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UNDERGRADUATE

SYMPOSIUM

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY 2018

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DEAN’S WELCOME Welcome to the 38th Undergraduate Symposium! This day of presentations of scholarly and creative activities by our undergraduate students is the culmination of a year-long collaboration between the students and their faculty mentors.The presentations, posters, performances and exhibits illustrate an impressive level of accomplishment as a result of these mentorships. As you explore the extraordinary breadth and depth of student scholarly and creative activity, you will discover the special synergy of teaching and learning that powers this year’s Symposium program. Eastern’s Undergraduate Research Symposium is one of the longest standing events of its kind in the country. In 1980, then professor of chemistry and later provost of the University, Dr. Ronald Collins, conceived the idea of an annual conference opportunity for undergraduate research presentation. This innovative approach to encouraging undergraduate research was supported by then president, John W. Porter and provost, Dr. Anthony Evans. Each subsequent president and provost has continued to support the Undergraduate Symposium and acted to enhance its stature. The first event began with a handful of students and faculty mentors from the College of Arts and Science. Although the College of Arts and Sciences remains the host of the Symposium, student research presentations span all five EMU Colleges and every undergraduate discipline. Five years ago, the Undergraduate Symposium expanded beyond oral and poster presentations to include exhibits in the Crossing Lines Design Expo. The addition of this exhibit engages students whose creative processes involves various 2D and 3D materials. Many faculty and staff have worked hard to make this Undergraduate Symposium a success. I gratefully acknowledge the efforts of the volunteer Symposium Planning Committee and its chair, Dr. Harriet Lindsay, event coordinator Wendy Kivi, assistants Amy Bearinger and Judy Lewis, Symposium submission guru John Williams, and the staff of the College of Arts and Sciences Office of the Dean. The faculty sponsors of the student presenters are the expert core of the Symposium. They deserve special recognition for their voluntary efforts. I also want to recognize the families of the students, and the many sponsors and guests who provided essential support for this event and who are committed to the success of our students in their academic pursuits. A special thank you to donors who have supported the work of 21 Symposium Undergraduate Research Fellows for this academic year. Most especially, my congratulations to you, our students, who are presenting today!

Kathleen H. Stacey, Interim Dean College of Arts and Sciences


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Friday, March 23, 2018 EMU Student Center Oral Presentations

Second Floor

Room 204, Auditorium, Student Art Gallery

Third Floor

Rooms 304, 320, 330, 350, 352, Kiva

Session A

9-10:15 a.m.

Session B 10:30-11:45 a.m. Session C 1:30-2:45 p.m. Session D 3-4:15 p.m. Poster Presentations

Third Floor

Room 310 A/B

Group 1 9-10:30 a.m.

Group 2

11-11:45 a.m. & 1:30-2:15 p.m.

(Room closed over luncheon) Group 3 2:45-4:15 p.m. Design Expo: Crossing Lines

Third Floor

Room 300 and 302 Gallery Exhibit

9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Symposium Luncheon Ballroom 12-1:15 p.m. Keynote speaker: Christopher A. Gellasch Assistant Professor, Geography & Geology Lieutenant Colonel (retired), United States Army Student emcee: Kristine Gatchel English Language & Literature


TABLE OF CONTENTS

College of Arts & Sciences 31 Africology & African American Studies 33 Art & Design 38 Biology 51 Chemistry 63 Communication, Media & Theatre Arts 69 Computer Science 71 English Language & Literature 78 Geography & Geology 82 History & Philosophy 85 Mathematics & Statistics 88 Music & Dance 92 Physics & Astronomy 95 Political Science 102 Psychology 108 Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology 114 Women’s & Gender Studies 116 World Languages

College of Business 119 Marketing

College of Education 121 123 125

Leadership & Counseling Special Education Teacher Education

College of Health & Human Services 130 Health Promotion & Human Performance 131 Health Sciences 133 Nursing 135 Social Work

College of Technology 143 145 146 147

Engineering Technology Information Security & Applied Computing Technology & Professional Services Management Visual & Built Environments

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Oral Sessions SESSION A Room 204

Moderator: Mary Elizabeth Murphy

9 a.m.

Forty Year War: Analyzing America’s Shifting Crack Cocaine Policy Sarah Reasoner Caren L. Putzu, faculty mentor

Social Work

9:15 a.m. The White Woman’s Burden: Women’s Suffrage and American Imperialism Catherine Waldecker Mary-Elizabeth Murphy, faculty mentor

History & Philosophy

9:30 a.m. Jacqueline Cochran and the Forgotten Female Pilots of World War II Lacey Opdycke Mary Elizabeth Murphy, faculty mentor

History & Philosophy

9:45 a.m. Juvenile Justice: How Juvenile Waiver Laws Affect a Juvenile Later in Life Courtney Caudill Kimberly Barrett, faculty mentor

Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology

10 a.m. The American Revolution and Evangelical Thought Roxanne Reinhardt John G. McCurdy, faculty mentor

History & Philosophy

Moderator: Shel Levine

9 a.m. An Analysis of Using Exercise Rehabilitation to Offset Chemotherapy Induced Cardiotoxicity Jodi Baxter Shel Levine, faculty mentor

Health Promotion & Human Performance

ORAL SESSIONS

Room 304

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9:15 a.m. Benefits of Exercise in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Maegen Hopkins Shel Levine, faculty mentor

Health Promotion & Human Performance

9:30 a.m. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome Across Cultures, History,and Patient Experiences Megan Halstead Megan Moore, faculty mentor

Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology

9:45 a.m. Maternal Characteristics Associated with Parental Mind-Mindedness Jenipher Servin Olivares Non-presenting author: Stephanie Knight Alissa Huth-Bocks and Jamie Lawler, faculty mentors Psychology

10 a.m. Adsorption and Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide on the Rh (110) Terrace of Width 4 Ifrah Shoukat Ross Nord, faculty mentor Chemistry

Room 320

Moderator: Khairul Islam

9 a.m. Developmental Disabilities: A Review and Analysis Yasmin Zayed Khairul Islam, faculty mentor

Mathematics & Statistics

ORAL SESSIONS

9:15 a.m. Special Education Teachers’ Perspectives on the Communication Skills of Students with Down Syndrome Tara Poikey Ana Claudia Harten, faculty mentor

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Special Education

9:30 a.m. Nonpharmacological Nursing Interventions for Individuals with Cognitive Disabilities: A Literature Review Sarah Lally Tsu-Yin Wu, faculty mentor Nursing


9:45 a.m. Interprofessional Practice Between Respiratory Therapy and Speech-Language Pathology Nafiah Khan Ana Claudia Harten, faculty mentor Special Education

10 a.m. Assessing Usefulness of Clinical Reasoning Education Sessions Through Script Concordance Test Suzy McTaggart Khairul Islam, faculty mentor Mathematics & Statistics

Room 330

Moderator: Kelly Victor-Burke

9 a.m. Climate Change: The Russian Perspective Ashley Vought Kelly Victor-Burke, faculty mentor Geography & Geology

9:15 a.m. Bias in the American Press?: Global Warming and ‘Balanced’ Reporting Jaymes Dempsey Kimberly Barrett and Rita Shah, faculty mentors Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology

9:30 a.m. Implementing GIS Methods to Identify Suitable Living Areas for Senior Citizens in Ann Arbor Desiree Weitzmann Xining Yang, faculty mentor Geography & Geology

9:45 a.m. While the Grass Grows: Adjudicating the Debate Between Food Security and Food Sovereignty Eric Garant Jill Dieterle, faculty mentor

The Physics of Renewable Energy Resources Larry Borum J. Marshall Thomsen, faculty mentor Physics & Astronomy

ORAL SESSIONS

History & Philosophy 10 a.m.

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Room 350

Moderator: Richard Stahler-Sholk

9 a.m. In The Name of God: A Study of Religious Extremism and Its Implications Kangkana Koli Richard Stahler-Sholk, faculty mentor

Political Science

9:15 a.m. Abandoned Together: Community Leadership in Improving Health Outcomes in Appalachia Ethan Smith Richard Stahler-Sholk, faculty mentor

Political Science

9:30 a.m. The Interconnectedness of Radical Movements in Various Communities of Color Sanyu Lukwago Richard Stahler-Sholk, faculty mentor

Political Science

9:45 a.m. The Motivations for North Korea’s Aggressive Military Attitude Towards Its Neighbors Yura Kim Nitya Singh, faculty mentor

Political Science

10 a.m. The Role of the Turkish Dam Construction in Exacerbating Regional Tensions with Iraq and Syria Maria Paula Perdomo Garcia Ebrahim Soltani, faculty mentor

Political Science

ORAL SESSIONS

Room 352

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Moderator: Barry Pyle

9 a.m. The Media and Its Coverage of the Trump Administration Joshua Gurwell Edward Sidlow, faculty mentor

Political Science


9:15 a.m. Voter Remorse in the Age of Trump Hunter Butkovic Jeffrey Bernstein, faculty mentor

Political Science

9:30 a.m. Understanding Dynamics of State Civil Rights Commissions and Anti-Discrimination Policy Madelaine Coy Barry Pyle, faculty mentor

Political Science

9:45 a.m. Roe v. Wade: Facing Science, Ethics, and Morality Abigail Bongiorno Barry Pyle, faculty mentor

Political Science

10 a.m. History of the Study of Guaranteed Basic Income Thomas Klemm Perry Silverschanz, faculty mentor

Social Work

Auditorium

Moderator: John Dorsey

9 a.m. Concerto for Trumpet, Opus 41 Darin Good Carter Eggers, faculty mentor

Music & Dance

9:15 a.m. Anton Bruckner’s Mass No. 2 in E Minor—A Conductor’s Guide Louis Vajda Brandon Johnson, faculty mentor

Music & Dance

Music & Dance

ORAL SESSIONS

9:30 a.m. A Look Back at Early Music Therapy: Comparing Music Therapy from the 1800s with Modern Research Sophia Heitkamp Theresa Merrill, faculty mentor

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9:45 a.m. Women in Music: A Performance by Women, About Women Alexis Sikes, Emily Schafer, Chelsey Parker and Samantha Meyers Woody Chenoweth, faculty mentor

Music & Dance

10 a.m. The Perception of Water in Piano Works by Liszt, Debussy, Ravel, and Griffes Megan Angriawan Garik Pedersen, faculty mentor

Music & Dance

Student Art Gallery Moderator: Martha Baiyee 9 a.m. Keeping it “REAL� with Authentic Assessment in Early Childhood Danielle Mijnsbergen and Megan Zydeck Martha Baiyee, faculty mentor

Teacher Education

9:15 a.m. Translating the World One Picture Book at a Time Kristine Gatchel Jessica De Young Kander, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

9:30 a.m. The Observations of Preschool Children in Gender-Stereotyped Play with Gender-Neutral Toys Chelsey M. Eatmon Anne Bednar, faculty mentor Teacher Education 9:45 a.m.

ORAL SESSIONS

Concepts to Go! Melanie Prince Christina Mirtes, faculty mentor

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Teacher Education

10 a.m. Bullying in Grade School Children and Its Connection to the School-to-Prison Pipeline Alyssia Hence Celeste Hawkins and Sarah VanZoeren, faculty mentors

Social Work


SESSION B Room 204

Moderator: Christine Neufeld

10:30 a.m. A Reflection of Repulsion: Narcissism in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Jessica C. Williams Christine Neufeld, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

10:45 a.m. The Ethical Order of Antigone Lauren Williams Laura McMahon, faculty mentor

History & Philosophy

11 a.m. The Gospel of Thomas: An Examination of the History and Theology of a Religious Text Jack Collins John Wegner and Rick Rogers, faculty mentors

History & Philosophy

11:15 a.m. The Old English Translations under King Alfred the Great Katlyn Dudek Philip Schmitz, faculty mentor

History & Philosophy

Room 304

Moderator: Kimberly Barrett

10:30 a.m. To Teach or Not to Teach: Assessing Why Students Decide to Enter or Leave the Field of Education Nathaniel J. Pyle Barbara Patrick, faculty mentor

Political Science

Political Science

ORAL SESSIONS

10:45 a.m. Russian Social Media Usage During the 2016 Election Taylor Chase Edward Sidlow, faculty mentor

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11 a.m. Analysis of Self-Determination of Students and Teachers at EMU Post Socio-Political Events 2016-2017 Nadia Ansari Kimberly Barrett, faculty mentor

Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology

11:15 a.m. Student Involvement: A Comparative Study of Eastern Michigan University and Oxford-Brookes University Meaghan Lynch Linda Foran, faculty mentor

Leadership & Counseling

11:30 a.m. Wings: Radical Self-Transformation Through Leadership Connstynce Nduta Chege Kate Curley and Steve Bryant, faculty mentors

Leadership & Counseling

Room 320

Moderator: Heather Neff

10:30 a.m. The Effects of Deindustrialization on the Economy and Environment of Flint, MI Courtni Montgomery, Shayla Card-Nowlin and Deziray Taylor Heather Neff, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

10:45 a.m. Examining the Educational Challenges of Children Affected by the Flint Lead Water Crisis Victoria Fields, Desiree Drake, Jadyn Guess and Fajr Muhammad Heather Neff, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

ORAL SESSIONS

11 a.m. Modern Day Slavery: The Exploitation of Immigrant Workers in the Middle East Mariam Akanan and Kangkana Koli Richard Stahler-Sholk, faculty mentor

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Political Science

11:15 a.m. Economic Development in Latin America and East Asia JĂşlia Miyahara Richard Stahler-Sholk, faculty mentor

Political Science


11:30 a.m. Clientelism in Social Policy Sean Robinson Richard Stahler-Sholk, faculty mentor

Political Science

Room 330

Moderator: Arnold Fleischmann

10:30 a.m. Twitter for Business: Channel Strategies for Enhancing Social Media Marketing Emily Locke Russ Merz, faculty mentor Marketing

10:45 a.m. Social Media Communication by Michigan County and City Government Courtney Marshall Arnold Fleischmann, faculty mentor

Political Science

11 a.m. Operation of Unmanned Aerial Systems and the Law Kyle Adrian Bjorklund Tracy Nothnagel, faculty mentor

Technology & Professional Services Management

11:15 a.m. Using Strategic Changes to Reduce Organizations’ Vulnerabilities to Data Security Breaches Zahirul Islam Bilquis Ferdousi, faculty mentor

Information Security & Applied Computing

11:30 a.m. Analyzing Counter Improvised Explosive Device Equipment for Effectiveness in Preventing Casualty Roxanne Reinhardt Megan Moore, faculty mentor

Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology

ORAL SESSIONS 13


Room 350

Moderator: Bradley Ensor

10:30 a.m. Ceramics as Commodities: Market Access and Distributions in Rural Southeast Michigan Timothy Maze Bradley Ensor, faculty mentor

Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology

10:45 a.m. Socioeconomic Differentiation at Historic Sites: A Comparison of Ceramic Analytical Methods Julia R. Joblinski Bradley Ensor, faculty mentor

Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology

11 a.m. Using Inorganic Proxies to Delineate Organic Groundwater Contaminants Near the Ann Arbor Landfill Jacob Kowalczyk Christopher Gellasch, faculty mentor

Geography & Geology

11:15 a.m. Synthesis of Pt(IV) Complex Containing Lonidamine and Steroid Based Bormones Justin Norris James Hoeschele, faculty mentor Chemistry

11:30 a.m. Synthesis and Analysis of Novel Platinum (IV) Prodrugs and Their Potential as Anti-Cancer Agents Natalia Anaya and Bradley Clegg James Hoeschele and Deborah Heyl-Clegg, faculty mentors Chemistry

ORAL SESSIONS

Room 352

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Moderator: Bernard Miller

10:30 a.m. Is Discovery Necessarily Linguistic? Natalia Anderson W. John Koolage, faculty mentor

History & Philosophy


10:45 a.m. Brandon Victor Dixon of Hamilton Delivers a Speech to Mike Pence on Broadway: A Rhetorical Analysis Colleen E. Sadows Anke Wolbert, faculty mentor

Communication Media & Theatre Arts

11 a.m. Sociopragmatic Strategies in the 2016 Election Connor De Haan Eric Acton, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

11:15 a.m. Transition of the False Narrative into the Digital Era Amanda Wasunyk Bernard Miller, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

11:30 a.m. Queer Theory and Cosmopolitan Theory: Comparing Approaches to Global Justice Abigail Vermeulen Ebrahim Soltani, faculty mentor

Political Science

Auditorium

Moderator: John Dorsey

10:30 a.m. Through My Eyes: A Student Music Therapist's Self-Reflection on Experiencing Culture in Pediatrics Mary Rose Nieman Theresa Merrill, faculty mentor

Music & Dance

10:45 a.m. Censorship and Chromaticism: Russia’s 20th Century Through the Eyes of a Composer Emily Katynski Joel Schoenhals, faculty mentor Music & Dance

11 a.m. Musical Influences in Three Pieces for Solo Clarinet by Igor Stravinsky James Rayle Sandra Jackson, faculty mentor

Music & Dance

ORAL SESSIONS

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11:15 a.m. Concerto in D Major by Giuseppe Tartini Anthony Vigliotti Carter Eggers, faculty mentor

Music & Dance

11:30 a.m. New Works by Student Composers: The Misty Sea and Two Miniatures Megan Angriawan and William Mufarreh Whitney Prince, faculty mentor

Music & Dance

Student Art Gallery

Moderator: Barbara Patrick

10:30 a.m. Be a Leader. Fight Racism. A Discussion of Racism and Why It Needs to End Christopher Suisham Victor Okafor, faculty mentor

Africology & African American Studies

10:45 a.m. The Silent Protest Against Racism: Where is the Love? Desmine Robinson Elisabeth Däumer and Micala Evans, faculty mentors

English Language & Literature

11 a.m. The Framing of Minorities in the Media Dereka Bennett Geoffrey Hammill, faculty mentor

Communication Media & Theatre Arts

11:15 a.m. The Death Penalty and Its Usage in Modern Day America: What Do Citizens Think Jordan Weeks Barbara Patrick, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSIONS

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Political Science

11:30 a.m. The State of Our Nation Sarah Pakray Sylvia Sims-Gray, faculty mentor

Social Work


SESSION C Room 204

Moderator: Pamela Becker

1:30 p.m. Keepers of Opulent Resources: Michigan Jayla Talley Micala Evans and Ronald Woods, faculty mentors

Africology & African American Studies

1:45 p.m. In the Business of Cosplay: The Final Stage Lilly DeRamos Holly Mosher and Julie Becker, faculty mentors

Visual & Built Environments

2 p.m. Detroit Urban Redevelopment and Rehabilitation Dariya Protcheva Kasim A. Korkmaz, faculty mentor

Visual & Built Environments

2:15 p.m. 2017 Steelcase NEXT Competition Brandon White Diane Guevara, faculty mentor

Visual & Built Environments

2:30 p.m. The Tool of Pattern Making CAD to Create the Corset Wonder Lilly DeRamos Julie Becker, faculty mentor

Visual & Built Environments

Room 304

Moderator: Laura George

Communication Media & Theatre Arts

1:45 p.m. Superheroes, Culture and American Mythology Scotty Schlueter Patrick Barry, Jr., faculty mentor

Communication Media & Theatre Arts

ORAL SESSIONS

1:30 p.m. Struggling to Identify: An Analysis of Rust Micah Huff Jonathan S. Carter, faculty mentor

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2 p.m. The Power of Observation Oksana Diana Palczynski Martha Baiyee, faculty mentor

Teacher Education

2:15 p.m. Comics and Inclusivity: Turning the Page on Comic History Leijah Petelka Natasa Kovacevic, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

2:30 p.m. Falling Outside the Gender Binary Samantha DeRosia Laura George, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

Room 320

Moderator: Emily Grman

1:30 p.m. The Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy for the Prevention of Pain and Injury in Dental Students Leah McQuone, Basem Alsalah, Conor Laurencelle and Madelyn Prebola Jayne Yatczak and Sharon Holt, faculty mentors

Health Sciences

1:45 p.m. More the Merrier: Energetic Consequences of Grouping Male and Female Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches Christine Doran Cara Shillington, faculty mentor Biology

2 p.m. Building a New Tree of Life on Madagascar Using RADSeq Nicholas Drews Margaret Hanes, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSIONS

Biology

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2:15 p.m. No Evidence for Trade-Offs Found Between Three Prairie Plant Species and Their Mutualistic Partners Emily Galloway Emily Grman, faculty mentor Biology


2:30 p.m. Native Prairie Plant Seedling Establishment is Affected by Spatial Arrangement but Not Treatment Joseph Proietti Emily Grman, faculty mentor Biology

Room 330

Moderator: Dennis O'Grady

1:30 p.m. East to West: Conflict in Career Choices Between First-Generation Students and Immigrant Parents Faraz Ansari Dennis O’Grady, faculty mentor

Communication Media & Theatre Arts

1:45 p.m. Building Student Schedules Efficiently During Honors Advising Jamie Peterson and Kelly Mayhew Non-presenting authors: John Davis, Cameron Copland and Christina Spalding Krish Narayanan, faculty mentor

Computer Science

2 p.m. Barriers to Academic Success Experienced by Student Veterans Anthony Terry Ellen Koch, faculty mentor Psychology 2:15 p.m.

College Major’s Influence on Political Identity: Self Selection or Indoctrination? Jacob Deutsch Jeffrey Bernstein, faculty mentor

Political Science

Room 350

Moderator: Anke Wolbert

Communication Media & Theatre Arts

ORAL SESSIONS

1:30 p.m. Our Hair Matters Lorian Tompkins Anke Wolbert, faculty mentor

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1:45 p.m. Using Beyoncé’s Visual Album, Lemonade, to Teach Black Feminist Thought Sina H. Webster Ashley Glassburn Falzetti, faculty mentor

Women’s & Gender Studies

2 p.m. Reconceptualizing the “Black Queen”: Utilizing Hip-Hop Feminism to Reshape Images of Black Women Faith G. Williams Ashley Glassburn Falzetti, faculty mentor

Women’s & Gender Studies

2:15 p.m. Arab Spring Influences on German Hip-Hop Music Mariam Samir Carla Damiano, faculty mentor

World Languages

2:30 p.m. Hip-Hop Lessons: Detroit Candis Caldwell Micala Evans, faculty mentor

Africology & African American Studies

Room 352

Moderator: David Pawlowski

1:30 p.m. Humans—A Solar System Species: Introduction Larry Borum and Rosalie Tezak David Pawlowski, faculty mentor

Physics & Astronomy

1:45 p.m. Humans—A Solar System Species: Design Andrew Richardson and Kyle Wilhelm David Pawlowski, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSIONS

20

Physics & Astronomy

2 p.m. Mars H2O Extraction Mission Results Sam Carano and Ryan Walker David Pawlowski, faculty mentor

Physics & Astronomy


2:15 p.m. Effects of Solar Irradiance on the Atmosphere of Mars Jonah Pollens-Dempsey David Pawlowski, faculty mentor

Physics & Astronomy

Auditorium

Moderator: John Dorsey

1:30 p.m. A Study of Keiko Abe’s Influence on the Repertoire, Design, and Status of the Marimba Claire Castle John Dorsey, faculty mentor

Music & Dance

1:45 p.m. Relationships Between Chair Placement and Musical Self-Efficacy Among Middle School Band Students Olivia Gegich Heather Shouldice, faculty mentor

Music & Dance

2 p.m. Incorporating Play into the Classroom Sierra Morrissey Darlene Leifson, faculty mentor

Communication Media & Theatre Arts

2:15 p.m. Quantitative Reasoning Using Graduation Data Talia Edgar Khairul Islam, faculty mentor

Mathematics & Statistics

2:30 p.m. Descriptive Statistics Using Java Programming Language Sadia Sarker Khairul Islam, faculty mentor

Mathematics & Statistics

1:30 p.m. Older Adolescent Health Female Health Experiences Micaela Stevenson Dyann Logwood, faculty mentor

Women’s & Gender Studies

ORAL SESSIONS

Kiva Moderator: Charles Cunningham

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1:45 p.m. A Period of Learning: How and What Commercial Popular Culture Teaches about Menstruation Scout Bostley Christopher Robbins, faculty mentor

Teacher Education

2 p.m. Ironing Out the Wrinkles: Conformity, Economy, and Maternity in Tillie Olsen’s “I Stand Here Ironing” Megan Sears Charles Cunningham, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

2:15 p.m. Breastfeeding Knowledge, Attitudes and Intentions of Eastern Michigan University Students Olga Cheianu-Marshall Olivia Ford and Alice Jo Rainville, faculty mentors

Health Sciences

2:30 p.m. Postpartum Hospital Support for Families After Perinatal Loss Micaela Stevenson Megan Moore, faculty mentor

Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology

Student Art Gallery

Moderator: Susan Badger Booth

1:30 p.m. Diversity, Inclusion, Access and Equity: An Analysis of Otherness in Cultural Organizations Cheyanne Jeffries Susan Badger Booth, faculty mentor

Communication Media & Theatre Arts

ORAL SESSIONS

1:45 p.m. Challenges of Art Conservation in the Modern and Contemporary Era Hannah McCready Brendan Fay, faculty mentor

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Art & Design

2 p.m. Steven Young Lee and Ai Weiwei: Continued Conversations in Traditional Chinese Ceramics Sasha Guo Thomas Suchan, faculty mentor

Art & Design


2:15 p.m. Building an Archive of EMU’s Arts Management & Administration Programs: 40th Anniversary Joshua R. Smith Susan Badger Booth, faculty mentor

Communication Media & Theatre Arts

2:30 p.m. Data Generation with Python and Docker Mark Weiman Samir Tout, faculty mentor

Information Security & Applied Computing

SESSION D Room 204

Moderator: Megan Moore

3 p.m. A Cross-Cultural Analysis on Arthritic Variation Between Agricultural and Foraging Societies Alexander Belanger Megan Moore, faculty mentor

Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology

3:15 p.m. Latin American Immigration: The Importance of Immigrants Christian Lopez Bettie Kay McGowan, faculty mentor

Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology

3:30 p.m. Power, Politics and Place: The Governance of Natural Resources in Namibian Conservancies Kelsey Hawkins-Johnson Maria Garcia, faculty mentor

Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology

World Languages

ORAL SESSIONS

3:45 p.m. A Standards-Based Collection of Culture Capsules on Francophone Countries Outside of Europe Lauren Jones Geneviève Peden, faculty mentor

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4 p.m. Integrating Refugees in Germany Non-Conventionally Morgan Day Margrit Zinggeler, faculty mentor

World Languages

Room 304

Moderator: Elizabeth Däumer

3 p.m. Mary Wilkins Freeman’s Alternative Path to Salvation Mona Beydoun Joseph Csicsila, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

3:15 p.m. Nighttime, Fairytales, and Vampirism: Comparing “Christabel” and “Goblin Market” Katlyn Dudek Laura George, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

3:30 p.m. The Poetry of T.S. Eliot as Bibliotherapy for Chronically Ill Readers McKayla Menzel Elisabeth Däumer, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

3:45 p.m. Trauma, Gender, and Transformation in T.S. Eliot’s Writings Jessica Tapley Elisabeth Däumer, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

4 p.m. Prufrock’s Pervigilium Anna Machasic Elisabeth Däumer, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSIONS

24

English Language & Literature

Room 320

Moderator: Brittany Albaugh

3 p.m. Synthesis and Evaluation of a New Class of Inhibitors of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Justin Powers Cory Emal, faculty mentor Chemistry


3:15 p.m. Selective Salt Crystallization as a Method for Separating Amino Alcohol Diastereomers Caitlin Keif Harriet Lindsay, faculty mentor Chemistry

3:30 p.m. Characterization of Histone Binding Properties of D363A UHRF2 Mutant by Fluorescence Polarization Hana Khan and Marisa E. Gilliam Non-presenting authors: Alyssa Winker and Shane Ginnard Brittany Albaugh, faculty mentor Chemistry

3:45 p.m. Characterization of the TTD Binding Domain of Epigenetic, Tumor-Suppressor UHRF2 with Histone H3 Timothy Petzold Brittany Albaugh, faculty mentor Chemistry

Room 330

Moderator: Tanweer Shapla

3 p.m. Physical Applications of Partial Differential Equations Jared Korotney and Jared Bender Kenneth Shiskowski, faculty mentor

Mathematics & Statistics

3:15 p.m. On Some Applications of the Trigonometric Functions Lilly Vael Tanweer Shapla, faculty mentor

Mathematics & Statistics

3:30 p.m. Predicting the Price of a Used Car via a Feedforward Neural Network Elijah Nichols Ovidiu Calin, faculty mentor Mathematics & Statistics

3:45 p.m. Are Hurricanes More Prevalent Now: A Statistical Review Emily Eubanks Tanweer Shapla, faculty mentor

Mathematics & Statistics

ORAL SESSIONS

25


4 p.m. Correlates of Global Warming and Greenhouse Gases in Climate Change Jessica Hawkins Khairul Islam, faculty mentor

Mathematics & Statistics

Room 350

Moderators: Jeffery Bernstein

3 p.m. Cross Pressured: The Heteronomy of Perspectives on LGBT+ Issues Monica Laschober, Josi Ezinga and Kristen Hudecz Jeffrey Bernstein, faculty mentor

Political Science

3:15 p.m. Beyond the Generalization of Racial Categories: How Voters React to Different Asian Identities Kangkana Koli Jeffrey Bernstein, faculty mentor

Political Science

3:30 p.m. The Intersection of Social Exclusion and Experimenter Race on Prejudice Attribution Jamaine T. Atkins Rusty McIntyre, faculty mentor Psychology

3:45 p.m. From Consumption to Resistance: Cultural Pedagogy and Engaging Protest in Popular Music Mackensi Crenshaw Christopher Robbins, faculty mentor

Teacher Education

4 p.m. The Metafictional References in Our Literature Vanessa Stoddard Ian Wojcik-Andrews, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSIONS

26

English Language & Literature


Room 352

Moderator: Charles Graham Jr.

3 p.m. The Underutilization of Mental Health Services on College Campuses by African American Students Mahogany Anderson Charles Graham Jr., faculty mentor

Social Work

3:15 p.m. Black Experiences at a PWI with Double Consciousness in Regard to Mental Health Nailah Bush Micala Evans, faculty mentor

Africology & African American Studies

3:30 p.m. How Being a Domestic Violence Survivor Affects Women in Leadership Mel Roberts Steven Bryant and Kate Curley, faculty mentors

Leadership & Counseling

3:45 p.m. Men’s Violence Against Women: A Comparative Review of Which Programs Work Best Yeliani Valdez Paul Leighton, faculty mentor

Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology

4 p.m. Canine-Assisted Therapy: The Impact of Service Dog Partnership on Symptoms of PTSD in Veterans Katherine Ankenbauer Jennifer Kellman-Fritz and Angie Mann-William, faculty mentors

Social Work

Auditorium

Moderator: Anita Rich

World Languages

ORAL SESSIONS

3 p.m. Rudi Deusing: Restoring the History of Braunfels, Germany and New Braunfels, Texas Jaycie Sabala Margrit Zinggeler, faculty mentor

27


3:15 p.m. Explorations: Multimedia Poetry Using Media Appropriation Thomas Dunn II Carla Harryman, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

3:30 p.m. The Taste of Kimchi: Gender and Film in Colonial Korea Aaron Carpenter Deron Overpeck, faculty mentor

Communication Media & Theatre Arts

3:45 p.m. African American Students’ Experiences in Traditional University Theatre Programs Amber White, Madison Coates and Lexxus Glaze-Beeman Wallace Bridges, faculty mentor

Communication Media & Theatre Arts

4 p.m. Bullying: A Curriculum Based Reader’s Theater Performance Hailey Holmgren Anita Rich, faculty mentor

Communication Media & Theatre Arts

Student Art Gallery

Moderator: Eric Acton

3 p.m. The Rhetorical Discourse Surrounding Female Intersex Athletes in Olympic Sports Victoria Fields Dennis O’Grady, faculty mentor

Communication Media & Theatre Arts

3:15 p.m. Stereotypes and Gendered Adjectives in Nominations for Student Awards Mitchell DeVore and Ashlee Simpkins Eric Acton, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSIONS

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English Language & Literature

3:30 p.m. I Now Pronounce You Forbidden to Say My Name Gabriella Perry Verónica Grondona, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature


3:45 p.m. The Syntax and Semantics of Resultatives Marley Beaver Daniel Seely, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

4 p.m. Affixtacular: An Investigation of the Libfix Chloe McCrystal and Adrianna Blount Daniel Seely, faculty mentor

English Language & Literature

ORAL SESSIONS 29


ABSTRACTS COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES DEPARTMENT OF AFRICOLOGY & AFRICAN STUDIES Green Book: A History and Modern Application of The Negro Motorist Green Book During Racial Riots Amanda L. Brezzell Patrick Pieh, faculty mentor The Negro Motorist Green Book was a guide designed to help Black Americans avoid lifethreatening obstacles during a period of violent racial unrest. At its height, it contained hotels, restaurants, service stations, and safe places for Black Americans. This guide was necessary due to acts of violence, discrimination and intimidation perpetrated by businesses that refused service to Black Americans. Our research explores the history of the book and its significance in the community. We used this research to create a cell phone application that is a modern version of the Green Book, giving individuals an opportunity to find and support Black-owned businesses. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Black Experiences at a PWI with Double Consciousness in Regard to Mental Health Nailah Bush Micala Evans, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 352—3:15 P.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Mental health tends to be a taboo subject within the Black community. It is defined as a person’s condition with regard to his/her psychological and emotional well-being. For the Black community, mental health is often neglected, and awareness is also almost unmentionable. I am using an auto-ethnographic method in order to gain a deeper understanding of mental health awareness issues, particularly as they relate Black students. The research will include a direct observation of three high traffic areas where mental health resources are offered at the university. The second phase will be my autoethnographic exploration of mental health awareness on the campus.

