the lips are full and the nose pug-shaped. The curly hair is represented by circles painted in purple on the skull. At the end of the 6t h century B.C., many ateliers of Attic potters made vessels in the shape of heads of Africans (single or janiform) that J. D. Beazley discusses comprehensively in a famous article. This aryballos was modeled in a more realistic fashion than its parallels, especially the rendering of the bone structure of the head (brows, apples of the cheeks, contours of the jaw, chin) ; the position of the head, bent slightly forward, allows for the simultaneous realistic rendering of the neck, which is not just a simple cylinder, but faithfully reproduces the Adam’s apple and the musculature. The term used in contemporary Greek texts to

refer to the inhabitants of Africa is “Aithiops” (ΑΙΘΙΟΨ, to which ancient and modern lexicographers assign the meaning “of burnt face” ; the same word, Aethiops, was unfashionable in latin). In many modern languages, the specific part of the African continent is not indicated today nor the precise ethnic group (Ethiopia, Ethiopians). Until the early 5t h century, Greek knowledge of Africa and its inhabitants was very cursory : in Athenian ceramic painting, which is our most important iconographic source for this period, images of Africans are limited to the “pure” types with strongly marked physical traits but without any other allusions to caricatures or mockeries, such as on this aryballos.

Provenance : Ex-American Private Collection. Exhibited : J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 1984-1996. Bibliography : BEAZLEY J.D., Chairos, Attic Vases in the Form of Human Head, in The Journal of Hellenic Studies 49, 1929, pp. 76-78. HEILMAYER W.-D. (ed.), Antikenmuseum Berlin, Die ausgestellten Werke, Berlin, 1988, pp. 158-159, n. 11-12. SNOWDEN F.M., Blacks in Antiquity ; Ethiopians in the Greco-Roman Experience Cambridge (Mass.), 1970, pp. 24, 40, fig. 9. SNOWDEN Jr. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Version en français page 94

39


18. A Janiform Aryballos Representing Two Heads of Africans Attic, ca. 480-470 B.C. H: 6.3 cm, (enlarged picture)

40

The two heads, which were made from the same mold, are joined behind the ears. Between the chins, there is a small cylinder whose function is not clear ; it does not allow the aryballos to sit straight. The neck is in the shape of a funnel with a small vertical handle. The faces represent Africans. Maybe because of its small size, the modeling is a bit cursory compared to n. 17. Their skin is rendered by the magnificent brilliant black color of Attic ceramics ; the polychromy is completed by the white, used for the brows, the eyes (with the iris and the pupil clearly marked) and the teeth (black lines indicate the individual teeth) while the natural color of the terracotta represents the lips and the area around the eyes ; on the hair there are also traces of purple paint (the curly tresses are in relief). This type of miniature Attic aryballos is very rare : J.D. Beazley grouped it with an identical piece in the Metropolitan Museum (inv. 27.122.21, unpublished ?) and another in Berlin, representing two monkeys. Given its comprehensive polychromy and excellent state of preservation, this example is probably the finest of the three.

Provenance : Ex-E. Brummer Collection, acquired in 1926. Exhibited : J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 1984-1996. Published in : The Ernest Brummer Collection, Ancient Art, Vol. II, Zurich, 1979, pp. 324-325, n. 691. Bibliography: FURTWÄNGLER A., La collection Sabouroff, Monuments de l’art grec, T. 1st, Berlin, 1883 (drawing at the top of pl. 65). FURTWÄNGLER A., Beschreibung der Vasensammlung im Antiquariat, Vol. 1, Berlin, 1885, p. 1027, n. 4050 (without photo). Version en français page 95


19. A Cup in the Shape of a Head of an African Italic (Apulian), middle of the 4t h century B.C. (370-350 B.C.). H: 19 cm

The shape of the vase is that of a large cup fitted with a single vertical handle whose body is modeled as a head of an African. The skin of the man is painted black, while his hair and ears are covered in a sort of Phrygian cap tied around the chin. This head covering was probably made from a leopard skin with black and white spots. The features of the face, skillfully modeled, were undoubtedly those of an African, with the pug nose and full lips painted purple. The eyes were rendered in a very lively manner, shaded brownish-black and white with a black pupil. On the neck of the cup, the scene is painted in red figure technique representing a young seated man facing a standing woman. The man, who wears a crown on his head, grasps a long staff and holds a large phiale while the woman offers him a garland ; in her left hand, she holds a situla for pouring wine. The two vessels, painted in yellow, would have been in gold or bronze. Images of Africans were more successful in Italic art than in Attic art : nevertheless, there exists an excellent parallel for this piece in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, which Trendall

and Cambitoglou compare to the work of the Iliupersis Painter, one of the greatest Apulian artists. The stylistic similarities (painting and modeling) that exist between these two pieces seem to suggest that this cup can be attributed to the same artist.

Provenance : Ex-American Private Collection. Exhibited : J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 1984-1996. Bibliography : The example in the Bibliothèque Nationale : DE RIDDER A., Catalogue des vases peints de la Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, 1902, p. 668-669, n. 1238. TRENDALL A.D. - CAMBITOGLOU A., The Red-Figured Vases of Apulia, vol. II, Oxford, 1982, p. 614, n. 75, pl. 235, 3. For other Italic vases with representations of Africans : SNOWDEN Jr. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Cambridge (Massachusetts) - London, 1991, fig. 212-220. Version en français page 96

43


20. A Plastic Vase (Askos ?) Representing a Young African Sleeping on an Amphora Hellenistic (Alexandria ?), 3rd century B.C. H: 6.2 cm, L : 10.1 cm, (enlarged picture)

44

The piece was molded, and is entirely hollow. Its state of preservation is extraordinary. A lone young nude African sleeps curled in a ball on the ground, leaning against the wine amphora that he was carrying ; the vase holds a tilted position thanks to four large stones scattered on the ground. He is characterized as an African by the dark, shiny coloring of his skin, by his curly hair and by the features of his face. But this Hellenistic realism is not limited only to his ethnic features : in spite of the miniature size of this object, the curled position was studied in extreme detail, and the modeling of the entire body was rendered in a very naturalistic fashion (the thinness of youth, the bones of the rib cage and back, the muscles of the legs, details of the face, hair). This subject, originally probably Alexandrian (cf. the serpentine statuette in the Brooklyn Museum in New York), was known through numerous replicas of approximately the same quality. An askos in the Ashmolean Museum at Oxford is particularly similar to this vase, but it does not exhibit traces of polychromy. After the stereotypical subjects of the Archaic and Classical Periods (the myth of the Pygmies vs. the cranes ; military themes like the group of the Negro Alabastra, the myth of Heracles vs. the Egyptian king Busiris ; simple or janiform plastic vases, etc.), an important change occurred in the Greek iconography of Africans under the influence of Alexandrian artists at the beginning of the Hellenistic Period. Many objects from the minor arts of widely varying quality (terracotta figurines and vases, small bronzes, pendants for

necklaces or earrings, etc.), started to reproduce African men in their daily routines : young sleeping servants, transporters of amphorae, acrobats, dancers, singers, jockeys, prisoners, etc. (images of female Africans are rare). As indicated by their different activities, most Africans who lived in the Mediterranean world certainly belonged to a lower level of society and had arrived there through their sale as slaves following a war of conquest. The written sources as well as the ancient iconography are silent about the episodes of racism towards Africans ; for example, Africans who had attained more visible social positions are not ignored, as proven by the statues of priests of Isis with Negroid features or by Roman portraits of Africans (for example, among the Athenian aristocracy of the 2nd century A.D., the friend and collaborator of Herodotus Atticus, Memnon, was an African) ; in the literary world, major figures like Terence or Heliodorus were probably of African origin.

Provenance : Ex-J. Elliot Collection, New York. Exhibited : University Art Museum, Princeton, New Jersey (until 1991). Bibliography : HIMMELMANN N., Alexandria und der Realismus in der greichischen Kunst, Tßbingen, 1983, pl. 49. HAUSMANN, U., Hellenische Neger, in Mitteilungen des deutschen Archaeologischen Institut, Abteilung Athen 77, 1962, pp. 262ss., pl. 77-78. Version en français page 96


21. An Amulet (?) of a Young Crouching African Hellenistic, 3rd – 2nd century B.C. H: 4.7 cm, (enlarged picture)

The solid cast figurine is partially covered in an attractive green patina. The circular hole, certainly ancient, pierced between the cheeks and the legs would have been used to suspend the object from a small chain. It may have been an amulet that one could have worn as a pendant or possibly, one that could have been suspended from a belt – in spite of the flattened, regular shape of the base, this figurine cannot stand on its own.

46

The amulet represents a crouching boy with Negroid features : his buttocks and feet are placed on the ground, his bent legs are drawn up to his chest, the head is slightly inclined to the right. The left hand is posed on the knee while the right, placed against the cheek, cradles the head. The young man is clothed in a small loincloth tied around his waist, which does not cover his genitals. In spite of the miniature size of this piece, the forms and the posture are rendered in a very realistic and observant manner, particularly concerning the musculature of the back, the features of the face and the folds of the fabric. The hair - arranged in large cylindrical curls - the wide flat face, and the broad flattened nose are all elements that allow us to identify this figure at first glance as a young African : the closed eyes and the head resting in the hand suggest that he may have settled himself on a street corner while waiting for his master, or that he is enjoying a moment of peace between the different chores assigned to him as a domestic slave. Iconographically, this figurine belongs to a well known genre, the earliest examples of which are

from the beginning of the Classical period and are known to us only through terracottas (Rhodes) and cameos. But it is at the end of the 3rd century B.C. and during the following Roman Period that this iconographical type enjoyed great popular success : the absence of precise references in the written sources indicate that the ancients may have used different images of young crouching Africans. If some examples served as amulets and good-luck charms, then others seem to have been toys (for example, among the objects found in a Roman tomb of a child discovered in Corinth, there was a terracotta rattle modeled in the form of a young crouching African who is sleeping), small vessels (perhaps for ink), even as appliqués or small handles for tripods or vessels, etc.

Provenance : Acquired on the European art market, 2001. Bibliography : SNOWDEN Jr. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Cambridge (Massachusetts) - London, 1991, pp. 164-166, fig. 194-195 ; pp. 229-233, fig. 302, 309. On the apotropaic roles of African figures, see : MITTEN D.G. - DOERINGER S.F., Master Bronzes from Classical World, Mayence/Rhin, 1968, p. 119, n. 116. SNOWDEN Jr. F. M., Blacks in Antiquity, Ethiopians in the Greco-Roman Experience, Cambridge (Mass.), 1970, pp. 272-273. Version en français page 97


22. An Applique (?) in the Shape of a Young Crouching African Hellenistic, 3rd – 1s t century B.C. H: 4.7 cm, (enlarged picture)

49

The object is in cast bronze, but it is hollow. The space between the feet and the shins is pierced by a large triangular opening. The statuette may very well have been soldered to a support such as a furniture element or a leg of a tripod, etc. For the type, cf. piece n. 21. The posture is identical, but the execution here is a bit rougher, or simply less idealized.

Provenance : Lennox Gallery, London, 1992. Bibliography : Cf. n. 21. Version en français page 98


23. A Toy (?) in the Shape of a Young Crouching African Hellenistic, 3rd – 1s t century B.C. H: 3.6 cm, (enlarged picture)

51

The figurine is solid cast. For the type, cf. n. 21. Here, the boy is naked and holds his head straight, with the fists clenched on either side of his jaw. This miniature example, rendered much squatter than usual, is perfectly shaped to be easily held in a child’s hand : it may have been a toy or a small gaming piece.

Provenance : Acquired on the European art market, 2003. Bibliography : Cf. n. 21. Version en français page 98


24. A Terracotta Flask (Lekythos ?) Representing a Seated Servant Hellenistic, 3rd – 1s t century B.C. H: 35.5 cm

52

This vessel, unusual because of its size, is clearly larger than average. Its shape corresponds to that of a lekythos, with the neck attached to the crown of the head and the handles fixed to the back of the figure at the neck ; the entire surface of the clay was painted completely black. Despite the presence of the base and some other differences in posture, the iconography of this lekythos is the same as that of the small bronzes n. 21 - 24. The young man, who is clearly identified as an African, is frozen in a moment of pause or expectation, but not of sleep : he lifts his head and directs his slightly blank gaze upward. The left arm is bent in a “V” and the fist is wedged under the jaw, while the right hand is posed on the left knee ; his legs are crossed. He is dressed in a smock (the article of clothing worn by artisans and by slaves) with an undulating border, which is tied on the right shoulder and which passes under the left arm. In spite of the very “popular” subject, it is necessary to emphasize the excellent

technical and artistic quality of this piece. This type of vessel is known from certain smaller parallels (ca. 25 cm) from Egypt (Fayoum), that display a nearly identical schema, but where the image of the young African is a cursory treatment compared to this one. Some other flasks in the shape of young seated Africans have been found in Southern Italy.

Provenance : Acquired from H. Korban, London and Geneva, 1993. Bibliography : PERDRIZET P., Les terres cuites grecques d’Egypte de la collection Fouquet, Nancy, 1921, p. 139, n. 368, pl. 97. SNOWDEN Jr. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Cambridge (Massachusetts) - London, 1991, pp. 176-183, n. 223-224. Version en français page 98


25. A Bronze Statuette of a Dancer Hellenistic, early 1s t century B.C. H: 18 cm, (enlarged picture)

This statuette, which was cast using the lost wax process, represents a subject often depicted by Alexandrian artists during the Hellenistic Period : a young man in the middle of an elaborate dance, gracefully raising his arms with his head thrown back. He probably held castanets in his hands with which to accompany himself. His expressive face and melancholic gaze turned upward, contrast with his exuberant pose and energetic movements. The simple loincloth worn draped around the waist characterizes this young man as a member of the lower classes, a slave or a street actor. Certain physical traits indicate that this may be a person of African origin : the hairstyle in large, tight curls, the rounded face, the pug nose and the unusually large dimensions of his phallus, features that Greek artists used to generally designate non-Hellenic peoples, in particular the “fringe groups” such as dwarves, grotesques, cripples, actors, Africans, etc. The three-dimensionality of this figure, meant to be seen in three-quarter and not frontally, is certainly an intentional effect, one that was carefully researched by the artist. In spite of this bold and complex position – only the tip of the right foot touches the ground, the body exhibiting torsion, the head turned in conjunction with the shoulders, etc. – the figure is rendered in a natural fashion, almost idealized. At the same time, his anatomy is very well balanced even while the musculature of the back, the legs and the stomach is highly developed. Contrary to many ancient images of Africans, who were summarily represented as grotesques, this work attains a new

artistic and technical level that is above average, and even the subject appears to have been treated differently in a nearly noble fashion. In the repertoire of Hellenistic artists – and much later by their Roman successors – dancers, acrobats or street actors were some of the most popular subjects. It is probable that these poses were often inspired by the creations of Alexandrian artists (Alexandria was one of the most important artistic centers of the Hellenistic world), as numerous images of nude African dancers, represented in positions that suggest a frozen moment in time, like here, are found throughout the Mediterranean world : Egypt, Carnutum, Herculaneum, Châlon-sur-Saône, Reims, etc.

Provenance : Ex-American Private Collection , acquired on the European art market, 1996. Bibliography : KOZLOFF A. - MITTEN D., The Gods Delight-The Human Figure in Classical Bronze, Cleveland, 1988, p. 124-131, n. 19-20. HIMMELMANN N., Alexandria und der Realismus in der greichischen Kunst, Tübingen, 1983, pp. 64-66, 88-89, pls. 42-43, 49, 62-63. SNOWDEN F.M., Blacks in Antiquity ; Ethiopians in the Greco-Roman Experience Cambridge (Mass.), 1970, pp. 28, 89, fig. 64. HAUSMANN, U., Hellenische Neger, in Mitteilungen des deutschen Archaeologischen Institut, Abteilung Athen 77, 1962, pp. 255-281. Version en français page 99

55


26. A Small Ivory (Bone ?) Plaque Representing the Head of an African Roman, 2nd – 3rd century A.D. H: 2.8 cm, (1:1 picture)

56

This minuscule triangular ivory fragment was probably a decorative element on a box, a chest or some other object of woodwork ; its back is flat. The three quarter view is perfectly rendered by the compression of the left half of the face. The figure sculpted in low relief is clearly meant to be an African (large round face, broad nose, curly hair, full lips), and his crown of ivy leaves would designate him as a cupbearer at a symposium.

Bibliography : MAIURI A., La casa del Menandro e il suo tesoro di argenteria, Rome, 1932, pp. 146-147, fig. 68 (black attendant with an ivy wreath, holding two askoi for the service of the wine). Version en français page 99


27. A Garnet Pendant of a Head of an African Greco-Roman, late 1s t century B.C. – 2nd century A.D.(?) H: 2.3 cm, (enlarged picture)

58

This minuscule head, broken at the base of the neck, certainly belonged to a statue of an African depicted standing or perhaps crouching. In spite of its size, the quality of the workmanship is clearly apparent, more a piece of sculpture than a mere gem. The Negroid features of the young man are evident in the treatment of the short, curly hair and the broad nose ; but the shape of the face, very fine and elongated, recalls features of Ethiopians or a cross between Ethiopians and Nubians. In Greco-Roman art, the use of semi-precious stones (agate, garnet, cornelian, etc.) or of amber for the creation of small jewels representing Africans are known from the end of the Classical Period : intaglios for rings, pendants for necklaces or earrings (cf. n. 28) carved in the shape of heads of Africans, a small agate pommel that reproduces three joined busts (two men and a woman), etc. On the other hand, no other whole figurine in garnet can be mentioned as a parallel for this statuette : it was probably an amulet that could be worn around the neck (a circular loop for the necklace is sculpted into the top of the head) to bring the

wearer apotropaic power and good-luck.

Provenance : Ex-Hatch-Conrad Collection, Rhineland, Germany, collected in the early 1970’s. Bibliography : SNOWDEN JR. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Cambridge (Massachusetts) - London, 1991, pp. 167-168, fig. 201 ; pp. 194-195, fig. 243-246. Version en français page 99


28. A Pair of Gold and Garnet Earrings Hellenistic, 4t h – 3rd century B.C. H: 2.5 cm, (enlarged picture)

The two earrings, clad in twisted gold wire, each end in a head of an African, sculpted from a fragment of garnet ; and whose eyes were applied. To imitate the curly hair on such a small gem, the jeweler utilized an ingenious technique : to the gold plaquette that covers the crowns of the two figures like a cap, he affixed many horizontal rows of twisted wire ornamented with small incised lines. Moreover, the features of the two faces clearly represent the ethnic characteristics of Africans. The ends of the earrings, from which the two heads hang, were decorated with linear and spiral motifs in relief. 61

The presence of a face of an African in garnet or amber to ornament jewels is known only on a few other pieces of Hellenistic jewelry : a pair of earrings like this one is in the Louvre, and another in the British Museum, which also holds clasps of pearl necklaces with similar type masks. As with statuette n. 27, it is probable that these small “exotic” heads were associated with good luck.

Provenance : Ariadne Gallery, New York. Bibliography: MARSHALL F.H., Catalogue of the Jewellery, Greek, Etruscan and Roman in the Department of Antiquities, British Museum, London, 1911, n. 1709, p. 186, pl. 31 ; n. 1961-1962, p. 216-217, pl. 36. SNOWDEN JR. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Cambridge (Massachusetts) - London, 1991, p. 194-195, Version en français page 100

fig. 244-245.


29. A Glass Flask in the Shape of a Head of an African Roman, second half of the 1s t century A.D. H: 9.8 cm, (enlarged picture)

The transparent glass with deep blue highlights is intact. The flask was mold blown in three parts whose joins are nearly invisible (the base and the front and back halves of the head, which were joined at the tops of the ears). This flask represents a head of a young African man with great realism, with a large face, slightly pug nose and full lips ; the hair is styled in horizontal rows of twisted curls. On his brow, he wears a crown of triangular leaves alternating with rounded berries. The neck of the vessel with its wide opening was situated at the top of the head. 62

Glass flasks in the shape of heads of Africans were known somewhat throughout the Mediterranean basin, but they were more frequent in the western part of the Roman Empire. Even if we cannot ignore the existence of the eastern prototype (Syria, Alexandria), it is nearly certain that in the western world there were glassmakers who were producing these vessels, perhaps in the region of Pompeii where the shape also appears as well as at Herculaneum. According to the analysis of M. Stern, who classified these flasks into different groups, this example belongs to type A3, which numbers only a few.

Provenance : Aboutaam Family Ancient Glass Collection, Geneva. Bibliography : STERN M., Roman Mold-blown Glass, The First through Sixth Century, The Toledo Museum of Art, Rome-Toledo, 1995, pp. 219-220, n. 139 and for the classification pp. 204-208. Version en franรงais page 100


30. A Small Marble Box with a Head of an African Roman (Apamea), beginning of the Imperial Period (1s t – 2nd century A.D.). H: 9.3 cm, (enlarged picture)

Among ancient sculpture, this head is very particular, and except for small chips, it is intact. It shows a young African woman whose ethnic features are indicated with such precision and realism, despite its miniature size, that an anthropologist would be able to identify her tribe of origin : the face, with the cleft chin, is large and solid, without any wrinkles but of a very fine and complete modeling of the musculature, especially of the cheeks and their apples. The nose is pugshaped and the lips are full ; the eyes are in transparent glass with the iris added in black. The small strong neck is ringed by horizontal lines typical of women, called the “rings of Venus”. The manner in which the hair is sculpted renders the curly hair of Africans very accurately : a multitude of long thin locks with surface incisions encircle the whole head and emanate from the crown, where, the surface is nevertheless smooth and flat (a plaster chignon may have been attached to this spot). Carved from white veined black marble, this head was not a simple sculpture : on the interior, it has a deep cylindrical cavity about 2-3 cm in diameter. Below the base, the rectilinear rail, which is perfectly preserved, would have been used to slide the lid (in wood ?) over this opening. The tubular

65

shape of the hole suggests the probable function of this object : it is a small box for precious objects, for example money. In this frame of reference, it is not difficult too see why they would have used the use of a head of an African, a sign of good luck. During the Hellenistic and Roman periods, sculptors wishing to reproduce images of Africans liked to use dark colored stones.

Provenance : Acquired from Elie Boustros, in the early 1980’s. Bibliography : SNOWDEN Jr. F.M., Blacks in Antiquity : Ethiopians in the Greco-Roman Experience, Cambridge (Massachusetts), 1970, pp. 197-198, fig. 251-252 ; pp.202203, fig. 256-258. ANDERSON M. L. - NISTA L. (ed.), Radiance in Stone, Sculptures in Coloured Marble from the Museo Nazionale Romano, Roma, 1989, pp. 70, n. 7. Version en français page 101


31. A Young Crouching Man in Black Marble Roman, early Imperial Period (late 1s t century B.C. – 2nd century A.D.) H: 45.3 cm

The only part that survives from the statue is the torso with the legs, as well as a base consisting of two sculpted ropes positioned on the shoulders of the figure. He is represented crouching and bent under the weight of the object that he carries on his back ; the lightly developed musculature of the person represented indicates that he is still a youth. Behind the head, a square hole would certainly have been used to insert the bottom part of a column or pillar. The head was facing forward, but slightly turned to the right. There are numerous anatomical details and the musculature is well modeled and rendered in a lifelike manner on the back, shoulders and on the chest. The vertebral column is indicated by a long depression while its sides are marked by slight undulations. Even the posture of the figure is carefully researched and unusual, the proportions of the statue faithfully taken from observations of life. In Greco-Roman art, the crouching or kneeling position is typical for figures burdened with heavy weights ; there are even some representations of such figures as early as the Archaic and Classical periods. Among the most famous figures represented in this manner, there is of course Atlas, the giant who had to carry the heavens on his shoulders. One also finds Barbarians, recognizable thanks to their costume, in this position from time to time, as well as satyrs : all of these characters play the role of telamons (the masculine equivalent of caryatides) and are often placed at the base of columns or monuments. In Athens, in the Theater of Dionysos, a crouching

silenos still holds up a part of the bema, located in front of the stage. The absence of all attributes prevents the precise identification of this young man as a specific mythological figure. The personage is probably of African origin : the presence of two small curls of hair preserved near the neck as well as the use of a dark colored stone for the creation of the statue both speak in favor of this hypothesis. This type of African servant kneeling and carrying a large weight on his back is occasionally seen among Alexandrian terracottas.

Provenance : Acquired on the Swiss art market, 1994. Bibliography : For the terracottas, see : SNOWDEN Jr. F.M., Blacks in Antiquity : Ethiopians in the Greco-Roman Experience, Cambridge (Massachusetts), 1970, pl. 40, a. On supporting figures in general, see : J. MARCADE, Au Musée de Délos, 1969, Paris, p. 199 and 448, pl. 24. R.M. SCHNEIDER, Bunte Barbaren, Worms, 1986. J. TRAVLOS, Pictorial Dictionary of Ancient Athens, Tübingen, 1971, p. 551. Version en français page 101

67


32. A Terracotta Statuette of a Standing Actor Greek (Corinth), middle of the 5t h century B.C. H: 8.9 cm, (enlarged picture)

68

The coroplath (a term that indicates an artisan who specializes in the production of terracotta statuettes) used two different techniques for the fabrication of this piece : the modeling by hand of the body and the molding of the head and face. At the beginning of the 5t h century B.C., this procedure is known especially from two regions of continental Greece : Corinth and Boeotia. The figurine represents a standing man whose balance is assured by two legs partially painted black and red and by a pointed tail ; on the shoulders, he wears a sort of sunburst cloak, fashioned from a long thin piece of fabric, rounded at the ends. The two arms hold the cloak around him, but they are completely covered. Contrary to the body, which is executed in a summary fashion, the head is very well modeled, as well as being very large : the remarkable threedimensional qualities of the mask – the anatomic details are either modeled or finely incised – add to the effects of the bichromy (red for the face, ears and hair ; black for the beard and moustache). The man has a long pointed beard while a mass of thick wavy hair frames his brow ; his ears are made from two clay buttons, modeled separately and slightly hollowed. A small group of three statuettes in the Cleveland

Museum of Art, probably originally Boeotian, and some other pieces from the British Museum in London (attributed to Corinthian artists) figure among the best parallels for this image : he is related to the satyrs (identified by the general typology of their faces and especially their pointed ears), who, because of their energetic movements and sharp gestures, seem to be in the middle of performing in a satyr play, a theatrical genre about which we know very little. In spite of the obvious connections, it is not certain that this figurine represents a satyr, but may perhaps be a human or divine figure : his face recalls Dionysiac masks that were suspended from Hermaic pillars.

Provenance : Ex-N.A.C. Embiricos Collection, London. Bibliography : HIGGINS R.A., Catalogue of the Terracottas in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities, British Museum, Vol. I, Greek : 730-330 B.C., London, 1967, pp. 253-255, n. 932-935. HOFFMAN H., Some Unpublished Boeotian Satyr Terracottas in Antike Kunst 7, 1964, pp. 67-71. MUSCARELLA O. W. (ed.), Ancient Art : The Norbert Schimmel Collection, New York, 1974, n. 46. Version en français page 102


33. A “Magenta” Ceramic Vase Representing an Actor on an Altar Hellenistic, 3rd century B.C. H: 11.8 cm, (enlarged picture)

The vessel in intact with many traces of polychromy preserved : red (hair, handle), bright pink (ribbons on the altar, head of the actor), sky blue (ears). This is one of the most beautiful and best preserved from this group of vases. Originally probably from Southern Italy (Campania ?), these so called “magenta” ceramics (end of the 4t h – 1s t century B.C.) were given their name by J. D. Beazley, who called them such because of their bright pink coloring, always appearing in the palette of colors used for their painted decoration. In their repertoire of shapes, two types recur : bottles and especially vases used to fill oil lamps, of which this piece is a very beautiful example. The filling of this vessel would have been achieved through the use of the holes pierced in the back of the actor (the bowl fixed just below the perforations is a standard feature and was used to catch the unavoidable drips of oil), while the transfer of the fuel to the lamp was through the small opening visible at the base of the left elbow. Aside from the actor, some other subjects represented in “magenta” ceramics are symposiasts, seated Africans, heads of Isis and all sorts of animals (in particular sacrificial animals, such as goats, sheet, bulls and pigs), etc.

71

fabric. As with guests at a banquet, a crown consisting of a thick band encircles his forehead. His situation is not terribly enviable : he seeks refuge at an altar, placing himself under divine protection : it is to flee his master, who is probably in a foul mood.

Provenance : Ex-American Private Collection. Exhibited : J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 1984-1996.

The features of this slave’s mask are associated from this point forward with those of the “New Comedy” : pug nose, thick arched brows, large, semi-circular megaphone-like mouth. He is dressed in a chlamys, held up in his right hand, while the left arm is completely enveloped in the

Bibliography : COURTOIS C., Le théâtre antique, Masques et figurines en terre cuite, Geneva, 1991, p. 29, n. 3. HIGGINS R., Magenta Ware in The British Museum Yearbook 1, 1976, pp. 1-32. SGUAITAMATTI M., Zwei plastische Vasen aus Unteritalien in Antike Kunst 24, 1981, pp. 107-113. Version en français page 103


34. A Terracotta Statuette of a Seated Actor Greek (Attic), middle of the 4t h century B.C. H: 8.9 cm, (enlarged picture)

The figurine, in yellowish-beige terracotta, is hollow ; the surface retains traces of red paint and white plaster. The man is seated on a stool covered by wavy fabric. The mask and the short dotted tunic, which does not cover the genitals, characterize this figure as an actor. He assumes a “thinking” position, with his legs spread, his left arm resting on his knee, while his right hand, placed on his chin, supports the head in an attitude of reflection, as if he is planning a prank. 72

Typologically, this genre of person is used in ancient low comedy to designate a slave ; the prominent buttocks and the rounded stomach are certainly padded, the disproportionate phallus is an attachment. In spite of its miniature size, the mask is modeled with extraordinary precision : the open mouth and large puckered lips, flattened nose, wrinkled cheeks and forehead, almond shaped eyes. The man even has pointed ears like a satyr, an unusual detail. This statuette can certainly be placed in relation to a famous group of terracottas in the Metropolitan Museum that come from an Athenian tomb and that constitute one of the most important and rare direct connections with the low comedy. Numerous figures from this group seem to belong to different comedies, thus making it is impossible to assign a title. Among the female figures, one can certainly recognize an old nurse, holding a swaddled baby in her arms, as well as some young women coquettishly veiling

their faces. Among the men, one can identify a statuette of Heracles, a traveler, perhaps a philosopher, and even a seated slave in a pensive pose that offers an exact parallel for this piece : according to M. Bieber, he was a precursor of the cunning, skilled slave, who would become a very important character in the “New Comedy”.