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Hip-Hop Lessons: Detroit Candis Caldwell Micala Evans, faculty mentor I want to open the door for others to understand Black culture in America through the eyes of music. Good and bad, every artist has a story to tell. I want show how certain types of music, such as “trap music,” a popular genre in our generation, affect us politically, socially, and economically. I will focus upon hip-hop in Detroit. Being a native from the city, I want to do more research on music in Detroit and explore how it impacts the city’s culture. I plan to interview a few hip-hop lovers, experts, producers, and artists. Using an authentic voice, my presentation will dig deep in order to elucidate why we listen to and create certain types of music. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 350—2:30 P.M.

The Silent Protest Against Racism: Where is the Love? Desmine Robinson Elisabeth Däumer and Micala Evans, faculty mentors In the fall of 2016, in response to racist vandalism on campus and class discussions, I organized a silent protest against racism, which helped me foster diversity and inclusion on campus and reach a deeper understanding of Black Lives Matter activism. For this presentation, I will research contemporary and past silent protests and violent protests, consider the stories of people who protested during the height of racial turmoil, and survey EMU students on how they interpret the Black Lives Matter Movement and protests. The movement has been called a terrorist organization by various political leaders and I fear some people agree with them, so my goal is to challenge it and to prove that we all can play a vital role in the movement.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—10:45 A.M.

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Be a Leader. Fight Racism. A Discussion of Racism and Why It Needs to End Christopher Suisham Victor Okafor, faculty mentor This paper presentation will discuss different forms of racism and how racism has become institutionalized in America. The presentation will also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the Affirmative Action Policy. Finally, the paper also discusses the likely impact of disproportionate incarceration rates of young Black males on the African American family. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—10:30 A.M.


Keepers of Opulent Resources: Michigan Jayla Talley Micala Evans and Ronald Woods, faculty mentors The purpose of our study is to examine the interactions between society and organizations. By enacting a digital marketing experiment, we will examine nonprofits whose goals and services compare to President Barack Obama’s, ‘My Brother’s Keeper’(MBK) foundation and its ‘Core 9 Point’ principles. The experiment will be devised of connecting directly/ indirectly, through storytelling branded marketing, to life coaching resources designed to help at-risk youth reach various levels of opulent success. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 204—1:30 P.M.

SCHOOL OF ART & DESIGN Keep Moving Forward, Looking Into the Future: Engineering a Human Bionic Eye Mary-Catherine Ballard Ryan Molloy, faculty mentor They say the eyes are the windows to our souls. But what if our windows were inevitably closed, denying our souls to look beyond oneself. This project explores possible prototypes that were developed through a semester in which we created a collection of images, sketches and finally a model system for engineering a bionic eye. After months of extensive research, and establishing an understanding for the mechanics behind a natural seeing human eye, I began to explore what advancements are currently available towards bettering the lives of those without vision. The design process is a perpetual learning process aimed to create an innovative yet modern design for those visually impaired individuals seeking to open their windows for the first time. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

Gretchen Otto, faculty mentor This display is a representation of diverse metal design and traditional techniques of undergraduate skills acquired through six semesters in the metalsmithing area. This includes the branching styles of traditional blacksmithing that is seldom seen in the School of Art & Design at EMU. It is mixed with modern designs in architecture, design, and smallscale work focusing in precious materials used in jewelry design. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Metal Designs Through Use of Diverse Materials and Function Andrew Basnaw

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Solitary Subversion Band Logo, Artwork and Design Sarah Bertram Leslie Atzmon, faculty mentor Solitary Subversion is a Ypsilanti-based band that identifies as progressive hardcore. Their first EP released last December, Document, explores the duality of power dynamics and other socio-political issues faced in contemporary society today. The goal of this project was to curate a cohesive design system across multiple media such as poster, postcard, album art, and CD insert for the band. A necessary and thorough understanding of the music led the way for an expressive design. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

Large Handbuilt Terra Cotta Pots Alexa Blohm, Will Boros, Sawyer Jacobs, Scott Thuernau, Makayla Boyink, Lucas McManamor, Taylor Perry, Kim Wehrmeister, Kayla Harvey, Jessica McDonald, Kendra Pettiford and William Watson Diana Pancioli, faculty mentor These pots are an exploration of historical ceramic forms with a contemporary vision. Similar shapes were made in Greece, Rome, and China. Our pots, as were many ancient pots, were constructed using terra cotta. Several of our pots follow the ancient Roman tradition of using "terra sigillata"—a clay slip—to create a rich red unglazed surface. Other pots in this exhibition have a more contemporary surface using colored slips and glazes. These forms follow an historical tradition allowing students to understand ceramics from the past while also making pots that are personal and relevant today. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Handbuilt Terra Cotta Baking Dishes Alexa Blohm, Will Boros, Makayla Boyink, Ari Comish, Anna Friss, Alexis Kalisz, Lucas McManamon, Taylor Perry, Jocelyn Peters, Nicole Redfield, Chelsea Spangler and Scott Thuernau

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Diana Pancioli, faculty mentor These baking dishes demonstrate the necessary integration of form and surface decoration. The image is first designed and slip painted on a clay slab. Then the walls of the piece are built around the image in order to integrate the form with the image. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300


Handbuilt Terra Cotta Platters Alexa Blohm, Will Boros, Makayla Boyink, Taylor Perry, Daniel Kaminski, Emily Rodziewicz, Ashleigh Swinehart, Mary Westcott, Emily Kiefer, Courtnie MacQuarrry, Zachary Mason and William Watson Diana Pancioli and Beth Ogden, faculty mentors These platters demonstrate the necessary integration of form and surface decoration. Two techniques are shown: “Maiolica”, in which colorants are painted on top of a white glaze to create a painterly decoration, and “Slip Painting”. This involves applying liquid colored clays on the unfired surface. Some of these platters demonstrate “sgraffito” a process of carving through the slip to show the clay beneath and then glaze is applied. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

Morgan Day Meets the Management Elijah Bobo Leslie Atzmon, faculty mentor This project focuses on the marketing and aesthetic vocabulary through a singular design narrative created for the proposed musical collective: Morgan Day Meets the Management. A simple chromatic scheme of black, white, and yellow is used to create two posters, two postcards, a brochure and vinyl record sleeve. The idea of the project is to create a cohesive and structured marketing environment surrounding the group. The design intertwined with photography from around Detroit is meant to represent the jazzy, laid-back music of the group. Predominantly keeping an upbeat and energetic feel that is synonymous with Detroit and jazz music, itself, is the goal of the project. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

Steven Young Lee and Ai Weiwei: Continued Conversations in Traditional Chinese Ceramics Sasha Guo This paper examines the influence of traditional Chinese ceramics in contemporary art through analysis of work by Steven Y. Lee, whose modern pieces emulate the Yuan and Early Ming Dynasty wares to explore themes of identity and authenticity, and Ai Weiwei, whose work often employs Han Dynasty artifacts and porcelain to highlight the political climate, culture, and economy in globalized China. Ceramics is inextricably woven into the history of East Asia, and Lee and Ai’s works and exude a shared desire to facilitate discussion about how contemporary ceramics serve as an amalgam of both old and new ideas and the persistence and transformation of cultural experience in a dynamic world. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—2 P.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Thomas Suchan, faculty mentor

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Young Fathers Album Artwork and Promotional Campaign Daniel Ignacio Leslie Atzmon, faculty mentor Young Fathers is a Scottish experimental hip-hop/indietronica trio, known for their grimy instrumentals, eclectic blend of international influences, and themes of war and family. They also have a focus on the Liberian and Ghanan background of two of their members. In the beginning of their career, Young Fathers released two short EPs – Tape One and Tape Two. I imagined how to promote a compilation of those EPs. To translate their sound into image, I employed a non-digital approach, involving collages of archival photography from Liberia’s and Ghana’s respective civil wars, cut-out typography, and handwriting in marker pen. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

Challenges of Art Conservation in the Modern and Contemporary Era Hannah McCready Brendan Fay, faculty mentor The progression of artistic practice through the modern and contemporary movements has led to an interdisciplinary approach to art making. The concept of medium-specificity has become a challenging subject when approached from a conservator’s perspective as opposed to the perspective of art historians and theorists as a result. This paper examines new scholarship and exhibition practices grounded in the reevaluation of “intermedia” practices within the 20th Century, as well as, current debates over the concept of “medium” as seen from the perspective of conservators, historians, and theorists regarding modern and contemporary art. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—1:45 P.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Experimental Bent Wood Chair Jordan Oliva

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John DeHoog, faculty mentor This furniture design project will explore unique and experimental uses of bent wood through various bending techniques. I will employ different kinds of woods that are suitable for bending such as veneer, flexible plywood, and laminate to design and build a chair. The chair will have a simple and playful design drawing influence from children’s furniture but will be suited for an adult’s body. The design will also include strategic use of color that will not hide the appearance of the wood. In the process of designing and building this chair I will consider how the shape of it relates to the human body and how the material can be used in unexpected yet functional ways. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300


Meaning in Metals Katie Penrose, Makayla Boyink, Amanda Forehand, Brianna Meyer, Sasha Guo, Amelia Hoover, Keiffer Heino, Jade Cantrell, Heather Smith and Emily McCleery Non-presenting author: Briana Wickoff Gretchen Otto, faculty mentor Students using the technical traditions of metalsmithing have pushed the boundaries of their designing skills to create works that are both meaningful and aesthetically beautiful. The students have moved on to complex processes such as stone setting and conceptual ideation after acquiring the foundational skills needed for metalsmithing. For both types of processes, the students were required to find inspiration from either a stone or from something they believe that will protect them. Taking those ideas further they were pushed to create meaningful self-generated designs. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

A Brief Look at Women in Ancient Greece Gemma Perrotta Ellen Schwartz, faculty mentor Research on art associated with women in ancient Greece is presented here as a virtual exhibition. Objects used by women, and depicting them, offer insight into how women lived in that era, from the fifth through the first century BCE. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Exploration of New Age Watercolor Media vs. Contemporary Watercolors Christina Petroff Chris Hyndman, faculty mentor

DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Manufacturers offer watercolors (WC) in a number of forms: hard pans, tubes, pencils, gel crayons, etc. I will explore how these forms of WC work alone and together, how they differ in terms of texture and color, and how they present unique benefits and challenges for artists. Stemming from an independent study, focusing on these evolving properties of contemporary watercolors and WC hybrids, I will work in two types of study. The first will involve a series of materials tests and associated notes. The tests, notes and data will be scanned to make a digital resource that can be shared physically. The second type of study involves making related works each with a combination of the tested media.

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Joining Together Kristal Serna and Sarell Shaw John DeHoog, faculty mentor Japanese craftsmen for thousands of years have been using wood to create both simple and elaborate joints for use in temples, everyday buildings, and small objects. This specialized knowledge of specific tools and joint design was passed through familial guilds; however, few people now use these ancient methods in their woodworking and artistic practices. We believe there is great value in studying these ancient ways, and in this project we have crafted 24 traditional Japanese joints with the use of traditional tools. We have also each built a piece of furniture that utilizes Japanese joints. The furniture designs are influenced by our research into Japanese culture and by our current sensibilities as American art students. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Testing Morphological Hypotheses in Humbertiella (Malvaceae) Using RAD Sequencing Asra Akhlaq Margaret Hanes, faculty mentor

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Madagascar is renowned for high levels of biodiversity and endemism. The plant genus Humbertiella (Malveaceae) contains six distinct species and exhibits vast morphological diversity. Previously, flower and leaf morphology were used to predict relatedness throughout the genus. In this study, molecular sequence data were collected to test the morphology-based hypotheses. Restriction site markers and molecular tags allowed 14 individuals (1- 3 individuals of each species) to be sequenced across their genome using a method called RadSeq. By comparing the molecular phylogenies with the morphological predictions we gained insight into the morphological evolution of Humbertiella.

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POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Do Tarantulas Show Handedness in Response to Prey Odors? Matthew Angelosanto Cara Shillington, faculty mentor Behavioral lateralization occurs as a result of the functional and structural dominance of one side of the body over the other (i.e. handedness). While behavioral lateralization is exhibited among all vertebrates, recent studies indicate this trait is also present in invertebrates. A recent study of adult male tarantulas provides evidence of lateralized behavior during encounters with female odors, but not with prey odors. The purpose of our study is to expand on this and determine whether the age and species of tarantula influence behavioral lateralization in response to prey odors. To test this, the movements of two species of juvenile tarantulas were recorded in a T-maze. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Study of Copy Number Variation on Human Fragile Site FRA3B and FRAXB Using Fluctuation Analysis Farzaneh Azizi and Faezeh Azizi Anne Casper, faculty mentor Copy number variation (CNV) is duplication/deletion of DNA sequences that occur frequently at common fragile sites (CFSs) under replication stress. Studies have shown associations between CNVs and a spectrum of diseases such as cancer. To study the CNV formation rates in human CFSs FRAXB and FRA3B, we performed fluctuation analysis using a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) model system with a reporter cassette. Due to the size of FRA3B being greater than FRAXB (1,217,500 bp > 389,500 bp), we hypothesized that the rate of cassette duplication/deletion (CNVs) would be higher in FRA3B than in FRAXB. However, our data suggest that CNV formation in both FRAXB and FRA3B occurs at similar rates. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Anne Casper, faculty mentor Copy number variations (CNVs) are deletions or duplications of large genomic regions, which have been linked to genetic diseases including tumor development and autism. CNVs are hypothesized to form by replication fork stalling and polymerase template switching, events that frequently happen in DNA at human common fragile sites. Using yeast containing human fragile site DNA, we investigated deletions and duplications of a reporter cassette at three locations that differ by their proximity to an AT-rich area of the fragile site, a sequence that can stall replication. Our data show that CNV frequency is affected by which side of the AT-rich area the reporter cassette is integrated. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Investigating Frequency of Copy Number Variations (CNVs) at Fragile Sites in S. cerevisiae Samantha Bartolet and Constance Vernham

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More the Merrier: Energetic Consequences of Grouping Male and Female Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches Christine Doran Cara Shillington, faculty mentor Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches live in hierarchical communities, making them ideal for sociality studies. We measured metabolic response to isolation-induced stress in animals tested individually, paired, and in small groupings of male, female and mixed-sexes. We hypothesized varying degrees of separation from colony members would result in increasing stress responses, with individuals experiencing the greatest metabolic activity. While this was supported in individual and paired tests, groups had significant increases in metabolic rates. This could be explained by widely documented behaviors of male competition, but little to no research has focused on surprisingly similar female trends. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 320—1:45 P.M

Discovery of Novel Antimicrobial Agents Against MRSA Sadaf Dorandish Paul A. Price, faculty mentor According to the World Health Organization and the United States Department of Agriculture, the lack of development of new antibiotics against multi-drug resistant pathogens is a major cause for concern. Many life-threatening infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We have isolated four Streptomyces strains that produce antimicrobial compounds that are highly active against MRSA. Organic extracts of these strains are also effective in killing MRSA and other Gram-positive pathogens. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Building a New Tree of Life on Madagascar Using RADSeq Nicholas Drews

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Margaret Hanes, faculty mentor Megistohibiscus represents a group of morphologically diverse plants comprising 5 genera and 35 species, all of which are endemic to Madagascar. To reconstruct the phylogeny for this group we extracted gDNA from 64 plants representing 1-3 individuals per species. Genomic libraries were sequenced with a tool, RADSeq, that uses restriction site markers and molecular tags to sequence genes across the genome in all individuals. The bioinformatic pipeline ipyrad was used to filter raw data and cluster sequences into homologous genes. Phylogenetic analyses, including tetrad and RAxML, were used to resolve how species of this clade are related. We also investigated when each genus originated. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 320—2 P.M.


No Evidence for Trade-Offs Found Between Three Prairie Plant Species and Their Mutualistic Partners Emily Galloway Emily Grman, faculty mentor Plants can form mutualistic relationships between one or more partners to help them grow and reproduce, but this could come at the expense of each partner’s success as they can compete for resources. We hypothesized that negative trade-offs between partners affect their abundance and asked whether these trade-offs are consistent between different plant hosts or soil communities. To test this, we compared mycorrhizal fungi colonization to the number of rhizobial root nodules in 3 legumes in 16 soil treatments (either from remnant prairies, 6 sites, or restored prairies, 10 sites.) We found no consistent evidence for trade-offs between partners across hosts or soil treatment. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 320—2:15 P.M.

A Comparison of Motivation in Students Enrolled in BIO 255 (Human Genetics) and BIO 301 (Genetics) Noha Ghannam Chiron Graves, faculty mentor Understanding student motivation can assist professors in making content more meaningful leading to increased learning. This study examines the relationship between student motivation and their reason(s) for taking a course by comparing motivation among students in a required genetics course for biology majors to that of motivation among students in an elective genetics course typically taken by non-biology majors. Participants responded to a 12 item survey asking them statements pertaining to their motivations behind their classroom behaviors. Data collected from the survey were analyzed and coded as avoidant, approach, performance, and mastery motivational oriented goals. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Paul Price, faculty mentor Legume plants rely on a symbiotic relationship with bacteria to obtain fixed nitrogen. Specific bacterial genes are known to affect the developmental processes of root nodules where nitrogen fixation occurs. On such gene, hrrP, has been observed to affect this development on a population-wide scale. The presence of the hrrP gene limits the ability of nodulating bacteria to fix nitrogen for certain ecotypes of plants, thus limiting the bacteria’s host range. We employed standard insertional mutagenesis to study the effects of hrrP on 24 wild bacterial isolates when interacting with their legume hosts. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Using Insertional Mutagenesis to Study Legume/Rhizobia Symbiosis Marion Graham

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Modified Vulintus Liquid Dilution Olfactometer Zachery Harkey Thomas Mast, faculty mentor Olfaction is the detection of volatile environmental chemical stimuli (odors). Behavioral detection of odors research can be done manually but is time-consuming. Olfactometers can automate this process, but are expensive. We have made an olfactometer that we hypothesize will generate high quality data. Custom hardware (Arduino) and software (Python) process animal investigation to provide total odor investigation time with millisecond resolution that keeps the machine both cheap and easy to modify while giving us similar resolution to a commercial unit. This device would allow an inexpensive route to getting similar data as the commercial box without decreasing the quality of the data. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Is Microbial Colonization of Prairie Plant Roots Predictable? Rita Hodges Emily Grman, faculty mentor Restoring prairie land after agricultural use is important because prairies have ecologically desirable and unique species. However, complex interactions between plants and microbes can inhibit restoration. To assess potential effects of a beneficial microbe, I grew a prairie grass, Big Bluestem, in soils of 28 prairie sites, measured plant biomass, and quantified microbial abundance. Based on prior knowledge of site characteristics, we predicted which restoration soils would show more microbial colonization. We found little support for our hypotheses, suggesting that other factors may influence relationships between plants and their beneficial microbes in restoration.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Genetic Comparison of United States Red Rump Tarantula, Brachypelma vagans, with Mexican Specimens Sarah N. Holtzen Cara Shillington and Salima Machkour M’Rabet, faculty mentors The red rump tarantula, Brachypelma vagans, is an attractive and popular pet species inhabiting areas from Mexico to Costa Rica. Due to over-collecting, all Brachypelma species are illegal to collect in the wild and are protected under CITES. However, red rump tarantulas were introduced into Florida at least 40 years ago and are also available in the pet trade. The goal of our research is to compare the genetic profiles of the invasive Florida population and pet trade animals with specimens from different locations in Mexico to see the relationship between U.S. and Mexican red rump tarantulas. This work will be the first genetic study of the red rump tarantulas available in the U.S. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Do C. elegans Worms Require Their Food to be Alive? Jewel B. Jackson and Emily Tubbs Hannah S. Seidel, faculty mentor C. elegans is a microscopic worm that feeds on bacteria and provides a useful model for understanding host-microbe interactions. Previous studies have suggested that C. elegans cannot grow well on dead bacteria and that riboflavin (vitamin B2) rescues this effect. We re-tested this result by feeding C. elegans bacteria (E. coli) killed by heat treatment at 65°C and 95°C, with and without riboflavin. We observed that C. elegans grew well on control (live) E. coli, but grew poorly on heat-killed E. coli, even in the presence of riboflavin: C. elegans fed live bacteria developed to adulthood within ~4 days post hatching, but C. elegans fed heat-killed bacteria (with or without riboflavin) failed to develop to adulthood, even after 10 days post hatching. We conclude that worms grow well on live bacteria, but can’t grow to adulthood on heat-killed bacteria. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

The Effect of KONJAC1 and KONJAC2 on GDP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase Activity of VTC1 Hafsah Jamil Aaron Liepman, faculty mentor Nucleotide diphosphate sugars (NDP-sugars) are substrates in biosynthetic reactions catalyzed by a group of enzymes known as glycosyltransferases, which transfer the sugar portion of an NDP-sugar to another molecule. Guanosine diphosphomannose (GDPmannose) and GDP-glucose are NDP-sugars used for the biosynthesis of glucomannan, a plant cell wall polysaccharide. Vitamin C Defective 1 (VTC1) is the major pyrophosphorylase involved in GDP-mannose biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana, and its activity is enhanced by the proteins KONJAC1 (KJC1) and KONJAC2 (KJC2). This study explores whether the GDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity of VTC1 is also enhanced by KJC1 and/or KJC2. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Aaron H. Liepman, faculty mentor Mannans and glucomannans are carbohydrate components of plant cell walls. These carbohydrates serve structural roles, and are used for energy storage in some plants. Dendrobium officinale plants are rich in glucomannans and these plants are widely used in traditional medicine to combat various conditions including cancer, fatigue, and gastric ulcers. It is hypothesized that CELLULOSE SYNTHASE LIKE-A (CSLA) family members DoCSLA6 and DoCSLA8 encode mannan synthases responsible for the biosynthesis of glucomannans in D. officinale. The aim of this study is to characterize recombinant DoCSLA6 and DoCSLA8 proteins produced in yeast to verify their enzymatic functions. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Characterization of Candidate Mannan Synthases DoCSLA6 and DoCSLA8 of Dendrobium officinale Sierra Linton

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Advancements of Alu-Based DNA Markers for Studies of Human Populations Madeline Maki David Kass, faculty mentor Alu elements represent the most common short interspersed elements (SINEs) in the human genome, with over one million copies. However, roughly 2,000 elements are not fixed in the human genome, providing dimorphic DNA markers shown to be highly useful in human population studies. Upon sequencing the Alu locus Yc1NBC60, we have identified additional variations, and have developed a relatively simple assay to identify them in individuals from various ethnic groups. We propose this will increase the robustness of Alu-based markers, laying the groundwork to further advance a wide range of studies of human populations. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Bacteria Talking! Detection of Molecular Signals in Human Gut Microbial Biofilms Natasha Marchese and Hannah Hakamaki Daniel Clemans, faculty mentor Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG and other bacterial species form biofilms on the lining of the gut. These biofilms of bacteria communicate through a process called quorum sensing, which is the exchange of signal molecules between the bacteria. One of these molecules, Autoinducer-2 (AI-2), is a component of biochemical pathways used by the body to prevent inflammation. This pathway has important implications for the prevention of cancer, as well as common inflammatory diseases. Our lab grew various species of intestinal bacteria together to test for the presence of AI-2 and other quorum sensing molecules used by bacteria for communication.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Migratory Behavior and Physiology in Type 10 Red Crossbills (Loxia curvirostra) Bailey Marston Jamie Cornelius, faculty mentor Billions of animals migrate each year in response to environmental change. Migratory patterns are highly variable and whether behaviors and physiology relating to migration are similar across species is important for understanding this phenomenon. The red crossbill is a species composed of many sub-species that rely on different food sources that may differentially impact migration. Little is understood about crossbill variations occurring east of the Rocky Mountains, or on how these subspecies may differ in migratory behavior. We investigate relationships between environmental cues that drive migration, behavior and physiology in a captive population of a Michigan subspecies of crossbill. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Antimicrobial Activity of Kefir Bacterial Isolates Justin McBride Paul Price, faculty mentor With increasing antibiotic resistance, researchers are looking for new sources of antibiotics from novel sources. Fermented dairy-based probiotics including Kefir contain a variety of yeast and bacteria, many of which are known to produce antimicrobial compounds. The goal of this experiment is to determine if any bacteria in traditional kefir preparations, which vary widely between locations and preparation methods, have antimicrobial activity. We have optimized growth conditions for these probiotics and are actively testing them for antimicrobial activity using media diffusion assays targeting known gastrointestinal and skin pathogens. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

P75NTR Fails to Co-Localize with Brain Lipid-Binding Protein in the Olfactory Bulb Rebecca McSorley Thomas Mast, faculty mentor Reduced sensory activity reduces olfactory bulb tyrosine hydroxylase expression and is an important mechanism in olfactory processes. How tyrosine hydroxylase is reduced is unknown, but previous results suggest a role for olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). However, it is unclear that p75NTR is expressed by OECs in the olfactory bulb. To locate OECs within the olfactory bulb we imaged brainlipid binding protein (BLBP), an OEC marker. After co-labeling for p75NTR and BLBP then quantifying the amount of overlap, we observed that the two proteins do not co-localize. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

David Kass, faculty mentor Retrotransposons are a group of transposable elements (TEs) that integrate into new chromosomal locations via an RNA intermediate. The mysTR family of LTR-retrotransposons appears to be limited to genomes of the Cricetidae family of rodents and is potentially related to mysERV elements of the Muridae rodent family. The objective of this study is to trace the ancestry of these elements. By utilizing “intra-mysTR PCR”, we have analyzed sequences from various rodents and the findings suggest that mysERV and mysTR elements originated from independent retroviral integrations. These results provide continued insights into the origins and evolution of mammalian TEs. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Evolutionary History of the mysTR Retrotransposons and Connection to mysERV Elements Tessa Passarelli

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The Effect of Social Interaction on the Metabolic Rate of Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches Katrina Prantzalos Cara Shillington, faculty mentor Madagascar hissing cockroaches are known for their complex social hierarchy. Previous studies in our lab have shown that groups of cockroaches have increased metabolic rates, likely due to social interactions. One related, yet relatively unexplored, factor in these cockroaches is their display of discontinuous gas exchange (DGE), associated with the opening and closing of their spiracles. My study focuses on metabolic rate and DGE patterns in individuals and pairs of female roaches over time. We hypothesize that familiarity will lead to increasing synchronization of DGE patterns, much like increased metabolic rates in groups. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Native Prairie Plant Seedling Establishment is Affected by Spatial Arrangement but Not Treatment Joseph Proietti Emily Grman, faculty mentor Plant communities provide important ecosystem services and functions that support biodiversity and human life, but nutrient pollution could dramatically disrupt plant communities. We compared native prairie plant species establishment in fertilized and unfertilized plots to understand the effects of plant spatial arrangement and nutrient differences within plant communities. The establishment of native prairie plants was significantly affected by spatial arrangement, and fertilizer treatment had no significant effect on seedling establishment. This suggests that other factors affecting spatial patterns may be more important for plant communities than nutrient pollution.

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ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 320—2:30 P.M.

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Intranasal Treatment Using Detergent Influences Food Discovery Time in Mice Khaleel Quasem Thomas Mast, faculty mentor Olfactory deprivation significantly reduces the amount of dopamine in the mouse olfactory bulb. Weak intranasal lavage treatments with 24 and 48-hour recoveries have been used, yielding anosmic and non-anosmic mice, respectively. We hypothesize that a longer recovery time is needed in response to stronger treatments. To test this hypothesis, a strong treatment using detergent and saline was performed. Animals were tested for recovery from anosmia by measuring the time needed to uncover chocolate. All 48-hour recovery animals found the chocolate. The present study provides a characterization of the discovery time of food in response to strong intranasal lavage treatments. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Nutrient Shifts Affect Coaggregation and Cell Surface Properties in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Amanda Rielinger Daniel Clemans, faculty mentor Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is a normal component of the gut microbiome that is thought to have a number of probiotic properties. In this study we examined the ways in which nutritional shifts cause variation in cell surface properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, ultimately affecting its ability to adhere to, or coaggregate with other intestinal bacterial species and to form communities called biofilms. Here, we provide evidence that growth media containing different carbohydrates (sugars) and peptones (proteins) affect coaggregation patterns and the cell surface of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Location and Interactions of the Trigeminal Ganglion in Mice Brad Savard Thomas Mast, faculty mentor This study characterizes the trigeminal ganglion of the mouse. This ganglion is an ovalshaped collection of neurons located below the forebrain. The three nerve divisions of the trigeminal ganglion were explored. The ophthalmic is the smallest of the three nerves, the maxillary is intermediate in size and position, and the mandibular is the largest. The ganglion in this organism is shown by histology pictures clearly expressing spatial and morphological traits. This study is important to help better understand the facial nerves in humans as they are similar to mice. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Uncovering the Phylogenetic Relationships Between Species of Megistostegium on Madagascar Tahsina Shimu The island of Madagascar is an ideal area to study species and speciation. The island contains unparalleled levels of endemism and species diversity. This study aims to use molecular data to determine how the three morphologically distinct species in the genus Megistostegium are related to one another and to determine the cause of their divergence. Genomic DNA was extracted and sequenced from 86 plants, representing one to five populations per species. Phylogenies were reconstructed to understand the relationship between the species. Species Distribution models were used to uncover the potential bioclimatic factors that led to the divergence within and between these species. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Margaret Hanes, faculty mentor

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Timing Key Events During Stem Cell Division in C. Elegans Tilmira A. Smith Hannah S. Seidel, faculty mentor Stem cells are vital for repairing tissue damage. Unlike other cell types, stem cells spend a lot of time in the DNA replication phase of the cell cycle and comparatively less time in the pre-replication phase. Little is known about how stem cells accommodate a short pre-replication phase. As a first step to understand this phase, we determined the timing of key pre-replication events in stem cells in the reproductive system of C. elegans. Using fluorescent dyes and microscopy, we learned that two events—chromosome unpacking and the start of DNA replication—occur in rapid succession. This finding shows that prereplication in stem cells is fundamentally different than in other cell types. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Parentage Analysis of Captive McCord’s Box Turtles (Cuora mccordi) Alyssa Swinehart, Meghan Dornburg and Jorrie Davis Non-presenting author: Jeff Jundt Katherine Greenwald, faculty mentor The McCord’s Box Turtle is critically endangered and believed to be extinct in the wild. The captive population consists of only 87 individuals held at a number of zoos in the United States, including the Detroit Zoo. Captive propagation is therefore critical for their survival. The parentage of 21 zoo-hatched offspring was unknown, drastically limiting the breeding population. We performed a parentage and relatedness analysis using DNA microsatellite markers, thereby facilitating the creation of new breeding pairs between genetically complimentary individuals. An increased captive breeding population will help retain genetic diversity and increase the overall population size.