Provenance : Ex-N.A.C. Embiricos Collection, London. Published in : WEBSTER T.B.L., Monuments illustrating Old and Middle Comedy, Third Edition revised and enlarged by J.R. Green, London, 1978, p. 58-59, AT 22f. Bibliography : BIEBER M., The History of the Greek and Roman Theater, Princeton, 1961, pp. 45-48, n. fig. 198. TRENDALL A.D. - WEBSTER T.B.L., Illustrations of Greek Drama, London, 1971, p. 127, pl. IV,9, n. 20. Version en français page 103


35. A Bronze Statuette of an Actor Greek (Attic), first half of the 4t h century B.C. H: 7.9 cm, (enlarged picture)

74

This amusing figurine wears a mask of a comic actor, characterized by grotesque features (open mouth, as if he were in the middle of delivering his lines, asymmetrical eyes, frowning brows, prominent cheeks, etc.) : the man is dressed in a short-sleeved tunic and tight pants that do not cover his genitals. Underneath the tunic fastened at his left shoulder – designed to indicate an inferior social rank – the rounded stomach and the prominent buttocks accentuate the comic aspect of the figure. The man - who is standing in a frontal position – extends his arms to the left and to the right in a very theatrical posture : in his hands, he holds plates or vessels, whose leftovers remain on his open palms. Like the notable example of a complete statuette with its attributes found at Olinthus, this appears to be a kitchen slave (a cook, a server), who imitates the authoritative air of his master : this is a very popular character from the ancient low theater whose importance is also emphasized by the central role played by the banquet in these theatrical genres. The typology of this figurine is also known from replicas in terracotta and from a small number of bronze pieces that nevertheless present some small differences in position, the expression of the mask and in the more or less stylized execution. This bronze example in solid bronze is whole and the surface of the metal is in good condition ; it is more volumetric and better mode-

led than other similar pieces. Probably created in Attica at the beginning of the 4 t h century B.C., maybe after the last works by Aristophanes, this mask was certainly used until around 330 B.C. when Menander profoundly changed the nature of Athenian comic theater to create the “New Comedy”.

Provenance : Ex-N.A.C. Embiricos Collection, London. Published in : MITTEN D.G. - DOERINGER S.F., Master Bronzes from the Classical World, Mayence/Rhin, 1967, p. 120-121, n. 119 b. WEBSTER T.B.L., Monuments illustrating Old and Middle Comedy, Third Edition revised and enlarged by J.R. Green, London, 1978, p. 39-41, AB1a. Bibliography : In Pursuit of the Absolute, Art of the Ancient World, The G. Ortiz Collection, London, 1994, n. 155. MITTEN D.G. - DOERINGER S.F., Master Bronzes from the Classical World, Mayence/Rhin, 1967, p. 120, n. 118. ROBINSON D.M., Excavations at Olinthus X, Metal and Minor Miscellaneous Finds, Baltimore, 1941, pp. 1-6, pl. 1. Version en français page 104


36. A Terracotta Head of an Actor in a Half-Mask Hellenistic, 3rd – 1s t century B.C. H: 3.5 cm, (enlarged picture)

The head, broken at the base of the neck, retains many traces of stucco covered in red paint, visible all over the mask. The position of the head, lowered and turned to the left, and the expression of the actor – whose mouth is half open, whose eyes are squinting and whose brows are furrowed – indicate the distress and pain that the man seems to suffer. Except for the mouth and the nose, the rest of the face and the top of the head are covered by a mask, probably made out of pliable leather ; a fine thread, fixed behind the ears, attaches the tight fitting mask to the head of the actor. This type of mask, of a type that recall the masks from the Italian “commedia dell’arte” of the 16t h century, was not common in Antiquity : few statues of actors playing a scene with a similar mask are preserved. The workmanship of the head and the hair display remarkably meticulous attention to detail. At points, one could easily confuse the mask with the actual features of the actor : the modeling is precise and realistic, there are miniscule incisions for the wrinkles on the forehead and the brows, the hairstyles of the mask and the actor are differentiated, etc. Such artistic quality points to

77

an Alexandrian origin for this head. Provenance : Ex-N.A.C. Embiricos Collection, London. Bibliography : BESQUES S., Cat. raisonné des figurines et reliefs en terre cuite grecs, étrusques et romains, vol. IV-I, Epoque hellénistiques et romaine, Italie Méridionale, Sicile, Sardaigne, Paris, 1986, p. 74, pl. 66 a, ; p. 76, pl 68, d and f. LEYENAAR-PLAISIER P. G., Les terres cuites grecques et romaines, Cat. de la collection du Musée National des Antiquité à Leyden, Leiden, 1979, p. 340, n. 923, pl. 123. Version en français page 104


37. Mosaic Panel of a Theater Mask Roman, stone and glass paste, 2nd century A.D. Dimensions : ca. 67 x 64 cm.

This image, beautifully crafted, is also remarkable for its rich polychromy. The framework is composed of friezes with geometric patterns such as a yellow and black meander, mostly lost, and a red and blue “S” garland. The central panel of this mosaic is adorned with a theater mask with exaggerated features : a wideopen mouth, a flat nose, deep wrinkles on the forehead and cheeks and threatening eyes. The prototypes for this subject, well known from other mosaics - it is the mask of the old slave, a character from Ancient Comedy - can be found in the Hellenistic period, and which Roman artists reproduced in innumerable variations (cf. nn. 34 and 38).

Provenance : Asfar and Sarkis, early 1960’s. Published in : Phoenix Ancient Art n.1, 2005, n. 36. Bibliography : Some famous mosaics with theater scenes : ANDREAE B., Antike Bildmosaiken, Mainz on Rhine, 2003, fig. 231, fig. 238. Version en français page 105

79


38. A Bronze Applique of a Theater Mask Roman, 1s t – 2nd century A.D. D: 6.3 cm, (enlarged picture)

80

The mask, which is completely hollow, emerges in very high relief from a bronze disk with a rounded border ornamented with small straight lines. The brows were also mostly silvered ; the pupils would have been inlaid in another material. The grotesque features of the mask are those of a typical aged servant from ancient comedy : an unusually large, open mouth resulting from the “spira” (an artificial manipulation of the shape of the mouth that allows for amplification of the voice), a pug nose like that of a satyr, frowning brows and in relief, a wrinkled brow. The hair covers the head like a thick skullcap that ends on the sides in two spiraled locks. At the beginning of the Imperial Period, disks with theater masks are known in terracotta and much more rarely in bronze. Their exact function is unknown : it is possible that they were probably a decorative element to embellish a piece of woodwork, like a piece of furniture, a chest or a bronze brazier. Its circular shape also corresponds to that of a disc of a fulcrum (a bronze element from a banqueting couch), but no other examples cast in the form of a theater mask are known. A very similar piece in bronze (only the mask is different), ornaments the tree trunk being used as a seat by a statuette of a fisherman found at Pompeii (Naples) : originally, it may have been

part of a fountain.

Provenance : Ex-M. Alsdorf Collection, Chicago, collected in the 1960’s-1970’s. Bibliography : DE CARO S. (ed.), Il museo archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Naples, 1994, n. 220-221. REINACH S., Répertoire de la statuaire grecque et romaine, T. 1, Paris, 1897, p. 540, 3. WEBSTER T.B.L., Monuments illustrating New Comedy, Thrid Edition revised and enlarged by J. R. Green and A. Seeberg, London, 1995, p. 340, 4XB 42, pl. 47 (bronze, Pompeii) ; p. 382, 4XT 9-10 (2 examples in terracotta). Version en français page 105


39. A Marble Head of an Old Nurse Hellenistic, 1s t century B.C. H: 10.4 cm, (1:1 picture)

This miniature head belonged to a marble statuette, which would have measured around 60 cm high. The woman is sculpted with a shocking realism on par with some other famous Hellenistic works, such as the old drunkard from Munich. She is quite old as her appearance indicates : numerous deep, vertical wrinkles covering her cheeks and her neck, an accentuated thinness that is nearly emaciation. Her toothless mouth is open as if she is in the middle of crying out ; her eyes are raised to the sky in an expression full of despair. She is identifiable as a nurse thanks to the stretchy fabric bonnet that covers her head like a skullcap and holds her hair in place. Contrary to the withered features of her face, the hair has a healthy look, abundant and well kept. Carefully selected by the family, the nurse was a servant charged only with the weaning and initial education of the infant (its feeding was one of the mother’s tasks) ; then replaced by the tutor, the nurse would stay with the family, where she would continue to play the role of confidante, messenger, faithful servant, chamber maid and of course as nurse to any other babies. In the Odyssey, Eurycleia was first the nurse of Odysseus, then of his son, Telemachos : she was the first to recognize the hero upon his return from Troy thanks to an old scar on his leg, proof of the strong bond

83

that unites a nurse and her infant charge. In the iconography, they appear as old women, sometimes with arched backs, sometimes holding a child in their arms ; they are dressed in a long, sleeved chiton and wear a bonnet or a short veil ; they are always found near their master(s).

Provenance : Ex-Vollmer Collection, New York. Published in : BIEBER M., The Sculpture of the Hellenistic Age, New York, 1961, p. 141, fig. 585. Bibliography : On nurses, see : SCHULTZE B., Ammen und Pädagogen, Sklavinnen und Sklaven als Erzieher in der antiken Kunst und Gesellschaft, Mayence/Rhin, 1998. VILATTE S., La nourrice grecque in L’Antiquité classique, 60, 1991, pp. 5-28. On the iconography of old women, see : ZANKER P., Die trunkene Alte, Das Lachen der Verhöhnten, Francfort, 1989. Version en français page 106


40. A Marble Head of a Veiled Woman (A Nurse ?) Greco- Roman, 1s t century B.C. – 1s t century A.D. H: 24.5 cm

The bust, carved from a beautiful marble with a smooth polished surface, seems to have been part of a Roman sarcophagus : the asymmetry of the face is partially explained by the fact that the woman would have been seen in three-quarters. The neck cranes forward slightly, as if her back was rounded, and the numerous wrinkles of the skin, that cover her face and neck, indicate the extreme age of this figure ; she wears a thick fabric tunic while a veil covers her head that, falling just to her neck, nearly completely covers her hair. 84

Like n. 39, this figure is identifiable as a servant, probably as a nurse, but her features are modeled in an elegant, refined manner : everything is realistic. This representation is a wonderful image of feminine old age. It is necessary to emphasize the excellent artistic quality of this piece, with a very fine sense of three-dimensionality about the face and the folds created by the veil on the neck. This head can be compared to images of nurses sculpted on Roman sarcophagi, for example like those representing the saga of Medea or Niobe.

Published in : Sotheby’s New York, June 12th 2001, n. 33. Bibliography : Cf. n. 39 Die Antikensammlung im Pergamonmuseum und in Charlottenburg, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Mayence/Rhin, 1992, pp. 232-233, n. 119. For the sarcophagi with the saga or Medea or Niobe, see : Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. VII, Zurich, 1994, s.v. Medea, p. 393, n. 50-61 ; s.v. Niobe pp. 908 ss. Version en français page 106


86

1. Statuette de danseur nu en bronze

2. Statuette de danseur nu en bronze

Art hellénistique, IIe s. av. J.-C. Ht. 7.8 cm.

Art hellénistique (Alexandrie ?), IIe s. av. J.-C. Ht. 10.5 cm.

Cette pièce est un très bel exemple d’art réaliste hellénistique : du point de vue thématique, le bronzier a choisi de représenter une image de la vie quotidienne (un danseur de rue, atteint d’une maladie ou d’une malformation) très différente des grands épisodes mythologiques ou des images de personnages célèbres ; techniquement et stylistiquement, malgré la taille miniature de la statuette, le sujet est néanmoins traité avec une rigueur et une précision remarquables, dans l’observation et dans le rendu des mouvements et des détails anatomiques. La position apparemment non naturelle et très hardie de l’homme s’explique par les mouvements rapides d’une danse. Il est tellement pris par la cadence de ses sauts, qu’il paraît insensible à ce qui l’entoure : le poids du corps est concentré sur la pointe du pied gauche, qui est le seul point de contact avec le sol ; les jambes sont pliées et croisées ; le torse est plié vers l’avant, les épaules et la tête sont légèrement tournées vers la gauche ; dans la frénésie de la danse, son énorme sexe est coincé entre les jambes. L’homme, d’une maigreur impressionnante (l’ossature et la musculature du dos, de la poitrine et des jambes sont d’une rare précision), est bossu et présente une grosse malformation à la poitrine, qui a un pourtour énorme : peut-être dans sa jeunesse a-t-il été victime du rachitisme. L’âge du danseur est difficile à estimer mais le front largement dégarni et les traits du visage semblent indiquer que l’homme est plutôt âgé.

Cette statuette reprend le schéma typologique de la précédente : la principale différence entre les deux figures se situe au niveau stylistique. En effet les formes de cet homme sont moins exagérées et les détails anatomiques, moins apparents, sont mieux modelés et se fondent plus harmonieusement avec le corps et les mouvements de l’homme. Le danseur, à la tête rejetée vers l’arrière, paraît presque dans un état de transe, tellement il est concentré sur les mouvements qu’il doit exécuter. Il porte un imposant collier et peut-être un bonnet pointu au bord en relief. Il est extrêmement maigre, son dos présente une grosse bosse pointue entre les omoplates et sa poitrine est anormalement développée : comme le n. 1, ce danseur est malade voire infirme (rachitisme ?). Apropos des bossus dans l’art antique, M. D. Grmek et D. Gourevitch notent justement que leur fréquence est bien supérieure à la moyenne des personnes réellement touchées par cette malformation. Les deux auteurs expliquent ce phénomène par la signification apotropaïque et de porte-bonheur qui était attribuée aux porteurs d’un tel handicap.

Provenance : acquise de Elie Boustros, au début des années 1980. Bibliographie : REEDER E. D. (Ed.), Hellenistic Art in the Walters Art Gallery , Baltimore, 1988, pp. 141143, nn. 56-57. SNOWDEN Jr. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Cambridge (Massachussets) - Londres, 1991, fig. 297-298.

Publié dans : Sotheby's New York, 8 juin 1994, n. 169. Bibliographie : Cf. n. 1. Sur les anomalies du thorax et de la colonne vertébrale : GRMEK M. D. - GOUREVITCH D., Les maladies dans l’art antique, Paris, 1998, pp. 209-219.

3. Statuette grotesque en terre cuite

Art hellénistique ou romain, Ier s. av. - Ier s. ap. J.-C. Ht. 13.5 cm. En archéologie, le terme «grotesque» désigne une importante classe d’objets, généralement de petite taille et de qualité artistique très variable, où les malformations physiques et les maladies humaines servent à susciter le rire : les artisans antiques n’ont pas toujours traité affections et difformités de façon réaliste, mais ils s’en sont inspirés pour obtenir un effet exagéré et caricatural. Cette mode s’est développée


surtout en Asie Mineure (notamment à Smyrne) et en Egypte (Alexandrie), mais, pendant les époques hellénistique et romaine, elle a intéressé toute la Méditerranée. Images d’hommes ou plus rarement de femmes et enfants, de vieillards, de nains, de noirs, d’obèses ou d’émaciés, etc., le répertoire des «grotesques» est extrêmement varié. De même que les supports choisis par les artistes : on dénombre une grande quantité de figurines en terre cuite et de statuettes en bronze, mais aussi des peintures, des reliefs, des mosaïques, etc. La pièce en examen est un très bel exemple de statuette grotesque de la fin de l’époque hellénistique : l’homme est certainement un vieillard, comme l’indiquent le dos voûté et décharné (on peut compter les côtes et les vertèbres), les bras frêles et minces, le visage aux traits profondément creusés et la calvitie, qui laisse apparaître le contour irrégulier du crâne. Il est probablement un ouvrier ou un vendeur de rue, assis sur un tabouret ou sur un rocher ; le plateau ou le panier (?) pour transporter et étaler les objets à vendre était inséré dans la fente bien visible en bas de son ventre (le tenon rectangulaire fixé à l’épaule droite appartenait peut-être à une sangle qui aidait l’homme à soutenir sa marchandise). Les jambes de la figure sont perdues. Derrière le cou, la grosse bélière circulaire servait certainement à suspendre la statuette à un support dont la nature est actuellement inconnue : ce détail est présent seulement sur quelques autres figurines grotesques. La position et le masque caricatural de ce vieillard ne sont pas sans rappeler les images attiques à figures rouges de Géras (la personnification de la vieillesse, fils de la Nuit), qui malgré sa laideur et son physique débilité se joue de la force et de la supériorité d’Héraclès : grâce à son art de manier la parole, il peut encore échapper à la massue du héros. Provenance : G. Weber Kunsthandel, acquis en 2000. Bibliographie : BESQUES S., Catalogue raisonné des figurines et reliefs en terre-cuite grecs et romains, vol. II : Myrina, Paris, 1963, pl. 174-176. BESQUES S., Catalogue raisonné des figurines et reliefs en terre-cuite grecs, étrusques et romains, vol. III : époques hellénistique et romaine, Grèce et Asie Mineure, Paris, 1977, pl. 243 ss. GRMEK M. D. - GOUREVITCH D., Les maladies dans l’art antique, Paris, 1998, p. 215, fig. 160.

NIELSEN A.M. - OSTERGAARD J.S., The Eastern Mediterranean in the Hellenistic Period, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhague, 1997, pp. 110-111, n. 91. PERDRIZET P., Les terres cuites grecques d’Egypte de la collection Fouquet, Nancy, 1921, pl. 118, n. 449 (statuette avec bélière de suspension). Sur les images de Geras v. : Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. IV, Zürich, 1988, s . v. Geras, pp. 180-182, pl. 100-101.

4. Statuette de bossu en bronze

Art hellénistique ou romain, Ier s. av. - IIe s. ap. J.-C. Ht. 7.1 cm. La structure de cette statuette est étonnante et recherchée : corps vu de trois quarts, visage représenté de profil et épaules très inclinées. L’homme, qui est de constitution mince, paraît âgé : il se dirige d’une démarche apparemment chancelante vers la droite. Son dos voûté présente une bosse atypique à l’emplacement de l’omoplate gauche, bien visible sous le tissu du vêtement ; les jambes maigres et légèrement pliées, il fait un grand pas en avant peu assuré (s’agit-il d’un pas de danse ?). Il est habillé d’un chiton court, retenu à la taille par une ceinture, qui forme un pli horizontal épais. Le bras droit, presque entièrement nu, est avancé et plié : dans la main droite, l’homme tenait peut-être un bâton qui l’aidait à marcher ; le bras gauche est enveloppé dans le tissu. Malheureusement l’état de la surface du métal ne permet pas d’établir si le personnage était chauve (mis à part une mèche redressée sur le sommet du crâne) ou si sa tête était couverte d’un bonnet pointu, qui accentue la forme allongée de la tête. Son visage rappelle les figures grotesques, même si ses traits sont moins exagérés que d’habitude, à cause notamment de l’absence de rides sur les joues et sur le front. Vu de face le visage est trop étroit. Neugebauer a publié quelques répliques très précises de cette pièce (provenant d’Egypte) : il les interprète comme images d’un bouffon qui intervient lors d’un banquet pour amuser les convives. Il appuie son hypothèse sur un texte de Lucien (Symposion XVIII). Qu’on l’interprète comme infirme ou comme bouffon en train de danser, la statuette en examen reste néanmoins un très bel exemple du réalisme hellénistique appliqué aux arts mineurs : malgré le sujet peu «noble»

87


et une certaine usure de la surface, il est encore évident

Provenance : ancienne collection Hatch-Conrad, Rhénanie, Allemagne, collectionné au début des années 1970. Bibliographie : NEUGEBAUER K. A., Die griechischen Bronzen der klassischen Zeit und des Hellenismus, Berlin, 1951, pp. 89-91, pl. 40, nn. 7374. Sur le réalisme dans l’art mineur hellénistique : HIMMELMANN N., Alexandria und der Realismus in der greichischen Kunst, Tübingen, 1983.

5. Tźte grotesque avec verrue en bronze

Art hellénistique ou romain, Ier s. av. - Ier s. ap. J.-C. Ht. 4.2 cm. Cette petite tête - qui appartenait probablement à une statuette complète plutôt qu’à une applique - a été fabriquée selon la technique de la fonte creuse à la cire perdue et a ensuite été remplie de plomb pour éviter les fractures. Malgré quelques différences formelles (forme du nez, visage sans rides, etc.), la typologie correspond à celle des nombreuses images grotesques hellénistiques et romaines (cf. nos. 3, 6, 7, etc.), mais elle présente deux éléments nouveaux et rarement attestés : la malformation du cartilage du nez qui forme une grosse bosse irrégulière entre les yeux et dont il est impossible de déterminer la cause et la verrue (ou le fibrome) bien visible sur la partie gauche du crâne chauve. Il existe un nombre limité de figures caractérisées par la présence d’une petite excroissance dermatologique : le plus souvent il s’agit de portraits individuels.

88

Bibliographie : Des personnages présentant une verrues ou des fibromes : GRMEK M. D. - GOUREVITCH D., Les maladies dans l’art antique, Paris, 1998, pp. 51-56, pp. 245-246. MITTEN D.G., Classical Bronzes, Museum of Art Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, 1975, n. 19, pp. 62-64.

6. Pendentif-amulette en forme de tźte grotesque en jais noir

que cette pièce est d’une qualité remarquable.

Art romain, Ier - IIe s. ap. J.-C. Ht. 2.1 cm.


Ce pendentif-amulette représente un tête grotesque aux traits très vivants, presque individualisés par rapport à d’autres images stéréotypées de ce genre : les deux moitiés du visage sont nettement différenciées, le nez énorme est encore plus crochu et tordu que d’habitude, les rides sur le front, les sourcils et les joues sont asymétriques. Le trou de suspension est percé dans la mèche de cheveux modelée sur le sommet du crâne ; l’arrière de la tête est plat. Le jais noir (une variété de lignite, de couleur très brillante) est un matériau rarement utilisé dans l’Antiquité : il était travaillé surtout dans la partie orientale de l’empire romain (Syrie) et servait pour la fabrication de bijoux ou de parures (pendentifs, bracelets, etc.). Souvent associé avec de l’or (ce pendentif pouvait être monté sur une plaquette dorée), ce matériau permettait d’obtenir une bichromie très élégante et particulièrement bien adaptée aux objets d’orfèvrerie, qui combinaient le noir brillant avec l’éclat du métal. Provenance : acquise de Elie Boustros, au début des années 1980. Bibliographie : Des têtes grotesques en terre cuite typologiquement comparables : BURN L. - HIGGINS R., Catalogue of Greek Terracottas in the British Museum, Vol. III, Londres 2001, pl. 71-72. LEYENAAR-PLAISIER P. G., Les terres cuites grecques et romaines, Cat. de la collection du Musée National des Antiquité à Leyden, Leiden, 1979, pl. 87-91.

7. Camée en agate avec visage grotesque de profil

Art romain, Ier - IIe s. ap. J.-C. Ht. 1.5 cm. Taillé dans une agate grise et blanche, ce camée présente une tête grotesque penchée vers l’arrière et vue de profil : l’aspect général et les traits caricaturés sont les mêmes que pour le n. 8. Malgré la taille miniature de la pierre, la précision du travail est remarquable : les sourcils, la mèche de cheveux sur la nuque, le pavillon auriculaire et même les dents sont des détails visibles uniquement lors d’un examen minutieux de la pièce.

Bibliographie : BABELON E., Introduction au catalogue des camées antique et modernes de la Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, 1897, p. 175, n. 320, pl. 38. WALTERS H.B., Catalogue of the Engraved Gems and Cameos, Greek, Etruscan and Roman in the British Museum, London, 1926, nn. 2223-25, 2599-2600, 3347 (sans photos).

8. Camée en agate avec visage grotesque vu de face

Art romain, Ier - IIe s. ap. J.-C. Dim. 1.7 x 1.1 x 1 cm. A l’époque romaine, le genre grotesque est tellement populaire que même les orfèvres et les tailleurs de pierres précieuses l’adoptent pour orner leurs parures. Malgré leur rareté par rapport à d’autres thèmes mythologiques ou de la vie quotidienne, les personnages grotesques (en pied ou tête seule) sont attestés dans la glyptique soit sur des gemmes soit sur des camées. Leur présence sur de tels supports s’explique probablement par le rôle apotropaïque qui leur était attribué : une bague ou un pendentif représentant un masque grotesque devait servir comme amulette et/ou porte-bonheur. Cette intaille ovale, en agate bleutée et blanche (la monture est moderne), est intacte : elle reproduit en très haut relief - pratiquement en ronde bosse (ce qui implique des capacités techniques extraordinaires de la part du graveur de pierre) - une tête grotesque à l’expression mélancolique, qui contraste avec l’esprit plutôt irrévérencieux et de moquerie du genre. Le vieillard, exceptionnellement vu de face, est rendu avec une force et une précision des détails remarquables : le crâne chauve et rond est couronné d’une petite mèche de cheveux, les joues et le front sont ridés, les yeux sont profondément marqués, avec les pupilles qui fixent droit le spectateur, le nez est tordu et aquilin. L’asymétrie de ce visage et la tristesse de son regard expriment un sentiment beaucoup plus humain que les habituelles figures grotesques, comme s’il s’agissait d’un portrait individuel. Aucun autre exemple de camée avec une tête grotesque vue de face n’est connu. Provenance : ancienne collection Feuardent, collec-

89


tionnée fin du 19ème siècle.

9. Tźte de mort en argent

Art hellénistique(Asie mineure), fin du Ier s. av. J.-C. Ht 1.8 cm.

90

Bibliographie : Cf. n. 7.

Creux et composé de plusieurs éléments, ce crâne appartenait probablement à un squelette entier mais articulé, comme l’attestent la forme de l’ouverture sous la nuque et les deux petits trous dans l’arrièrebouche, où pouvaient s’insérer les vertèbres cervicales. A l’arrière de la tête, il y a un petit tenon cylindrique dont la signification n’est pas claire. Les proportions et le rendu sont étonnants de réalisme et prouvent encore une fois que, déjà à cette époque, les notions d’anatomie étaient solidement répandues chez les artistes : on notera surtout l’articulation de la mâchoire qui s’ouvre et se referme, les différences dans la taille et la forme des dents (molaires, incisives) et les soudures des plaques crâniennes. Ce crâne a été trouvé avec une monnaie portant l’effigie de Labienus, un général de Jules César : il est donc à dater de la fin de l’époque républicaine ou du début de l’Empire. A l’époque hellénistique et romaine, les représentations de squelettes sont un sujet à la mode : ils apparaissent non seulement dans les arts mineurs (toreutique, glyptique, céramique à relief, statuettes en bronze non articulées) mais aussi sur des mosaïques polychromes ou en noir blanc. Comme plus tard dans la tradition chrétienne médiévale, leur signification est en relation avec la mort et se rapproche de façon directe mais parfois simpliste des conceptions philosophiques, le plus souvent épicuriennes. Ainsi, les écrivains antiques représentés sous la forme de squelettes et identifiés par des inscriptions en grec, qui apparaissent sur les célèbres modioli (gobelets) du Louvre (trésor de Boscoreale), prononcent des maximes telles que «réjouis-toi pendant que tu es en vie», «la vie est un théâtre», «demain est incertain», «le plaisir est suprême», etc. La sépulture d’une famille aisée, les Quintiliens, découverte sur la via Appia à Rome, est ornée d’une mosaïque en noir blanc qui met en scène un squelette couché, désignant de son index une inscription en grec au caractère philosophique évident : «connais-toi toi-même». Une autre mosaïque - provenant probablement d’une salle de symposium d’une villa détruite par l’éruption du Vésuve - représente un squelette noir sur fond blanc


qui tient deux cruches à vin. Sa simple présence et son regard fixe, avec de gros yeux carrés noirs, rappellent à tous les convives, et même pendant un moment de fête, l’inéluctabilité de la mort (memento mori en latin). Un squelette en relation avec le monde du symposium apparaît aussi dans la littérature latine, soit le Satiricon de Pétrone (34, 8) : pendant le banquet, Trimalcion montre à tous les convives un squelette articulé en argent, qu’il laisse tomber plusieurs fois sur la table, avant de prononcer un petit discours dont le sens s’approche du Carpe diem. La scène d’une mosaïque polychrome, trouvée à Pompéi, est plus élaborée : une tête de mort est suspendue au-dessus de la roue de la fortune et du papillon de Psyché. Sur le fond, se trouve une balance qui soutient de son bras gauche les symboles de la richesse et de la royauté (un sceptre et une toge pourpre) et de l’autre côté un bâton de mendiant, quelques haillons et une besace de pauvre, comme pour indiquer que devant la mort tout le monde est égal (omnia aequat mors). Provenance : acquis sur le marché d’art européen en 1995. Bibliographie : ADRANI A., Appunti su alcuni aspetti del grottesco alessandrino in Gli archeologi italiani in onore di Amedeo Maiuri, Cava dei Tirreni, 1965, pp. 39-62. ANDREAE B., Antike Bildmosaiken, Mayence/Rhin, 2003, pp. 258-265. BARATTE F., Le trésor d’orfèvrerie romaine de Boscoreale, Paris, 1986, pp. 64-67. Quelques petits squelettes en bronze : DE RIDDER A., Bronzes antiques du Louvre, T. I, Les figurines, Paris, 1913, p. 98, n. 710, pl. 49. Die Antikensammlung im Pergamonmuseumund in Charlottenburg, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Mayence/Rhin, 1992, p. 294, n.160. REINACH S., Répertoire de la statuaire grecque et romaine, vol. III, p. 205, 4 ; vol. IV, p. 440, 1.