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POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Population Genetics of Mudpuppy Salamanders (Necturus maculosus) in Minnesota Rivers and Streams Alyssa Swinehart Non-presenting author: Krista Larson Katherine Greenwald, faculty mentor Mudpuppy salamanders are listed as a Species of Special Concern in Minnesota, with over-collection and exposure to contaminants having contributed to population declines. Small and isolated populations are vulnerable to genetic bottlenecking and a loss of genetic diversity. Individuals were genotyped using DNA microsatellite markers to determine the population genetic structure. We assess population connectivity, genetic variation, and effective population size, and identify populations that show signatures of recent declines. These population genetic analyses will provide useful information for future conservation efforts. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Effects of a Dynamic Environment on Tarantula Personality Remy Thomas Cara Shillington, faculty mentor Personality in tarantulas is described as repeatable behavioral trends over time and is typically measured on a spectrum of bold to shy. We examined the role of environment on personality development by varying degrees of environmental change experienced by three groups of tarantulas. Bold/shy behaviors were recorded in an arena as rates of movement and proximity to the arena wall. We hypothesized that animals exposed to a constantly varying environment will be bolder than those kept under constant conditions. Bolder animals are indicated by increased rates of movement and more time spent away from the arena wall. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Development of a Cost-Effective Movement Assay for an Insect Sensory Neuroscience Lab Cody Townsley Thomas Mast, faculty mentor Undergraduate neuroscience laboratory exercises require equipment that is typically expensive and difficult to learn. Thus, cost effective and intuitive lab equipment is needed. Here we describe an inexpensive apparatus that detects insect movement. We paired a Backyard Brains SpikerBox amplifier with a turntable record cartridge. Using three different hardware-software combinations the signal was digitized. Hardware-software combinations included; an iWorx TA control module, laptop, and smartphone. All three combinations were successful in detecting insect movement. Future experiments include introducing stimuli to connected insects and monitoring resulting movement. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Thomas G. Mast, faculty mentor Dopamine (DA) is a neurotransmitter produced in the olfactory bulb (OB). DA needs to remain in a tight operating range to ensure that olfactory sensory processes, like the ability to smell, occur properly. Reduced DA levels indicate altered sensory processes and are linked to conditions like Parkinson’s disease; thus, measuring DA within the OB is important. Because current methods are costly and time consuming, I examined whether DA levels could be measured using a cost-effective, time-saving method. Fluorescence intensity (FI) following a reaction of DA resorcinol was investigated. As the concentration of DA increases FI increases also, suggesting this method is a promising direction. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Dopamine Levels can be Measured Using Fluorescence Intensity: A Cost-Effective Time Saving Method Regine West

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Utilization of Homoplasy-Free SINE Markers to Resolve the Phylogeny of Peromyscus Species Alec Wroblewski David Kass, faculty mentor The Peromyscus genus consists of over 50 recognized species, providing a rare opportunity to study evolutionary mechanisms of mammalian speciation. This requires determining their evolutionary relationships, which have been contested. In contrast to current methods, we propose utilizing short interspersed DNA elements (SINEs). These markers provide a "molecular fossil record" since shared genomic integrations of elements in different species corresponds to having a common ancestor. We have identified "young" SINEs from the sequences of two Peromyscus genome projects for developing the molecular assays to resolve the phylogenetic discrepancies accredited to other investigative approaches. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Using Worms to Study Cancer: Do Tumors Cause Healthy Tissues to be Stressed? Reem Yassine Hannah S. Seidel, faculty mentor Tumorous growth affects nearby healthy tissues, as seen in wasting disease experienced by cancer patients, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We studied tumor growth in C. elegans, a microscopic worm that shares many genes with humans and has the ability to grow tumors in its reproductive system. To test whether tumors cause stress in nearby tissues, we used genetic crosses to create strains containing tumors and fluorescent-based stress reporters. Tumorous and non-tumorous worms were imaged using a fluorescence microscope and quantified using ImageJ. Our main finding is that tumorous tissue does not increase stress response in nearby tissues but instead inhibits it.

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POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Season and Body Condition Influence American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) Blood Parameters Dorothy Zahor Non-presenting author: Dawson Bradley Jamie Cornelius, faculty mentor The American goldfinch is a partial migrant species; some individuals are year-round residents and some migrate south for winter. This research investigates blood physiology responses to seasonal environmental conditions in the context of molting, breeding, migration and overwintering. Hematocrit, the ratio of red blood cells to plasma, is thought to reflect metabolic demand and overall health. We found that hematocrit was significantly affected by season and body condition, supporting this hypothesis regarding physiological response to environmental variation. Understanding these responses can give us a better insight on how well birds will be able to cope with future changing climates. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY Distribution of Carbon Monoxide During Its Catalytic Oxidation on a Rhodium Surface Aula Abdulwahab Ross Nord, faculty mentor The oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO) plays an important role in reducing pollution. CO is a poisonous gas emitted during the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. Rhodium (Rh) is a metal commonly used in automobile catalytic converters which removes harmful compounds from car exhaust. Our goal is to better understand the catalytic oxidation of CO occurring on a Rh surface. We developed a computer program to simulate the molecular processes occurring on the catalytic surface. By changing different variables, we could see how they affected the distribution of CO on the Rh surface. Having a better understanding of the processes will aid in the development of more efficient catalysts. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Synthesis and Antitumor Activity of [Pt(cis-1,3-DACH)X2] Analogs (X2 = Cl2, 1.1-HO2C) Natalia Anaya and Marilyn Niedermeier James D. Hoeschele, Faculty mentor Platinum(II) complexes containing the diaminocyclohexane ligand (DACH) play an important role in cancer chemotherapy. The FDA-approved drug, Oxaliplatin, [Pt(1R,2R-DACH) Oxalate] is the principal drug in the regimen used world-wide to treat colorectal cancer. The antitumor complex, Kiteplatin, incorporating the cis-1,4-DACH group as in [Pt(cis-1,4-DACH) Cl2], shows activity against a broad range of tumor systems. Our research indicates that the complex, [Pt(cis-1,3-DACH)Cl2], shows better activity than Cisplatin and Kiteplatin vs. the Lewis Lung carcinoma. Studies of the antitumor activity of [Pt(cis-1,3-DACH)Cl2] and analogs continues here at EMU in collaboration with European research groups.

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POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Synthesis and Analysis of Novel Platinum (IV) Prodrugs and Their Potential as Anti-Cancer Agents Natalia Anaya and Bradley Clegg James Hoeschele and Deborah Heyl-Clegg, faculty mentors Recently, a new class of platinum (IV) prodrugs have been assessed for their potential in the treatment of various forms of cancer. This class of platinum prodrugs incorporate a myriad of compounds into the axial positions of their octahedral complex. By modifying these ligands, we attempt to optimize the physical and chemical properties of these compounds. It is our primary goal to overcome the setbacks that have led to very few platinum (IV) drugs being licensed for clinical use. In this study, we attempt to substitute previously proven anti-cancer peptides into the axial positions of oxoplatin in hopes that the compounds will reduce in vivo, releasing the peptide and cisplatin. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 350—11:30 A.M.

The Effect of Atg7 on Autophagosome Size and Number Ronith Chakraborty Non-presenting author: Hayley Cawthon Steven Backues, faculty mentor Autophagy is a eukaryotic membrane-trafficking mechanism which delivers cytosolic components into the lysosome/vacuole for degradation. It plays a critical role in cellular health, aging, and diseases, such as cancer and Alzheimer's. Atg7 (Autophagy Related Protein 7) is an E1 enzyme which is required for autophagy to occur. However, the functions of Atg7 are not fully understood. In this study, we show that changing the amount of Atg7 affects both the size and number of autophagosomes formed. Levels of Atg7 were varied using different promoters and verified by western blotting; autophagosomes were measured by electron microscopy.

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POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Analysis of Wild Fermented Apple Ciders using SPME-GS-MS and Microbiological Methods Olivia DeHate Cory Emal and Ruth Ann Armitage, faculty mentors We studied multiple wild fermented apple ciders and related fermentations with varying sources, chemical profiles, sulfite dosages, and cultured yeast additions. The presence of volatile flavor compounds was determined using solid phase microextraction analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS). Bacteria and yeast present postfermentation were identified by growth on different media types to isolate different classes of microorganisms. In our ciders we found molecules relating to apple, cinnamon, and pear flavors. Multiple species of bacteria were isolated from the wild fermentations, including B. subtilis and P. barcinonensis. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Characterization of the Histone Binding Properties of the Epigenetic Tumor Suppressor Protein UHRF2 Zeineb El-Mohri Non-presenting authors: Alyssa Winkler and Shane Ginnard Brittany Albaugh, faculty mentor Epigenetics regulate gene expression without altering DNA sequence. One example is the trimethylation of lysine 9 on histone 3 (H3K9me3). This modification attracts and binds the histone reader protein UHRF2 which, through a complex mechanism, recruits transcription factors to cancer gene targets. If UHRF2 is dysfunctional or repressed, cancer can develop as cancer cell proliferation is not suppressed; thus UHRF2 can be thought of as a tumor suppressor. To begin to understand the mechanism by which UHRF2 binds to H3K9me3, the amino acid residues critical to H3 binding must be characterized. Such work provides the molecular basis of developing novel anticancer therapies for targeting UHRF2. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

H3 Histone Binding of an N357A Mutant in the Cancer Protein UHRF2 Mikayla Elrod Non-presenting authors: Alyssa Winkler and Shane Ginnard Brittany Albaugh, faculty mentor UHRF2 is a specific protein found in various cancers. The goal of this experiment was to determine if Asparagine 357 (N357) of UHRF2 is critical for binding a protein called histone H3. To test this possibility, N357 was mutated to alanine (N357A) in UHRF2 and the binding affinity between UHRF2 to the tri-methylated lysine 9 residue on H3 (H3K9me3) was tested by Fluorescence Polarization. The Kd for N357A mutant was 0.16 uM and the Kd for Wildtype was 0.15 µM. Given the similar binding affinities between wildtype and mutant UHRF2, it was concluded that N357 is not involved in histone binding. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Ruth Ann Armitage, faculty mentor Some wall paintings from the Neolithic Villevenard tomb complex in France were removed in the 1970s for further study and conservation at the local museum. The paintings on those panels may have been treated with resin in organic solvent. Conservation treatments preserve paintings, but interfere with radiocarbon dating. We prepared replica paints on limestone from pigments mixed with organic binders, and applied two different resin treatments. Comparing the direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) results of the replica paintings to those of the samples from the tomb allows us to identify if any resin was applied to the Villevenard paintings, and inform our further studies. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Chemical Analysis of Replica Black Paints: Understanding Conservation Treatment at Villevenard Tombs Tara Fairchild

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Characterization of an Aza-Prins Cyclization Product Ashton Havens Harriet Lindsay, faculty mentor Piperidines are six-membered, nitrogen containing rings that exist within a wide range of pharmaceuticals. Previous research in the Lindsay group involved identifying reaction conditions that favored the production of piperidines of a specific configuration via an azaPrins cyclization. Experimenting with reaction conditions led to the inadvertent production of what we believe is a related piperidine molecule of ambiguous composition and configuration. We are currently attempting to isolate and characterize this product through means of various spectroscopic techniques. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Selective Salt Crystallization as a Method for Separating Amino Alcohol Diastereomers Caitlin Keif Harriet Lindsay, faculty mentor Pyrrolidines are molecules composed of five atoms: four carbons and a nitrogen. They serve as building blocks for a wide variety of pharmaceuticals and catalysts. The Lindsay group has previously made these pyrrolidine molecules with defined stereochemistry, or 3D atom arrangement using a new version of a chemical reaction called the aza-Cope/ Mannich (ACM) reaction. Forming products with defined stereochemistry is important for the function of a molecule, much like left and right hands function in similar but defined ways. However, before the ACM reaction can occur, my starting material’s “hands” must be separated. Through selectively forming a crystalline salt, I have separated the different “hands.” We are currently scaling up the salt formation to use it for ACM reactions to produce pyrrolidines.

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ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 320—3:15 P.M.

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Characterization of Histone Binding Properties of D363A UHRF2 Mutant by Fluorescence Polarization Hana Khan and Marisa E. Gilliam Non-presenting authors: Alyssa Winker and Shane Ginnard Brittany Albaugh, faculty mentor UHRF2 is an epigenetic protein involved in cancer regulation. The goal is to determine the amino acids in UHRF2 involved in histone binding. A D363A UHRF2 mutant was generated within the linked TTD-PHD and individual PHD domains by PCR; the protein was expressed in E.Coli with a Glutathione S-transferase tag. The protein was purified through column affinity chromatography purification using glutathione resin. Fluorescence polarization assay determined the binding affinity of the protein against H3K9me3 and unmodified H3 histone. Examination of the resulting Kd values suggested that the mutants binds weakly to the H3K9me3 histone, but show no binding towards unmodified H3. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 320—3:30 P.M.


Counteracting the D1–D2 Receptor Heteromer Complex with Synthetic Peptides Pouya Khazaei Deborah Heyl-Clegg and Hedeel Guy-Evans, faculty mentors The D1–D2 receptor heteromer is thought to be upregulated in major depression. The interaction between dopamine D1 and D2 receptors is thought to occur between arginine residues in intracellular loop 3 of the D2 receptor and glutamic acid residues in the carboxyl tail of the D1 receptor. Signaling of the D1–D2 receptor heteromer involves Gq/11 coupling/phospholipase C activation. Using solid-phase peptide synthesis, ELISA-based binding assays and other methods, we measured the binding kinetics of the heteromer and used peptides to antagonize the D1-D2 receptor interactions in vitro. This work will shed light on the heteromer kinetics and treatment of depression. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Commuter Exposure to Air Pollution Traveling from EMU Campus Joceyln Marsack Gavin Edwards, faculty mentor Concern over human exposure to particulate matter (PM 2.5) has grown in recent years. Data from the World Health Organization (WHO) suggests there are negative effects associated with exposure to the pollutant. PM 2.5 are ultra-fine aerosol particles that form from combustion reactions when fuel is burned and are found in automobile exhaust. EMU is primarily a commuter campus, and thus, includes students, staff, and faculty travel to campus daily, often at times of high traffic volume. In this work, data are presented showing PM 2.5 levels EMU commuters are potentially exposed to on the roadways around campus by making direct measurements of this species during the commute. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Maria C. Milletti, faculty mentor Humanin is a peptide that defends against Alzheimer’s disease through the inhibition of the neurotoxic protein amyloid-β. In this project we employ molecular modeling methods to analyze the behavior of humanin analogs. The analogs examined in this study are a fragment between amino acids 5-15 of the wild type and a mutated fragment of the same region where amino acid 11 (leucine in the wild type) is replaced with serine. Binding affinities are determined through simulated dimerization between the peptides and amyloid-β. The results improve understanding of the interactions between humanin and amyloid-β’s cell signaling pathways. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Examining the Binding of a Humanin Fragment to Amyloid-β and Its Effects in Preventing Aggregation Alexis Marsh

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Probing Atg11’s Self-Interaction: Elucidating a Critical Protein in the Selective Autophagy Pathway Mitchell Meyer Non-presenting author: Jasmine Winzeler Stephen K Backues, faculty mentor Autophagy is the cellular method of recycling, in which cytosolic material is engulfed by vesicles and then targeted for degradation. This recycling is crucial for maintaining cell health and thus, autophagy is a key tool in the fight against diseases such as Alzheimer’s. The autophagic pathway contains dozens of autophagy-related proteins (Atg) which work together to sequester the target material. Atg11, a critical protein in the selective autophagy pathway, contains a coiled-coil domain, CC2, that is necessary for Atg11’s self-interaction. To determine the critical amino acids for this interaction we have created a series of directed CC2 mutants for use in a Yeast-2-Hybrid Screen. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Molecular Characterization of UHRF1 and UHRF2 PHD in Cancer Ahmed Mohamed Brittany Albaugh, faculty mentor UHRF1 and UHRF2 are epigenetic proteins that are involved in cancer. These proteins have similar amino acid sequences but play opposite roles in cancer. Both proteins contain a histone reader domain called Plant Homeo Domain which binds to Histone H3. Using fluorescence polarization, we determined the binding affinity (KD) of UHRF 1 and 2 to H3K9me3 and H3unmod peptides. In addition, mutagenesis was used to generate an N366D UHRF2 mutant to determine the role of amino acid N366 in histone binding. Our results suggest the PHD of UHRF2 has lowered binding affinity to H3 than UHRF1, and these proteins use a distinct mechanism of histone binding.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Synthesis of Pt(IV) Complex Containing Lonidamine and Steroid Based Bormones Justin Norris James Hoeschele, faculty mentor The goal of our work is to synthesize Pt(IV) chemotherapeutic prodrugs containing lonidamine and bioactive steroids. Steroids are used to increase uptake of a Pt(IV) complex, bypassing the membrane, as well as by the aggressive uptake of hormones to targeted tumors. Upon delivery into a cellular system Pt(IV) is reduced, which allows the platinum drug to more effectively reach the target tumor without causing damage to the body. The drug will have three effects: delivery of platinum-based chemotherapy treatment to the cell, delivery of lonidamine to the cell, and the active effect of the hormone used. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 350—11:15 A.M.


An NGSS-Based Lesson Plan in Ballistics Delainey O’Donnell Lawrence Kolopajlo, faculty member Recently the Michigan Department of Education has unveiled its new K-12 science standards that are based on Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). These performance expectations incorporate three main elements: disciplinary core ideas, science and engineering practices, and cross-cutting concepts. The problem is that teachers need imaginative lesson plans that they can arrange in the classroom. The purpose of this project is to create a crime scene investigation lesson plan on ballistics, that is NGSS-based, that can be implemented in classroom teaching. The lesson plan is framed in terms of a 7E learning cycle. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Characterization of the TTD Binding Domain of Epigenetic, Tumor-Suppressor UHRF2 with Histone H3 Timothy Petzold Brittany Albaugh, faculty mentor Histone reader proteins regulate the expression of genes, such as those involved in cancer. One such uncharacterized reader is UHRF2. This research analyzes the mechanism by which the TTD domain of UHRF2 binds histone H3. Methodologies involve cloning of the TTD by PCR, protein expression and purification, and fluorescence polarization. Here, the Kd of the TTD against H3K9me3 peptide is reported. A fascinating result of the research is that a linker region connected to the TTD may have an autoinhibitory function, which is further investigated with structural peptide analogues. A future implication of the research is the development of mechanism-based anticancer drugs that target UHRF2. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 320—3:45 P.M.

Brittany Albaugh, faculty mentor UHRF2 is a protein with potential oncogene and tumor suppressor activities. To better understand the tumor suppressing capabilities of UHRF2, we sought to determine the mechanism by which UHRF2 interacts with Histone H3. We hypothesized that Asparagine 366 (N366) interacts with Arginine of 2 H3. To test this hypothesis, an N366K UHRF2 mutant was generated and we measured the ability of the mutant to bind to histone H3 by fluorescence polarization. This study provides insightful information to the role N366 plays in histone binding. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Determination of the Mechanism of Histone H3 Binding by UHRF2 Alla Popa Non-presenting authors: Alyssa Winkler and Shane Ginnard

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Synthesis and Evaluation of a New Class of Inhibitors of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Justin Powers Cory Emal, faculty mentor Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a mammalian protein involved in multiple cellular processes, including regulation of fibrinolysis. The primary inhibitory targets of PAI-1 are the plasminogen activators, which activate the enzymatic machinery that ultimately leads to the dissolution of blood clots. Increased levels of PAI-1 lead to increased clotting, and is a well-established risk factor for multiple disease conditions, including atherosclerosis, stroke, kidney fibrosis, and certain forms of cancer. In the present study, we assess the structural features of a new class of small molecules to determine which specific features may correlate to activity against PAI-I. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 320—3 P.M.

Investigation of Sanitation Methods in Preventing Spoilage Organisms in a Small-Scale Fermentation Justin Powers Cory Emal, faculty mentor In alcoholic fermentations, it is critical that conditions are properly controlled to prevent wild spoilage microorganisms, such as Lactobacillus, Acetobacter, and Brettanomyces, as these organisms can cause undesired modifications to the final fermented product. To demonstrate this to students in FERM 101 (Intro to Fermentation Science), an experiment was designed to show the effects of spoilage organisms on the profile of products when not properly sanitized and contained in an anaerobic environment. The results will be employed to design an activity for a new laboratory course that will demonstrate the impact of proper sanitation and handling on the sensory profile of the final product.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Examining the Binding Kinetics Between Amyloid-β and Humanin Deanna Price Deborah Heyl-Clegg and Hedeel Evans, faculty mentors Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by an accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaque deposits between neurons. Humanin, HN (1-24), a neuroprotective peptide, interacts primarily with Aβ (1-40). Binding kinetic studies were used to identify residues important for HN-Aβ interactions in vitro. To test the function of residues, peptides corresponding to HN (5-15) and Aβ (17-28) were synthesized and tested for their ability to block formation of the HN-Aβ complex. Our results show that HN (5-15) and Aβ (17-28) operate via different kinetics in regulating HN-Aβ interactions. This work should enable us to design smaller peptides aimed at inhibiting amyloid formation. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Investigating Sources of Chloride Along Millers Creek in Ann Arbor Lillian Richards and Leah VanLandingham Jose Vites and Christopher Gellasch, faculty mentors Previous research identified elevated chloride levels in Millers Creek, but potential sources were not identified. Increased chloride levels can have negative implications for water quality and the local ecosystem. Being able to pinpoint chloride sources that impact the creek may allow for mitigation and help protect the waterway. This study focuses on assessing the source location(s) for the observed elevated chloride levels in the creek. Data collection consists of field measurements, water sampling along the length of the creek, and laboratory analysis using ion chromatography. Knowledge of chloride sources will inform local agencies on how to better manage the watershed. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

The Effect of Autophagy Related Protein 1 on Autophagosome Size and Number Jacquelyn Roberts Non-presenting authors: Aaron Kramer and Hayley Cawthon Steven Backues, faculty mentor Autophagy is a cellular process by which cytosol is engulfed in a double membrane vesicle, or autophagosome, and transported to the vacuole for degradation. Autophagy is implicated in many diseases, cancers, and the process of aging. Autophagy is mediated by over 30 autophagy related (Atg) proteins. Current research is focused on determining the roles of these Atg proteins and their effect on autophagic flux. Atg1 is present at the beginning of autophagosome formation as the autophagy initiating kinase. Here we examine how Atg1 affects the size and number of autophagosomes using ALP assays, western blots, electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Hedeel Evans and Deborah Heyl-Clegg, faculty mentors Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an enzyme that breaks down the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at the synaptic cleft. Activity of AChE in the Alzheimer’s brain is associated with the amyloid core of senile plaques. AChE forms a stable toxic complex with the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) during its filaments assembly, increasing the aggregation and neurotoxicity of Aβ fibrils. Humanin (HN), a neuroprotective peptide, inhibits cell death induced by the Aβ aggregates. Using ELISA-based binding assays, the binding of Aβ (1-40) to HN was examined in the presence and absence of AChE. Better understanding of this mechanism could provide clues to therapeutic drug development against Alzheimer’s disease. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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The Role of Acetylcholinesterase in Regulating Amyloid-β and Humanin Interactions Masa Seif

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Adsorption and Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide on the Rh (110) Terrace of Width 4 Ifrah Shoukat Ross Nord, faculty mentor The primary purpose of our research is to study the adsorption and oxidation of carbon monoxide on the Rh (110) surface. The reaction is important due to the catalytic properties of the metal (fuel cells, pollution control). Cudia et al. experimentally studied the reaction and proposed two mechanisms based on the reaction temperature. A computer simulation program was developed to experimentally study the postulated low-temperature mechanism. Different variables are defined in the program and we can change them systematically to observe their effect on CO occupancy and its reactivity with oxygen. We will discuss how our results have improved our understanding of the mechanism. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 304—10 A.M.

Determining Atg11’s Binding Interactions Using a Yeast Two Hybrid System and Directed Mutagenesis. Jesse E. Smith Non-presenting authors: Mitchell Meyer and Jasmine Winzeler Steven K. Backues, faculty mentor Autophagy is a process within eukaryotes used for degradation of intracellular material. Mediated by autophagy related proteins (Atg), autophagy occurs in starvation conditions (non-selective), or in conditions where specific intracellular material threatens cell homeostasis (selective autophagy). Selective autophagy is believed to hold the key to furthering the understanding of neurodegenerative diseases due to its aid in a cell's longevity. In yeast, Atg11 (homologous with human proteins FIP200 and Huntington) is a scaffolding protein required for selective autophagy. In this study I will be dissecting Atg11’s interactions with Atg1 using a yeast two hybrid system and directed mutagenesis.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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The Stereoselective Effect of Omitting a Protecting Group at the Nitrogen Center of a Pyrrolidine Terrence Stahl Non-presenting author: Jalen Williams Maria C. Milletti, faculty mentor There are many pharmaceutical compounds and organic catalysts that utilize pyrrolidine within their chemical makeup. Usually, only one stereoisomer of pyrrolidine is active and the aza-Cope Mannich reaction is an efficient way to produce pyrrolidines stereoselectively. Here we apply computational methods to define the energy profile of the reaction for a pyrrolidine without protecting group at the nitrogen center. The results are used to determine whether there is a favorable pathway towards one of the stereoisomers. Results to date indicate that the lack of protecting group leads to an additional proton transfer in the last step of the reaction. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Optimizing the aza-Cope Mannich Reaction to Construct a Precise Configuration of Pyrrolidines Terrence Stahl and Brandon Hardy Harriet Lindsay, faculty mentor The aza-Cope Mannich reaction is an organic chemistry reaction that can be used to efficiently manufacture pyrrolidines. Pyrrolidines are cyclic molecules composed of four carbons and a nitrogen and are found in many pharmaceuticals. Our goal is to optimize the aza-Cope Mannich reaction to form pyrrolidines in a new and specific threedimensional orientation. In addition, we are using a chemical reactant that has not been used in this reaction before. The advantage of our reactant is that it has the potential to reduce the waste associated with the overall process. Progress toward optimizing this reaction will be presented. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Optimization of the Synthesis of Kiteplatin Using an Infinite Dilution Approach Cameron Talbot James D. Hoeschele, faculty mentor Kiteplatin (Pt(cis-1,4-DACH)Cl2) is a promising platinum(II) complex exhibiting anti-tumor activity against a wide range of tumor systems, and especially against colorectal cancer resistant to Oxaliplatin, the primary drug used in the treatment of colorectal cancer worldwide. Earlier methods of synthesis lead to yields averaging only 10-15%. The goal of our research is to enhance the yield and purity of kiteplatin. Using a modified Dhara approach coupled with an infinite dilution method, our yields have tripled and purity has been increased. Future work is aimed at further enhancing the yields of Kiteplatin by analyzing each step of the process to identify the cause of loss of product. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

A Theoretical Analysis of the Distribution and Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide on Rhodium (110) Razan Tanbour Ross Nord, faculty mentor 81% of all rhodium (Rh) is used in automobile catalytic converters. Consequently, researchers have dedicated a lot of effort into understanding the behavior of nonmetal oxides on a Rh surface. Using a computer simulation program, we have studied the absorption and oxidation of carbon monoxide on a terraced Rh surface (lattice) with a width of three and a height of 10000. Varying the reaction activation energies (rate constants), and the mobility of the CO, led to changes in the surface coverages of oxygen and carbon monoxide. This has led us to an improved understanding of how the results are influenced by the rates of the steps in the mechanism.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Cysteine Deleted Tachyplesin Analogs Containing the Hyaluron Binding Sequence as Anticancer Agents Jaylen Taylor Deborah Heyl-Clegg, Hedeel Evans, and Jeffrey Guthrie, faculty mentors Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) exhibit activity against bacteria. Their antibacterial properties are due to the ability to disrupt the cell membranes of prokaryotic bacteria cells causing lysis-cell death. The AMP cysteine deleted tachyplesin (CDT) also causes cell death in cancer cells. Attraction between the positive arginine rich peptide and negatively charged eukaryotic cancer cell membrane allows for the peptide to have selectivity in targeting cancer cells over healthy cells, as the healthy cells lack a negatively charged membrane. Truncated analogs of the CDT peptide containing the hyaluron binding sequence were synthesized and tested against A549 (adenocarcinoma) lung cancer cells. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Effects of Different Lewis Acids on aza-Prins Product Yield Hope Vaughan Harriet Lindsay, faculty mentor Imines are chemical compounds that can be made from other chemicals in an environmentally-friendly process. One product imines can form through cyclization is a piperidine, which is a ring composed of 5 carbon and a nitrogen. Piperidines are potentially useful building blocks for pharmaceuticals such as Paxil (an antidepressant), Ebastine (an antiallergen/antiasthmatic) and others. We use a new version of the aza-Prins cyclization reaction to form the piperidine. In this project, we are investigating the effect of using different Lewis Acids in the reaction on the amount of desired piperidine product versus the amount of undesired side product produced. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION, MEDIA & THEATRE ARTS East to West: Conflict in Career Choices Between First-Generation Students and Immigrant Parents Faraz Ansari Dennis O’Grady, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 330—1:30 P.M.

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First-generation students of immigrant parents from the Middle East have different considerations than most when choosing a career path. These first-generation children, having adopted values from the United States, tend to have western, individualistic values when choosing their majors and/or careers, while their immigrant parents tend to have eastern, family-oriented values when trying to persuade their children of their career choice. These students are left to decide whether to follow their passions, consider their family’s values, or find a mixture of both. Personal interviews were conducted with undergraduate students at EMU to determine what factors led to conflict, or lack thereof, between these children and their parents, and to what degree students consider their parents when deciding their career path.

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The Framing of Minorities in the Media Dereka Bennett Geoffrey Hammill, faculty mentor The purpose of this project is to define and discuss the issues concerning mass media including racial issues, negative stereotypes created and embedded in the minds of news consumers, and how some of these racial issues and negative stereotypes coordinate with the underrepresentation and overrepresentation of minorities in the newsrooms due to media framing. This research will provide an in-depth analysis on media framing and the problems that have occurred for decades because of this agenda-setting tradition. The proposed methodology to gather data will include archival research, interviews with students on campus and possibly reporters from my local news stations. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—11 A.M.

The Taste of Kimchi: Gender and Film in Colonial Korea Aaron Carpenter Deron Overpeck, faculty mentor Conflicts concerning the role of Japanese culture in realizing an idealized “unified Asia” under Japanese control during the 1930s and World War II are reflected in the use of cinema to define gender roles in Korea. Through a combination of private and government agencies, Japan controlled all aspects of the Korean film industry, and Korean films began to reflect this influence. This situation illuminates the role of asymmetrical cultural exchange in establishing colonial authority. To illustrate this, I will use two films: What Did the Lady Forget? (Japan; Yasujiro Ozu,1937) and Sweet Dreams (Korea; Yang Ju-nam, 1936).

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—AUDITORIUM—3:30 P.M.

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The Rhetorical Discourse Surrounding Female Intersex Athletes in Olympic Sports Victoria Fields Dennis O’Grady, faculty mentor For decades, female intersex athletes have been ostracized by professional sport organizations due to their androgynous or masculine physiques. Media coverage of these athletes is often highly negative, which has led to these athletes undergoing sex verification tests and/or suspensions by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) (Elsas et al, 2000). This study will examine the derogatory and harmful rhetoric used against female intersex athletes, and discuss how these messages have affected their professional image and impacted the public's perception of intersex athletes. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—3 P.M.


Bullying: A Curriculum Based Reader’s Theater Performance Hailey Holmgren Anita Rich, faculty mentor This performance was crafted as an example for high school students when creating a curriculum-based Reader’s Theater. It is the second piece of a three-part thesis project titled Reader’s Theater: Teaching and Enhancing Communication Through Performance, which utilizes theater in the English language arts classroom. The performance, written and directed by Holmgren, uses compiled scripting of multiple texts including songs, statistical data, social media posts, literature and academic articles. Bullying is the theme chosen for this piece, as it is a significant issue with real consequences for students as well as administrators and other educational professionals. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—AUDITORIUM—4 P.M.

Struggling to Identify: An Analysis of Rust Micah Huff Jonathan S. Carter, faculty mentor When it was first released, the critically acclaimed videogame Rust quickly rose to popularity with players worldwide. However, in 2016, game designers randomized the race and sex of every player character in an effort to promote the idea that race and sex directly affect one’s ability to survive. Immediately, this shift prompted a vocal backlash across the player base. This research analyzes Rust through the lens of dramatism, and argues that the backlash was caused by a disidentification between players and the rhetoric of Rust’s gameplay. Finally, the research draws implications for both the videogame community and the future rhetorical analysis in videogames. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 304—1:30 P.M.

Diversity in cultural organizations has been the subject of much research dedicated to expanding cultural institutions’ boards and staff. The American Alliance of Museums found that “museum directors and board chairs believe board diversity and inclusion are important to advance their missions, but have failed to prioritize action steps to achieve it” (BoardSource). Thus, the purpose of this research is to analyze the diversity in arts organizations, specifically art museums and to reflect on its importance. Enhancing inclusion and access in the arts has the power to propel organizations and artists into new and powerful collaborative direction. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—1:30 P.M.

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Diversity, Inclusion, Access and Equity: An Analysis of Otherness in Cultural Organizations Cheyanne Jeffries Susan Badger Booth, faculty mentor

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The Costume Design Process: Trojan Women and Harvey Hayden Keene Melanie Schuessler Bond, faculty mentor For every movie, TV show, or theatrical performance, there is someone who decides what the characters look like and wear: the costume designer. Working alongside the director and other designers, the costume designer is in charge of utilizing the director’s concept and designing the wardrobe for each character. This presentation breaks down the costume design process for Eastern Michigan University’s production of Trojan Women as well as the hair design process for Harvey from concept to finished product. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

EMU Unity Mural—A Creative Collaborative Project Deven Kozinski, Serena Boykin, Alison Carpenter, Desmine Robinson, Scotty Schlueter, Lauren Pottschmidt, EmiJoy Izirein and Steven Kwasny Non-presenting authors: Diane Brinson-Days, Michelle Peet and Lynne Settles Susan Badger Booth, faculty mentor We will introduce the EMU Unity Mural Collaboration, a student-led project supported by faculty, administration and community organizations. Planning began in October 2016 after racist graffiti was found on an outside wall of King Hall. A small group of students set out to create a piece of art that would reflect the university’s diverse and inclusive community. EMU is a school of opportunity, not luxury. It opens doors to students and families that may not have considered higher education as an option. The purpose of creating a mural is to engage individuals who do not have the time to attend rallies, vigils, or teach-ins. The mural is a 155’ timeline of EMU and Ypsilanti, with three sections: past activism, present, and future ambitions.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

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Fashion Meets Masculinity Lauren McDonald Christina Stansell-Weaver, faculty mentor The focus of my research is the concept of masculinity and how it impacts men’s fashion choices. Fashion plays a huge role on how men are perceived in their workplace, school, and in their personal lives. For many men, there is pressure to conform to society’s standards when it comes to apparel in order to protect their masculinity. My research focuses on society’s norms for masculinity and how these norms may be in direct conflict with freedom of expression. Through fashion, modern men are redefining masculinity and gradually changing some of these norms. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Incorporating Play into the Classroom Sierra Morrissey Darlene Leifson, faculty mentor Play is a crucial aspect of teaching. Since the opposite of play is not work but boredom, I was curious about how teachers incorporate play into their classrooms for the purposes of teaching and learning. For this project, I returned to Roy C. Start High School to observe and interview three teachers about how they incorporate play into their classrooms and lives: an orchestra teacher, an AP literature teacher, and a drama teacher. This presentation shows how all three teachers implemented philosophies of play to their teaching to enhance learning. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—AUDITORIUM—2 P.M.

Brandon Victor Dixon of Hamilton Delivers a Speech to Mike Pence on Broadway: A Rhetorical Analysis Colleen E. Sadows Anke Wolbert, faculty mentor Just 11 days after the Presidential election of 2016, Vice-President-elect Mike Pence attended the award-winning musical Hamilton. To Mr. Pence’s surprise, the cast and creators of the show had prepared a speech for him. The short speech spawned a social media storm that included Twitter responses from President-elect Donald Trump. This paper analyzes the rhetorical elements of four politically significant responses to suggest that the current administration has established a pattern of divisive and selfdestructive rhetoric that has diminished the credibility of the United States government on a global stage, while simultaneously redefining the salience of entertainment as political commentary. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 352—10:45 A.M.

Research shows that play has multiple benefits. These benefits extend from childhood to adulthood, and include developmental social and cognitive benefits. Play also contributes to workplace creativity and a healthier lifestyle, including improved sleep. This poster presentation provides a visual representation of all of the myriad ways play supports healthy development for children and adults, and offers suggestions for incorporating play into everyday life. The poster also presents several examples of companies that embrace playful workspaces in order to enhance employee performance and the quality of creative collaboration in the workplace. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Play and Its Effects Across the Lifespan Harold Schaus IV Darlene Leifson, faculty mentor

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Superheroes, Culture and American Mythology Scotty Schlueter Patrick Barry, Jr., faculty mentor The comic book is one of the few art forms indigenous to America. As such, it stands to reason that superheroes are continually and inseparably intertwined with American culture, politics, and discourse. Just as superheroes are born from and molded by Americana, culture in turn is historically shaped in quantifiable ways by the proliferation and popularity of superheroes. This presentation aims to highlight the role figures like Superman, SpiderMan, and Batman play in both mirroring and affecting various periodic social zeitgeists. Whether they’re helping us dismantle the KKK or aiding in our national healing after 9/11, the day-to-day presence of super-heroic icons in unmistakable. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 304—1:45 P.M.

Serving Up Swoops: How Art Effects Social Change Elizabeth Smith and Hannah Burke Susan Badger Booth, faculty mentor In this exhibit, we will be introducing the “Serving Up Swoops” event held by the AMP! Student Organization in March of 2017. The goal of this event was to raise money for Swoops Food Pantry, a campus-based organization which provides food and emergency supplies to EMU students in need. AMP! members with Art Professor Diana Pancioli created hand-made bowls that were sold during the March event at Cultivate, a local coffee and tap house in Depot Town. This event was supported by numerous local businesses. It is one of many examples demonstrating that when artists come together with the community, powerful social change can be effected. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Building an Archive of EMU’s Arts Management & Administration Programs: 40th Anniversary Joshua R. Smith

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Susan Badger Booth, faculty mentor Forty years ago, this spring, the Arts & Entertainment Management major had their very first graduate. My research project will document the history of the program and measure the impact it has had on the cultural community. To collect the data I will review and update the Arts Management & Administration materials saved in the University Archives plus interview alumni, faculty and community internship advisors. The presentation will include highlights and results from this research and my evaluation of the program’s impact on the cultural community. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—2:15 P.M.


Our Hair Matters Lorian Tompkins Anke Wolbert, faculty mentor Throughout history, biased standards of beauty have contributed to the marginalization of minority groups. For African American women specifically, standards of beauty surrounding hair and skin have often been used to promote racial intolerance and self-hatred. The way in which African American hair has been viewed in the past continues to influence Americans’ perspective on Black hair today. In this research, I will analyze the historical significance of African American hair and its impact in the United States by tracing its historical and cultural journey. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 350—1:30 P.M.

African American Students’ Experiences in Traditional University Theatre Programs Amber White, Madison Coates and Lexxus Glaze-Beeman Wallace Bridges, faculty mentor These performances will probe experiences of underrepresented African American students in college theatre programs. The performers are demanding proper representation, since they lack acknowledgement from predominantly white programs. There needs to be an awareness for diverse production choices that aid the development of African American students without stereotypical roles. African American students feel alienated in theatre programs and whites will not discuss it. There needs to be acknowledgement of white privilege and why African American students rarely pursue theatre. There needs to be a sense of empathy and awareness amongst white theatre participants, as well as African American communities. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—AUDITORIUM—3:45 P.M.

Graphics in Java Izzeddine Bouzid Zenia Bahorski, faculty mentor This presentation will illustrate the use of JavaScript to animate visuals onto a Web page. A real-time, interactive prototype will be presented. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

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Exploring False Positive Probability in Bloom Filters Craig Campbell Andrii Kashlev, faculty mentor A bloom filter is a probabilistic data structure used to determine whether an element is a member of a set. It can be used to quickly test whether a user with a particular email exists in a given customer database, or whether a product with a certain ID is in a warehouse. Such test produces one of two possible answers: “definitely not in set”, or “possibly in set”. If a bloom filter produces the latter response while in reality the element is not in the set, such response is called a false positive. The objective of this research is to implement a bloom filter, and to experimentally explore the effect of the number of elements in the filter on the probability of false positives. The bloom filter data structure will be implemented in programming language such as Python and an appropriate simulation will be carried out. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

The Software Development Life Cycle and Its Application Gillian Lemke Krish Narayanan, faculty mentor The Software Development Life Cycle (SLDC) is a concept that is incredibly important to have a deep understanding of as a software engineer. My goal was to learn the complexities of each step conceptually and apply my skills to an actual application. The SDLC includes the following phases: planning and requirement analysis, design and development, implementation, testing, and integration. In order to apply these concepts, I created a Web application for users to schedule messages to be sent. The API is written in Ruby on Rails and the front end is written in ReactJS. There is also a PostgreSQL database that stores data such as saved messages and user information.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Android App for Order Placement and Tracking Ryan Neet, Joseph T. Galbreath III and Josh Wheeler Non-presenting authors: Zachary Denoyer and Tyler Melnik Krish Narayanan, faculty mentor As their business grew, Sweetwaters Coffee and Tea, in Ann Arbor, found that some of their stores were occasionally so busy that customers waiting for drinks took up too much store space. To resolve this issue, we designed and developed a mobile app to allow customers to customize, place, and track drink orders from their phones. We also designed and developed a Web app to help Sweetwaters employees track and fulfill incoming orders. Our team worked closely with Sweetwaters to determine the needs of the company and developed the software using the process of evolutionary prototyping. The software was built using Android Studio, MySQL, PHP, and Bootstrap. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Building Student Schedules Efficiently During Honors Advising Jamie Peterson and Kelly Mayhew Non-presenting authors: John Davis, Cameron Copland and Christina Spalding Krish Narayanan, faculty mentor Academic advising is one of the most common services the Honors College offers, but building a custom schedule for busy students remains a time-consuming task. We have built a Web application using JavaScript, PHP, and MySQL along with popular frameworks to help advisors do this more efficiently. Features include automatically updating course listings, searchable course details, an enrollment count, and schedule generation. This presentation will cover the algorithms behind the website's features and its use in advising. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 330—1:45 P.M.

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE The Syntax and Semantics of Resultatives Marley Beaver Daniel Seely, faculty mentor All human language includes rules for sentence structure (syntax) and rules for meaning (semantics). Linguistic theory attempts to establish what these rules are and how they work. A particularly important challenge to current theory is the resultative construction, eg, “The girl painted the table blue,” wherein the table becomes blue as a result of the act of painting it. Under current understanding of linguistic rules, this deceptively simple construction should not be possible. The goal of this talk is to show precisely why this structure contradicts current theory, critically review recent alternative theories that accommodate resultatives, and explore new data and hypotheses. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—3:45 P.M.

Joseph Csicsila, faculty mentor Mary Wilkins Freeman’s work provides commentary on the religious climate of her time and place, late 19th century New England. While Freeman is certainly critical of organized religion, she also provides an alternative, a path to happiness and salvation. This project traces a “sermon” through three of her short stories, “A New England Nun,” “A Village Singer,” and “A Church Mouse.” Using her upbringing as a backdrop, this project explores the theme of religion in her work and paints a complete picture of Freeman’s religious narrative. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 304—3 P.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Mary Wilkins Freeman’s Alternative Path to Salvation Mona Beydoun

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Sociopragmatic Strategies in the 2016 Election Connor De Haan Eric Acton, faculty mentor Grice (1975) shows that much of what our words convey depends on differences between the words we use and other expressions we might have used instead. Drawing on Grice’s work and critical discourse analysis, I present a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the use of key terms by four major U.S. political parties during the 2016 election season. One example I’ll be examining is the distribution of terms like free, universal, and single-payer within the context of healthcare. I show how subtle differences in word choice across the parties and individuals suggest substantial differences in their goals, attitudes, and intentions. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 352—11 A.M.

Falling Outside the Gender Binary Samantha DeRosia Laura George, faculty mentor I examine non-gender binary characters in three novels written from the mid 1800s through the mid 2000s that reject dominant gender binary ideas: Julia Ward Howe’s The Hermaphrodite, written in 1846, first published in 2004; Virginia Woolf’s Orlando, in 1928; and Jeffrey Eugenides’ Middlesex, in 2002. The authors create empathy in readers for characters who don’t fit within the binary and show how they navigate decisions regarding their identity. These novels demonstrate an array of narrative strategies for resisting repressive gender stereotypes. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 304—2:30 P.M.

Stereotypes and Gendered Adjectives in Nominations for Student Awards Mitchell DeVore and Ashlee Simpkins

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Eric Acton, faculty mentor

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Turner-Bowker’s (1996) research uncovers differences in gender stereotyped descriptors applied to female and male characters in children’s books. Our analysis of 20 essays written in support of nominees for a student advisor award similarly reveals differences in how female and male nominees are described. Positive adjectives written in the essays belonged to three categories: intellect, empathy, and professionalism. After controlling for the fact that female nominees received slightly more positive compliments overall, we find a weak pattern in which females received disproportionally more positive adjectives related to their empathy and few related to their intellect and professionalism. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—3:15 P.M.


Nighttime, Fairytales, and Vampirism: Comparing “Christabel” and “Goblin Market” Katlyn Dudek Laura George, faculty mentor Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s poem, “Christabel” and Christina Rossetti’s poem “Goblin Market” have been written on extensively in the academic world but there is little research examining them together. I aim to fill a gap by comparing them and proving that “Christabel” influenced Rossetti during her writing of “Goblin Market.” I do this by examining elements such as times of day, fairytales, and the supernatural. The major events of both poems take place under the cover of darkness; their consequences become evident the next day. Furthermore, both poems contain fairytale elements. Lastly, the supernatural, specifically vampirism, is evident in the actions of both Christabel and the Goblins. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 304—3:15 P.M.

Explorations: Multimedia Poetry Using Media Appropriation Thomas Dunn II Carla Harryman, faculty mentor I will present a nine-minute multimedia poetry piece that incorporates poetry, music, and film. The work addresses appropriation as a means of creating new forms as well as manipulating language and sound that either work with or against the visuals. I think of modes of creativity as ways that the audience interacts with the piece. These ways are through visual (film), and auditory (poetry, music). ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—AUDITORIUM—3:15 P.M.

Examining the Educational Challenges of Children Affected by the Flint Lead Water Crisis Victoria Fields, Desiree Drake, Jadyn Guess and Fajr Muhammad Exposure to lead in young children has permanent effects including, but not limited to: acute and chronic diseases, declines in behavioral and cognitive development and attention span, as well as other neurological functions (Campbell, Greenberg, Mankikar, and Ross, 2016). Our research will investigate the effects of Flint’s lead water crisis through a nine-year longitudinal study of local children's academic and behavioral progress. In this study, we expect to find significant results that prove Flint’s lead water crisis will have detrimental and long-lasting effects to children’s intellectual development. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 320—10:45 A.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Heather Neff, faculty mentor

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Translating the World One Picture Book at a Time Kristine Gatchel Jessica De Young Kander, faculty mentor The cry “we need diverse books” recognizes the need to provide a more apt representation of the world to young readers. But is that representation truly diverse when so little of the literature published is from outside our own borders? Diversity, in relation to global literature, is sadly lacking as only 3% of the annual U.S. publishing market is of translated texts. These texts represent an untapped resource in the quest for diversity perhaps partially due to the lack of knowledge of their existence. This study of nearly 300 translated picture books found a source rich in language, story, culture, religion, history and art that largely goes unnoticed and underappreciated. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—9:15 A.M.

Prufrock’s Pervigilium Anna Machasic Elisabeth Däumer, faculty mentor T.S. Eliot’s poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” was first published in 1917, containing 131 lines and two ellipsis markers before lines 70 and 75. These ellipses signal a 33 line-long scrapped passage Eliot titled “Prufrock’s Pervigilium,” which alludes to the Latin poem “Pervigilium Veneris.” “Pervigilium” and “Prufrock,” alike, figure women in roles of sexual power. In addition, both poems feature male speakers rendered silent, and in each case, unspoken words lead to mental anguish. In “Pervigilium,” the creative powers of Venus are responsible for the fertility of mankind, and it is this female power that renders a neurotic Prufrock figuratively emasculated. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 304—4 P.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Affixtacular: An Investigation of the Libfix Chloe McCrystal and Adrianna Blount

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Daniel Seely, faculty mentor This presentation investigates a linguistic feature called a libfix. Coined by the linguist Arnold Zwicky, a libfix is a type of affix that originates as a non-affixal part of a word; thus, 'gate' in 'Watergate' is a libfix used productively in, e.g., 'Deflategate', 'Clintongate' etc. Libfixes are also distinct from traditional affixes in that they are “semantically heavier”—in the example of ‘gate’, this suffix means something roughly similar to “a scandal surrounding X.” We present the history of libfixes and their nomenclature, analyze various examples, and explore the interesting questions they raise for current morphological theory. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—4 P.M.


The Poetry of T.S. Eliot as Bibliotherapy for Chronically Ill Readers McKayla Menzel Elisabeth Däumer, faculty mentor Finding camaraderie with oneself, through reading a poetic narrative or writing one, is a powerful form of bibliotherapy evident in the works and practices of T.S. Eliot. For those with physical and mental chronic illness, facing oneself in this way is a powerful way to grapple with and explain the true pain of illness. The metaphoric ability of poetry is a healing medical humanities tool clearly demonstrated in the poetry of T.S. Eliot. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 304—3:30 P.M.

The Effects of Deindustrialization on the Economy and Environment of Flint, MI Courtni Montgomery, Shayla Card-Nowlin and Deziray Taylor Heather Neff, faculty mentor Even before 2016, citizens of Flint, MI faced several challenges, including deindustrialization and environmental injustice. During the Flint water crisis, many residents were negatively impacted by the contaminated water, and were left without the proper resources to recover. We aim to assess how the city’s lower-socioeconomic status residents have been affected by the crisis, gain insight on their personal perceptions, and investigate how the crisis qualifies as environmental injustice by conducting interviews in alliance with the local community organization, Crossing Waters. After data analysis, our results will be used to advocate for better conditions for Flint residents. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 320—10:30 A.M.

I Now Pronounce You Forbidden to Say My Name Gabriella Perry Verónica Grondona, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—3:30 P.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Avoidance language is a linguistic phenomenon that involves restrictions on speakers’ use of specific lexical items, most commonly words or phrases regarding a speaker’s relatives and their names and is found in languages across the globe. The restrictions are most often placed on the speech of daughters-in-law and references to past ancestors. In this paper, I explain what avoidance language is, how it works in three different languages, and how each of those languages deals with those speech restrictions. The languages I will use to demonstrate this phenomenon are: Datooga in Tanzania, Guugu Yimidhirr of Queensland, Australia, and Swadesh of Graciosa Bay in the Solomon Islands.

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Comics and Inclusivity: Turning the Page on Comic History Leijah Petelka Natasa Kovacevic, faculty mentor Comics and graphic novels as we know them have been in existence since the 1920s. However, the history of comics gives readers a homogenized view of the world. Only in the past 20 years have comics started to address the issue of race and colonization directly. Comics such as “Black” and Boxers and Saints provide readers with a perspective on racial history and its impact on our society today. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 304—2:15 P.M.

The Silent Protest Against Racism: Where is the Love? Desmine Robinson Elisabeth Däumer and Micala Evans, faculty mentors In the fall of 2016, in response to racist vandalism on campus and class discussions, I organized a silent protest against racism, which helped me foster diversity and inclusion on campus and reach a deeper understanding of Black Lives Matter activism. For this presentation, I will research contemporary and past silent protests and violent protests, consider the stories of people who protested during the height of racial turmoil, and survey EMU students on how they interpret the Black Lives Matter Movement and protests. The movement has been called a terrorist organization by various political leaders and I fear some people agree with them, so my goal is to challenge it and to prove that we all can play a vital role in the movement. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—10:45 A.M.

Ironing Out the Wrinkles: Conformity, Economy, and Maternity in Tillie Olsen’s “I Stand Here Ironing” Megan Sears

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Charles Cunningham, faculty mentor

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The stories of working class women often go untold, and the influence of economics on women and children go unexplored, but Tillie Olsen makes these themes the central focus of her short story “I Stand Here Ironing.” Spanning the decades from the Great Depression to the prosperous Fordist era of the 1950s, Olsen remarks upon the increasing prosperity of the nation, while revealing the sacrifices a mother-daughter relationship makes to this so-called progress. While economic conditions have improved, gender roles and expectations for women remain largely unchanged. Published in 1954, Olsen subverts the idyllic 1950s notions of conformity, prosperity and motherhood, and questions the familial and societal expectations for women. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—KIVA ROOM—2 P.M.


Arise and Actualize: Relating to, and Finding Relevance in a Past of Jewish Revolution in the Warsaw Ghetto Samuel Siegel Thomas Ulch II, faculty mentor In this essay, the author, Sam Siegel, explores the significance of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising as a historical event and as an instance in time that has a strong pull on his life in the present. This essay combines historical research and personal narrative into a complete think piece representative of the thought process the author goes through living in an American present that is too reminiscent of the reality in Germany at the time of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. The essay is summarized with a question; “with the initiators of this revolt as my role models, what does that history demand of me in my present reality?” POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

The Metafictional References in Our Literature Vanessa Stoddard Ian Wojcik-Andrews, faculty mentor This interpretive study analyzes John Green’s novel, The Fault in Our Stars and the literary allusions contained within the book. It argues the benefit of metafictional references within Green’s novel, utilizing various forms of reviews and journals, and is focused on the metafictional and non-fictional literary references that Green used to color his novel. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 350—4 P.M.

Trauma, Gender, and Transformation in T.S. Eliot’s Writings Jessica Tapley Elisabeth Däumer, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 304—3:45 P.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

In The Waste Land T.S. Eliot advises using pain from trauma as a source for artistic transformation. He specifically captures the societal and individual trauma resulting from war. Eliot also writes about sexual assault in a post war society. However, while the experiences of war veterans and sexual assault survivors are often similar, Eliot does not appear to distribute his empathy equally. Does Eliot represent his female characters in a misogynistic, limiting way that takes away their voice as survivors of violence or does he empathize with women?

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Transition of the False Narrative into the Digital Era Amanda Wasunyk Bernard Miller, faculty mentor False stories or narratives have been told for generations, but it is not until the digital age that educators and media experts are noticing how influential and compelling they actually are, seeming to persuade not just the gullible but otherwise knowledgeable people as well. The purpose of this presentation is to examine the phenomenon of these false narratives, known as “fake news,” and to specifically address the questions of where fake news comes from, why it is created, and why we are drawn to it, especially now as it spreads farther and faster due to the rise of the Internet. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 352—11:15 A.M.

A Reflection of Repulsion: Narcissism in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Jessica C. Williams Christine Neufeld, faculty mentor This project reveals Victor Frankenstein as a pathological narcissist in accordance with the diagnostic criteria defined by the DSM-5 and the creature as a manifestation of his neurosis. Freudian theory substantiates this assertion by contextualizing Victor’s narcissistic behavior as the result of emotional trauma during psychological development. His unconscious aims to resolve the resulting feelings of inadequacy and rejection through his grandiose scientific pursuit to create life. Interpreting the creature as an embodiment of Victor’s repressed unconscious supplements the understanding of his narcissistic motivation with parallels to the mythology of Narcissus. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 204—10:30 A.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY & GEOLOGY

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Pumping-Induced Groundwater Fluctuations as an Indicator of Public Supply Well Vulnerability Kayla Bicknell Christopher Gellasch, faculty mentor Previous research in a South-Central Wisconsin aquifer system revealed unusual monitoring well responses due to pumping of a nearby public supply well from a lower, confined aquifer. This current research project involved data collection from seven additional sites in the area to further explore this phenomenon. Collection of waterlevel data occurred at 1-minute intervals and revealed that duration and magnitude of monitoring well responses were proportional to distance and depth of nearby municipal supply wells. Knowledge of how well pumping impacts shallower aquifers may lead to a better understanding of public supply well vulnerability to near-surface contaminants. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Analysis of Berea Formation Well-Cores from Bay County, MI Amber Rose Cassidy Steven LoDuca, faculty mentor The Berea Formation consists of sandstone and siltstone deposited along a marine delta that covered much of Michigan and Ohio during the Mississippian Period, 370 million years ago. The sandstone intervals, which have high porosity because of their uniform grain size, are economically important because they contain significant amounts of petroleum. Outcrops of this unit exist in Ohio, but in Michigan it is known only in the subsurface from drilling investigations. This study will analyze two Berea Formation well-cores from eastcentral Michigan (Bay County), the Kennedy core and the B. Sheets core. Included in this analysis will be detailed lithostratigraphic correlation between the cores. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Analysis of Motion on Faults Associated with the Ste. Genevieve Fault System, Eastern Missouri Maximilian Fraleigh Eric Portenga, faculty mentor I studied a group of exhumed faults in eastern Missouri to better understand the nature of fault motion along the Ste. Genevieve Fault System, an area associated with intracontinental seismicity in the central United States. I measured and inferred the orientations and senses of shear of faults exposed in a network of box canyons which are otherwise undetectable at the surface. Studying the characteristics of these small-scale faults broadens the perspective of the deformational history of the larger, regional Ste. Genevieve Fault System. I interpret there to be three families of faults, which indicate a zone of transtension in Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Christopher Gellasch, faculty mentor For most of the 20th century the City of Ann Arbor utilized the Ann Arbor Landfill to dispose of solid waste. Older portions of this now closed landfill were not constructed to modern standards, resulting in a groundwater contamination plume. This plume contains organic compounds, such as 1,4-dioxane, which pose a human health risk and are expensive to analyze. The purpose of this study was to determine if common inorganic species (iron, nitrate, sulfate, etc.) can be used as a proxy for the organic contaminants. This will allow the City of Ann Arbor to more effectively monitor groundwater near the landfill to mitigate potential human health risks. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 350—11 A.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Using Inorganic Proxies to Delineate Organic Groundwater Contaminants Near the Ann Arbor Landfill Jacob Kowalczyk

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Volcanic Ash Weathering Classification Emily Nowacki Christine Clark, faculty mentor Upon deposition, volcanic ash begins to weather, a complex process that is influenced by a variety of factors. The existing weathering classification scheme consists of volcanic material analyzed by SEM and XRD from four different sources. We are replicating their methods and further broadening the classification scheme with analyses of material from additional sources in order to improve it as a tool for studying weathering variations based on time and location. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Mapping Russia and Surrounding Countries Stephanie Overla William Welsh and Kelly Victor-Burke, faculty mentors This project explores the physical geography of modern Russia as well the surrounding countries. These maps have been created for use in EMU’s Geography Department, specifically within GEOG 314W: Geography of Russia and Neighboring States. This project completes an update of previous maps that were EMU Geographic Information Science graduate student produced. The new maps were created with an emphasis on appealing visual cartography and being user friendly. The cartographic goal of these maps is to enhance student learning in the GEOG 314W classroom. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

Investigating Sources of Chloride along Millers Creek in Ann Arbor Lillian Richards and Leah VanLandingham

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Jose Vites and Christopher Gellasch, faculty mentors

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Previous research identified elevated chloride levels in Millers Creek, but potential sources were not identified. Increased chloride levels can have negative implications for water quality and the local ecosystem. Being able to pinpoint chloride sources that impact the creek may allow for mitigation and help protect the waterway. This study focuses on assessing the source location(s) for the observed elevated chloride levels in the creek. Data collection consists of field measurements, water sampling along the length of the creek, and laboratory analysis using ion chromatography. Knowledge of chloride sources will inform local agencies on how to better manage the watershed. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Assessing the Relationship Between Conflict, Environmental Security and Effects on Agricultural Productivity in Syria and Northern Iraq Harel Tanjong William Welsh, faculty mentor This report will examine the effects of the recent takeover of Islamic State of parts of Syria and Iraq on vegetative health and agricultural productivity in the area. The study will utilize satellite imagery tools together with publicly available geospatial information. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Climate Change: The Russian Perspective Ashley Vought Kelly Victor-Burke, faculty mentor This paper analyzes the Russian perspective on climate change amid physical and geological changes currently transpiring in Russia due to global warming. Recent polls have discovered that Russians feel positively towards the potential effects of climate change, which diverges from majority opinion. Although there have been few studies conducted on Russian emotions toward climate change, extensive research in this topic uncovered that Russia’s environmental attitudes are shaped by the potential economic benefits of a warming environment, the Russian government’s inconsistent message regarding climate skepticism, and a regional lack of knowledge on climate change science. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 330—9 A.M.

Implementing GIS Methods to Identify Suitable Living Areas for Senior Citizens in Ann Arbor Desiree Weitzmann Xining Yang, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 330—9:30 A.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

My research project involved using GIS to identify suitable living areas in Ann Arbor. According to SEMCOG, seniors (age 65 and older) will be the age demographic that experiences the most growth from the year 2010-2040 in southeast Michigan. Due to seniors’ unique challenges, finding suitable living areas is challenging. By utilizing ArcGIS software, publicly available data and spatial analysis methods, suitable areas for senior living in Ann Arbor was created.

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DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY & PHILOSOPHY Is Discovery Necessarily Linguistic? Natalia Anderson W. John Koolage, faculty mentor This paper introduces J.J. Gibson’s work, including his theory of affordances, to disrupt the theories of discovery offered by Karl Popper, William Whewell, and Wilfred Sellars. All three of these philosophers have different views regarding the nature of discovery, but there is a shared assumption that language is required to make discoveries in the form of hypothesis generation and checking. Gibson’s work suggests that the linguistic piece is not necessary for discovery. While I argue that the linguistic component of discovery is not necessary, the checking part remains untouched by my argument. Finally, I briefly consider the nature of discovery without language. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 352—10:30 A.M.

The Gospel of Thomas: An Examination of the History and Theology of a Religious Text Jack Collins John Wegner and Rick Rogers, faculty mentors The Gospel of Thomas was found in Egypt in a collection of ancient texts known as the Nag Hammadi. It resembles the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke and is thought to be related to Q, a possible shared source for Matthew, Mark, Luke and Thomas. The Gospel of Thomas is often debated among scholars about when it was written, who wrote it and whether or not is considered a gnostic text. This project will look into the Gospel of Thomas’s relation to other more mainstream Christian texts. I will also explore the history behind the Gospel of Thomas and different theories surrounding its structure and origin.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 204—11 A.M.

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The Old English Translations under King Alfred the Great Katlyn Dudek Philip Schmitz, faculty mentor At the end of the ninth century C.E., King Alfred the Great of England began a series of translations of Latin texts into Old English. While the extent of his involvement in the translation process is disputed, the translations were undoubtedly begun at his command. I examine what motivated the King to begin this program and what he hoped to achieve by it. This research also looks at the immediate and the long-term effects of these translations. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 204—11:15 A.M.


While the Grass Grows: Adjudicating the Debate Between Food Security and Food Sovereignty Eric Garant Jill Dieterle, faculty mentor Roughly 842 million people in the world do not have enough to eat. Two major movements seek to address this problem: the food security movement, which is solely concerned with ensuring that people have both enough food and appropriate food to maintain a healthy diet; and the food sovereignty movement, which additionally seeks for people and communities to have direct power over the production of their food. In this paper, I argue that while food sovereignty is a worthy ideal, the scope of global hunger ought to compel us to throw our immediate support behind food security, which is more easily obtained. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 330—9:45 A.M.

Jacqueline Cochran and the Forgotten Female Pilots of World War II Lacey Opdycke Mary Elizabeth Murphy, faculty mentor When exploring women’s military history during World War II, many are aware of the Women’s Army Corps (WACs), but little is known about the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs). The WASPs were a civilian organization of women pilots trained to fly military aircraft. In my paper, I will discuss the day-to-day experiences of the Women Airforce Service Pilots and describe the sex discrimination they faced, highlighting the role of Jacqueline Cochran, a central figure in the women’s pilot program. My talk will draw on oral histories and personal letters of WASPs to analyze this under-studied dimension of women’s military history. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 204—9:30 A.M.