10. Coupe en argent doré avec satyres dansant

Art hellénistique, fin de l’époque hellénistique, Ier s. av. J.-C. Ht. 3.6 cm, Diam. 17.8.

Cette phialé, ornée d’un médaillon qui était entièrement doré, a été modelée par martelage ; la scène en relief du médaillon a été obtenue au repoussé, probablement sur une matrice en bois. Malgré la taille miniature de la scène et les attitudes complexes des danseurs, les proportions et les détails sont incisés et modelés de façon très naturelle et fidèle: la musculature et les formes des corps sont bien différenciés pour exprimer l’âge de deux figures; des minuscules incisions indiquent les mèches de cheveux; le visage aux traits marqués du silène est concentrée sur ses pas de danse; le contour tourmenté du tronc, l’écorce et les feuilles des arbres sont extrêmement réalistes, etc. Grâce à sa maîtrise technique, l’artiste a su rendre à la perfection la gaieté de cette danse, qui est évidemment en étroit rapport avec l’emploi des coupes, des vases à boire, utilisés lors des symposia. La scène se déroule près d’un sanctuaire de Priape, dans un milieu naturel, caractérisé par le fond caillouteux et par un arbre recourbé aux feuilles triangulaires et dentelées (un platane ?). Un personnage âgé (probablement un silène), chauve mais barbu et habillé d’un pagne court, danse avec un jeune satyre, reconnaissable à sa petite queue ; dans leurs mouvements frénétiques, ils sont en train de sautiller en se tenant les mains. Un lièvre, capturé à la chasse, est peut-être un don entre amants ; l’animal est enveloppé dans un baluchon suspendu à une branche. Entre les danseurs et l’arbre, il y a un hermès priapique posé sur une haute base. Le torse du dieu est nu, son sexe au repos ; de la main droite il tient un thyrse ; sur la tête, il porte une sorte de foulard, la mitra. Les hermès sculptés en forme de Priape apparaissent dans l’art grec dès le début du IIIe s. av. J.-C. Ils sont souvent placés dans un milieu sylvestre ou champêtre et, de ce fait, sont en relation avec le culte de divinités naturelles ou sauvages comme Dionysos, les satyres et/ou les silènes, Pan, Artémis et les nymphes, etc. A partir de l’époque hellénistique, les représentations de thiasos, de danses de satyres et/ou ménades, de disputes entre satyres et nymphes se déroulent régulièrement en la présence d’un hermès priapique. Priape est un dieu originaire de Lampsaque, ville située sur les Dardanelles, et fils d’Aphrodite et de Zeus (selon une autre tradition de Dionysos). Sa difformité - Priape était pourvu d’un phallus démesuré - était le fruit d’un maléfice d’Héra, qui entendait ainsi punir la relation

91


92

extraconjugale de son époux. Abandonné par sa mère, il fut élevé par des bergers, qui rendirent un culte à sa virilité ; ceci explique pourquoi Priape demeura une divinité essentiellement rurale et rustique, préposée à la garde des jardins, des vignobles, des vergers et de la végétation en général. Iconographiquement, l’attitude des deux danseurs a de nombreux parallèles, qui apparaissent déjà dans l’art classique (lutteurs peints sur la céramique attique à figures rouges, images de satyres agressant une nymphe, etc.), mais que l’on retrouve encore dans les représentations romaines : par exemple, parmi les personnages qui ornent un fulcrum (petit élément en bronze servant à décorer un lit) du Palais des Conservateurs à Rome, il y a un groupe de deux figures, un homme et une femme, qui dansent dans un cadre champêtre et de vendange à côté d’un hermès priapique. Leurs mouvements sont les mêmes que ceux du silène et du satyre de ce médaillon. La forme, qui est peu utilisée à l’époque romaine, le style des figures et l’ensemble de la composition, dont l’esprit reste grec, permettent de fixer la datation de la phialé vers la fin de la période hellénistique, probablement entre la fin du IIe s. et le Ier s. av. J.-C. Provenance : ancienne collection De Chambrier, Neuchâtel (Suisse), constituée au XIXe siècle. Publié dans : Phoenix Ancient Art, 2006 - n. 1, n. 9. Bibliographie : Sur Priape en général, voir : Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. VIII Suppl., 1997, s . v. Priapos. D’autres représentations de danseurs dans un sanctuaire de Priape dans : FAUST S., Fulcra, Figürlicher und ornamentaler Schmuck an antiken Betten, pp. 69, 206 et pl. 23 (fulcrum). OLIVER Jr. A. - LUCKNER K.T., Silver for the Gods : 800 Years of Greek and Roman Silver, Toledo, 1977, nn.142-143. Des phialaï de la même forme : KARABELNIK M., Aus der Schatzkammern Eurasien : Meisterwerke antiker Kunst, Zürich, 1993, pp. 182ss. POZZI E. (éd.), Le collezioni del Museo Nazionale di Napoli, vol. I,1, Naples, 1989, p. 206, n. 14.

11. SilŹne (?) encapuchonné en bronze

Art romain, Ier s. ap. J.-C. Ht. 9.3 cm. La statuette est en fonte pleine, seul l’extrémité du capuchon est perdue. L’image représente un homme âgé et barbu, entièrement enveloppé dans un manteau (paenula) dont le capuchon est remonté sur la tête de la figurine : seuls le visage ovale et la partie inférieure des jambes sont visibles. Il est chaussé de petits souliers en cuir avec noeud. Sous l’épais tissu du manteau, on devine la forme bien potelée du ventre et le contour des bras, qui sont pliés et posée sur le ventre. Le manteau tombe verticalement en formant des plis réguliers et bien modelés. Le visage ressort du bord du capuchon comme s’il s’agissait d’un masque. Malgré l’impossibilité de voir la forme des oreilles et l’expression étrangement sombre, avec les sourcils courroucés et les yeux plissés, la typologie générale semble désigner ce personnage comme un silène : les proportions du corps sont trapues et rondelettes, la tête est trop grande, le front est bombé et haut (les silènes sont chauves), la grosse moustache entoure les lèvres charnues, le nez est épaté. Le menton est caché par une barbe pointue et bien soignée. Les silènes encapuchonnés sont rares, mais le type est attesté par quelques autres bronzes romains. Cette interprétation présente néanmoins quelques difficultés, notamment à cause du visage sérieux de la statuette, qui contraste avec l’habituelle gaieté des silènes. Dans l’iconographie antique, d’autres figures portent un long manteau avec capuchon pointu : on pense en particulier à Télesphore (le petit génie des guérisons, caractérisé comme un enfant bienveillant, qui est le plus souvent lié à Asclépios), à des acteurs, voire à de simples vieillards. Provenance : Kunstwerke der Antike, Münzen und Medaillen A.G., Auktion 34, 6 mai 1967, Bâle, 1967, p. 19, n. 35. Bibliographie : NEUGEBAUER K. A., Antike Bronzestatuetten, Berlin, 1921, pp. 109-110, fig. 62. VON SACKEN E., Die antiken Bronze des k.k. Münzund Antiken Cabinetes in Wien, Vienne, 1871, pp. 68ss, pl. 33, 4. D’autres figures avec capuchons : BABELON E. -


BLANCHET J.-H., Bronzes antiques de la Bibliothèque

12. Relief en marbre avec tźte de Pan

Art romain, IIIe s. ap. J.-C. Dim. 40.6 x 31.4 cm.

Nationale, Paris, 1895, pp. 172-173, nn. 382-383.

BESQUES S., Cat. raisonné des figurines et reliefs en

terre-cuite grecs, étrusques et romains, vol. IV-II,

Epoque hellénistiques et romaine, Cyrénaïque, Egypet

Ptolémaïque et romaine, Afrique du Nord et Proch-

Orient, Paris, 1992, pp. 73-74, pl. 40.

Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae

(LIMC), Vol. VII, Zürich, 1994, s. v. Telesphoro s, pp.

870-878.

Ce fragment en marbre, de forme vaguement triangulaire, conserve les restes d’une tête masculine finement et savamment sculptée en relief et représentée de profil gauche. Au-dessus et au-dessous de la tête, on voit un bord en relief, légèrement arrondi. L'homme est caractérisé par des traits fortement marqués, presque caricaturaux : ses sourcils sont bombés et froncés, le nez est camus et gros, les lèvres sont charnues, le menton proéminent et arrondi est orné d'une petite barbe pointue, la mâchoire est forte et nette, les pommettes et les joues sont bien modelées. Il porte une chevelure courte et drue qui est organisée en petites mèches désordonnées et séparées par de profondes incisions. Le sommet de l'oreille est brisé, mais elle se terminait probablement en pointe. Malgré l'absence d'attributs précis et décisifs, l'iconographie générale permet de reconnaître dans cette tête une image du dieu champêtre Pan : il est possible qu'un des traits sculptés au-dessus de la chevelure appartenait à une des cornes de bouc, dont ce dieu est normalement pourvu. L’identification comme satyre paraît moins probable. Pan, dont le culte est répandu dans toute la Grèce et à partir de l'époque impériale aussi dans le monde romain, est le dieu des bergers et des troupeaux. Ses sanctuaires sont souvent immergés dans la nature, voire situés à l'intérieur d’une grotte. Il est représenté comme un être hybride avec tête humaine et oreilles pointues ; sur le front, il a une paire de cornes de bouc. Ses traits presque grotesques et son expression de ruse sont parfois inquiétants. Le torse est humain mais velu, tandis que la moitié inférieure du corps est celle d'un bouc, avec des sabots à la place des pieds. Typologiquement, ce relief est très proche d'une tête de Pan en trois dimensions conservée au Fine Arts Museum de Boston. Provenance : ancienne collection C. Kempe, Suède, collectionné avant 1967. Bibliographie : COMSTOCK M. B. - VERMEULE C. C., Sculpture in Stone, The Greek, Roman and Etruscan Collections of the Museum of Fine Arts,

93


Boston, Boston, 1976, p. 130, n. 201. OSTERGAARD J. S., Catalogue Imperial Rome, NyCarlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhague, 1996, pp. 196-197, n. 100. Sur Pan v. : Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), Vol. VIII suppl., Zürich, 1997, s. v. Pan, pp. 923-941.

13. Skyphos attique ą figures rouges avec deux nains dansant

Art grec, deuxième moitié du Ve s. av. J.-C. Ht. 7 cm.

94

Petit skyphos à corps hémisphérique et base annulaire, avec une anse verticale rubanée et une anse horizontale à section circulaire. A l’exception des deux figures de nains, la surface du récipient est entièrement noire ; le fond de la scène est désigné par une ligne ondulée qui représente probablement un sol en terre battue. Les deux nains, qui sautillent sur une seule jambe, sont probablement en train de danser : l’un est vu de face (il baisse la tête et porte sa main gauche vers le front) tandis que l’autre, vu de profil, pose sa main gauche sur sa hanche. Ils sont chauves et portent une petite barbe pointue, détails qui les caractérisent comme adultes. Leur nanisme se manifeste à travers les jambes trop courtes et la taille de la tête, qui est trop grande. Il existe quelques autres images de couple de nains peints sur la céramique attique à figures rouges, mais le rapport entre les deux figures n’est jamais aisé à définir : s’agit-il de deux figures exécutant la même danse ou du même personnage dessiné deux fois ? Une coupe fragmentaire de Hambourg réunit dans le médaillon, un espace bien plus restreint que les deux faces d’un s k yphos, une paire de nains dont les mouvements correspondent parfaitement à ceux de ce récipient : là il s’agit certainement de deux personnages différents peut-être des frères, voire des jumeaux - qui dansent ensemble. A la période archaïque, les monuments grecs ne représentent que les Pygmées - une population mythique pour les Grecs - qui sont considérés des nains ethniques, tandis que les nains pathologiques n’apparaissent que bien plus tard, au Ve s. avant notre ère, sur les vases à figures rouges. Provenance : Nicolas Koutoulakis, Genève et Paris,

acquise au début des années 1970. Bibliographie : Des représentations de couples de nains dans la céramique attique à figures rouges : DASEN V., Dwarfs in Ancient Egypt and Greece, Oxford, 1993, pp. 288-289, pl. 42. HORNBOSTEL W., Aus Gräber und Heligtümern, Die Antikensammlung W. Kropatschek, Mayence/Rhin, 1986, p.142, n. 83. Sur l’interprétation comme jumeaux, v. : DASEN V. , Jumeaux, jumelles dans l’Antiquité grecque et romaine, Zurich, 2005, pp. 221-223.

14. Statuette de nain boxeur en bronze

Art romain, début de l’époque impériale (Ier - IIe s. ap. J.-C.). Ht. 9.8 cm. Cette pièce a été réalisée en fonte pleine selon la technique de la cire perdue ; les yeux du personnage sont incrustés en argent (seul le droit est conservé). Le sommet de la tête, les mains et les pieds sont percés de trous circulaires, dont la présence ne peut être expliquée de manière précise : ce nain était fixé à un autre objet, mais la nature de la pièce dans son ensemble nous échappe : s’agissait-il d’un récipient avec une anse figurée, d’un candélabre avec pied figuré, d’une groupe de statuettes de nain, etc. ? Les pieds, disposés l’un devant l’autre, comme si le nain se tenait sur une poutre, n’assurent pas l’équilibre vertical de la statuette. Les proportions de la figurine sont typiques des représentations antiques des nains. Bien que les Anciens n’aient pas eu les moyens scientifiques pour décrire les variantes des malformations connues sous le terme de nanisme, ils ont su en présenter les aspects extérieurs les plus évidents : membres disproportionnés, tête trop grande, visage plat, ventre et fesses proéminents, malformation de la colonne, tendance à l’obésité, etc. Parmi les différentes formes connues de cette affection, le nanisme disproportionné (achondroplasie) est celui qui apparaît le plus fréquemment dans la nature ainsi que dans l’iconographie gréco-romaine : les images de nains se distinguent généralement par les jambes et/ou les bras trop courts et par une tête surdimensionnée, tandis que le torse a une taille souvent


normale. Une autre anomalie fréquente, mais qui n’a pas de fondement scientifique, est la taille démesurée du sexe, qui avait peut-être simplement une valeur apotropaïque. Deux seules caractéristiques du nanisme apparaissent de manière évidente sur cette statuette : les jambes courtes avec les fesses proéminentes et arrondies et le phallus trop long. Le nain est représenté debout, sur la pointe des pieds ; ses bras sont soulevés à l’horizontale et dirigés légèrement vers la gauche ; son corps est entièrement nu mais il semble porter un bonnet ; ses mains et ses poignets sont protégés par trois lanières en cuir, que les boxeurs antiques utilisaient à la place des gants. Le torse est doté d’une musculature très développée, aussi bien dans le dos que pour les abdominaux. Tous ces détails anatomiques très réalistes sont rendus par un remarquable travail plastique, qui alterne avec précision les volumes bien modelés et les petites dépressions. Contrairement aux représentations de nains exécutées par des artisans d’origine alexandrine ou d’Asie Mineure, qui sont le plus souvent caractérisées par des traits caricaturaux, la statuette en examen est très sobre : la malformation de cet homme est rendue avec réalisme et respect. Typologiquement, l’attitude de ce nain est encore proche des pugilistes peints sur les amphores panathénaïques. Il est en train de sautiller sur la pointe des pieds pour éviter les coups de son adversaire et tend ses bras pour le frapper. Malgré quelques variantes (bras pliés pour se protéger, torse légèrement penché, etc.), la même iconographie est suivie par d’autres images romaines de nains. Chronologiquement, il faut dater cette statuette des premiers siècles de notre ère. Provenance : Christian Niederhuber, Vienne, 1998.