The American Revolution and Evangelical Thought Roxanne Reinhardt This project explores the events leading up to the American Revolution such as the Great Awakening and the Seven Years War through the works of Hannah Heaton and Esther Edwards Burr’s diaries, as well as Sarah Osborn’s writing. By looking at the religious views of the people during this time, this paper explains the trend of revivalist and evangelical uprisings and the religious break from authority. This paper argues why evangelicals leading up to the American Revolution viewed the oncoming revolution with prophetic significance, and looks at if this prophetic belief represented a larger civic spiritual trend in the newly forming nation. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 204—10 A.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

John G. McCurdy, faculty mentor

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Truman and Israel: A Personal Connection Nadine Sabri Mary-Elizabeth Murphy, faculty mentor Historiographical accounts of President Truman’s recognition of Israel have focused on Truman as a politician and as a man of faith. Many discuss his decision to recognize Israel as a state, but few have examined his personal motives. Scholars assume that his decision to recognize Israel as a state was merely a political move that would affect his re-election. A deeper analysis of Truman’s writings, speeches, etc. reveals facts about his private life that contributed to his decision to recognize Israel as a state. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

The White Woman’s Burden: Women’s Suffrage and American Imperialism Catherine Waldecker Mary-Elizabeth Murphy, faculty mentor From 1899 to 1902, the U.S. struggled to end an independence movement in the Philippines, a territory seized from Spain at the end of the Spanish-American War. Despite the strong pre-Civil War connection between women’s suffrage movements and racial equality, suffragists tended to support involvement in the Philippines because of racist ideologies already present in the women’s rights movement, assumptions of the natural superiority of white, Euro-American society, and desire to gain favor with the imperialist and overwhelmingly male U.S. government. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 204—9:15 A.M.

The Ethical Order of Antigone Lauren Williams

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Laura McMahon, faculty mentor

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I argue that Sophocles’ Antigone exemplifies an inherent conflict within the two spheres of Hegel’s ethical order, as depicted in The Phenomenology of Spirit. I explain the two spheres: family and community. Then, I analyze the relationship between the two spheres. Finally, I draw on examples from Antigone to demonstrate that the two spheres of Hegel’s ethical order are in constant conflict because they are inherently at odds with one another. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 204—10:45 A.M.


DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS Quantitative Reasoning Using Graduation Data Talia Edgar Khairul Islam, faculty mentor Quantitative reasoning (QR) refers to understanding of any quantitative analysis in a way that it makes sense mathematically, logically and in interpretational perspectives. Math 110 accounts for a QR requirement for the General Education program. In this project, we intend to provide examples of quantitative reasoning using the U.S. graduation data. We analyze Department of Education data for quantitative reasoning with specific statistical learning objectives and goals. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—AUDITORIUM—2:15 P.M.

Are Hurricanes More Prevalent Now: A Statistical Review Emily Eubanks Tanweer Shapla, faculty mentor Has the frequency of hurricanes increased during recent times? The debate regarding this question takes place from the political arena to family dinner tables. In this presentation, we search for the answers by investigating the hurricane history in the Atlantic basin over the last 150+ years. We analyze the data using various graphs and statistical tests. We also employ statistical models to predict hurricane prevalence. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 330—3:45 P.M.

Dark and Regular Matter Balance and Imbalance States and Its Effect on Acceleration Burak Guner Kenneth Shiskowski, faculty mentor

POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

To describe various forms of accelerations I assigned a transformation property based on gravitational waves an object emits when accelerating to quantum fluctuations. I then defined regions of spacetime and worked out the consequences of these transformations to determine how various regions interacted with one another. Based on these interactions one can determine phenomena such as gravitational acceleration, black hole evaporation, cosmic inflation, and more.

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Correlates of Global Warming and Greenhouse Gases in Climate Change Jessica Hawkins Khairul Islam, faculty mentor The Earth’s climate is changing due to the increasing trend of atmospheric carbon dioxide and other components of greenhouse gases, and their imbalances in the atmosphere. The most significant evidence of climate change is the rise of global average temperature. In this study, we employ statistical analyses to explore the correlates of global warming and greenhouse gases along with their effect in climate change and extreme events, using NASA, NOAA and EPI data. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 330—4 P.M.

Physical Applications of Partial Differential Equations Jared Korotney and Jared Bender Kenneth Shiskowski, faculty mentor Whether for examining the process of heat transfer or analyzing risk in the financial market system, partial differential equations (PDEs) have a plethora of practical uses in the real world. Physics and engineering have very much become the most common areas of study for applying various topics of PDEs. This research will delve into the basic ideas and subtopics of a PDE, as well as going into a few examples of physics and engineering applications of PDEs that appear to be more prevalent in an ever growing technological world. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 330—3 P.M.

Assessing Usefulness of Clinical Reasoning Education Sessions Through Script Concordance Test Suzy McTaggart

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Khairul Islam, faculty mentor

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As part of a course for students entering the clinical phase of their education, The University of Michigan Medical School presented students with clinical reasoning education sessions. To judge if these sessions were impactful, a pre- and post-Script Concordance Test were administered to all students. The test compares students’ clinical reasoning to that of an expert panel. We reviewed the exam results to determine if students experienced enhanced clinical reasoning skills following the given sessions. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 320—10 A.M.


Predicting the Price of a Used Car via a Feedforward Neural Network Elijah Nichols Ovidiu Calin, faculty mentor The creation of a feedforward deep neural network to accurately predict the selling price of a used car. The model will be trained with various market and product factors such as model year, mileage, color, number and severity of crashes, etc. gathered from Kelley Blue Book and other, similar services for aggregating used car data. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 330—3:30 P.M.

A Machine-Learning Exploration of Human Brain Connectome Data and Psychiatric Conditions Katrina Prantzalos Andrew Ross, faculty mentor The Human Connectome Project dataset includes brain imaging data, demographics, and psychological data, from 1,206 individuals. We performed exploratory data analysis, including an investigation of the distinctions in connectome data across participants with anxiety and/or depression as opposed to those without. The intent of this project was to predict the two mental disorders from given data via machine learning techniques like random forest methods. This project, in the long term, could lead to a better understanding of certain psychological disorders and provide a method for analysis that acknowledges the many variables with relationships between the brain and behavior. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Descriptive Statistics Using Java Programming Language Sadia Sarker Khairul Islam, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—AUDITORIUM—2:30 P.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Statistical softwares such as R, SAS, SPSS, Minitab, etc. are tools built with data analysis in mind. These softwares mostly rely on a series of subroutines, functions and/ or procedures to execute a programming task. On the other hand, Java is one of the most popular programing language that makes the platform for building enterprise-scale applications. In this presentation, we write programs to evaluate and output various descriptive statistics using Java programming language.

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On Some Applications of the Trigonometric Functions Lilly Vael Tanweer Shapla, faculty mentor Trigonometric functions have long been used in modeling a wide range of real-world phenomena. While trigonometry was originally developed for completing computations in geography and astronomy, trigonometry is now widely used in the fields of mathematics, physics, engineering, oceanography, architecture, land survey, chemistry, and many additional fields. In this presentation, we will provide some examples of how trigonometric functions are being used to solve and model various real-world problems. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 330—3:15 P.M.

Developmental Disabilities: A Review and Analysis Yasmin Zayed Khairul Islam, faculty mentor Characterized by impairment in physical, learning, or behavior areas, developmental disabilities (DDs) are a group of conditions that start during the developmental period and may affect lifetime functioning. With a prevalence of about one in every six children, DDs are a common problem in the U.S. In this study, we explore the important characteristics of DDs along with trends and models. Such study leads to early diagnosis awareness and improved outcomes of children with DDs. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 320—9 A.M.

SCHOOL OF MUSIC & DANCE

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

The Perception of Water in Piano Works by Liszt, Debussy, Ravel, and Griffes Megan Angriawan

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Garik Pedersen, faculty mentor Charles Tomlinson Griffes, Maurice Ravel, Franz Liszt, and Claude Debussy are famous composers from different countries, with distinct musical personalities, training, and influences. Each wrote works for piano that describe water and each with different characteristics as they describe water in different ways, ideas, and perspectives; giving the effects of flow, splash, ripple, spray, etc. This study examines the use of the piano to depict various qualities of water and to compare and contrast several pieces of “water music.” As the performer explores the composers’ extra-musical intentions, she discovers interpretive choices that cause increased connection in the listeners’ imaginations. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—AUDITORIUM—10 A.M.


New Works by Student Composers: The Misty Sea and Two Miniatures Megan Angriawan and William Mufarreh Whitney Prince, faculty mentor The Misty Sea by Megan Angriawan begins mysteriously in the darkness at the bottom of the sea. Gradually life appears as sparkles in the calm waters. The middle section depicts a foggy dusk with music that is restless and increasingly dissonant. Following a powerful climax, the music gradually calms and settles again at the bottom of the sea. “Abyss,” the first of Two Miniatures by William Mufarreh, conveys darkness and a feeling of melancholy. It begins quietly and builds to a chaotic climax before returning to the opening mood. “Electric,” an energetic closer, builds off a recurring jazz-influenced motive that is developed with a nod towards the music of Messiaen and Stravinsky. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—AUDITORIUM—11:30 A.M.

A Study of Keiko Abe’s Influence on the Repertoire, Design, and Status of the Marimba Claire Castle John Dorsey, faculty mentor Japanese marimbist Keiko Abe (b. 1937) is, in large part, responsible for bringing the marimba out of a category of instruments used only for popular and novelty music to a position of respect, an instrument that can truly be valued as a serious contributor to music. This is due to her innovations in marimba playing techniques, her commissions of works by serious composers for marimba, her assistance to the Yamaha company with improving the sound and construction of the instrument and her influence on younger generations of marimba players. Today’s presentation includes a performance of her virtuosic composition written in 1986, Prism, for solo marimba. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—AUDITORIUM—1:30 P.M.

Heather Shouldice, faculty mentor Some school band teachers utilize a “chair placement system,” in which they rank students according to playing ability. This study will examine the relationship between the presence or absence of a chair placement system and middle school band students' musical selfefficacy. The researchers will administer a 10-item survey to measure musical self-efficacy among two groups of students: those who participate in a band program that utilizes a chair-placement system and those who participate in a band program that does not utilize such a system. Statistical analyses will be conducted to see if musical self-efficacy differs between the two groups of students. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—AUDITORIUM—1:45 P.M.

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Relationships Between Chair Placement and Musical Self-Efficacy Among Middle School Band Students Olivia Gegich

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Concerto for Trumpet, Opus 41 Darin Good Carter Eggers, faculty mentor Concerto for Trumpet, Opus 41 (1930), was originally written for B-flat trumpet and orchestra by Russian composer Alexander Goedicke (1877-1957). Goedicke was a professor at the Moscow Conservatory and won the Rubinstein Prize for Composition at the age of 23. Because his music was not acceptable in the Soviet Union when it was written and since the Western world disapproved of the Soviet government, Goedicke’s music did not become mainstream. This one movement concerto presents three main themes which alternate in variation throughout the piece. The work ends with a cadenza (solo passage) and final variation in a fresh, new key. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—AUDITORIUM—9 A.M.

A Look Back at Early Music Therapy: Comparing Music Therapy from the 1800s with Modern Research Sophia Heitkamp Theresa Merrill, faculty mentor This project focuses on some of the very first writings about music therapy from the early 1800s whose authors discuss the benefits they have seen from music in medicine. However, due to limited technology, many of their observations have little research to support these claims. One specific piece, The Topsail Shivers in the Wind, mentioned in the article written by Edwin Atlee in 1805, will be performed and discussed as an example of music therapy in the early 1800s. The goal is to use current research in music therapy to support some of the earliest ideas in music therapy in medicine, such as physiological responses, the iso principle, and the use of music therapy with different diagnoses.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—AUDITORIUM—9:30 A.M.

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Censorship and Chromaticism: Russia’s 20th Century Through the Eyes of a Composer Emily Katynski Joel Schoenhals, faculty mentor The rapid political changes in Russia during the 20th century had significant impacts on both the daily life of citizens and international affairs. Tragic stories are preserved in textbooks, letters, and memories, but some experiences are saved in a completely different way. Music of the prominent composer Dmitri Shostakovich shares an unfamiliar and grim perspective of life in the Soviet Union. His music over the years not only reflects his maturation as a musician, but also growing tension with administrations whose taste for strictly “democratic” music led to brutal punishments for those who failed to obey. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—AUDITORIUM—10:45 A.M.


Through My Eyes: A Student Music Therapist’s Self-Reflection on Experiencing Culture in Pediatrics Mary Rose Nieman Theresa Merrill, faculty mentor As a music therapy student in pre-internship clinical training in a pediatric hospital, I wondered about the role of culture in my setting. Through arts-based self-study and ethnographic reflexive journaling, I hope to gain insight to the following: In what ways do I experience culture in a pediatric hospital as a student music therapist? What insights can I gain from my position regarding culture and power? Where do I notice my own personal bias contributing to the therapeutic relationship week-to-week? In what ways do my role and identity (age, race, gender identity, class etc.) contribute to or inhibit therapeutic relationship with patients and families? I hope that through this experience I will be able to connect with my patients on a deeper level and better meet them in my practice. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—AUDITORIUM—10:30 A.M.

Musical Influences in Three Pieces for Solo Clarinet by Igor Stravinsky James Rayle Sandra Jackson, faculty mentor Igor Stravinsky's (1882-1971) Three Pieces for Solo Clarinet is a unique short work composed in 1918 in Switzerland as a thank you gift to amateur clarinetist and friend Werner Reinhart. Reinhart had helped fund Stravinsky's L'Histoire du Soldat (The Soldier's Tale) for chamber ensemble which premiered in 1918. Both Three Pieces for Clarinet and L’Histoire du Soldat show the influence of ragtime, including the music of Sidney Bechet, an American jazz musician. Along with a performance of Three Pieces for Solo Clarinet, the musical influences that occur in the different movements will be discussed. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—AUDITORIUM—11 A.M.

Woody Chenoweth, faculty mentor Mosaic is an all-female saxophone quartet studying musical works written by women. Our goal is to bring attention to this under-represented group and provide research on the experiences of women in music. We plan to accomplish this by giving lectures to young musicians and commissioning works by female composers. Professional music is wildly behind most professions in equality and inclusion. We serve to educate the world on the challenges female musicians face every day, and the greatness they still accomplish. “The [feminist] movement is a sort of mosaic. We each put in our little stone, and at the end you get a great mosaic” - Alice Paul. Please enjoy our little stone. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—AUDITORIUM—9:45 A.M.

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Women in Music: A Performance by Women, About Women Alexis Sikes, Emily Schafer, Chelsey Parker and Samantha Meyers

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Anton Bruckner’s Mass No. 2 in E Minor—A Conductor’s Guide Louis Vajda Brandon Johnson, faculty mentor The music of Anton Bruckner presents various challenges that have long perplexed choral and instrumental conductors alike. This presentation will provide a performance guide for conductors who are preparing a presentation of Bruckner’s Mass No. 2 in E Minor including musicological considerations, performance logistics, and gesture suggestions. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—AUDITORIUM—9:15 A.M.

Concerto in D Major by Giuseppe Tartini Anthony Vigliotti Carter Eggers, faculty mentor Giuseppe Tartini (1692-1770) was a composer and virtuoso violinist in the late-Baroque era of music history. Born in modern-day Slovenia, Tartini grew up in an upper-class family and received basic music instruction as a child. As an adolescent, he moved to Italy, where he began to play the violin. In 1721, Tartini became the music director at the Basilica di Sant'Antonio in Padua, and in 1726 he opened a violin school. His Concerto in D Major, originally written for the violin, is just one of more than a hundred concerti he composed. The concerto was later arranged by Jean Thilde for trumpet, strings, and continuo, and has become a commonly performed piece in the piccolo trumpet repertoire. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—AUDITORIUM—11:15 A.M.

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY

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The Physics of Renewable Energy Resources Larry Borum

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J. Marshall Thomsen, faculty mentor Industrialized nations have relied on fossil fuels for decades. However, these resources are not sustainable and contribute to the growth of greenhouses gases. Therefore, there has been increased interest in renewable resources for energy production. In addition, renewable energy sources have the potential to meet the rising demand for energy: wind, solar, tidal and geothermal are some examples of these renewable resources, and all of these illustrate various concepts of physics. This investigation exploits these concepts to craft homework-style problems in physics based on renewable energy sources. The problems produced can be applied to realistic scenarios within the energy industry. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 330—10 A.M.


Humans—A Solar System Species: Introduction Larry Borum and Rosalie Tezak David Pawlowski, faculty mentor Our project focuses on bio-inspired technologies for resource allocation on extraterrestrial bodies, specifically Mars, as a part of the 2018 NASA Undergraduate Student Design Challenge. Using various aspects of physics, engineering, biology and computer modeling, we will design and examine feasible processes for the extraction, transportation and storage of water on Mars. These processes are designed to be sustainable and energyefficient so that established colonies can obtain and use water on other habitable bodies within the Solar System. We will present the introduction of the project and provide background information regarding characteristics of Mars. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 352—1:30 P.M.

Development of a Computational Model for Predictive Analysis of Geothermal Heating Systems Taylor A. Callis J. Marshall Thomsen, faculty mentor The efficiency of a geothermal heating/cooling system is determined both by the system itself and by its thermodynamic interactions with its environment. The goal of this project is to predict energy needs determined from known and/or estimated system and environmental parameters. Using a computational model will allow the predication to be done quickly and efficiently, greatly reducing the time and money investment in developing a new system. The demanding nature of the thermal diffusion equations used to model heat flow in the environment has led to using cutting edge code development and the building of a dedicated computational server. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

David Pawlowski, faculty mentor The purpose of this presentation is to continue discussing the 2018 University Student Design Challenge by NASA Glenn submission by EMU’s 2018 Physics Capstone Class. We will summarize the results and talk about the feasibility of our design to extract, transport, and store water on Mars. The goal of our analysis is to determine how capable the design might perform within the constraints of the environment, resource availability, and assumed technologies within the next 50 years. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 352—2 P.M.

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Mars H2O Extraction Mission Results Sam Carano and Ryan Walker

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Martian Dust Storms Josh DesMarais David Pawlowski, faculty mentor Dust storms, moving clouds of dust produced by strong winds that lift dust from the surface to the atmosphere, are a regular part of Martian weather. These dust storms are classified by size, from the smallest being local storms, to regional storms, which are larger, to planet-encircling storms, which span all longitudes on the planet. Dust storms are most active during spring and summer on the southern hemisphere, when the Mars is closest to the sun in its orbit. In this presentation, we analyze data from both the Mars Global Surveyor and the Viking landers using optical depth as a proxy to observe the density of dust in the atmosphere to observer dust storms. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Effects of Solar Irradiance on the Atmosphere of Mars Jonah Pollens-Dempsey David Pawlowski, faculty mentor The MAVEN spacecraft has been orbiting Mars since September 2014. The focus of this study is on understanding the sources of variability in density observations of Mars’s neutral atmosphere that were obtained by MAVEN’s accelerometer. The primary objective is to examine the correlation of these measurements with the solar irradiance. The correlation was found for several periods in which the spacecraft was orbiting on the planet’s dayside. The results indicate that Mars’s upper atmosphere is more often under solar control when the radiation input from the Sun is more significant. However, outliers to this trend exist. In this presentation, we focus on these outliers and their causes. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 352—2:15 P.M.

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Humans—A Solar System Species: Design Andrew Richardson and Kyle Wilhelm

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David Pawlowski, faculty mentor The purpose of our project is to design a system that optimizes the extraction of water from Mars using techniques inspired by nature to fulfill the design requirements set by the 2018 NASA undergraduate student design challenge. We are developing a system that improves on modern day resource extraction techniques by minimizing resource and energy usage, while maintaining multifunctionality. In the design we look at the extraction, transportation, refinement, and storage of the materials. We will present on the preliminary design of our system. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 352—1:45 P.M.


DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE Modern Day Slavery: The Exploitation of Immigrant Workers in the Middle East Mariam Akanan and Kangkana Koli Richard Stahler-Sholk, faculty mentor The mistreatment of migrant workers in the Middle East is an issue that calls for global attention. However, due to the hierarchical social norms within the Middle East many find this treatment as socially acceptable and few people acknowledge the scope of this problem. These migrant workers often work as in-house maids where they receive below minimum wages, emotional abuse, and even physical abuse. The governments in the region do little to nothing to protect these workers and their basic human rights. Through an analysis of real-life stories of such workers, we hope to raise awareness of this international problem and examine potential policy changes in the Middle East to protect migrant workers. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 320—11 A.M.

Roe v. Wade: Facing Science, Ethics, and Morality Abigail Bongiorno Barry Pyle, faculty mentor In 1973, the Supreme Court extended privacy doctrine to cover reproductive rights in the landmark case of Roe v. Wade. The majority opinion in the case avoided numerous vital questions and instead rested on historical and traditional legal arguments to determine that reproductive rights fall under the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. In doing so, the majority failed to account for scientific data (outside of fetal viability), ethical, and moral concepts. This paper discusses the ramifications of excluding these three crucial elements and the ultimate legal and social implications of those failures. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 352—9:45 A.M.

Jeffrey Bernstein, faculty mentor I consider the overall trend of dissatisfaction with Donald Trump’s presidency, as well as exploring observable variations in which voters are feeling remorse for their decision. These findings will be compared to the first year of the presidency of Barack Obama. The purpose of this research is to gain a more in-depth understanding of how often, and in what manner, voters contemplate the capabilities of elected officials once they have voted them into office. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 352—9:15 A.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Voter Remorse in the Age of Trump Hunter Butkovic

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Russian Social Media Usage During the 2016 Election Taylor Chase Edward Sidlow, faculty mentor The United States is still attempting to understand the impact that Russia had on the 2016 election. This paper examines the ways in which the Russians used social media during 2016 to attempt to influence the American public. I examine the role of the Internet Research Agency, how different social media websites were used and manipulated, and how the content on these websites was designed. The paper also analyzes the goals of the Russians and their potential impacts on the American people. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 304—10:45 A.M.

Understanding Dynamics of State Civil Rights Commissions and Anti-Discrimination Policy Madelaine Coy Barry Pyle, faculty mentor Civil rights commissions and similar institutions play an important role in the creation and implementation of anti-discrimination policy in the states. This presentation examines the institutional and structural dynamics of various state civil rights commissions as well as observations of demographic and background characteristics of commission members. Ultimately, I will tie this preliminary analysis to the content and character of commission decisions in the area of civil rights and liberties. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 352—9:30 A.M.

College Major’s Influence on Political Identity: Self Selection or Indoctrination? Jacob Deutsch

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Jeffrey Bernstein, faculty mentor

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For decades the connection between education and political attitudes have been apparent and well analyzed. Yet, whether one's political attitudes are formed as a direct result of matriculation or if one's political attitudes lead one to matriculate, is not yet known. This study seeks to explore if self-selection that causes the horizontal differences in political knowledge, identity, and involvement between college students in different majors. In essence, is it self-selection or indoctrination? This study evaluates undergraduate college students’ current political attitudes, their recollection of pre-matriculation political attitudes, and their closeness to their chosen major. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 330—2:15 P.M.


The Media and Its Coverage of the Trump Administration Joshua Gurwell Edward Sidlow, faculty mentor As the media unquestionably influence our perception of politics, it is important to understand that these outlets have their own agendas. Consequently, although the facts of a story may always be the same, each media outlet has their own spin on every situation. As Trump continues to claim that any negative news is “fake news”, it is the goal of this inquiry to ascertain whether the media are truly covering the Trump Administration negatively, or if the media are merely relaying the facts. This research involves the analysis of the prominent media outlets, such as CNN, MSNBC, and Fox, during their prime time hours (7-8 pm), in which the stories covered were scored objectively. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 352—9 A.M.

The Motivations for North Korea’s Aggressive Military Attitude Towards Its Neighbors Yura Kim Nitya Singh, faculty mentor Public perception of North Korea supports the view that its current leadership does not follow conventional norms of inter-state behavior. This perception is based on North Korea’s provocative behavior. Using theoretical concepts such as ideology and the role of military alliances as an enabling factor, North Korea's aggressive behavior can be rationalized and understood. Two factors that have particularly enabled North Korea are support from China and the role of Songun ideology in keeping the state together. The use of aggressive posturing in the region is an attempt by North Korea to project power and gain domestic and international leverage during negotiations with stakeholders. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 350—9:45 A.M.

Richard Stahler-Sholk, faculty mentor Scholars have studied the phenomenon of religious extremism in historical context, focusing on the causes of such extremism or what leads people to identify with such movements. This project examines the effect of religious extremism on levels of development. Most researchers have looked at the relation between secular attitudes and development, or between religious extremism and terrorism, but there is a lack of literature making the connection between extremism and development. Using data collected from various cross-national religious study centers updated through 2011, this project examines whether religious extremism limits a country’s capacity for development. While religious extremism is a difficult variable to measure, the results suggest a stronger relationship between secular state policies and development. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 350—9 A.M.

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In The Name of God: A Study of Religious Extremism and Its Implications Kangkana Koli

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Beyond the Generalization of Racial Categories: How Voters React to Different Asian Identities Kangkana Koli Jeffrey Bernstein, faculty mentor The racial category of Asian has been designated to refer to a group of people from a certain part of the world who, dependent on region, actually have completely different cultures, languages, and even physical features. This raises the question of whether Americans even recognize the specific ethnicities within this pan-ethnic identity of Asian. This project seeks answers to several questions regarding political attitudes toward Asian Americans. For a long time the racial identity of Asian has forced people into a category that is unrepresentative of them. By bringing light to such questions, we hope to contribute to the beginnings of more conversations surrounding the political attitudes directed toward Asian Americans. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 350—3:15 P.M.

Cross Pressured: The Heteronomy of Perspectives on LGBT+ Issues Monica Laschober, Josi Ezinga and Kristen Hudecz Jeffrey Bernstein, faculty mentor Our research examines how a person’s environment, and the “cross-pressures” they experience, direct their views on LGBT+ issues. We used a survey to inquire about public opinions on LGBT+ issues, and analyzed the data to find patterns by which people come to their perspectives. We conducted post-survey interviews with non-LGBT+ identifying people to explore the socio-political roots of their various beliefs, as well as with LGBT+ identifying people who grew up in environments they found unwelcoming to discuss how they—and their peers—handled LGBT+ relations. Our work seeks to understand the effects of crosspressures on LGBT+ relations and controversial social policy.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 350—3 P.M.

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The Interconnectedness of Radical Movements in Various Communities of Color Sanyu Lukwago Richard Stahler-Sholk, faculty mentor This research strives to identify why similarities exist between various radical social movements historically and globally. I will examine a group’s stimulus, membership, goals, and how successful their movement was. Civil society uprisings are indicative of a population’s distrust and dissatisfaction with the current system’s institutions. Understanding the dynamics of mobilization of marginalized groups against mistreatment can help address unjust policies and practices. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 350—9:30 A.M.


Social Media Communication by Michigan County and City Government Courtney Marshall Arnold Fleischmann, faculty mentor In this fast-paced society, municipal governments struggle to keep up with avenues of communication to relay information to their public. As of 2017, an estimated 23 million people follow Twitter accounts maintained by government entities. Residents depend on social media more than going to their represented municipal websites for information. Nowadays, government employees struggle to produce information that the public can read and understand. The purpose of this study is to discover if cities and counties in Michigan follow a social media policy and if a community’s affluence affects governments’ ability to communicate to their citizens through social media. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 330—10:45 A.M.

Economic Development in Latin America and East Asia Júlia Miyahara Richard Stahler-Sholk, faculty mentor This research seeks to explain the different development paths of Latin America and East Asia in the post-World War II era through a comparative study of economic, political, and social factors. I compare policies such as agrarian reform, trade liberalization or protectionism, labor and social policies, and external borrowing, to explain the differing growth rates of each region. Understanding why and how these two regions developed differently will clarify options available to developing countries. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 320—11:15 A.M.

The Role of the Turkish Dam Construction in Exacerbating Regional Tensions with Iraq and Syria Maria Paula Perdomo Garcia Ebrahim Soltani, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 350—10 A.M.

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The reasonable and fair distribution of hydric resources in a water-stressed region like the Middle East is an important task to maintain stability. Turkey has been constructing dam projects along the Tigris and Euphrates to sustain economic and social development. The impacts of these dam projects on its neighbor countries exacerbated conflict in the region. Water scarcity, caused by the dams, negatively impacted economic and social development in Iraq and Syria. Therefore, this case study can be considered research about the defining factors of the hydropolitics of the region and regional tensions caused by water resources.

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To Teach or Not to Teach: Assessing Why Students Decide to Enter or Leave the Field of Education Nathaniel J. Pyle Barbara Patrick, faculty mentor Recruitment and retention are ongoing issues in the field of public education. This research seeks to contribute to the literature by utilizing survey data to assess reasons students avoid, enter, and remain in the College of Education. The results will provide the College of Education with objective data regarding strategies and policy reforms that might enhance the number of students recruited and retained in the discipline. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 304—10:30 A.M.

Clientelism in Social Policy Sean Robinson Richard Stahler-Sholk, faculty mentor The World Bank and development specialists have praised conditional cash transfer (CCT) programs as successful models of investing in human capital to help the poor end the vicious cycle of poverty. I will critically examine Mexico’s CCT programs since the 1990s to highlight their use as clientelistic tools, offering conditional cash that appears to be coming directly from the executive to further a political agenda. This evaluation is important for designing effective poverty alleviation strategies. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 320—11:30 A.M.

Abandoned Together: Community Leadership in Improving Health Outcomes in Appalachia Ethan Smith

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Richard Stahler-Sholk, faculty mentor

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Appalachia has lagged behind the rest of United States in important human development metrics. Despite large-scale state and federal government initiatives since the 1960s, the region has continued its relative decline. As a result, community initiatives have increasingly taken up the onus for improving health outcomes. Using non-profit community wellness groups and health centers in Pulaski, VA as a case study, I explore the potential for community-based health initiatives to compensate for government shortcomings. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 350—9:15 A.M.


Queer Theory and Cosmopolitan Theory: Comparing Approaches to Global Justice Abigail Vermeulen Ebrahim Soltani, faculty mentor In an increasingly globalized world, discussions about global justice include the topic of transnationalism. Both queer theory and cosmopolitan theory address the relationship between an individual and a society; however, they offer different conceptualizations of how to interact with “otherness.” This paper focuses on an interaction that takes place between members of different nations and argues that when considering transnational interactions, queer theory’s conceptualization of “otherness” is preferable to cosmopolitan theory’s idea of “homogenization” which leads to devaluation of “otherness.” ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 352—11:30 A.M.

Examining the Challenges Facing Women of Rural Areas in the Developing World Marri Visscher Richard Stahler-Sholk, faculty mentor This research serves to examine the specific economic, social, and political restraints on women living in rural regions of countries of the global South. These obstacles are multifaceted and often feature both micro and macro components, including broad systemic issues facing all citizens of the developing world, as well as more localized impediments concerning each individual nation and community. Women, especially those living in rural areas, are disparately impacted by these obstacles, lacking crucial tools for autonomy and development such as legal rights to ownership of property and businesses, opportunity for education, access to credit and leadership roles in their communities. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Barbara Patrick, faculty mentor Citizens’ views on capital punishment can impact policymakers’ willingness to discontinue its use or commission studies addressing equity in its application. This research utilizes national survey data to assess variations in support for capital punishment among different demographic groups. It finds significant variations among racial, educational, and ideological groups. Racial minorities, liberals, and highly educated individuals were all more likely to oppose to the death penalty than their counterparts. Additional analysis controlling for education and political ideology reveal notable distinctions in views with minorities being more opposed to the death penalty. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—11:15 A.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

The Death Penalty and Its Usage in Modern Day America: What Do Citizens Think Jordan Weeks

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DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY Social Desirability Bias in Surveys Regarding Food Allergies Shazell Alexander Catherine Peterson, faculty mentor This exploratory survey study examined college student knowledge and perceptions of food allergies in the college setting. Respondents completed items assessing demographics, familiarity with food allergies, diagnosis of a food allergy, knowledge of allergies, and mock vignettes assessing how students would react. Results are discussed in the context of students' tendency to respond in a socially desirable way. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

The Intersection of Social Exclusion and Experimenter Race on Prejudice Attribution Jamaine T. Atkins Rusty McIntyre, faculty mentor The current research examines the effect of social exclusion on prejudice attribution. Participants (Ps) were randomly assigned to the condition of exclusion by their own race or a different race. Ps then completed the following tasks: a race-based IAT, an online game of catch designed to exclude the P, and a post-race-based IAT. Either before or after the post IAT, Ps completed a multiple-choice questionnaire based on scenarios designed to assess their level of perceived racial prejudice when treated negatively. Minority Ps attributed the negative treatment to racial prejudice at a significantly higher rate than non-minorities if the experimenter was a minority.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 350—3:30 P.M.