Bibliographie : En général sur les nains dans l’Antiquité, v. : DASEN V., Dwarfs in Ancient Egypt and Greece, Oxford, 1993. Quelques statuettes de nains-boxeurs : COMSTOCK M.-VERMEULE C., Greek, Etruscan and Roman Bronzes in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1971, p. 128, n. 143. DE RIDDER A., Bronzes antiques du Louvre, T. 1, Les figurines, Paris, 1913, nn. 703-708

15. Mosaēque représentant un nain en lutte contre une grue

Art romain, IIe s. ap. J.-C. Dim. 104 x 80.5 cm. Ce panneau de forme rectangulaire ornait probablement le sol de la salle de banquet d’une riche villa romaine. Le nom inscrit en haut à droite est peut-être celui du nain, tandis que la longue phrase en bas reproduit en grande partie les cris de l’oiseau pendant la lutte. Le nain, qui est désigné comme tel par les jambes courtes mais musclées et par la taille démesurée des organes génitaux, a attrapé la grue par son long cou, qu’il essaie de serrer et de tordre. L’oiseau est encore debout et semble bouger ses ailes pour se libérer de sa mauvaise posture : son attitude et sa coloration avec des tesselles gris clair font penser à un héron. A l’époque hellénistique et romaine, les images de nains présentent souvent aussi des éléments typique des figures «grotesques» : sur cette mosaïque, on notera que la courbure du dos du nain est trop accentuée, sa tête est trop grande et son nez trop long et pointu. L’attitude ce personnage est très similaire à celle d’un nain «porte-bonheur» d’une mosaïque contemporaine trouvée à Antioche. La lutte entre les Pygmées et les grues est un légende très populaire dans la littérature et dans l’art grécoromain : à l’époque archaïque, les Pygmées sont représentés comme des hommes vigoureux et farouches mais de petite taille, combattant contre des grues qui pillaient régulièrement leurs récoltes, comme l’on voit par exemple sur le pied du célèbre cratère François de Florence. Mais à partir du Ve s. av. J.-C., un important changement est intervenu dans l’iconographie de ce mythe : les petits hommes qu’étaient les Pygmées sont de plus en plus souvent remplacés par des nains dysplasiques aux jambes courtes. Sur les mosaïques et les peintures romaines racontant cet épisode (cf. surtout les grandes scènes se déroulant en Egypte dans un milieu luxuriant au bord de l’eau, que l’on appelle nilotiques) les «pygmées» ne se distinguent plus du tout des images courantes d’autres nains achondroplases, si ce n’est qu’ils ont parfois la peau foncée. Provenance: acquis sur le marché d’art européen en 1990. Bibliographie : Quelques parallèles d’époque romaine : CIMOK F., Antioch Mosaics, A corpus,

95


Istanbul, 2000, pp. 36-37.

16. Garćon nain en bronze

Art hellénistique ou romain, IIe s. av. - IIe ap. J.-C. Ht. 6 cm.

DUNBABIN K.M.D., Mosaics of the Greek and Roman

World, Cambridge, 1999, pp. 146-147, fig.152.

96

Sur les Pygmées dans l’Antiquité, v. : Lexicon

La statuette en fonte pleine a perdu les pieds. Elle représente un enfant debout, avec la jambe droite avancée ; le bras gauche est posé sur le ventre tandis que droit est complètement plié, de manière que le garçon se touche l’oeil (ou la joue) avec l’index. Il est habillé d’une tunique, courte retenue à la taille par une ceinture et pourvue des petites manches. Son développement physique ne paraît s’être déroulé de façon très harmonieuse, puisque la tête est trop grande, les jambes et les bras sont trop courts et les mains sont démesurées ; en plus, il a un gros ventre tout arrondi. Cette figurine, pour laquelle il n’est pas possible de proposer de parallèles, est énigmatique : l’enfant souffre probablement d’une maladie ou d’une malformation dont il est impossible de préciser la nature exacte. Les dimensions de la tête, des bras et des jambes pourraient le désigner comme un nain, mais la taille des mains et le ventre enflé sont plus difficiles à expliquer. Le geste de la main droite portée vers la visage n’est pas courant: on le retrouve par exemple sur une statuette d’acteur en terre cuite du IVe s. av. J.-C., lequel serait en train de se lamenter. S’agirait-il ici d’un petit enfant chagriné qui essuie une larme, peut-être un orphelin vivant dans la rue, comme en connaissaient certainement les quartiers pauvres de Rome, Antioche, Alexandrie ou d’autres villes antiques? Provenance: acquis sur le marché d’art européen en 2002.

Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol.

Bibliographie : Sur les nains cf. : DASEN V., Dwarfs in Ancient Egypt and Greece, Oxford, 1993. GRMEK M. D. - GOUREVITCH D., Les maladies dans l’art antique, Paris, 1998, pp. 198-209. La statuette d’acteur se lamentant : COURTOIS C., Le théâtre antique, masques et figurines en terre cuite, Genève, 1991, p. 27, n. 3.

17. Aryballe plastique représentant une tźte de noir

Art attique, début du Ve s. av. J.-C. (500-490 av. J.-C.). Ht. 9.6 cm. VII, Zürich, 1994, s.v. Pygmaioi, pp. 594-601.

Malgré deux fragments recollés sur la nuque, cet ary-


balle est pratiquement intact. Il est pourvu d’un goulot en forme d’entonnoir renforcé par deux petites anses recollées. A l’exception de la base réservée, la surface est entièrement peinte en noir ; des restes d’un pigment (?) rouge sont conservés sur les lèvres et sur les cheveux, les yeux étaient probablement peints en blanc. Le personnage est clairement caractérisé comme africain grâce à la peau peinte en noir mais aussi grâce au modelage réaliste qui imite précisément les traits d’un noir, comme si le coroplathe avait été un anthropologue désirant décrire une population peu connue : le visage présente un certain prognathisme, les lèvres sont charnues, le nez est épaté. La chevelure crépue est rendue par les cercles peints en pourpre sur la calotte. A la fin du VIe av. J.-C. plusieurs ateliers de potiers attiques ont fabriqué des récipients, modelés en forme de tête de noir (simples ou janiformes), que J. D. Beazley a rassemblés dans un article célèbre. Cette aryballe est modelé de façon encore plus sensible que ses parallèles, surtout dans le rendu de la structure osseuse de la tête (arcades sourcilière, pommettes, contour de la mâchoire, menton) ; la position de la tête, légèrement basculée vers l’arrière, permet même d’exécuter un dessin plus réaliste du cou, qui n’est pas simplement cylindrique mais qui reproduit fidèlement la pomme d’Adam et la musculature. Le terme couramment utilisé dans les textes grecs pour désigner les habitants de l’Afrique est Aithiops (ΑΙΘΙΟΨ, auquel les lexicographes anciens et modernes attribuent le sens de «au visage brûlé» ; le même mot, Aethiops, est passé en latin). Dans plusieurs langues modernes il n’indique aujourd’hui qu’une partie du continent noir et un groupe ethnique précis (Ethiopie, éthiopien). Jusqu’au début du Ve s., les connaissances des Grecs sur l’Afrique et ses habitants sont plutôt sommaires : dans la peinture athénienne sur céramique, qui est notre source iconographique la plus importante pour cette période, les images de noirs se limitent au type «pur» avec les traits somatiques fortement marqués mais sans aucune allusion caricaturale ou méprisante, comme c’est le cas sur cet aryballe. Provenance : collection Privée Américaine Exposé : Musée J. Paul Getty, Los Angeles, 19841996. Bibliographie : BEAZLEY J.D., Chairos, Attic Vases

in the Form of Human Head, in The Journal of Hellenic Studies 49, 1929, pp. 76-78. HEILMAYER W.-D.(éd.), Antikenmuseum Berlin, Die ausgestellten Werke, Berlin, 1988, pp. 158-159, nn. 11-12. SNOWDEN F.M., Blacks in Antiquity ; Ethiopians in the Greco-Roman Experience Cambridge (Mass.), 1970, pp. 24, 40, fig. 9. SNOWDEN Jr. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Cambridge (Massachussets) - Londres, 1991, fig. 153-154, 159-160, 193, 199.

18. Aryballe janiforme représentant deux tźtes de noir

Art attique, vers 480-470 av. J.-C. Ht. 6.3 cm. Les deux têtes, qui ont été faites dans le même moule, sont soudées derrière les oreilles ; entre les mentons, il y a un petit cylindre, dont la fonction n’est pas claire, puisqu’il ne permet pas à l’aryballe de rester droit. Le goulot est en forme d’entonnoir avec une petite anse verticale. Les visages représentent un Africain. Peut-être à cause de la petite taille, le modelage est un peu plus naïf que pour le n. 17. Leur peau est rendue par la magnifique couleur noire brillante de la céramique attique ; la polychromie est complétée par le blanc, utilisé pour les sourcils, les yeux (avec des traits qui désignent l’iris et la pupille) et la dentition (des lignes noires indiquent les dents) ainsi que par la couleur naturelle de la terre cuite pour les lèvres et pour la zone autour des yeux ; sur la chevelure il y a encore des traces de peinture pourpre (les boucles crépues sont en relief). Ce type d’aryballe attique miniature est très rare : J.D. Beazley le regroupe avec un pièce identique du Metropolitan Museum (inv. 27.122.21, inédite ?) et une autre représentant deux singes conservée à Berlin. En tenant compte de sa polychromie et de l’excellent état de conservation, l’exemplaire en examen est probablement le plus beau des trois. Provenance : ancienne collection E. Brummer, acquise en 1926.

97


Exposé : Musée J. Paul Getty, Los Angeles, 19841996. Publié dans : The Ernest Brummer Collection, Ancient Art, Vol. II, Zurich, 1979, pp. 324-325, n. 691. Bibliographie : FURTWÄNGLER A., La collection Sabouroff, Monuments de l’art grec, T. Ier, Berlin, 1883 (dessin au dessus de la pl. 65). FURTWÄNGLER A., Beschreibung der Vasensammlung im Antiquariat, Vol. 1, Berlin, 1885, p. 1027, n. 4050 (sans photo).

19. Cruche (oenochoé) en forme de tźte de noir

Art italiote (Apulie), milieu du IVe s. av. J.-C. (370-350 av. J.-C.). Ht. 19 cm.

98

La forme du vase est assimilable à une oenochoé dont le corps est modelé en forme de tête d’Africain. La peau de l’homme est peinte en noir, tandis que sa chevelure et ses oreilles sont couvertes d’une sorte de bonnet phrygien noué sous le menton. Ce couvre-chef était probablement en peau de léopard, à en juger par les taches noires et blanches. Les traits du visage, soigneusement modelés, sont indubitablement ceux d’un africain, avec le nez épaté et les lèvres charnues, surpeintes en pourpre. Les yeux sont rendus de manière très vivante, en dégradé noir-brun et blanc, avec la pupille noire. Sur le col de la coupe, la scène peinte selon la technique de la figure rouge représente un jeune homme assis faisant face à une femme debout. L’homme, la tête ceinte d’une couronne, s’appuie sur un long bâton et tient une grande phiale, tandis que la femme lui offre une guirlande ; dans la main gauche elle tient une situle pour le service du vin. Les deux récipients, surpeints en jaune, étaient dans la réalité en or ou en bronze. Les images de noirs ont eu beaucoup moins de succès dans l’art italiote que dans l’art attique : il existe néanmoins un excellent parallèle pour cette pièce, conservé à la Bibliothèque Nationale de Paris, que Trendall et Cambitoglou rapprochent de l’oeuvre du peintre de l’Iliupersis, un des plus grands artistes apuliens. Les similitudes stylistiques (peinture et modelage) qui exis-

tent entre ces deux pièces, semblent permettre d’attribuer la coupe en question au même artiste. Provenance : ancienne collection privée américaine. Exposé : Musée J. Paul Getty, Los Angeles, 19841996. Bibliographie : L’exemplaire de la Bibliothèque Nationale : DE RIDDER A., Catalogue des vases peints de la Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, 1902, pp. 668-669, n. 1238. TRENDALL A.D. - CAMBITOGLOU A., The RedFigured Vases of Apulia, vol. II, Oxford, 1982, p. 614, n. 75, pl. 235, 3. D’autres vases italiotes avec représentant des noirs : SNOWDEN Jr. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Cambridge (Massachussets) - Londres, 1991, fig. 212-220.

20. Vase plastique (askos ?) représentant un jeune noir endormi sur une amphore

Art hellénistique (Alexandrie ?), IIIe s. av. J.-C. Ht. 6.2 cm, Long. 10.1 cm. La pièce, qui a été moulée, est entièrement creuse. Son état de conservation est extraordinaire. Un jeune africain nu s’est endormi en boule à même le sol, en s’appuyant sur l’amphore à vin qu’il transporte ; le vase est maintenu dans une position inclinée par quatre gros cailloux disposés par terre. Il est caractérisé comme noir par la coloration foncée et brillante de sa peau, par la chevelure crépue et par les traits de son visage. Mais le réalisme hellénistique ne se limite pas seulement à une description ethnologique : malgré la taille miniature de cet objet, la position en boule est étudiée dans les plus petits détails et rendue par un modelage très fidèle de tout le corps (maigreur de jeunesse, ossature de la cage thoracique et du dos, musculature des jambes, détails du visage, chevelure). Ce sujet, dont l’original est très probablement alexandrin (cf. statuette en serpentine du Brooklyn Museum à New York) est connu à travers de nombreuses


répliques plus ou moins fidèles. Un askos de l’Ashmolean Museum d’Oxford se rapproche tout particulièrement du petit vase en examen, mais il ne présente pas de traces de polychromie. Après les sujets stéréotypés de l’époque archaïque et classique (mythe des Pygmées avec les grues ; cadre militaire comme les groupes des Negro Alabastra, mythe d’Héraclès contre le roi égyptien Busiris ; vases plastiques simples ou janiformes, etc.), un important changement se produit dans l’iconographie grecque des noirs, sous l’impulsion des artisans d’Alexandrie au début de l’hellénisme. Beaucoup d’objets d’art mineur, de qualité très variable (figurines et vases en terre cuite, petits bronzes, pendentifs de colliers ou de boucles d’oreilles, etc.), reproduisent désormais des hommes noirs dans leurs occupations quotidiennes : jeunes serviteurs endormis, transporteurs d’amphores, acrobates, danseurs, échansons, jockeys, prisonniers, etc. (les images de femmes noires sont rares). Comme l’indiquent ces différentes activités, la plupart des noirs qui vivaient dans le monde méditerranéen appartenaient certainement aux couches inférieures de la société et y étaient arrivés vendus comme esclaves suite à des guerres de conquête. Les sources écrites ainsi que l’iconographie antique sont muettes quand à des épisodes de racisme envers des Africains ; par ailleurs, les exemples de noirs ayant atteint des positions sociales plus en vue ne manquent pas, comme le prouvent les statues de prêtres d’Isis aux traits négroïdes ou les portraits romains de noirs (par exemple dans l’aristocratie athénienne du IIe s. ap. J.-C., parmi les amis et collaborateurs d’Hérode Atticus, Memnon était un noir) ; dans le monde littéraire, des personnages majeurs comme Térence ou Héliodore étaient probablement d’origine africaine. Provenance : ancienne collection J. Elliot, New York. Exposé : University Art Museum, Princeton, New Jersey (jusqu’en 1991). Bibliographie: HIMMELMANN N., Alexandria und der Realismus in der greichischen Kunst, Tübingen, 1983, pl. 49. HAUSMANN, U., Hellenische Neger, in Mitteilungen des deutschen Archaeologischen Institut, Abteilung Athen 77, 1962, pp. 262ss., pl. 77-78.

21. Amulette (?) en forme de jeune noir accroupi

Art hellénistique, IIIe - Ier s. av. J.-C. Ht. 4.7 cm. La figurine en fonte pleine est partiellement recouverte d’une patine verte. Le trou circulaire, certainement antique, percé entre les joues et les jambes, servait pour suspendre cet objet à une chaînette. Il s’agissait donc d’une amulette que l’on pouvait porter comme pendentif ou plus difficilement suspendue à une ceinture - malgré la forme aplatie et régulière de la base, cette figurine ne tient pas debout toute seule. Elle représente un garçon accroupi aux traits négroïdes : ses fesses et ses pieds sont posés sur le sol, ses jambes ramassées sont ramenées vers la poitrine, la tête est légèrement inclinée vers la droite. La main gauche est posée sur le genou, tandis que la droite, plaquée contre la joue, soutient la tête. Le jeune homme est habillé d’un petit pagne noué autour de la taille qui ne cache pas ses organes génitaux. Malgré la taille miniature de la pièce, les formes et la position sont rendues de manière extrêmement réaliste et bien observée, en particulier en ce qui concerne la musculature du dos, les traits du visage et les plis du tissu. La chevelure, rangée en grosses mèches cylindriques, le visage plat et large et le nez épaté sont les éléments qui permettent d’identifier du premier coup d’oeil le personnage comme un jeune d’origine africaine : les yeux fermés et la tête appuyée sur la main, il est peutêtre installé au coin d’une rue en attendant son maître ou il s’accorde un moment de repos entre les différentes tâches que devait accomplir un esclave domestique. Iconographiquement, cette figurine appartient à une série bien connue, dont les premières attestations remontent au tout début de l’époque classique et qui nous sont connues surtout à travers des terres cuites (Rhodes) et des camées. Mais c’est à partir du IIIe s. av. J.-C. et ensuite pendant l’époque romaine que ce type iconographique a eu un remarquable succès populaire : l’absence de renseignements précis dans les sources écrites indique peut-être que les Anciens faisaient différents emplois des images de jeunes noirs accroupis. Si certains exemplaires servaient comme amulettes/porte-bonheur, d’autres semblent avoir été des jouets (par exemple, parmi les objets trouvés dans

99


une tombe romaine d’enfant, découverte à Corinthe, il y a un hochet en terre cuite modelé en forme de jeune africain accroupi et endormi), des petits récipients (peut-être des encriers) voire des appliques ou de petites poignées pour des trépieds ou des récipients, etc. Provenance : acquis sur le marché d’art européen 2001.

100

Bibliographie : BABELON E. - BLANCHET J.-H., Bronzes antiques de la Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, 1895, pp.441-442, nn. 1011-1013. SNOWDEN Jr. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Cambridge (Massachussets) - Londres, 1991, pp. 164-166, fig. 194-195 ; pp. 229-233, fig. 302, 309. Sur le rôle apotropaïque des images de noirs v. : MITTEN D.G. - DOERINGER S.F., Master Bronzes fro m Classical World, Mayence/Rhin, 1968, p. 119, n. 116. SNOWDEN Jr. F. M., Blacks in Antiquity, Ethiopians in the Greco-Roman Experience, Cambridge (Mass.), 1970, pp. 272-273.

en forme de jeune noir accroupi

Art hellénistique, IIIe - Ier s. av. J.-C.

Ht. 3.6 cm.

La figurine est en fonte pleine. Pour le type cf. n. 21.

Ici le garçonnet est nu et tient sa tête droite, avec les

poings serrés à côtés des mâchoires.

Cet exemplaire, de taille miniature et de forme encore

plus ramassée que d’habitude, tient facilement dans

une main d’enfant à laquelle sa forme s’adapte parfai22. Applique (?) en forme de jeune noir accroupi

Art hellénistique, IIIe - Ier s. av. J.-C. Ht. 4.7 cm.

tement : il s’agissait peut-être d’un jouet ou d’un petit

L’objet est en bronze fondu mais il est creux ; l’emplacement entre les pieds et les tibias est percé d’une ample ouverture triangulaire. A cet endroit, la statuette était vraisemblablement soudée à un support que l’on peut identifier, par exemple, avec un élément de meuble ou avec une tige de trépied, etc. Pour le type cf. la pièce n. 21. La position est identique, mais l’exécution est ici un peu plus grossière ou simplement moins idéalisée.

jeton.

Provenance : acquis sur le marché d’art européen en

2003. Provenance : Galerie Lennox, Londres, 1992 Bibliographie : Cf. n. 21.

23. Jouet (?)

Bibliographie : Cf. n. 21.


24. Flacon (lécythe ?) en terre cuite représentant un serviteur assis

pp. 176-183, nn. 223-224.

Art hellénistique, IIIe - Ier s. av. J.-C. Ht. 35.5 cm. Ce récipient est hors du commun à cause de sa taille, nettement supérieure à la moyenne ; sa forme correspond à celle d’un lécythe, avec le col façonné sur le sommet de la tête et l’anse fixée dans le dos de la figure et sur le col ; la surface de l’argile était entièrement peinte en noir. Malgré la présence de la base et quelques différences dans la position, l’iconographie de ce lécythe se rattache à celle des petits bronzes n. 21-24. Le jeune homme, qui est clairement identifié comme un Africain, s’accorde un moment de pause ou d’attente, mais il n’est pas encore endormi : il lève la tête et dirige son regard un peu vide vers le haut. L’avant-bras gauche est plié en «V» et calé sous la mâchoire, tandis que sa main droite est posée sur le genou gauche ; ses jambes sont croisées. Il est habillé d’une exomide (le vêtement porté par les artisans et par les esclaves) au bord ondulé, qui est nouée sur l’épaule droite et qui passe sous le bras gauche. Malgré le sujet très «populaire», il faut souligner l’excellente qualité technique et artistique de cette pièce. Ce type de récipient est connu surtout à travers quelques parallèles de plus petite taille (env. 25 cm) provenant d’Egypte (Fayoum), qui reproduisent un schéma presque identique, mais où l’image du jeune noir est spéculaire par rapport à celle-ci. D’autres flacons en forme de jeune noir assis ont été trouvés en Italie méridionale. Provenance : acquis chez H. Korban, Genève et Londres, en 1993. Bibliographie : PERDRIZET P., Les terres cuites grecques d’Egypte de la collection Fouquet, Nancy, 1921, p. 139, n. 368, pl. 97. HAUSMANN, U., Hellenische Neger, in Mitteilungen des deutschen Archaeologischen Institut, Abteilung Athen 77, 1962, pp. 274-176, pl. 80, 3-4. SNOWDEN Jr. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Cambridge (Massachusetts) - Londres, 1991,

101


25. Statuette de danseur en bronze

Art hellénistique, début du Ier s. av. J.-C. Ht. 18 cm.

102

Cette statuette, qui a été fondue à la cire perdue, représente un sujet souvent traité par les artistes d'Alexandrie pendant l'hellénisme: un jeune homme exécute un pas de danse très élaboré et soulève gracieusement ses bras en balançant sa tête vers l’arrière. Dans ses mains il tenait probablement des castagnettes, avec lesquelles il accompagnait sa performance physique. Son visage expressif et son regard mélancolique, tourné vers le haut, tranchent nettement avec son attitude exubérante et ses mouvements effrénés. Le simple pagne qu’il porte noué à la taille caractérise le jeune homme comme membre d’une classe inférieure, un esclave ou un acteur de rue. Certains traits physique indiquent qu’il s’agit d’un personnage d’origine africaine : la chevelure en grosses boucles crépues, le visage circulaire, le nez large et les dimensions hors norme de son phallus, artifice que les artistes grecs utilisaient généralement pour désigner des non-helléniques et en particulier des «marginaux» comme des nains, des figures grotesques, des estropiés, des acteurs, des noirs, etc. La tridimensionnalité de cette figure, qui est construite pour être vue de trois quarts et non de face, est certainement un effet intentionnel et recherché par l’artiste. Malgré cette position très hardie et complexe seule la pointe du pied droit touche le sol, le corps exécute une torsion, la tête est tournée par rapport aux épaules, etc. - la figure est rendue de façon naturelle, presque idéalisée. De même, son anatomie est extrêmement bien équilibrée même si la musculature du dos, des jambes et du ventre est très développée et athlétique. Contrairement à beaucoup d’images antiques de noirs, qui débordent facilement dans le grotesque, cette oeuvre atteint donc un niveau artistique et technique hors du commun et même le sujet paraît avoir été traité différemment, de façon presque ennoblie. Dans le repertoire des artistes hellénistiques - et plus tard de leurs successeurs d’époque romaine - les danseurs, les acrobates ou les acteurs de rue étaient un des sujets les plus populaires. S’il est probable que les attitudes étaient le plus souvent inspirés par les créations alexandrines (Alexandrie était un des centres artistiques les plus importants de l’hellénisme), de nombreuses images de danseurs noirs nus, représentés

dans des positions instantanées comme ici, proviennent de localités situées dans tout le monde méditerranéen : l’Egypte, Carnutum, Herculaneum, Châlon-surSaône, Reims, etc. Provenance : ancienne collection privée américaine ; acquis en 1996 sur le marché d'art européen. Publié dans : Phoenix Ancient Art, 2006 - n. 2, n.12. Bibliographie : KOZLOFF A. - MITTEN D., The Gods Delight-The Human Figure in Classical Bronze, Cleveland, 1988, pp. 124-131, nn. 19-20. HIMMELMANN N., Alexandria und der Realismus in der greichischen Kunst, Tübingen, 1983, pp. 64-66, 88-89, pl. 42-43, 49, 62-63. SNOWDEN F.M., Blacks in Antiquity ; Ethiopians in the Greco-Roman Experience Cambridge (Mass.), 1970, pp. 28, 89, fig. 64. HAUSMANN, U., Hellenische Neger, in Mitteilungen des deutschen Archaeologischen Institut, Abteilung Athen 77, 1962, pp. 255-281.

26. Plaquette en ivoire (os ?) représentant une tźte de noir

Art romain, IIe - IIIe s. ap. J.-C. Ht. 2.8 cm. Ce minuscule fragment triangulaire en ivoire provient probablement à la décoration d’une boîte, d’un coffre ou d’autre objet de menuiserie ; son dos est plat. La vue de trois quarts est parfaitement rendue par la compression de la moitié gauche du visage. Le personnage sculpté en bas relief est clairement caractérisé comme africain (visage rond et large, nez camus, cheveux crépus, grosses lèvres); la couronne de feuilles, qui ceint son front, le désigne comme échanson pour un symposium. Bibliographie : MAIURI A., La casa del Menandro e il suo tesoro di argenteria, Rome, 1932, pp. 146-147, fig. 68 (serviteur noir avec couronne tenant deux askoi pour le service du vin).

27. Pendentif en grenat en forme de tźte de noir

Art gréco-romain,


fin du Ier s. av. J.-C. - IIe s. ap. J.-C. (?). Ht. 2.3 cm. Cette tête minuscule, brisée au niveau du cou, appartenait certainement à une statuette d’Africain représenté debout ou peut-être accroupi. Malgré la taille, la qualité du travail est telle qu’elle s’apparente plus à une oeuvre de glyptique ou d’orfèvrerie qu’à une simple sculpture. Les traits négroïdes du jeune homme sont évidents, surtout à cause du traitement de la chevelure courte et crépue et du nez épaté ; mais la forme du visage, plutôt fin et allongé, rappelle plus les traits d’un Ethiopiens ou d’un métisse que ceux d’un Nubien. Dans l’art gréco-romain, l’utilisation de pierres semiprécieuses (agate, grenat, cornaline, etc.) ou de l’ambre pour la fabrication de petits objets précieux représentants des noirs(es) est attestée à partir de l’époque classique déjà : des intailles pour des bagues, des pendentifs de collier ou des boucles d’oreilles taillés (cf. n. 28) en forme de tête de noir, un petit pommeau en agate reproduisant trois bustes conjoints (deux hommes et une femme), etc. En revanche, aucune autre figurine entière en grenat ne peut être mentionnée comme parallèle pour cette statuette : il s’agissait probablement d’une amulette qui pouvait être portée au cou (une bélière circulaire pour le collier est sculptée au sommet du crâne) et à laquelle on attribuait une valeur apotropaïque et de porte-bonheur. Provenance : ancienne collection Hatch-Conrad, Rhénanie, Allemagne, collectionné au début des années 1970. Bibliographie : SNOWDEN JR. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Cambridge (Massachussets) Londres, 1991, pp. 167-168, fig. 201 ; pp. 194-195, fig. 243-246.

28. Paire de boucles d’oreilles en or et grenat

Art hellénistique, IVe-IIIe s. av. J.-C. Ht. 2.5 cm. Les deux boucles, qui sont recouvertes d’un fil d’or tor-

sadé, se terminent chacune par une tête d’Africaine, sculptée dans un fragment de grenade ; leurs yeux étaient rapportés. Pour imiter les cheveux crépus sur un bijou aussi petit, l’orfèvre a utilisé une technique très ingénieuse : sur la plaquette en or qui couvre le crâne des deux figures comme un bonnet, il a fixé horizontalement plusieurs rangées de fils torsadés et ornés de petits traits incisés. Par ailleurs, les traits des deux visages reproduisent clairement les caractéristiques somatiques des Africains. Les extrémités des boucles, dans lesquelles s’insèrent les deux têtes, sont décorées de motifs linéaires et de spirales en relief. La présence d’un masque de noir(e) en grenade ou en ambre pour orner des bijoux est attestée seulement sur quelques autres pièces d’orfèvrerie hellénistique : une paire de boucles d’oreilles comme celles-ci se trouve au Louvre et une autre au British Museum ; ce musée conserve aussi des fermoirs de colliers à perles constitués du même genre de masque. Comme la statuette n. 27, il est probable que ces petites têtes «exotiques» ont eu une signification de porte-bonheur. 103 Provenance : Ariadne Gallery, New York. Bibliographie : MARSHALL F.H., Catalogue of the Jewellery, Greek, Etruscan and Roman in the Department of Antiquities, British Museum, Londres, 1911, n. 1709, p. 186, pl. 31 ; nn. 1961-1962, p. 216217, pl. 36. SNOWDEN JR. F. M., Iconographical Evidence on the Black Populations in Greco-Roman Antiquity in VERCOUTTER J., The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 1 : From the Pharaohs to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Cambridge (Massachussets) - Londres, 1991, pp. 194-195, fig. 244-245.