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Effects of Personal Attitudes on the Criminal Justice System Samantha Ayers Natalie Dove, faculty mentor The purpose of this project was to observe the relationship between individuals’ personal attitudes and their later decisions regarding arrests and sentencing within the criminal justice system. It is hypothesized that political conservatives and those higher in social dominance will endorse harsher punishments for alleged criminals. This project will inform further studies involving jury decision making and possible reform of the criminal justice system. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


An Examination of the Relationship Between College Student Drinking Patterns and Associated Consequences Annaliese Corace Karen Saules, faculty mentor This project aims to identify risk factors for college student drinking. Data collection is ongoing via online survey methodology. It is hypothesized that students who drink in college will be more likely to face adverse consequences, including but not limited to poor G.PA./grades, strained interpersonal relationships, and elevated anxiety and depression. Consequences of drinking, however, are expected to vary as a function of involvement in other risky activities (e.g., Greek life). It is also hypothesized that students who do not drink in college are different from students who do drink in college as a result of differing social activities. Results may inform campus college student drinking prevention efforts. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Effects of Social Exclusion and Experimenter Race on the Attribution of Prejudice Carter Di Ponio Non-presenting author: Jamaine Atkins Rusty McIntyre, faculty mentor The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of social exclusion and race on prejudice attributions. Participants (Ps) were given an IAT (pre/post) and played an online game of catch structured to induce feelings of social exclusion. Ps were randomly assigned to be excluded by same race or different race. Ps also completed a questionnaire based on narratives designed to assess perceived racial prejudice when treated different from others. The narratives produced no significant difference in response, no matter the race of the P. However, if the experimenter was a minority, minority Ps were more likely to attribute negative racial prejudices to their own race. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Catherine Peterson, faculty mentor This ongoing study examines the communication and decision making about ADHD treatment in 104 parents with children with ADHD and 39 pediatricians treating children with ADHD. Survey items assessed parent information needs, parent perception of physician communication and decision making, and pediatrician perceptions of communication with parents. Preliminary results indicated that pediatricians generally encourage parent involvement in making decisions about ADHD treatment and encourage parents to ask for more information about ADHD. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Parent and Pediatrician Perceptions of Communication and Decision-Making in ADHD Treatment Sabah Hassan

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Peer Weight Teasing and Body Image in Adolescent Girls: Self-Objectification as a Moderator Sierra Hill Chong Man Chow, faculty mentor The study expands body image research to examine how the way one views oneself, based on assessments of body and peer weight-teasing, relates to eating disorders and body dissatisfaction in adolescent girls. Within a stress-diathesis model, stressful events of peer weight-teasing would contribute to pre-existing vulnerabilities of girls who evaluate themselves based on appearance and the belief that that is the way they are assessed (self-objectification). We examine the girls’ reports of peer weight-teasing, self-objectification, eating attitudes and body dissatisfaction and establish relationships between these variables with a regression analysis. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

The Effect of Listening to Music on Reading Comprehension Rebekah Kakos Heather Janisse, faculty mentor Research has shown that listening to music while studying can have an impact on students ability to retain information. Students may score lower on reading comprehension tests when in a music listening condition as compared to studying in silence. This goes against the popular theory of a positive “Mozart Effect” on performance outcomes. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of different listening conditions on reading comprehension in college students. The current study will utilize data from EMU students to offer insight into the effects of music. This study may help to identify effective study habits for students.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Cognitive Functioning After Lifetime Use of Alcohol and Cigarette Smoking Among U.S. Older Adults Courtni M. Montgomery Karen K. Saules, faculty mentor Little is known about potential interactions between substances used on the cognitive functions of older adults. To explore this, we used processing speed and substance use data of older adults from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). A 2 (smoke now; yes/no) by 2 (ever binge drink; yes/no) ANOVA revealed a significant main effect for alcohol on processing speed, a trend for smoking on processing speed, but a non-significant interaction term. Processing speed among nonalcohol users was significantly higher than for alcohol users. Future research should study more complex interactions between substances on the processing speed of older adults. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Stress and Physical Health in College Students Clarissa Morgan Non-presenting author: Sharon Nelson Ellen Koch, faculty mentor This research study explores the effects of stress on the physical health of undergraduate college students. Predictions were made that students with worse physical health will show worse mental health, and students with better physical health will show better mental health. To assess these two constructs, a 42-question online survey was sent out via email and 254 students responded. The measures used were the Patient Health Questionnaire and the Brief PHQ. Total scores from both stress and physical health questions were totaled and correlated. There was a positive correlation between the two variables (r = .639, n = 210, p = .000). These results show that as stress increases physical health worsens, supporting the hypothesis. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Investigating Procrastination and Health Kirsten Oard Non-presenting author: Sharon Nelson Ellen Koch, faculty mentor Procrastination and health have been investigated before; however, procrastination’s individual relationships with physical and mental health have not. This study explores these relationships with college students. Multiple measures were used: The Procrastination Scale (Schwarzer et al., 2000), Patient Health Questionnaire SADS (Spitzer et al., 1990), Brief Patient Health Questionnaire (Spitzer et al., 2000) and PROMIS Emotional Distress Depression Short Form (PROMISE Health Organization, 2008). Procrastination was found to have statistically significant correlations with anxiety, depression, and somatic symptoms. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Angela D. Staples, faculty mentor Perfectionism has been associated with negative traits like anxiety, depression, and trouble coping. These traits could lead perfectionistic college students to resort to negative coping strategies when faced with extreme stress. This study investigated the potential relation between perfectionism, drinking to cope, and stress. Results (N = 258) found a positive relation between an orientation of perfectionism and drinking to cope, as well as an inverse relation between perceived stress and drinking to cope. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Maladaptive Perfectionism and Problem Drinking in College Students Jamie L. Page

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A Sweet Truth: Initial and Post-Ingestive Effects of Sugar and Proteinon Taste Preferences in Rats Katrina Prantzalos Silvia von Kluge, faculty mentor With growing concern over an obesity epidemic, one common question continues to arise: Why is sugar so appealing? With a long term goal of working towards an answer to this question, the purpose of this study was to investigate the food preferences of rats when given food with either a high protein or a high sugar content. We also compared initial preferences and long-term exposure to determine the role of taste and then post-ingestive effects to examine taste preferences formed on the basis of taste alone or those caused by the body’s absorption of nutrients. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Maternal Characteristics Associated with Parental Mind-Mindedness Jenipher Servin Olivares Non-presenting author: Stephanie Knight Alissa Huth-Bocks and Jamie Lawler, faculty mentors Parental mind-mindedness (MM; Meins et al., 2015) refers to caregivers’ interest and understanding of their children’s mental states. MM can be assessed through observation of a caregiver’s comments on the child’s mental states or their child’s behavior description (McMahon & Bernies, 2017). This study examined various demographic characteristics in relation to parents’ MM toward their infants and toddlers. Participants included 90 parents and young children enrolled in infant mental health services. Preliminary results included significant, positive associations between family income and MM and total descriptors of the child, as well as days in the NICU and self-referential comments.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 304—9:45 A.M.

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Relation Between Anxiety and the Perception of Expressed Emotion Kimberly Solomon Angela Staples and Ellen Koch, faculty mentors This study investigated the relation between anxiety, expressed emotion, and perceived emotion in a face-to-face interaction task. Students (N = 56) participated in a dyadic three-phase laboratory task that involved 1) writing about a remembered event (either anxious or serene; randomly assigned), 2) engaging in a face-to-face interaction task, and 3) completing personality and mood questionnaires. Preliminary findings suggest experimentally induced anxiety may not play a role in listener-speaker agreement about expressed/perceived affective information during face-to-face interactions. Further analysis will consider the role of context and personality on listener-speaker agreement. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Stress and Emotional Eating in Adolescent Girls: Attachment Security as Moderator Karess Taylor Chong Man Chow, faculty mentor Emotional eating among adolescent girls is an important precursor of weight gain and obesity (Braet et al., 2016). Combining the stress- diathesis model and attachment theory, the current study investigates whether adolescent girls’ attachment security within close relationships may moderate the association between experiences of stress and emotional eating. It is hypothesized that girls who are low in attachment security will engage in more emotional eating when they experience stress. In contrast, girls who are high in attachment security will engage in less emotional eating regardless of their stress levels. To test the hypothesis, data will be drawn from archival data that includes100 adolescent girls (11-18 years old). Moderation hypothesis will be examined with multiple regression implemented in R. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Individual Differences in Distress Tolerance in the PASAT-C Rachel M. Taylor Angela D. Staples and Thomas J. Waltz, faculty mentors Distress Tolerance (DT) is assessed with two methodologies: affective (self-report) measures and behavioral measures, which assess performance in a real-time environment. Little work has been done to relate these two types of measures. The Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT-C) is a behavioral measure of DT. This research analyzes participant responses to characterize their levels engagement during the PASAT-C and correlates these results with several self-report measures of DT. Analyses indicate affective and behavioral measures are unrelated, except in the case of two subscales of the Distress Tolerance Scale, Absorption and Appraisal. Implications will be discussed. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Ellen Koch, faculty mentor Thirty to forty percent of veterans do not complete their postsecondary programs (Cate, 2013). Many veterans do not have the proper assistance to cope with stressors that affect their college experiences. While veterans must manage the transition to post-military life and related role shifts, “20% of recent veterans have […] post-traumatic stress disorder or depression and 19% have experienced some form of traumatic brain injury” (Hoge et al., 2006, p. 1025). Using a mixed methods approach with a survey and focus groups, this study highlights veterans’ barriers in the pursuit of higher education and examines whether and how veterans’ experiences could facilitate academic success. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 330—2 P.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Barriers to Academic Success Experienced by Student Veterans Anthony Terry

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Examining the Mentoring Needs of Non-White Graduate Students Anthony Terry Non-presenting authors: Sharon Nelson and Michelle Fernando Ellen Koch, faculty mentor In 2013, the active psychology workforce was 83.6 percent White. The other ethnic and racial groups combined accounted for 16.4 percent of psychologists (American Psychological Association, 2013). This gap in diversity affects the chances of ethnic and racial minorities in a mostly White-dominated field. One of the problems of a Whitedominated work field is the lack of cultural self-awareness. Having cultural self-awareness allows one to understand that one’s viewpoint is different from everyone else’s (Fouad & Arredondo, 2007). This study examines students from APA-accredited graduate Psychology programs and recruited through Facebook. The concerns raised by non-White participants are summarized and discussed. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY & CRIMINOLOGY Analysis of Self-Determination of Students and Teachers at EMU Post Socio-Political Events 2016-2017 Nadia Ansari

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Kimberly Barrett, faculty mentor

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The academic journey of a graduate student involves overcoming a variety of challenges. While the process itself is challenging, the negative socio-political climate of 2016 and 2017 posed further dilemmas. Additionally, professors, too, shared the effects of adversities of politics. The goal of the research study is to analyze the application of SelfDetermination Theory by students as well as professor at EMU in stabilizing and adjusting their emotional well-being so as to remain dedicated and intellectually engaged in their academic and professional pursuits. The question of the study is: How did the students and teachers at EMU manage to persevere and deflect political toxicity? ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 304—11 A.M.


A Cross-Cultural Analysis on Arthritic Variation Between Agricultural and Foraging Societies Alexander Belanger Megan Moore, faculty mentor This research compares the distribution of osteoarthritis among diverse skeletal samples from bioarchaeological sites located in Stillwater, NV, Pickwick Basin, AL, Towton, England, and Yinxu, China. The English and Chinese sites are agriculturist, while the U.S. sites are foraging populations. The goal of this cross-cultural analysis is to demonstrate how the prevalence of osteoarthritis and osteophytosis in the vertebra reflects the environmental, dietary, and social stressors, along with activity patterns once exhibited in these populations. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 204—3 P.M.

GIS Spatial Analysis of Incomplete Forensic Anthropology Cases in Southeastern Michigan Casey M. Butler Megan Moore, faculty mentor With many forensic anthropology cases of human skeletal remains, the skeletons become incomplete for a variety of reasons such as animal scavenging, acid bone diagenesis, fluvial transport, etc. However, prior research fails to examine different methods in tracking incomplete cases. This study investigates different methods used for mapping crime scenes and other applications of GIS technology to determine the best software to create a spatial mapping system to track 15 incomplete cases from southeastern Michigan. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Juvenile Justice: How Juvenile Waiver Laws Affect a Juvenile Later in Life Courtney Caudill Kimberly Barrett, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 204—9:45 A.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

In the United States, the earliest juvenile court systems were first established in the late 1800s. Advocates for juvenile justice systems argued that that Juveniles should be treated differently than adults. However, over time, attitudes towards juvenile offenders shifted, and lawmakers decided to create waiver laws in the 1970s and 1980s that would allow a Juvenile to be transferred and ultimately prosecuted in adult court. This presentation reviews literature that examines the effects that waiver laws have on Juveniles in the adult criminal system. These effects include federal sanctions such as employment restrictions, restrictions against government funded housing, adoption and eligibility for financial aid or educational restrictions that can occur as a result.

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Bias in the American Press?: Global Warming and ‘Balanced’ Reporting Jaymes Dempsey Kimberly Barrett and Rita Shah, faculty mentors For the past 20 years, scientific consensus on global warming has remained steady, yet the attitude of the public does not reflect this fact. As public knowledge of science comes primarily from the mass media, journalistic practices shape popular understanding of the issue. This study analyzes several American newspapers in order to determine whether the journalistic norm of ‘balance’ results in the distorted communication of scientific fact; the study also explores journalists’ application of the norm of ‘balance,’ and journalists’ determination of ‘sidedness.’ The study concludes with a discussion of implications for theory and policy. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 330—9:15 A.M.

Justice for All Leah Diebel Jennifer Kellman-Fritz, faculty mentor Overcrowding, unjust terms, and discrimination are just some of the inconsistencies related to mandatory minimum sentencing. The human rights are stripped from individuals, removing access from resources and branding them criminal for life. Our society is blinded, and this presentation will highlight the research about those being stigmatized and oppressed daily. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Louisiana Voodoo Mysteries Renee' Golden (Baker)

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Liza Cerroni-Long, faculty mentor

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Louisiana Voodoo is a set of spiritual beliefs and practices deeply rooted in West African Dahomeyan Vodun, disseminated through the African diaspora. This poster presentation seeks to elucidate how Louisiana Voodoo emerged from the syncretism of Vodun and Catholicism in the context of the French Creole traditions of New Orleans. Emphasis is placed on the pivotal role that public Voodoo gatherings and the rise of Voodoo Queens and Kings had in the emergence of this African-based religion. Details on the purpose for and ritual use of spells, charms, and voodoo dolls are also presented. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome Across Cultures, History, and Patient Experiences Megan Halstead Megan Moore, faculty mentor While Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) is a disorder that has been studied since the mid-1800s, it is still considered to be one of the most common chronic illnesses that no one has ever heard of. The etiology of POTS is well described in modern medical literature, but the disorder continues to be misdiagnosed or overlooked entirely in patients. By reviewing historical literature, patient narratives, and cross-cultural medical literature on POTS through the context of the disease vs. illness model developed by medical anthropologists, this study aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of POTS to facilitate more positive outcomes in physician-patient interactions. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 304—9:30 A.M.

For God and for Country: Religious, Economic and Institutional Incentives for Forest Conservation Kelsey Hawkins-Johnson Maria Garcia, faculty mentor Church forests are thousands of small patches of indigenous Afromontane forests that are located in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. Today, threats like climate change endanger the ecological integrity of church forests that the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church have conserved over centuries in the Amhara state, as well as the effectiveness of the institutions that have long sustained them. Through a review of literature, an analysis of original household survey data and collection of stories, this project looks at the interactions between the formal institutions of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church and the legal institutions of the government of Ethiopia in terms of each actor’s role in conserving the forests. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Maria Garcia, faculty mentor After independence in 1990, Namibia has implemented a Community-Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) program into their legislation where communities were given the right to manage their land and conserve biodiversity and wildlife. This study examines the institutional governance and conservation of natural resources by communal conservancies and by the local NGOs amid adversity, particularly in the Ovambo region of Namibia. This study of Namibian conservancies provides a model for sustainable rural development and rural empowerment after colonization and the continuation of indigenous knowledge systems as a livelihood strategy. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 204—3:30 P.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Power, Politics and Place: The Governance of Natural Resources in Namibian Conservancies Kelsey Hawkins-Johnson

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Socioeconomic Differentiation at Historic Sites: A Comparison of Ceramic Analytical Methods Julia R. Joblinski Bradley Ensor, faculty mentor Using pottery, archaeologists have made advances in understanding socioeconomic differentiation in historical societies. However, there are debates over which methods— minimal number of vessels vs. sherd counts for cost-varying pottery types—are better suited for this purpose. In this analysis, I compare the two methods using historic pottery collected by the EMU Archaeology Field School from different rural socioeconomic contexts. The effects of sherd sizes from different site conditions are also considered. The results of the comparison can better inform approaches to socioeconomic research in historical archaeology. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 350—10:45 A.M.

Latin American Immigration: The Importance of Immigrants Christian Lopez Bettie Kay McGowan, faculty mentor The United States government has begun deporting thousands of immigrants claiming that they don’t do anything to benefit our country and only bring crime and drugs. The purpose of this study is to share the story and many contributions of Latino immigrants, to serve as an example of what immigrants do for the United States. In addition to defending immigrants, we would like to share some of the history of Latin American immigration to provide explanation for why people chose to move here and why mass deportation would only make matters worse. Immigrants do so much more for this country than what has been alleged.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 204—3:15 P.M.

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Ceramics as Commodities: Market Access and Distributions in Rural Southeast Michigan Timothy Maze Bradley Ensor, faculty mentor Historical archaeology can provide perspectives on developing markets. However, in addition to class differences, there are various complex factors that influence the distribution of commodities in historic rural areas, such as proximity to markets, the general availability of manufactured goods, as well as consumer behaviors. Using the EMU Archaeology Field School collections, this presentation analyzes the distribution of historic pottery—a common market commodity—among 19th to 20th century rural homes along the Lower Huron River. The distributions are discussed in light of class, distance from markets, and other factors. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 350—10:30 A.M.


Analyzing Counter Improvised Explosive Device Equipment for Effectiveness in Preventing Casualty Roxanne Reinhardt Megan Moore, faculty mentor This research explores injury patterns of casualties from combat due to Improvised Explosive Devices (IED), which can vary due to the unique circumstances related to an injury. This research hopes to understand how decisions on equipment production and safety mechanisms are employed. Some of the preliminary research includes a metaanalysis of various IED events, with a focus on conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. This research also considers historical, current, and predictive analysis, to best understand the IED threat. Finally, this IED study uses the anthropological discipline to simultaneously consider both biological and cultural contexts. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 330—11:30 A.M.

Postpartum Hospital Support for Families After Perinatal Loss Micaela Stevenson Megan Moore, faculty mentor Approximately 15-25% of pregnancies will result in miscarriage, and approximately 1% of pregnancies result in stillbirth in the United States. While most patients who experience these losses grieve, many families suffer from complicated grief. While researchers are aware of available interventions during hospital stays, few studies explore support for families once they leave hospitals. We have created a national survey to gather what interventions are made available to families once they leave the hospital after experiencing perinatal loss. In this study, we illuminate available resources for families after experiencing perinatal loss and what barriers exist to providing quality care. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—KIVA ROOM—2:30 P.M.

Paul Leighton, faculty mentor One in four women will be victims in Domestic Violence (DV) and Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). Some of the solutions to these major health problems include incarceration, couples counseling, anger management and batterer intervention programs. Through the literature we are able to determine the shortcomings and effectiveness of each. It is important to understand that some of the sanctions and programs in place are part of a larger conversation and the ability to compare and analyze the differences of opinions about each program is important to the safety of women who are victims of men’s violence. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 352—3:45 P.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Men’s Violence Against Women: A Comparative Review of Which Programs Work Best Yeliani Valdez

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Harry Potter and American Culture Haylee Wills Liza Cerroni-Long, faculty mentor Since its release in 1997 Harry Potter has become a global phenomenon, selling millions of copies worldwide. In the United States, the books made a major impact since first publication. In 2001, Harry Potter went from paper to film, garnering an even larger audience. Each consecutive book and film release has affected American popular culture in various ways, from triggering witch hunts to generating the Snapewives phenomenon. This poster documents some of these unexpected effects. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Epigenetics, Bone Health and the Holocaust Shaina Wolinsky Megan Moore, faculty mentor The aim of this research is to explore the role of epigenetics on bone health in the aftermath of a great trauma such as the Holocaust. Epigenetics are how the body reacts at the genome level to stress and the environment during an individual’s life, which they can potentially pass on to the subsequent generations. Descendants of Holocaust survivors seem to have a higher rate of osteoporosis, which correlates to poorer bone health since osteoporosis can be the result of nutritional deficiency or metabolic imbalance. This research demonstrates how trauma experienced by one victim is passed on transgenerationally and how it affects future generations. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

DEPARTMENT OF WOMEN'S & GENDER STUDIES

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Where’s the “Gay” in Video Gaymes? An Exploration of LGBT+ Representation in the Video Game Industry Alexandria Fodor Mary Larkin, faculty mentor This presentation’s focus is on the depiction, or lack thereof, of LGBT+ characters in all types of video games. The presenter will display research on the topic, examples from multiple games, and raise questions about the topic at large. There will be an analysis of the LGBT+ community’s relationship with representation in video games, as well as an outlook on the video game development teams’ role. The goal of this presentation is to make others question if the LGBT+ community is represented accurately in games when the demographics of game creators are majorly not LGBT+. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Older Adolescent Health Female Health Experiences Micaela Stevenson Dyann Logwood, faculty mentor Little research has explored the experiences of older adolescent girls with their reproductive health providers. Even less research has explored racial and class disparities in treatment of older adolescent girls. In this study, I created a five-minute survey to assess the experiences of adolescent girls between 18 and 24 with their healthcare providers within the State of Michigan. A two-way ANOVA test was utilized to assess racial and class based differences among the sample. Statistically significant differences were seen when looking at racial and class differences. Future directions include assessing how to properly change physician education with this study’s findings in mind. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—KIVA ROOM—1:30 P.M.

Using Beyoncé’s Visual Album, Lemonade, to Teach Black Feminist Thought Sina H. Webster Ashley Glassburn Falzetti, faculty mentor The popularity of Beyonce’s visual album, Lemonade, allows for it to be used as a palpable teaching tool, as the legacies of Black Feminist thought are apparent throughout the album. This research will focus on how Lemonade can be used to teach Black Feminist thought to Black men about intersectionality (Lorde, 1984) and how the liberation of Black women will bring about the liberation of all (hooks, 1984). Knowing that Black men are closely related to Black women in the struggle for liberation, Black women require that Black men resist all forms of oppression with and in support of them. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 350—1:45 P.M.

Reconceptualizing the “Black Queen”: Utilizing Hip-Hop Feminism to Reshape Images of Black Women Faith G. Williams Afrocentrism is a political framework that has aided Black intellectuals and scholars in re-conceptualizing a world with Blackness at its center. However, Afrocentrism has left the most marginalized people in the Black community—Black women, Black queer individuals and Black trans women—invisible and exploited. Hip-Hop Feminism developed a powerful framework to refute the oppressive language and images of Black women in mainstream hip-hop influenced by Afrocentrism. This presentation examines the multifaceted framework of Hip-Hop Feminism and discusses its relevance in dismantling the reductive images of Black women that dominate social media today. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 350—2 P.M.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Ashley Glassburn Falzetti, faculty mentor

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DEPARTMENT OF WORLD LANGUAGES Integrating Refugees in Germany Non-Conventionally Morgan Day Margrit Zinggeler, faculty mentor Since 2015, more refugees have arrived in Germany than anywhere else in the European Union. Their integration into society has been an ongoing challenge, and one not without setbacks. Government policy is undoubtedly essential in this process; however, the response and efforts of German citizens are equally imperative. This project analyzes the positive impacts of German grassroots organizations on the incoming population using curated individual stories and experiences through discussion and interviews. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 204—4 P.M.

A Standards-Based Collection of Culture Capsules on Francophone Countries Outside of Europe Lauren Jones Geneviève Peden, faculty mentor Although only 39.87% of French speakers live in Europe whereas 60.13% live outside of Europe, they have dominated much more classroom time. This session presents a series of culture capsules and segments of standards-based lessons that I have developed to teach various aspects of culture frequently encountered in non-European Francophone countries at the Novice level. Taking an inclusive approach, I believe students are better served when they can see themselves represented in their classrooms. By including culture capsules outside of Europe, French teachers can better serve students of color and students of nonChristian religions.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 204—3:45 P.M.

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Making Mistakes is Part of Learning: A Case Study of ESL vs. Non-ESL Errors in 4th Graders’ Writing Rachel Roemmele, Jessica Eddings and Guadalupe Serrato Ildiko Porter-Szucs, faculty mentor In this study, Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) students received writing samples from 4th grade English Language Learners (ELLs) at a U.S. public school and analyzed their errors. Ten weeks later they received new samples from the same ELLs to analyze the progress made by these ELLs. The ELLs writing samples were then compared with those of 4th grade native speakers at the same school, using the same prompt as the first sample from the ELLs. The goal of this research was to conduct an error analysis of student writing samples and to suggest strategies for improvement. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Rudi Deusing: Restoring the History of Braunfels, Germany and New Braunfels, Texas Jaycie Sabala Margrit Zinggeler, faculty mentor This project is a short documentary on Rudi Deusing and his work towards restoring the history between Braunfels, Germany and New Braunfels, Texas. Through interviews in both New Braunfels, Texas and Braunfels, Germany, this documentary was produced used the editing software Adobe Premiere Pro. By translating the interviews from German to English, we can see the outcomes of keeping the history alive. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—AUDITORIUM—3 P.M.

Arab Spring Influences on German Hip-Hop Music Mariam Samir Carla Damiano, faculty mentor The Arab Spring and ensuing unrest in the Middle East unleashed an incessant stream of refugees seeking asylum in Europe. Millions of refugees have made their way into Germany, a majority of them being Muslim. The influx has had a major impact on German culture and society, the business world, and even the music scene. Though the response to this migration has varied among the German population, many have taken a hostile standpoint, thereby fueling a fire for the resurgence of xenophobia. Many Muslim youth experiencing this hostility use music, especially hip-hop, as an outlet for their frustrations. This presentation focuses on the changes in German hip-hop as a result of this mass migration. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 350—2:15 P.M.

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COLLEGE OF BUSINESS DEPARTMENT OF MARKETING Twitter for Business: Channel Strategies for Enhancing Social Media Marketing Emily Locke Russ Merz, faculty mentor This research examines the importance of Twitter in the formation of a channel marketing strategy for business. Key areas of this analysis include the digital marketing components, specific channel marketing plan steps, and a brief overview of the social media marketing escalator. By highlighting the platform’s impact on overall firm growth and objectives, the resources and strategic steps required to maintain an active social presence are proven to be effective in creating a high return on investment, regardless of company size and budget. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 330—10:30 A.M.

Political Risk in the Supply Chain of the Diagnostics Industry in Venezuela Maria Rivera Harash Sachdev, faculty mentor The purpose of this project is to explore the impact of political risks in the business environment of supply chain. More specifically, I want to learn about the political risk in Venezuela, and how is impacting the diagnostics industry. I’ll collect information and data from a distribution center in Venezuela, which has been in the diagnostics business for over 25 years and has been working closely with the American company Abbott Laboratories. Based on the information gathered I will provide suggestions to manage and mitigate the impact of such risk. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION DEPARTMENT OF LEADERSHIP & COUNSELING How to Lead When You Cannot Follow What You are Teaching Hannah Brenneman Kate Curley and Steve Bryant, faculty mentors Using autoethnography as a medium to explain personal experiences, I will explore what authentic leadership looks like while experiencing cognitive dissonance or the inability to follow or believe the very things you are teaching. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Wings: Radical Self-Transformation Through Leadership Connstynce Nduta Chege Kate Curley and Steve Bryant, faculty mentors Change is inevitable, nuanced, and often times difficult. Evolution and transformation are the intentional steps we take to move in the direction of change. This change can be marked by our growth, the shift it has on an individual and societal level. Applying and critiquing the model of transformative leadership, this autoethnographic illustration will connect my own intrapersonal transformation to societal change and my own selfawareness as a leader. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 304—11:30 A.M.

Classism Differences Between White and Black Communities Tyler Dotson Kate Curley and Steve Bryant, faculty mentors

POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

This autoethnography showcases the differences of the Great Depression between White and Black communities. It includes history on institutional racism, the economic structure of the United States, and focuses on classism.

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Student Involvement: A Comparative Study of Eastern Michigan University and Oxford-Brookes University Meaghan Lynch Linda Foran, faculty mentor Through a comparative analysis of Eastern Michigan and Oxford-Brookes Universities, it has been determined that despite being similar in size and reputability, student organizations look drastically different. Questions explored include: Why are student organizations not as prevalent at Oxford-Brookes as they are at Eastern Michigan? Generally, are student organizations more prevalent at American universities than British universities? If so, why? What facets of British and American culture and history promote attitudes towards extracurricular involvement? Does the perceived purpose of a university education make a difference in experience? ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 304—11:15 A.M.

How Being a Domestic Violence Survivor Affects Women in Leadership Mel Roberts Steven Bryant and Kate Curley, faculty mentors This oral presentation explores what it means to be within the intersection of being a woman, a campus leader, and a domestic violence survivor. Using an autoethnographic approach, the relationship among self-blame, trauma, and triggers are described in correlation to one’s confidence leading. Practical suggestions from the research to combat stereotypes and stigma are discussed to help survivors love themselves again and understand resources available. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 352—3:30 P.M.

Leading Off the Binary Caitlyn Steur and Emmett Mix Kate Curley and Steve Bryant, faculty mentors

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Using personal reflection, life experience, and media developed and explored in the Multicultural Leadership Experience (MLE); we will weave our life experiences to critique the gendered language around leadership through autoethnography.

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POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATION The Impact of Executive Functions on Students with Disabilities Joanna Hwang Alicia Li, faculty mentor For more than two decades, executive functions (EFs) have been a common focus in research related to students with disabilities. What are they? How do they affect learning? What can schools and families do to improve students’ EFs? Although there are several different models of EFs, this poster summarizes the common definitions and significance of EFs according to the literature. Suggestions for interventions for students with disabilities who exhibit deficits of these critical skills will also be shared. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Interprofessional Practice Between Respiratory Therapy and Speech-Language Pathology Nafiah Khan Ana Claudia Harten, faculty mentor In a changing healthcare industry, it is imperative that different healthcare professionals collaborate to address the state of the patient. Respiratory therapists (RTs) and speechlanguage pathologists (SLPs) frequently work with the same general patient population in the healthcare setting; however, while RTs typically provide emergency interventions, SLPs work with the patient in the rehabilitative domain. This study investigates the perspectives of SLPs and RTs on interprofessional practice, their current levels of collaboration, and how this professional collaboration can be strengthened to improve patient outcomes. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 320—9:45 A.M.

Special Education Teachers’ Perspectives on the Communication Skills of Students with Down Syndrome Tara Poikey Ana Claudia Harten, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 320—9:15 A.M.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

For most children, school is a key setting to engage in social interactions. Children with Down syndrome are at a disadvantage in establishing relationships because of their cognitive and communicative difficulties, often missing out on early opportunities to engage in social interactions with peers. Although special education teachers have a vested responsibility to their students to better them in all areas of education, many times they have to deal with aspects of a disability that are not necessarily part of their area of expertise. This study investigates special education teachers’ perspectives on the communication needs of children with Down syndrome within the school context.