29. Gobelet en verre représentant une tźte de noir

Art romain, deuxième moitié du Ier s. ap. J.-C. Ht. 9.8 cm. Le verre transparent avec des reflets bleu foncé est intact. Le gobelet a été moulé et soufflé en trois éléments dont les soudures sont presque invisibles (la base et les moitiés antérieure et postérieure de la tête,


qui sont soudées à la hauteur des oreilles). Ce gobelet présente avec beaucoup de naturalisme la tête d’un jeune homme d’origine africaine, avec le visage large, le nez légèrement épaté et les lèvres charnues ; ces cheveux coiffés en rangées horizontales de mèches torsadées. Sur le front, il porte une couronne de feuilles triangulaires alternant avec des baies rondes. Le col du récipient à l’ample ouverture est situé sur le sommet de la tête. Les gobelets en verre en forme de tête d’Africain sont attestés un peu partout dans le bassin méditerranéen, mais ils sont beaucoup plus fréquents dans la partie occidentale de l’Empire romain. Même si on ne peut pas exclure l’existence d’un prototype oriental (Syrie, Alexandrie) il est presque certain que dans la moitié occidentale il existait des vitriers qui en produisaient, peut-être dans la région de Pompéi où la forme est présente aussi bien à Herculanum qu’à Pompéi. Selon l’analyse de M. Stern, qui partage l’ensemble de gobelets en différents groupes, cet exemplaire appartient au type A 3, qui compte très peu d’unités.

104

Provenance : collection de verres antiques, Famille Aboutaam, Genève. Bibliographie : STERN M., Roman Mold-blown Glass, The First through sixth Century, The Toledo Museum of Art, Rome-Toledo, 1995, pp. 219-220, n. 139 et pour le classement pp. 204-208.

30. Petite boĒte en marbre représentant une tźte de noire

Art romain (Apamée), début de l’époque impériale (Ier-IIe s. ap. J.-C.). Ht. 9.3 cm. Dans le panorama de la sculpture antique, cette tête est très particulière. Mis à part de petits éclats, elle est intacte ; elle représente une jeune femme africaine, dont les traits somatiques sont indiqués avec une telle précision et un tel réalisme, malgré sa taille miniature, qu’un anthropologue pourrait être tenté d’identifier sa tribu d’origine : le visage, au menton carrée, est massif et large, sans rides superficielles mais avec un modelage très fin et complet de la musculature, surtout sur les joues et sur les pommettes. Le nez est épaté et les lèvres charnues ; les yeux sont en verre transparent

avec l’iris rapporté en noir. Le cou petit et fort est sillonné par quelques lignes horizontales typiquement féminines, que l’on nomme les «anneaux de Vénus». La manière de sculpter la chevelure rend très fidèlement les cheveux crépus des noirs: une multitude de longues mèches minces avec des gravures superficielles s’enroulent tout autour de la tête et sont ramenées vers l’occiput, où, pourtant la surface est plate et lisse (un chignon en plâtre était peut-être fixé à cet endroit). Taillée dans un marbre noir tacheté de blanc, cette tête n’est pas une simple sculpture : en effet, à l’intérieur, elle comporte une profonde cavité cylindrique d’environ 2-3 cm de diamètre. Sous la base, le rail rectiligne qui servait pour faire glisser le couvercle (en bois ?) de cette ouverture est encore parfaitement conservé. La forme tubulaire du trou suggère la probable fonction de cet objet : il s’agissait d’une petite cache pour de petits objets précieux, comme par exemple des monnaies. Dans cette otique, l’utilisation d’une image d’Africain, auxquelles on attribuait une valeur de porte-bonheur, n’est vraisemblablement pas due au hasard. A l’époque hellénistique et romaine, les sculpteurs qui désiraient reproduire des images d’Africains utilisait volontiers des pierres de couleur foncée. Provenance : acquis chez Elie Boustros, au début des années 1980. Bibliographie : SNOWDEN Jr. F.M., Blacks in Antiquity : Ethiopians in the greco-roman Experience, Cambridge (Massachusetts), 1970, pp. 197-198, fig. 251-252 ; pp.202-203, fig. 256-258. ANDERSON M. L. - NISTA L. (édd.), Radiance in Stone, Sculptures in Coloured Marble from the Museo Nazionale Romano, Roma, 1989, pp. 70, n. 7.

31. Jeune homme accroupi en marbre noir

Art romain, début de l’époque impériale (fin du Ier s. av. J.-C - IIe s. ap. J.-C.). Ht. 45.3 cm. De la statue il subsiste le torse avec les jambes ainsi qu’une base composée de deux cordons sculptés et posés sur les épaules de la figure. Celle-ci est représentée accroupie et pliée sous le poids de l’objet qu’el-


le transportait sur le dos ; le développement musculaire peu prononcé indique que le personnage représenté était un jeune. Derrière sa tête, un trou carré servait certainement pour encastrer la partie inférieure d’une colonne ou d’une tige. La tête était dirigée vers l’avant, mais légèrement tournée vers la droite. Les détails anatomiques sont nombreux et la musculature est bien modelée et rendue de manière plastique dans le dos, sur les épaules et sur la poitrine. La colonne vertébrale est indiquée par une longue dépression tandis que les côtes sont marquées par des légères ondulations. Même si l’attitude de la figure est très recherchée et peu commune, les proportions de la statue sont fidèlement respectées et la composition est claire. Dans l’art greco-romain, la position accroupie ou agenouillée est typique pour les personnages contraints à soutenir de gros poids ; il existe de telles représentations remontant déjà aux époques archaïques et classiques. Parmi les figures les plus célèbres représentées selon ce schéma, il faut citer celle d’Atlas, le géant qui doit soutenir sur ses épaules la voûte céleste. Dans cette attitude, on trouve également des Barbares, reconnaissables à leur costume, ainsi que des satyres : tous ces personnages jouent le rôle de télamons (le correspondant masculin des caryatides) et sont souvent situés à la base de colonnes ou de monuments. A Athènes, dans le théâtre de Dionysos, un silène accroupi soutient encore aujourd’hui une partie du bema, situé devant la scène. L’absence de tout attribut empêche l’identification sûre du jeune homme avec une figure mythologique précise. Le personnage est probablement d’origine africaine : la présence de deux petites boucles de la chevelure conservées près du cou - et qui font penser aux cheveux crépus - ainsi que l’utilisation d’une pierre de couleur foncée pour l’exécution de la statue parlent en faveur de cette hypothèse. Le type du serviteur noir agenouillé et transportant un gros poids sur le dos est par ailleurs attesté dans le répertoire des terres cuites alexandrines.

Sur les figures de soutien en général, v. : J. MARCA-

DE, Au Musée de Délos, 1969, Paris, pp. 199 et 448,

pl. 24.

105

R.M. SCHNEIDER, Bunte Barbaren, Worms, 1986.

J. TRAVLOS, Pictorial Dictionary of Ancient Athens,

Provenance : acquis sur le marché d’art suisse en 1994. Bibliographie : Pour les terres cuites, v. : SNOWDEN Jr. F.M., Blacks in Antiquity : Ethiopians in the grecoroman Experience, Cambridge (Massachusetts), 1970, pl. 40, a.

Tübingen, 1971, p. 551.


32. Statuette d’acteur debout en terre cuite

Art grec (Corinthe), milieu du Ve s. av. J.-C. Ht. 8.9 cm.

106

Le coroplathe (terme qui indique l’artisan spécialisé dans la production des statuettes en terre cuite) a utilisé deux différentes techniques pour fabriquer cette pièce : le modelage à la main pour le corps et le moulage pour la tête et le visage. Au début du Ve s. av. J.C., ce procédé est attesté surtout dans deux régions de la Grèce continentale : Corinthe et la Béotie. La figurine représente un homme debout, dont l’équilibre est assuré par deux jambes partiellement peintes en noir et en rouge et par une queue pointue ; sur les épaules, il porte une sorte de manteau rayé, façonné dans un tissu long et mince, aux extrémités arrondies. Les deux bras servent de soutien pour le manteau, mais elles en sont entièrement recouvertes. Contrairement au corps, qui est exécuté plutôt sommairement, la tête est très bien réalisée, bien que beaucoup trop grande : aux remarquables qualités plastiques du masque - les détails anatomiques sont modelés ou finement incisés - vient s’ajouter la bichromie (rouge pour le visage, les oreilles et la chevelure ; noir pour la barbe et la moustache). L’homme porte une longue barbe pointue tandis qu’une masse de cheveux épais et ondulés encadre son front ; ses oreilles sont formées de deux pastilles d’argile, modelées séparément et légèrement creusées. Un petit groupe de trois statuettes du Musée de Cleveland, d’origine probablement béotienne, et quelques autres pièces du British Museum de Londres (attribuées à des artisans corinthiens) figurent parmi les meilleurs parallèles de cette image : il s’agit de satyres (la typologie générale de leurs visages et surtout les oreilles pointues les désignent comme tels), qui, à cause de leurs mouvements exubérants et de leur gestuelle accentuée, seraient en train de jouer dans des drames satyriques, un genre théâtrale, dont il ne nous reste que très peu de choses. Malgré les analogies évidentes, la figurine en question ne représente certainement pas un satyre, mais une figure humaine ou, peutêtre divine : son visage rappelle les masques dionysiaques suspendus aux piliers hermaïques. Provenance : ancienne collection N.A.C. Embiricos, Londres.

Bibliographie : HIGGINS R.A., Catalogue of the Terracottas in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities, British Museum, Vol. I, Greek : 730-330 B.C., Londres, 1967, pp. 253-255, nn. 932-935. HOFFMAN H., Some Unpublished Beotian Satyr Terracottas in Antike Kunst 7, 1964, pp. 67-71. MUSCARELLA O. W. (éd.), Ancient Art, The Norbert Schimmel Collection, New York, 1974, n. 46.

33. Vase en céramique dite «magenta» représentant un acteur sur un autel

Art hellénistique, IIIe s. av. J.-C. Ht. 11.8 cm. Le récipient est intact; de nombreuses traces de polychromie sont conservées: rouge (chevelure, anse), rose vif (rubans sur l’autel, tête de l’acteur), bleu ciel (oreilles). Il s’agit d’une des pièces les plus belles et les mieux conservées de ce groupe de vases. Originaire probablement d’Italie méridionale (Campanie ?), la céramique dite «magenta» (fin du IVe - Ier s. av. J.-C.) doit son nom à J. D. Beazley, qui l’a définie ainsi à cause du pigment rouge vif, constamment présent dans la palette des couleurs utilisées pour la décoration peinte. Dans le répertoire des formes deux types sont récurrents : les bouteilles et surtout les récipients utilisés pour remplir les lampes à huile, parmi lesquels la pièce en examen est un très bel exemple. Le remplissage de ce récipient se faisait par les trous percés dans le dos de l’acteur (la cuvette fixée juste au-dessous des perforations est une constante et servait pour récupérer d’éventuelles gouttes d’huile), tandis que le transfert du combustible à la lampe passait par la petite ouverture visible au niveau du coude gauche. A côté de l’acteur, d’autres sujets sont présents dans la céramique «magenta» : des symposiastes, des noirs assis, des têtes d’Isis ainsi que toutes sortes d’animaux (en particulier les animaux à sacrifier, comme les chèvres, les moutons, les taureaux et les cochons). Les traits de ce masque d’esclave correspondent désormais à ceux de la «comédie nouvelle» : nez épaté, sourcils épais et arqués, bouche à grand porte-voix semicirculaire. Il est habillé d’une chlamyde, qu’il retient de sa main droite, tandis que le bras gauche est entièrement enveloppé dans le tissu. Comme pour les participants à un banquet, une couronne entourée d’une


épaisse bandelette ceint son front. La situation de ce personnage n’est pas très enviable : s’il s’est réfugié sur un autel, en se plaçant sous la protection divine, c’est pour fuir son maître, auquel il a probablement joué un mauvais tour. Provenance : ancienne collection privée américaine. Exposé : Musée J. Paul Getty, Los Angeles, 19841996. Bibliographie : COURTOIS C., Le théâtre antique, Masques et figurines en terre cuite, Genève, 1991, p. 29, n. 3. HIGGINS R., Magenta Ware in The British Museum Yearbook 1, 1976, pp. 1-32. SGUAITAMATTI M., Zwei plastische Vasen aus Unteritalien in Antike Kunst 24, 1981, pp. 107-113.

34. Statuette d’acteur assis en terre cuite

Art grec (Attique), milieu du IVe s. av. J.-C. Ht. 8.9 cm. La figurine, en terre cuite beige-jaune, est creuse ; la surface conserve des traces de peinture rouge et d’engobe blanc. L’homme est assis sur un tabouret couvert

d’un tissu ondulé. Le masque et la tunique pointillée et courte, qui ne couvre pas les organes génitaux, le caractérisent comme acteur. Il se tient dans une position de «penseur», avec les jambes écartées, le bras gauche appuyé sur le genou, tandis que de la main droite, posée sous le menton, il soutient la tête dans une attitude de réflexion, comme s’il préparait une ruse. Typologiquement, ce genre de personnage est utilisé dans la comédie ancienne et moyenne pour désigner des esclaves ; les fesses proéminentes et le ventre arrondi sont certainement rembourrés, le phallus démesuré est postiche. Malgré la taille miniature, le masque est moulé avec une précision extraordinaire : bouche ouverte et grandes lèvres plissées, nez aplati, joues et front ridés, yeux en amande. Détail insolite, l’homme a les oreilles pointues, comme celles d’un satyre. Cette statuette est certainement a mettre en relation avec un célèbre groupe de terres cuites du Metropolitan Museum, qui provient d’une tombe d’Athènes et qui constitue un des plus importants et rares témoignages directs de la comédie moyenne. Les nombreux personnages composant ce groupe appartiennent certainement à différentes comédies, auxquelles il n’est plus possible de donner un titre. Parmi les personnages féminins, on reconnaît certainement une vielle nurse, tenant un enfant emmailloté dans ses bras, ainsi que

107


Profile for emyphoenix

Phoenix Ancient Art 2007 EXOTICS  

This piece is a beautiful example of Hellenistic realism in art : from a thematic point of view, the bronzesmith chose to represent an image...

Phoenix Ancient Art 2007 EXOTICS  

This piece is a beautiful example of Hellenistic realism in art : from a thematic point of view, the bronzesmith chose to represent an image...

Advertisement