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A Special Education Model of Systematic Instruction to Teach Grooming Skills Alissa Selle Jacquelyn McGinnis, faculty mentor Ecological inventory as described by Browder and Spooner (2011) is a research-based best practice assessment carried out in the natural environment in order to identify instructional goals for students with moderate to severe disabilities. This poster will present a description of this assessment process as well as how it was used to create an intervention to teach tooth-brushing to an individual with a severe cognitive impairment. The specific data collected and subsequent instructional method will also be shared. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Top Apps for Managing Language Disorders: Reviews and Recommendations Ashlee Simpkins and Chaise Henige Audrey Bernard, faculty mentor The recent introduction of apps on smart devices has significantly changed the management of communication disorders. Yet, there is a paucity of evidence-based research on the use of apps in the field of speech-language pathology. After conducting a literature review on apps utilized by speech-language pathologists to meet language goals, the presenters reviewed the top-rated apps and made recommendations for treating various language disorders, which this poster summarizes. An online assistive technology resource directory for educators will also be shared. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Navigating the World of Alzheimer’s Disease: An Educational Guide for Family Members Delaney Walker

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Ana Claudia Harten, faculty mentor

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Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a condition that deteriorates the brain and results in a form of dementia. It is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., and its symptoms have significant impact on both the individuals with AD and their caregivers. Family members are often confused and overwhelmed when confronted with an AD diagnosis. This poster incorporates a comprehensive literature review that addresses four significant areas of needs for individuals impacted by Alzheimer’s: feeding, communication, behavior, and activities of daily living. The poster also highlights the importance of family education as they navigate the unfamiliar road of AD. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Helping Parents Navigate the World of Cleft Lip and Palate Ciara Woods Ana Claudia Harten, faculty mentor Cleft lip and palate (CL/P) are craniofacial anomalies affecting one in every 940 births in the United States per year. Despite advances in medical care, CL/P conditions have significant impacts on those affected. Parents are often overwhelmed when trying to understand the impact of the condition on their children. This poster incorporates a comprehensive literature review that addresses five significant areas of need for individuals impacted by CL/P. The goal of the poster is to provide resources and knowledge to families experiencing CL/P disorders to eliminate confusion and anxiety, as well as inform SLPs on how to promote support, advocacy, and understanding for those impacted by CL/P. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION A Period of Learning: How and What Commercial Popular Culture Teaches about Menstruation Scout Bostley Christopher Robbins, faculty mentor While school should be engaged as important sites of education, the broader culture proves to be a society’s most powerful educational force. In looking at media messaging, in particular advertising culture social media representation related to adolescent and female development, I have found that it is essential for teachers to work with students to develop critical literacy and analytic skills to interpret and analyze popular culture messages. This presentation will focus on the role of a teacher in fostering critical literacy and analytical skills. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—KIVA ROOM—1:45 P.M.

Flavored Popcorn!: An Activity to Build Partnership Kaitlynne Bujaki During this poster presentation, I will explain how I prepared, implemented, and documented an activity with preschoolers. I designed this activity to allow children to follow a recipe, while using simple measurements, to create their own bag of flavored popcorn. Once finished, the children collaborated to create a chart of their favorite flavors. This activity explores the domains of development in mathematics, language, and early literacy. These domains align with the State of Michigan’s Early Childhood Standards of Quality. Through use of photographs, recipe cards, and a completed chart of the children’s favorite flavors, I will demonstrate my implications for teaching and learning. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Martha Baiyee, faculty mentor

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Planning and Teaching with Intentionality Sister Gabriella Cotter and Sister Theresita Belemjian Martha Baiyee, faculty mentor A child’s first few years are the most critical to their development. It is the responsibility of parents, educators, and all members of society to contribute to the formation of our youngest learners. Though a single day in a preschool classroom may look like play and nothing more, there are, in fact, many intentional, intellectual, and formational activities taking place. Our presentation answers the following questions: Why does early childhood education matter; what comprises child development; and what does quality early childhood education look like? The main focus will showcase activity plans that make for a well-rounded and balanced experience for a preschool classroom. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

From Consumption to Resistance: Cultural Pedagogy and Engaging Protest in Popular Music Mackensi Crenshaw Christopher Robbins, faculty mentor Cultural pedagogy is a term that captures the myriad of ways people, students included, learn in a variety of social contexts and from various cultural sites. One such site of interest is that of popular culture, specifically pop music. In analyzing the legacy of popular American protest music, one can identify important social, political, and cultural dynamics across time. Through the application of cultural and educational theory in conjunction with analysis of protest in pop music, students can develop critical analytic skills and varied literacies. This presentation ultimately can lead to a discussion of current and future pedagogical practices surrounding pop culture in American schools. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 350—3:45 P.M.

The Observations of Preschool Children in Gender-Stereotyped Play with Gender-Neutral Toys Chelsey M. Eatmon

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Anne Bednar, faculty mentor

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It has been noted that children in classroom setting are interacting with toys that lean toward their gender. This topic should be emphasized because children need to be introduced to the idea of interacting with toys of their choosing, not what is held to parental and societal standards that children are taught the minute they can manipulate a toy; girls are typically viewed as playing with their hair, clothes, and dolls, while boys play with heavier equipment, cars, and engage in athletics because of their physical size (Lynch, 2014). This presentation will report findings from a study of 3- and 4-year-olds interactions with Duplo blocks: a toy that is being considered “gender neutral”. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—9:30 A.M.


Honoring Diversity in the Classroom: Educating Native American Students with Disabilities Rebecca Middleton and Madison Pasini Elizabeth Johnson, faculty mentor Through an educational honors society on campus, we traveled to a Native American reservation south of Phoenix, AZ to work in a middle school. While working in two special education classrooms, we learned more about teaching than we ever thought possible. We worked with students who were both cognitively and emotionally impaired who have faced more trauma by the age of five than the average person would experience in their entire lives. Despite their hardships, we experienced their dedication to education. For this research project, we have taken a closer look into their culture, beliefs, and trauma to understand how teachers can better serve students from diverse cultures and backgrounds. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Keeping it “REAL” with Authentic Assessment in Early Childhood Danielle Mijnsbergen and Megan Zydeck Martha Baiyee, faculty mentor Often when we think of assessment, we picture a pencil, a piece of paper, and a onesize-fits-all standardized test. This type of assessment is debilitating for children and undermines the uniqueness of each child. In this presentation, we will discuss what authentic assessment means and the benefits it provides for young children in the early childhood setting. We will review different assessment techniques that early childhood professionals can use to generate more accurate/authentic results with young children. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—9 A.M.

The Power of Observation Oksana Diana Palczynski Martha Baiyee, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 304—2 P.M.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

In early childhood education, teachers use observations as a form of assessment. There are five observation styles that help an educator focus on aspects of child development, which are used to make inferences about child development. These inferences can be written into narrative reports that positively explains a child’s developmental status. A wellwritten narrative report concludes with clearly articulated enrichment and/or corrective experiences. During this presentation, I will explain how the practice of observation is a skill for every educator to master and discuss implications for impactful teaching.

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Concepts to Go! Melanie Prince Christina Mirtes, faculty mentor “Concepts to Go!” is a grant funded project to purchase and create nearly 100 custom bags containing developmentally appropriate early childhood education (Pre-K through 3) books and materials supporting early literacy and intentional teaching in the content areas. Students wrote lesson plans and content resource cards to supplement each transdisciplinary bag. Pre-service teachers can "check out" bags to implement while teaching children in the community, as access to quality resources is often limited for college students. Results of survey will be disseminated.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—9:45 A.M.

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COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF HEALTH PROMOTION & HUMAN PERFORMANCE An Analysis of Using Exercise Rehabilitation to Offset Chemotherapy Induced Cardiotoxicity Jodi Baxter Shel Levine, faculty mentor Chemotherapy is a valuable treatment for many cancer patients, but the drugs can potentially have a negative effect on the heart. Cardiotoxicity is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in survivors. Exercise is a common tool used to prevent heart disease. This study will analyze research that uses a cardiac exercise program on patients with early signs of heart disease induced by chemotherapy. It will evaluate the effectiveness that this program had on the patient’s functional capacity in comparison to variances such as the type of surgery they had, timing of their treatment, and adherence to the program; and whether these factors are associated with or isolated from one another. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 304—9 A.M.

The Role of Prescription Trends in the Opioid Epidemic and the Factors that Affect Physician Prescriptions Ashley Beals

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

Jeffrey Schulz, faculty mentor

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Every day more than 90 Americans die from opioid overdose (NIH, 2017b). Opioids manipulate the pain relieving and reward portion of our brain by building a learned association between taking the drug and its euphoric effect. This association puts the user at risk for misuse, making prescribing difficult. Other factors affecting opioid prescriptions are racial disparities, patient-physician mistrust, pain perception, and pain type. The purpose of this poster is to explore physician prescriptions, and prescription trends in the opioid epidemic. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Benefits of Exercise in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Maegen Hopkins Shel Levine, faculty mentor Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) is an increasingly common, complex disease originating in the cardiovascular system where the demands of the body are greater than what the heart can meet. Decreased cardiac output from the overload of volume and pressure can exacerbate symptoms and health risks for the patient. This presentation highlights the overall pathology, individual risk factors, epidemiology, treatment options and uncovers the power of exercise for patients diagnosed and battling with Congestive Heart Failure. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 304—9:15 A.M.


The Effects of Benzodiazepines on Exercise Activities Hannah McCombs Shel Levine, faculty mentor Anxiety disorders are the most common forms of mental illnesses in the United States, affecting more than 18% of Americans over the age of 18. A common treatment for anxiety disorders is the use of benzodiazepine medications. Additionally, in 2010 it was estimated that approximately 80% of the American population participated in athletic activity. Therefore, the possibility for an individual to be involved in athletics and on benzodiazepines is evident. These medications have been shown to cause detrimental effects on an individual’s ability to athletically perform since benzodiazepines have sedative and muscle relaxant properties. This presentation will specifically explore these detrimental effects and how they occur during exercise. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES Breastfeeding Knowledge, Attitudes and Intentions of Eastern Michigan University Students Olga Cheianu-Marshall Olivia Ford and Alice Jo Rainville, faculty mentors

ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—KIVA ROOM—2:15 P.M.

Helping Students' Understand Genetics Through PCR, Bacterial Identification and Short-Tandem Repeats Lindsey Hopkins Lynne Shetron-Rama, faculty mentor A three-lab combination to assist in teaching students’ concepts of molecular diagnostics. The PCR Lab demonstrates the principle of how this technology works, through different set-up conditions. The Bacterial Identification Lab will show how genetic differences on a single gene can identify bacteria. Lastly, the Short-Tandem Repeat Lab will show how different genetic patterns across humans can identify people. These labs are designed so all teachers can conduct them to help students gain a better grasp on these concepts. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the breastfeeding knowledge, attitudes, and intentions of Eastern Michigan University students. Students (n=305) from the College of Health and Human Services, College of Business, and College of Technology were surveyed using an online questionnaire. Comparisons were made between the colleges. Overall, 68.4% of respondents feel “very positive” about breastfeeding; only one respondent felt "very negative"; and 9.5% reported not feeling comfortable seeing someone breastfeed in public.

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Exploration of Over the Counter Nasal Sprays on Microbes Sydney Klausing Lynne Shetron-Rama, faculty mentor To provide relief from the dryness of the nares, a symptom of Sjogren’s syndrome, individuals use over the counter (OTC) nasal sprays, oils and washes. The effects of these remedies on microbe growth was investigated using Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) assays, both broth and plate techniques, and measured using optical density, disc diffusion, and counting colony forming units. This study began to characterize ingredients of the OTC sprays and found one to be bacteriostatic. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Hand Grip Strength of Ypsilanti Meals on Wheels Clients, 60 Years of Age and Older Elizabeth McEvoy Hutchins-Wiese, faculty mentor Poor nutritional status is common in homebound older adults, the purpose of this study was to assess potential related factors. Hand grip strength (HGS) is used to assess functional ability of older adults and is linked to muscle mass and nutritional status. HGS was measured in 34 Ypsilanti Meals on Wheels (YMOW). The mean age was 70.85 years ± 6.59 (mean ± SD). HGS is categorized as weak, intermediate and normal; 29.4% (n=10) of clients were categorized as weak, 20.6% (n=7) as intermediate, and 50% (n=17) as normal. Higher nutrition risk status is positively associated with age but not HGS. Further research is needed to assess relationships between age, HGS, and nutrition status in YMOW clients.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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The Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy for the Prevention of Pain and Injury in Dental Students Leah McQuone, Basem Alsalah, Conor Laurencelle and Madelyn Prebola Jayne Yatczak and Sharon Holt, faculty mentors The goal of this research is to examine the effects of occupational therapy intervention on the prevention of pain and injury for students at the University of Michigan’s School of Dentistry. Dentistry involves repetitive, forceful movements that increase the risk of injury. Many dentists report receiving inadequate training on how to move safely. The occupational therapy program will provide education on the acquisition of safe habits and modification of the environment. Results of this study could influence the design of dental education to ensure longevity of healthy practice through the development of an occupational therapy intervention protocol. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 320—1:30 P.M.


Nutrition Risk and Quality of Life in Ypsilanti Meals on Wheels Older Adult Clients Hannah Przeslawski Heather Hutchins-Wiese and Sarah Walsh, faculty mentors The purpose of this study was to examine nutrition risk and quality of life (QOL) in Ypsilanti Meals on Wheels clients. Thirty-four clients aged 60 years and over participated. 76.5%, (n=26) had a high nutrition risk, 14.7% (n=5) had a moderate risk, and 5.9% (n=2) a low risk. QOL was categorized as high (14.7%; n=5), average (55.9%; n=19), low (14.7%; n=5) and very low (11.8%; n=4). Further data collection and analysis is required to explore possible associations. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

SCHOOL OF NURSING A Student’s Perception of a Large Scale Interprofessional Simulation Peter A. Brinson Kathleen Seurynck and Linda Myler, faculty mentors

POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Physician Assisted Suicide Mackenzie Dixon Jennifer Avery, faculty mentor Currently, the nurses’ role in physician assisted suicide (PAS) is unclear. The purpose of this research is to investigate literature in support and opposition of nurses’ involvement in PAS. The discussion references recurrent themes in ethical and moral considerations for nurses, effective palliative care and the integration of individual and professional values. Findings support nursing involvement and that it is within a patient’s autonomous right to decide the course of their death through PAS. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

Interprofessional simulation (IPS) is one way to expose students of differing disciplines to each other in a safe environment. In 2017, 200 students, from nine different disciplines in CHHS, came together to work with standardized patients to improve teamwork, communication, and knowledge of each other’s roles. Prior to the IPS, participants reviewed TeamStepps and completed pre and post surveys. Thematic analysis of responses revealed three themes; communication, teamwork, and role clarification. Additional research should be focused on the frequency of IPS opportunities for healthcare students so that benefits can continue to be assessed within the context of interprofessional learning.

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Dementia: Recognizing Different Types and Education in Psychology Julie Lahtonen Jennifer Sjostedt-Avery, faculty mentor The need for dementia education has increased; over 20% of the population is over 65 and dementia risk increases with age. Dementia is often synonymous with Alzheimer’s disease though there are many different types. The purpose of this review is to compare common types of dementia and explore how each is addressed within psychology courses at EMU. Results demonstrate the significance of dementia differences and need for inclusion of multiple dementia types in psychology programs. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Nonpharmacological Nursing Interventions for Individuals with Cognitive Disabilities: A Literature Review Sarah Lally Tsu-Yin Wu, faculty mentor Nonpharmacological nursing interventions (NPI) provide holistic care to individuals with cognitive disabilities. People with cognitive disabilities such as developmental delay, mood disorders, and mental health challenges are over-medicated in the healthcare setting to control behavior. NPI can have the same benefits as medication to reduce symptoms of cognitive disabilities. Research showed that exercise can be as effective as antidepressants when combined with psychotherapy for individuals with cognitive disabilities. In addition, therapeutic touch decreases mood disturbances and anxiety. NPI are essential for nurses to provide holistic care to individuals with cognitive disabilities.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 320—9:30 A.M.

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Dietary Acculturation of Filipino-American Students in the Midwest Nikkolo Romero Meriam Caboral-Stevens, faculty mentor An estimated 3.9M Filipino-Americans (FA) are living in the U.S. in 2015. FAs are the third largest Asian ethnic group in the U.S. Like other immigrants, FAs undergo acculturation to their new country. Guided by the Social-ecological model, the purpose of this study is to describe dietary acculturation FA students Michigan. A descriptive survey will be performed. Self-identified FA students who are enrolled in two universities in Michigan are eligible. Dietary acculturation will be measured using Dietary Acculturation Questionnaire for Filipino-Americans (DAQFA). This study may provide significant information about FA students’ dietary habits, which may increase risk to cardiovascular disease. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Barriers to African American Nursing Student Success Brianna R. Young Angela P. Lukomski, faculty mentor Many barriers exist that challenge African American nursing students. These barriers result from a lack of minority role models, the lack of minority faculty members for support and mentoring, and isolation amongst peers. These barriers threaten program completion and contribute to the underrepresentation in the profession. Recognizing these barriers will reduce their impact, increase African Americans pursuing nursing and increase the presence of Black nurses in the healthcare setting. POSTER GROUP #1, 9-10:30 A.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK The Underutilization of Mental Health Services on College Campuses by African American Students Mahogany Anderson Charles Graham Jr., faculty mentor

ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 352—3 P.M.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

Studies show that Black American college students’ underutilization of mental health services is in part due to stigma (Masuda, Anderson & Edmonds, 2012). This study considers additional reasons for this underutilization. Through the use of a quantitative approach, this study focuses on how comfortable Black students are with using mental health services, the stigma around receiving such help and whether their racial and/or gender identity play a role in service utilization. A confidential survey was administered to test the hypothesis that both gender and other identity markers predict the comfort and willingness of African Americans to utilize campus mental health services.

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Canine-Assisted Therapy: The Impact of Service Dog Partnership on Symptoms of PTSD in Veterans Katherine Ankenbauer Jennifer Kellman-Fritz and Angie Mann-William, faculty mentors This review analyzes the efficacy of Canine-Assisted Therapy as a Complementary and Alternative Medicine Method for combat veterans suffering symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The presenter examines reductions in physical, psychological and emotional symptoms attributed to PTSD, as well as the impact on social experiences and interactions which determine levels of support and overall quality of life. Although service dogs are incorporated into therapy for post-deployment veterans, early research rendered inconclusive findings on efficacy. This presentation examines more recent studies that indicate more promising results about Animal-Assisted Therapy. ORAL SESSION D, 3-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 352—4 P.M.

Substance Use Education in School Systems Yasmeen Berry Sarah VanZoeren, faculty mentor This poster presentation highlights the importance of substance abuse education in school systems, using data from multiple external sources. The research presented focuses on preventive measures and program implementation in schools. Nationwide statistics on alcohol, tobacco and illicit drug use, as well as mental health correlations and deaths related to overdose, will be utilized to underscore the importance of providing substance abuse education in schools. This presentation focuses on the rationale for supporting the development of local, state and national educational policies that would promote prevention while also focusing on funding sources to cover costs.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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Social Needs in Washtenaw County Emily Goodson Christina Marsack, faculty mentor This project explores the crucial need for community support in Washtenaw County. Specifically, the poster focuses on such key social needs as mental health, food instability, elder care and refugee resettlement. The poster explores the presenter’s first-hand experiences, while interning at Jewish Family Services, providing support services. The intent of the presenter is to increase awareness surrounding the vast problem of unmet social needs among residents in Washtenaw County, specifically in regard to mental health, basic human needs, and social support. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Bullying in Grade School Children and Its Connection to the School-to-Prison Pipeline Alyssia Hence Celeste Hawkins and Sarah VanZoeren, faculty mentors This presentation examines bullying, its origin and the prevalence it has in our society. The research focuses on the connection between bullying and suspension/expulsions in pre-kindergarten-12th grade schools. This presentation considers the impact of studentteacher relationships as they relate to the school-to-prison pipeline. Various approaches are reviewed to examine ways to combat bullying without using extreme disciplinary measures, such as suspension or expulsion. Specifically, the presenter discusses schoolbased interventions, used in the United States and Jamaica, to assist educators in recognizing, monitoring and intervening in bullying situations. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—10 A.M.

Making Youth Matter: A University-Community Partnership Alyssia Hence, Taylor Parker and Breyanna Sylvia-Moals Celeste Hawkins and Sarah VanZoeren, faculty mentors This presentation highlights the research related to the school-to-prison pipeline, including exploring how exclusionary practices impact the schooling experiences of students. The presenters will share their experience in participating in an intensive mentoring program designed to interrupt the school-to-prison pipeline. The details of the mentoring program will be shared with participants, including strategies for supporting mentors, mentees, families and teachers. The poster also examines strategies for developing universityschool partnerships. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Perry Silverschanz, faculty mentor Guaranteed basic income can be defined as payments guaranteed to cover basic necessities granted by a government to its citizens without conditions. This project will explore the history of guaranteed income, evaluate studies of its effectiveness, and explore the ideologies from which the idea arose. Contemporary arguments for and against guaranteed income will be weighed, especially as they relate to casino revenues paid to Native American tribal citizens by their tribes. Preliminary results of a qualitative interview study about per capita income will be presented, examining the benefits and challenges faced by current members of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 352—10 A.M.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

History of the Study of Guaranteed Basic Income Thomas Klemm

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Addressing Trauma in Foster Care: A Review of Interventions for Children Birth to 12 Years Paige Lancour Jennifer Farley, faculty mentor Instances of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are significantly higher among foster care alumni (30.0%) than the general public (7.6%) (Pecora, 2010). With nearly 400,000 children and youth in foster care in the United States, understanding the role that trauma plays in the lives of these children, as well as the need for treatment, is incredibly important (Human Rights Campaign, 2017). Therefore, this poster will explore how trauma impacts social and emotional development and current evidence-based interventions that focus on trauma resolution for children in foster care birth to 12 years of age. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Understanding the Epidemic of Domestic Violence Haley McNiven Christina Marsack, faculty mentor Safety is a human right that all people should enjoy. Domestic violence, also referred to as intimate partner violence (IPV), represents an epidemic surrounded in secrecy and disbelief. Hollywood entertainment has begun to address this serious social issue, and the media can play a key role in increasing awareness. This presentation explores domestic violence in its many forms, rates of IPV and the impact of domestic violence on children and adults. Additionally, the presenter will examine domestic violence within the context of the Power and Control Wheel. The presentation heightens awareness of domestic violence and educates the public about this important human rights issue.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

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From Surviving to Thriving Rita G. O’Brien David Manville, faculty mentor Human trafficking represents a serious problem in today’s society. Although awareness has increased, myths and confusion still surround this issue. Being trafficked at a young age can also lead to confusion for the person who was trafficked. This poster presentation examines one survivor’s experiences growing up in a cult while being trafficked. Specifically, the presenter explores how she found healing and now educates others about trafficking. The poster focuses on support available to survivors, strategies for how others can support those recovering from trafficking experiences, and how to maintain a judgment-free approach when working with survivors. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Reality Check: The Efficacy of Our Current Treatment of Depression and Suicide Patrick O'Flynn Charles Snyder, faculty mentor Great controversy surrounds the field of psychiatry. Distortions and misnomers in the knowledge base related to depression and suicide represent two such areas of controversy. This poster examines these key concepts from a historical perspective, explores recent research findings and considers the effectiveness of current treatment trends. The intent of the presenter is to raise awareness about depression and improve the services and supports provided to those living with depression. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

The State of Our Nation Sarah Pakray Sylvia Sims-Gray, faculty mentor African Americans are adversely affected by a discriminatory wage gap which is rooted in the framework of social engineering. The state of our nation reflects this meticulously manufactured social planning. The institution of white supremacy largely influences the wealth gap that has eventuated. Between the 1930s-1960s, African Americans were excluded from the home-mortgage market and deprived of a vital component for prospective growth because of the housing policies that denied their ability to accumulate wealth. For the nation to heal the injuries that have accrued, reparations are due to those who have suffered from policies that preclude them from having upward mobility in society. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—11:30 A.M.

Sarah VanZoeren, faculty mentor This poster presentation highlights experiences of engaging in a PhotoVoice project with youth involved in the Making Youth Matter Mentoring Program. PhotoVoice is a research method designed to empower marginalized groups and involves the taking of photographs and sharing of stories in order to give voice to participants’ experiences (Wang & Burris, 1997). This PhotoVoice project focuses on creating a photographic description of strengths and concerns in our community while also providing an avenue to support and encourage youth voice and empowerment. The presenters will discuss how this project empowers youth and strengthens university-community partnerships. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

Empowering Youth Through PhotoVoice: Exploring the Impact of Images Taylor Parker, Alyssia Hence and Breyanna-Moals

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Forty Year War: Analyzing America’s Shifting Crack Cocaine Policy Sarah Reasoner Caren L. Putzu, faculty mentor Understanding the impact of American drug laws created as part of the War on Drugs is vital for social workers in their pursuit for social justice and effective advocacy. This research analyzes the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 and the Fair Sentencing Act of 2010, two laws concerning mandatory minimum sentences for crack cocaine-related convictions, to evaluate the direction of American drug laws, the disparate impact these laws have on African American communities and the values underlying these laws. This presentation explores how these laws can continue to be adapted to solve the issue caused by drugs in communities while promoting equality and fairness within our criminal justice system. ORAL SESSION A, 9-10:15 A.M.—ROOM 204—9 A.M.

The Impact of Trauma on the Developing Brain: A Review of the Literature Victoria Anne Rife Angie Mann-Williams, faculty mentor Trauma has the profound capacity to physically alter the developing human brain. Trauma primarily impacts the anterior cingulate cortex, the hippocampus and the amygdala, the brain’s “smoke detector” for danger. The brain might perceive imminent danger when triggered by internal or external sources, thus tripping the “smoke detector” to respond by “sounding the alarm” to the body, resulting in post-traumatic stress symptoms. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

Behaviors and Treatments for Hoarding in Older Adults Meagen Russell

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Diane Fenske, faculty mentor This poster presentation examines multiple methods that have been successfully utilized to treat individuals with Hoarding Disorder. The presentation reflects a review of the current research as well as the presenter’s first-hand experiences volunteering with individuals living with Hoarding Disorder. The poster includes a specific focus on older adults living with Hoarding Disorder. The poster includes an in-depth consideration of the role that CognitiveBehavioral Therapy and interventions based on a Harm-Reduction Model play in assisting this population. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Interrupting the School-to-Prison Pipeline: Are We Educating or Incarcerating Our Youth? Gayle Springer Celeste Hawkins and Sarah Van Zoeren, faculty mentors Zero-tolerance policies in schools have led to substantial financial, personal, and social costs. These policies are widely criticized for being discriminatory, particularly among youth from minority backgrounds. The ways we have responded to behaviors in school has changed dramatically over the years. Today, harsh discipline measures result in lengthy out of school suspensions for minor infractions. This presentation will examine the schoolto-prison pipeline and how zero tolerance policies have contributed to this social justice issue. Responses to recent changes in the discipline law as well as strategies designed to interrupt the school to prison pipeline will also be highlighted. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Past Conformity of the Acceptance of the Natural Hair Movement Deziray Taylor Celeste Hawkins, faculty mentor Today’s acceptance of the natural hair movement has evolved from African American women’s conformity in the early 15th century (Johnson & Bankhead, 2013). Due to pop culture’s suppression of the Black race as a whole and, specifically, the Black woman’s lack of representation in popular culture, many Black women subconsciously thought of themselves as inferior to the media image of beauty exemplified by white women (Marco, 2017). Using research, this project examines the early history and essence of natural hair, current trends and political statements surrounding natural hair styles and the revolutionary implications of African American women’s embracing their unique appearance. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Celeste Hawkins, faculty mentor This presentation focuses on issues and questions that arise when an individual is nearing the end of their lifetime. This poster explores society’s lack of information on details related to the process of end-of-life preparation, with specific focus on the options available as people transition to their later years. This poster will examine assisted suicide, hospice, palliative care and other related areas. Of specific focus will be information supported by research regarding what services and treatment plans are available, how to access particular services and how it pertains to end-of-life issues. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

Questioning the End of Life Carly Vargo Non-presenting author: Autumn Luginbuhl

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COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Mustang Group Jonathan Farkas and Kevin Souders Non-presenting authors: Grant Roe III, Jake Feathers, Savannah Theisen and Vonzeka Lipscomb Jr. Paul Kominsky, faculty mentor A standard Mustang caliper mounting bracket can only support a single caliper for foot brakes. We wanted to add a second caliper for a handbrake system, to allow the car to have a greater entry angle into a corner resulting in faster cornering speeds. We designed a brake caliper mounting bracket that offers mounting points for dual calipers on a 2000 Ford Mustang. The new caliper bracket also had to meet requirements for braking forces and allowable size. Once implemented, the car’s allowable corner angle increased due to the hydraulic handbrake system which was made possible by our dual caliper bracket. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

The Stirling Engine Kaitlyn Ford Emad Tanbour, faculty mentor The purpose of this project was to create a Stirling engine. Thermodynamic process of the engine involves a system of two reservoirs, in which air compresses and expands. As the topic of energy optimization increases in popularity, the engine is a great alternative because of the effective operation. It can operate on a any heat source. This project required construction of a small Stirling engine. Testing was done after each prototype was created to ensure that the engine ran smoothly. The engine is a great way of utilizing waste heat and it can operate regeneratively. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 143


An Experimental Investigation of Torque Loss in a Die Cast Aluminum Threaded Fastener Joint Robert Green MacArthur LaMar Stewart, faculty mentor This study investigates the root cause of torque loss in a die cast aluminum fastener joint with a property class 10 stud and nut assembly. The goal is to predict the fastening performance of die cast aluminum fastened joint in an automotive powertrain application. A Taguchi orthogonal array will be used to investigate the relative contribution of the factors that impact fastener torque loss. These factors include, but not limited to: thread engagement, fastener stretch, grip length, fastener twist, and surface contact pressure. From the Taguchi orthogonal array, the ANOVA statistical model will be used to compute the relative weighting of each factor. From these statistical results, an optimum set of factor settings will be established. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Stirling Engine: A Sustainable Solution Donavan Hunt Emad Tanbour, faculty mentor The purpose of the project is to develop a Stirling engine. The design aids in understanding thermodynamic principles. Prototypes were assembled and evaluated. The result is a low cost Engine that manifests the thermodynamic principles into a tangible machine. Stirling engines have the capacity to generate sustainable electricity without the consumption of fossil fuels. It can be used to improve efficiency and supply underdeveloped societies with electricity. Modern applications of the Stirling engine are being researched in the automotive, marine, and aviation industries among many others. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Transfemoral Prosthetic Simulator Jeff Presbie, Ariel Powdhar, Rodney Ridley and Mike Wilkerson Non-presenting author: Anthony Dorosz

COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

Paul Kominsky, faculty mentor

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In collaboration with the Orthotics and Prosthetics program, our objective was to design and build a transfemoral prosthetic simulator. This would allow an able-bodied person to emulate uniplanar motion with a prosthesis, as if the leg was amputated above the knee. It is to be used by O&P graduate students to help them test and practice exercises. In order to make sure it is safe, we performed simulation software analyses of the forces on our design at critical points. We then built the device and ran various practical tests to make sure the device is up to the standards set by our theoretical values. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Autonomous Golf Cart Franklin Schmitzer, Matthew Didur, Cole Greve and Abdulrahman Hamzi Paul Kominsky and Alvin Tessmer, faculty mentors The goal of our project was to develop an autonomous golf cart that can safely drive itself to different locations. We used an electric golf cart as our vehicle and used Nav and Mobius from ASI for automation and control. Nav is system of actuators and sensors that provide control over critical functions of the vehicle. Mobius is the software that controls Nav, as well as generates the path the vehicle will travel. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

SCHOOL OF INFORMATION SECURITY & APPLIED COMPUTING Using Strategic Changes to Reduce Organizations’ Vulnerabilities to Data Security Breaches Zahirul Islam Bilquis Ferdousi, faculty mentor Since data security is increasingly becoming a serious challenge, many organizations are considering adopting more information security policies to protect their organization from data security breaches. Even with such adoption, organizations are still vulnerable. The decision to bring changes is the first step to staying on top of the evolving environment. Kotter’s 8-step change model guides managements around the world to better lead organizations in large business transformation projects. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 330—11:15 A.M.

Construction of a Custom Network Security Appliance Jacob Rickerd James Banfield, faculty mentor

POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

Over the last three semesters, I worked toward my final goal to develop a custom network security appliance. I first completed a comparison analysis of network intrusion detection systems. These devices read traffic from the network and determine if network packets should go through or be dropped. Second, I conducted a feasibility study of a custom framework to profile attackers in a network. Finally, I created a custom network security appliance. It uses the profiles I created in my framework to more efficiently block malicious attackers in comparison to other security appliances.

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Data Generation with Python and Docker Mark Weiman Samir Tout, faculty mentor This project produced a machine learning model to generate simulated power values by using data that was collected from buildings for research purposes, in combination with various feature data, such as temperature, luminescence, and humidity. Docker instances were also employed to represent different buildings sending power data to a central station. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—STUDENT ART GALLERY—2:30 P.M.

SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES MANAGEMENT Operation of Unmanned Aerial Systems and the Law Kyle Adrian Bjorklund Tracy Nothnagel, faculty mentor Unmanned Aerial Systems (commonly known as drones) have become increasingly prevalent in recent years. This rapid growth has spurred Congress and the Federal Aviation Administration to enact legislation and regulations to provide safety for others, both in the sky and on the ground. This presentation will examine these current pieces of legislation and regulations. It will then examine the legal issues relating to the use of small unmanned aerial systems, as well as a possible future for the regulation of unmanned aerial systems. ORAL SESSION B, 10:30-11:45 A.M.—ROOM 330—11 A.M.

Medical Advancement in Cuba: A Composite History Emily Florance

COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

Pamela Becker, faculty mentor

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The 1959 Cuban Revolution brought changes to the political system and in its medical system, as well. Cuba’s culture and the ideals of the new officials lead to a universal healthcare system dedicated to raising low birth rates and short life expectancies. With many tribulations, from lack of funding to lack of professionals, the Cuban government used many methods to find what would work in their communist system. The Ministry of Public Health administered measures that helped morph the healthcare system into what it is today: high birth rate, 100 percent health coverage for its citizens, and one of the highest life expectancies in the world that rivals many first world countries. The Cuban medical system may now become a leader in medical innovation on a global scale. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B


Impressions of Cuba in Ceramics Sasha Guo Pamela Becker, faculty mentor These pieces are the products of observations, reflections, and research from a Technology and Innovation course in Cuba. The emphasis of this course was placed on the importance of fusing history, identity, and cultural heritage with innovation and adaptation. In relation to concepts of limitation and adaptation, these pieces aim to balance artistry with functionality through the practice of design and construction economy. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems in Cuba Leah A. VanLandingham Pamela Becker, faculty mentor Sustainable agriculture and the mechanisms that Cubans use to meet growing demands for food were analyzed to determine the motivation for Cuban society to move towards sustainable development. The accumulated research shows that the push toward sustainable development was motivated by a societal pressure due to lack of resources and not due to the desire for environmentalism. Cuban sustainable agriculture has been an overwhelming success and has ensured a new level of food security for the general Cuban population; however, there are still challenges and drawbacks that exist within Cuban society that prevents Cuba from ensuring quality, equitable access to all citizens. POSTER GROUP #2: 11-11:45 A.M. AND 1:30-2:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

SCHOOL OF VISUAL & BUILT ENVIRONMENTS π r2 CAD Design Elizabeth Becker Julie Becker, faculty mentor

DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

Student explores Gerber CAD Pattern Development Software to create a convertible circle shoulder bag.

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Welcome to 1910 Fashion Jasmine A Billings Holly Mosher, faculty mentor My project will be both a shadowbox and a poster (a timeline on 1910 fashion) plus a PowerPoint showing pictures of 1910 fashion. My presentation is to educate others on the fashion era of 1910 and how the 1910 era fashion reflects in today fashion. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

Pavilion Space Development Design Solution Alondra Chavez Deb deLaski-Smith, faculty mentor As people navigate throughout spaces, they engage in way-finding. They create mental maps in order to help them orient. Kevin Lynch proposes that mental maps consist of five elements: paths, edges, districts, nodes and landmarks. The Golden Mean is a ratio of length to width of rectangles that can be found in nature and that has been considered to be the most pleasing to the eye as it provides aesthetic composition. Using Lynch’s five elements along with the Golden Mean, I have designed a pavilion heavily inspired by the Barcelona Pavilion designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

Lane Hall: An Urban Mixed-Use/Adaptive Reuse Design Lauren Clem, Amanda Chalmers and Priya Ghandikota Shinming Shyu, faculty mentor Lane Hall is centrally located on the University of Michigan’s campus. Its proximity to one of the University’s residence halls and its pivotal location on State Street make it the prime location to attract both students and people in the surrounding areas. Heavy emphasis has been placed to unify sustainability, function, and aesthetics throughout the entire design process via critical thinking and creative problem solving to derive innovative design solution.

COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

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Fashion: Technique, Process, and Ensemble Lilly DeRamos Julie Becker, faculty mentor The creation of corset prototypes, a feather skirt, and a metal bustier was a process that involved structure of materials, unconventional textiles, and product development. Garment construction was a process between artistic vision and innovative digital technology, Gerber AccuMark Computer Aided Design (CAD). Collaboration of both digital technology and hand-crafting methods helped enhance the designer’s ability to create a visual presentation. The handcrafting involved building a duct-tape prototype to ensure proper corset fit as well as providing pattern shapes. Hammering in holes into the feathers to sew into the bias tape, and using tin snips to cut into steel boning to get the proper length for the bustier was also involved. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

The Tool of Pattern Making CAD to Create the Corset Wonder Lilly DeRamos Julie Becker, faculty mentor Product development is a continuing process. There is always room for improvement for a better product and/or for better manufacturing efficiency. The progression of the Corset Wonder is presented to discuss the changes from conception to the final product as well as mistakes made along the way. You can also find a display of the corset at the Design Expo. ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 204—2:30 P.M.

In the Business of Cosplay: The Final Stage Lilly DeRamos Holly Mosher and Julie Becker, faculty mentors

ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 204—1:45 P.M.

COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

Cosplay is a worldwide fan phenomenon that holds the potential of an untapped market. Cosplay is a word derived from costume-play to describe a culture of fans who dress like characters from various pop culture media. This business plan of Creation House is an accumulation of three years of finding a better understanding of the market, the best layout, and proper tools for optimal efficiency for this niche yet vast market. This presentation will describe the steps from which Creation House will take to establish itself as the store by cosplayers for cosplayers.

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Henry Ford Village Model Elizabeth Ehinger Susan Haifleigh, faculty mentor This exhibit showcases a unique project that was done for the retirement community, Henry Ford Village. A model home was renovated, based on a design inspired by a mock ‘client’ who is already a resident at Henry Ford Village. The model was then staged and shown in multiple open houses to potential buyers. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

Study of Materials and Finishes in a Healthcare Setting Elizabeth Ehinger Jiang Lu, faculty mentor This project focuses on the specific materials and finishes needed in a healthcare setting. Instead of starting from the ground up, this project will start with an already completed building shell and focus exclusively on applying materials and finishes. Research evidence and manufacturer information will be provided for each element chosen. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

3D Pavilion Space Development Samantha Groen Deb deLaski-Smith, faculty mentor In designing my pavilion, I maintained the elements of Kevin Lynch’s five components: nodes, paths, edges, districts and landmarks. In addition to these components, I also ensured to incorporate Mies Van Der Rohe’s design principles from his Barcelona pavilion, such as walls, columns, a reflecting pond, vista, gazebo, seating, and the golden mean for proportion. All of these elements and components assist in the way-finding of a space, or rather gives individuals sensory cues from their surroundings that assists in navigating their environment. In this a way to create a pattern of circulation and space.

COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

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Sustainable Shelter Design Marwa Hakouz Shinming Shyu, faculty mentor The design of the sustainable shelter focuses on the guidelines of International Green Construction Codes (IGCC) for energy efficiency and water preservation. All building materials were selected based on recyclability and sustainability to highlight the shelter design concept. The design incorporated grey water, natural light, and PV panels to reduce the consumption of energy and water. In addition, VOC-free paint and recyclable accoya wood were adopted to achieve healthy indoor air quality and a better environmentallyfriendly design. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

Sustainable Shelter Pei Huang, Crystal Malone and Katelyn Nolan Shinming Shyu, faculty mentor This disaster-recovering shelter addresses the concerns in sustainability relative to the environment and human health. The design team proposed a site near local transportation and stores to reduce vehicle usage. Designers also proposed to source the construction materials from reused and recycled lumber to minimize waste. Other building materials were carefully selected in order to achieve high thermal performance and low indoor pollutant emissions. Other design strategies are incorporated to highlight the design features aiming at energy efficiency and healthy indoor environment. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

Golden Mean Urban Park Christin Kikkert Deb deLaski-Smith, faculty mentor

DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

In designing this city park, particular attention was given to including areas of privacy, in addition to a covered common area. The Golden Mean was used to plan out the footprint of the park, with “thirds” being the common denominator of placement. Intended paths for pedestrian travel flow logically along the bench line and across the bridge. The edges of the park are designated by raising the entire park area 10”, incorporating an ADA approved curved ramp on one side. The basic districts of this park are the covered pavilion common area, continuous flow pond, widely spaced double benches, the gazebo and large sculpture. This park is approximately 1/2 square mile in size and will be the focal point of a high-rise urban business district.

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Augmented Reality (AR) Game Design for STEM Instruction Nicholas Koons Pamela Speelman, faculty mentor Augmented Reality (AR) is a growing field today in the technological world of business and education. Many people have not seen the all the possibilities for the potential of enhancing STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) instruction through the use of AR. In the past year, many large scale companies like Apple and Google have been embracing AR for designing of games and other applications that provide simulation of what things may be seem like in the real world. My project is a basic car game which shows how AR can be used to introduce the real world in a digital format. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

Technological Advancements Lead to Toxicity Within the Music Industry Kai Le Paul Majeske, faculty mentor For decades, Americans, due to rapid technological advances, have had a variety of music-listening processes that each became obsolete as new processes emerged. With each popularization of a new method, society adapted to fit the constraints that followed each innovation. Frequently, the change that occurred was detrimental to parties within the music industry, often appearing as unemployment or unfair compensation. It is hoped that this research will inform individuals how the music industry has become severely toxic due to technology eliminating positions and procedures, the ease of pirating media and, finally, streaming platforms where consumers do not have to purchase music. POSTER GROUP #3, 2:45-4:15 P.M.—ROOM 310 A/B

Sustainable House Design with Model Virginia Leinonen Non-presenting author: Kristina Browder

COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

Shinming Shyu, faculty mentor

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Based on the principles of sustainable design we researched building materials, including paints, flooring, insulation, Energy-star appliances, as well as various strategies that were sustainable and energy-efficient. We designed a small home that can be used as a temporary shelter for people to use during times of emergency. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300


Detroit Urban Redevelopment and Rehabilitation Dariya Protcheva Kasim A. Korkmaz, faculty mentor The automobile industry created and continued a thriving economy in Detroit, MI from the early- to mid-1900s. When outsourcing impacted the industry, people began to leave the city creating an economic crisis. Add in a housing market crash in 2008, and Detroit became a ghost city and filed Chapter 9 bankruptcy in 2013. This research discusses the downfall of the City of Detroit and predicts possible outcomes of current revitalization by analyzing the impacts of current incentives and construction investments on various districts of Detroit during the last decade (2008-2018). ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 204—2 P.M.

Lane Hall Renovation – Design Studio 7 Jordan Stefl and Brooke Johnson Shinming Shyu, faculty mentor Just like the city of Ann Arbor and the University that lies within, Lane Hall’s renovation seeks to blend old with new, creating a space for all to use. With immersive food and cultural experiences, health and wellness at its forefront, and a nod to Earth friendly and sustainable practices, Lane Hall will be a “must visit” for years to come. DESIGN EXPO EXHIBIT—9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.—ROOM 300

2017 Steelcase NEXT Competition Brandon White Diane Guevara, faculty mentor

ORAL SESSION C, 1:30-2:45 P.M.—ROOM 204—2:15 P.M.

COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

The Steelcase NEXT Competition, is a competition for Interior Design juniors across the country. This year, we were to design a space for a medical office located in Seattle, Washington. Our goal for this space was to meet our clients’ needs and create an easy to navigate, functional space. During our design process, we used virtual reality to help us vision the space as if we were standing in it. We were also challenged to use CET, software that creates 3D models, floor plans, and renderings, without the need to transfer our files between other software. CET also allowed us to easily insert furniture into our file with correlating fabrics, and finishes.

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THANK YOU Our appreciation is extended to the following Eastern Michigan University offices and individuals who contribute annually to the success of the event:

Caroline Eidt and Tytiana Steele, graphic design students, and Ryan Molloy, Art & Design

John Williams, Christine Deacons and the staff of Academic Support Services

Ramona Caponegro, Mary Ramsey and students of the Honors College

Jeff Guyton, Lisa Comben and the EMU Foundation staff

Walter Kraft, Geoff Larcom and Darcy Gifford, EMU Communications

Paul Lehman, Music & Dance

Paul Majeske and Karen Gabrys, Event Photo Opportunity Team

Pam Moore, Computer Science

EMU Office of the Provost, Academic Affairs

EMU Office of Admissions

EMU Information Technology

EMU Catering and Dining Services

EMU Public Safety and Parking

EMU Student Center and the Event Planning

Intermedia Gallery Group (IGG)

We extend a special thank you to Steinway Piano Gallery of Detroit for their support to provide a Steinway piano for student performances.

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EVENT HOST—COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES CAS Dean’s Office

Kathleen H. Stacey Steven Pernecky W. Douglas Baker Jeff Guyton John Shubsda Karen Peacock Wanda Monks Akshata Hiremath Katie Meyette Michael Moses Jaylen Taylor

Interim Dean Associate Dean Interim Associate Dean Chief Development Officer Data Analyst, Accreditation & CI Programs Administrative Associate Administrative Secretary Student Assistant Student Assistant Student Assistant Student Assistant

CAS Department Heads/School Directors/Program Directors

Victor Okafor Sandra Murchison Marianne Laporte Debra Heyl-Clegg John Cooper (I) Augustine Ikeji James Saunoris Joseph Csicsila (I) Tom Kovacs Richard Sambrook James Egge (I) Marty Shichtman Debra Ingram Diane Winder Alex Oakes David Klein Ketl Freedman-Doan Julian Murchison Peter Higgins Jeff Popko (I)

Africology & African American Studies Art & Design Biology Chemistry Communication, Media & Theatre Arts Computer Science Economics English Language & Literature Environmental Science & Society, Interdisciplinary Geography & Geology History & Philosophy Jewish Studies Mathematics & Statistics Music & Dance Physics & Astronomy Political Science Psychology Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology Women’s & Gender Studies World Languages

Design Expo Planning Team

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Leslie Atzmon Greg Tom Susan Booth John Charles James Stein

Art & Design Art & Design Communication, Media & Theatre Arts Communication, Media & Theatre Arts Visual & Built Environments


SYMPOSIUM PLANNING COMMITTEE Representatives Victor Okafor Gretchen Otto Aaron Liepman Brittany Albaugh Elena SV Flys Elsa Poh Abdullah Dewan Annette Wannamaker Tom Kovacs Christine Clark Mary-Elizabeth Murphy Jeffrey Bernstein Khairul Islam John Dorsey James Sheerin Jeffrey Bernstein Claudia Drossel Xianghong Feng Mary-Elizabeth Murphy Wendy Wang Mary Ramsey W. Douglas Baker Kyle Sutherland Cory Hamilton Jennifer Desiderio Martha Baiyee Rebecca Moore Lynne Shetron-Rama Sherry Bumpus Barbara Walters LaMar Stewart Samir Tout Dorothy McAllen Jiang Lu Amy Bearinger

Africology & African American Studies Art & Design Biology Chemistry Communication, Media & Theatre Arts Computer Science Economics English Language & Literature Environmental Science & Society, Interdisciplinary Geography & Geology History & Philosophy Jewish Studies Mathematics & Statistics Music & Dance Physics & Astronomy Political Science Psychology Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology Women’s & Gender Studies World Languages University Honors Liaison CAS Liaison COB Liaison COE Liaison Leadership & Counseling COE Liaison Special Education COE Liaison Teacher Education CHHS Liaison Health Promotion & Human Performance CHHS Liaison Health Sciences CHHS Liaison Nursing CHHS Liaison Social Work COT Liaison Engineering Technology COT Liaison Information Security & Applied Computing COT Liaison Technology & Professional Services Management COT Liaison Visual & Built Environments Event Assistant

Judy Lewis

Event Assistant

Wendy Kivi

Event Coordinator

Harriet Lindsay

Event Chair

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2017-18 SYMPOSIUM UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS

We are pleased to recognize the 2017-18 Symposium Undergraduate Research Fellows their faculty mentors and the individuals or organizations who contribute financially to support undergraduate research. Megan Angriawan Music & Dance Gary Pedersen, faculty mentor Dale and Gloria Heydlauff and American Electric Power, award sponsor Faraz Ansari Communication, Media & Theatre Arts Dennis O’Grady, faculty mentor Molly Luempert-Coy and the DTE Energy Foundation, award sponsor Mary-Catherine Ballard Art & Design Ryan Molloy, faculty mentor Tom Sidlik, award sponsor Jodi Baxter Health Promotion & Human Performance Shel Levine, faculty mentor Richard and Norma Sarns, award sponsor Kayla Bicknell Geography & Geology Christopher Gellasch, faculty mentor Family of John Hanawait, award sponsor Claire Castle Music & Dance John Dorsey, faculty mentor Retirement Income Solutions, award sponsor Morgan Day World Languages Margrit Zinggeler, faculty mentor Tom and Mary Layher, award sponsor Olivia DeHate Chemistry Cory Emal, faculty mentor Michael Morris, award sponsor Elizabeth Ehinger Visual & Built Environments Jiang Lu, faculty mentor Retirement Income Solutions, award sponsor Alyssia Hence Social Work Celeste Hawkins, faculty mentor Evelyn Tucker, award sponsor 158


Rita Hodges Biology Emily Grman, faculty mentor William Fennel, award sponsor Lindsey Hopkins Health Sciences Lynne Shetron-Rama, faculty mentor Mary Ann and Dennis Watson, award sponsor Joshua Gurwell Political Science Edward Sidlow, faculty mentor Dykema, award sponsor Madelaine Coy Political Science Barry Pyle, faculty mentor Dykema, award sponsor Hannah McCready Art & Design Brendan Fay, faculty mentor Diane Rockall, award sponsor Leah McQuone Health Sciences Jayne Yatczak, faculty mentor Richard and Norma Sarns, award sponsor Melanie Prince Teacher Education Christina Mirtes, faculty mentor Michael Morris, award sponsor Jenipher Servin-Olivares Psychology Alissa Huth-Bocks, faculty mentor George Cogar, award sponsor Josh Smith Communication, Media & Theatre Arts Susan Booth, faculty mentor William Fennel, award sponsor Tilmira Smith Biology Hannah Seidel, faculty mentor William Fennel, award sponsor Jaylen Taylor Chemistry Deborah Heyl-Clegg, faculty mentor Delta Dental of Michigan, award sponsor

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SYMPOSIUM SPONSORS SYMPOSIUM CHAMPIONS DTE Energy Foundation Dykema William Fennel Dale & Gloria Heydlauff JPMorgan Chase Michael Morris Retirement Income Solutions Mark Sadzikowski

RESEARCH CHAMPIONS

George Cogar Delta Dental Plan of Michigan Diane and Charles Jacobs Tom and Mary Layher Molly Luempert-Coy Richard and Norma Sarns Mary Anne and Dennis Watson

EVENT CHAMPIONS

Dennis and Char Beagen Patricia and Joseph Butcko Domino's Ed and Suzanne Jakeway Emery G. Lee Don and Nancie Loppnow Sally McCracken Diane Rockall Tom Sidlik Ed Sidlow and Beth Henschen Kathleen Stacey and Robert Sneddon Maureen Thomas Evelyn Tucker Thomas and Anne Venner Bette Warren

160


ACADEMIC ADVOCATES

Stuart Baggaley and Amy Seetoo Bank of Ann Arbor Chelsea Milling Nina and George Contis Carolyn Embree Jeanette Hassan and Don Pearson Abe and Elaine Karam Wendy and Dave Kivi Walter Kraft Wade Peacock Ingrid and Clifford Sheldon

STUDENT ADVOCATES

Rosalyn Barclay Patrick and Cheryl Barry Stephen Brewer and Ruby Meis Raymond Carr Mary Cronin Brian Fitzgerald Carol Freedman-Doan Chris Gellasch Robert Grady II

Christopher Herman Samuel Hirsch and Martha Walsh Jill Hunsberger Doreen Lawton Judy and Ken Massingill Nancy Mida John and Mary Pappas Linda Pritchard Vicki Reaume Lynne Shetron-Rama William and Andrea Stickney James Vandenbosch Glenn Walker and Yurand Ye Alida Westman Diane Winder

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161


INDEX Abdulwahab, Aula

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

51

Akanan, Mariam

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 320 — 11 a.m.

95

Akhlaq, Asra

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Alexander, Shazell

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

102

Alsalah, Basem

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 320 — 1:30 p.m.

132

Anaya, Natalia

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 350 — 11:30 a.m.

Anaya, Natalia

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

51

Anderson, Mahogany

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 352 — 3 p.m.

135

Anderson, Natalia

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 352 — 10:30 a.m.

82

Angelosanto, Matthew

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

39

Angriawan, Megan

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Auditorium — 10 a.m.

88

Angriawan, Megan

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Auditorium — 11:30 a.m.

Ankenbauer, Katherine

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 352 — 4 p.m.

Ansari, Faraz

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 330 — 1:30 p.m.

63

Ansari, Nadia

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 304 — 11 a.m.

108

Atkins, Jamaine

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 350 — 3:30 p.m.

102

Ayers, Samantha

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

102

Azizi, Faezeh

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

39

Azizi, Farzaneh

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

39

Ballard, Mary-Catherine

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

33

Bartolet, Samantha

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

39

Basnaw, Andrew

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

33

Baxter, Jodi

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 304 — 9 a.m.

130

Beals, Ashley

Poster Group 1: 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

130

Beaver, Marley

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m.— Student Art Gallery — 3:45 p.m.

Becker, Elizabeth

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

147

Belanger, Alexander

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m.— Room 204 — 3 p.m.

109

Belemjian, OP, Sister Theresita Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B Bender, Jared

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 330 — 3 p.m.

Bennett, Dereka

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m.— Student Art Gallery — 11 a.m.

INDEX

Berry (Aboulhassan), Yasmeen Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

162

38

52

89 136

71

126 86 64 136

Bertram, Sarah

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

34

Beydoun, Mona

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 304 — 3 p.m.

71

Bicknell, Kayla

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Billings, Jasmine

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Bjorklund, Kyle

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 330 — 11 a.m.

Blohm, Alexa

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Blount, Adrianna

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m.— Student Art Gallery — 4 p.m.

74

Bobo, Elijah

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

35

Bongiorno, Abigal

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 352 — 9:45 a.m.

Boros, Will

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Borum, Larry

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 330 — 10 a.m.

Borum, Larry

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 352 — 1:30 p.m.

Bostley, Scout

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Kiva — 1:45 p.m.

Bouzid, Izzeddine

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

69

Boyink, Makayla

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

34, 35, 37

Boykin, Serena

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

66

78 148 146 34, 35

95 34, 35 92 93 125


Brenneman, Hannah

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Brezzell, Amanda

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

121

Brinson, Peter

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Bujaki, Kaitlynne

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Burke, Hannah

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

68

Bush, Nailah

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 352 — 3:15 p.m.

31

Butkovic, Hunter

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 352 — 9:15 a.m.

Butler, Casey

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Caldwell, Candis

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 350 — 2:30 p.m.

32

Callis, Taylor

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

93

Campbell, Craig

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

70

Cantrell, Jade

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

37

Carano, Samuel

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 352 — 2 p.m.

93

Card-Nowlin, Shayla

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 320 — 10:30 A.M.

75

Carpenter, Aaron

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Auditorium — 3:30 p.m.

64

Carpenter, Alison

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

66

Cassidy, Amber Rose

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

79

Castle, Claire

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Auditorium — 1:30 p.m.

Caudill, Courtney

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m.— Room 204 — 9:45 a.m.

Chakraborty, Ronith

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Chalmers, Amanda

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Chase, Taylor

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 304 — 10:45 a.m.

Chavez, Alondra

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

148

Chege, Connstynce

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 304 — 11:30 a.m.

121

Cheianu-Marshall, Olga

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Kiva — 2:15 p.m.

131

Clegg, Bradely

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 350 — 11:30 a.m

Clem, Lauren

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Coates, Madison

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Auditorium — 3:45 p.m.

Collins, Jack

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m.— Room 204 — 11 a..m.

Corace, Annaliese

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B.

Cornish, Ari

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Cotter, OP, Sister Gabriella

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Coy, Madelaine

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 352 — 9:30 a.m.

96

Crenshaw, Mackensi

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 350 — 3:45 p.m.

126

Davis, Jorrie

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Day, Morgan

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m.— Room 204 — 4 p.m.

De Haan, Connor

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 352 — 11 a.m.

DeHate, Olivia

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Dempsey, Jaymes

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 330 — 9:15 a.m.

110

DeRamos, Lilly

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

149

DeRamos, Lilly

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Room 204 — 2:30 p.m.

149

DeRamos, Lilly

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Room 204 — 1:45 p.m.

149

DeRosia, Samantha

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 304 — 2:30 p.m.

72

DesMarais, Josh

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

94

Deutsch, Jacob

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 330 — 2:15 p.m.

96

DeVore, Mitchell

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m.— Student Art Gallery — 3:15 p.m.

Di Ponio, Carter

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

103

Didur, Matthew

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

145

Diebel, Leah

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — 310A/B Student Center

110

31 33 125

95 109

89 109 52 148 96

52 148 69 82 103 34 126

48 116 72 52

72

INDEX 163


INDEX 164

Dixon, Mackenzie

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Doran, Christine

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 320 — 1:45 p.m.

40

Dorandish, Sadaf

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

40

Dornburg, Meghan

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Dotson, Tyler

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Drake, Desiree

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 320 — 10:45 a.m.

73

Drews, Nicholas

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 320 — 2 p.m.

40

Dudek, Katlyn

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m.— Room 204 — 11:15 a.m.

82

Dudek, Katlyn

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 304 — 3:15 p.m.

83

Dunn, Thomas

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Auditorium — 3:15 p.m.

Eatmon, Chelsey

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m.— Student Art Gallery — 9:30 a.m.

126

Eddings, Jessica

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

116

Edgar, Talia

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Auditorium — 2:15 p.m.

Ehinger, Elizabeth

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

El-Mohri, Zeineb

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

53

Elrod, Mikayla

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

53

Eubanks, Emily

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 330 — 3:45 p.m.

85

Ezinga, Josi

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 350 — 3 p.m.

98

Fairchild, Tara

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

53

Farkas, Jonathan

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

143

Fields, Victoria

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 320 — 10:45 a.m.

Fields, Victoria

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m.— Student Art Gallery — 3 p.m.

Florance, Emily

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

146

Fodor, Alexandria

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

114

Ford, Kaitlyn A.

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

143

Forehand, Amanda

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

37

Fraleigh, Max

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

79

Friss, Anna

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

34

Galbreath III, Joseph T.

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

70

Galloway, Emily

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 320 — 2:15 p.m.

41

Garant, Eric

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 330 — 9:45 a.m.

83

Gatchel, Kristine

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Student Art Gallery — 9:15 a.m.

74

Gegich, Olivia

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Auditorium — 1:45 p.m.

Ghandikota, Priya

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Ghannam, Noha

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

41

Gilliam, Marisa

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 320 — 3:30 p.m.

54

Glaze-Beeman, Lexxus

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Auditorium — 3:45 p.m.

Golden (Baker), Renee´

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Good, Darin

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m

Goodson, Emily

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Graham, Marion

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Green, Robert

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

144

Greeve, Cole

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

145

Groen, Samantha

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

150

Guess, Jadyn

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 320 — 10:45 a.m.

Guner, Burak

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Guo, Sasha

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Guo, Sasha

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Student Art Gallery — 2 p.m.

35

Gurwell, Joshua

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 352 — 9 a.m.

97

Auditorium — 9 a.m.

133

48 121

73

85 150

73 64

89 148

69 110 90 136 41

73 85 37, 147


Hakamaki, Hannah

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Hakouz, Marwa

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

151

44

Halstead, Megan

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 304 — 9:30 a.m.

111

Hamzi, Abdulrahman

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

145

Hardy, Brandon

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

61

Harkey, Zachery

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

42

Harvey, Kayla

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Hassan, Sabah

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

103

Havens, Ashton

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

54

Hawkins, Jessica

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 330 — 4 p.m.

Hawkins-Johnson, Kelsey

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m.— Room 204 — 3:30 p.m.

111

Hawkins-Johnson, Kelsey

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

111

Heino, Keiffer

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Heitkamp, Sophia

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Auditorium — 9:30 a.m.

Hence, Alyssia

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m.— Student Art Gallery — 10 a.m.

Hence, Alyssia

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Henige, Chaise

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

124

Hill, Sierra

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

104

Hodges, Rita

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

42

Holmgren, Hailey

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Auditorium — 4 p.m.

65

Holtzen, Sarah

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

42

Hoover, Amelia

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Hopkins, Lindsey

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

131

Hopkins, Maegen

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 304 — 9:15 a.m.

130

Huang, Pei

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

151

Hudecz, Kristen

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 350 — 3 p.m.

98

Huff, Micah

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 304 — 1:30 p.m.

Hunt, Donavan L.

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

144

Hwang, Joanna

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

123

Ignacio, Daniel

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Islam, Zahirul

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 330 — 11:15 a.m.

Izirein, EmiJoy

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

66

Jackson, Jewel

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

43

Jacobs, Sawyer

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

34

Jamil, Hafsah

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

43

Jeffries, Cheyanne

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Student Art Gallery — 1:30 p.m.

Joblinski, Julia

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 350 — 10:45 a.m.

112

Johnson, Brooke

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

153

Jones, Lauren

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m.— Room 204 — 3:45 p.m.

116

Kakos, Rebekah

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

104

Kalisz, Alexis

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

34

Kaminski, Daniel

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

35

Katynski, Emily

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Auditorium — 10:45 a.m.

90

Keene, Hayden

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

66

Keif, Caitlin

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 320 — 3:15 p.m.

54

Khan, Hana

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 320 — 3:30 p.m.

54

Khan, Nafiah

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 320 — 9:45 a.m.

123

Khazaei, Pouya

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

55

Kiefer, Emily

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

35

34

86

37 90 137 137, 139

37

65

36 145

65

INDEX 165


INDEX 166

Kikkert, Christin

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Kim, Yura

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 350 — 9:45 a.m.

151

Klausing, Sydney

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

132

Klemm, Thomas

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 352 — 10 a.m.

137

Koli, Kangkana

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 350 — 9 a.m.

97

Koli, Kangkana

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 350 — 3:15 p.m.

98

Koli, Kangkana

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 320 — 11 a.m.

Koons, Nicholas

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

152

Korotney, Jared

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 330 — 3 p.m.

86

Kozinski, Deven

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

66

Kowalczyk, Jacob

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 350 — 11 a.m.

79

Kwasny, Steven

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Lahtonen, Julie

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

134

Lally, Sarah

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 320 — 9:30 a.m.

134

Lancour, Paige

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

138

Laschober, Monica

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 350 — 3 p.m.

Laurencelle, Conor

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 320 — 1:30 p.m.

132

Le, Kai

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

152

Leinonen, Virginia

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

152

Lemke, Gillian

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Linton, Sierra

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Locke, Emily

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 330 — 10:30 a.m.

119

Lopez, Christian

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m.— Room 204 — 3:15 p.m.

112

Lukwago, Sanyu

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 350 — 9:30 a.m.

Lynch, Meaghan

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 304 — 11:15 a.m.

Machasic, Anna

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 304 — 4 p.m.

74

MacQuarry, Courtnie

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

35

Maki, Madeline

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Malone, Crystal

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Marchese, Natasha

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

44

Marsack, Jocelyn

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

55

Marsh, Alexis

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

55

Marshall, Courtney

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 330 — 10:45 a.m.

99

Marston, Bailey

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

44

Mason, Zachary

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

35

Mayhew, Kelly

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 330 — 1:45 p.m.

Maze, Timothy

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 350 — 10:30 a.m.

McBride, Justin

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

McCleery, Emily

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

McCombs, Hannah

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

McCready, Hannah

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Student Art Gallery — 1:45 p.m.

36

McCrystal, Chloe

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m.— Student Art Gallery — 4 p.m.

74

McDonald, Jessica

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

34

McDonald, Lauren

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

McEvoy, Elizabeth

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

McManamon, Lucas

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

McNiven, Haley

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

138

McQuone, Leah

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 320 — 1:30 p.m.

132

McSorley, Rebecca

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

97

95

66

98

70 43

98 122

44 150

71 112 45 37 131

66 132 34

45


McTaggart, Suzy

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 320 — 10 a.m.

86

Menzel, McKayla

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 304 — 3:30 p.m.

75

Meyer, Brianna

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

37

Meyer, Mitchell

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

56

Meyers, Samantha

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Auditorium — 9:45 a.m.

Middleton, Rebecca

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

127

Mijnsbergen, Danielle

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m.— Student Art Gallery — 9 a.m.

127

Mix, Emmett

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

122

Miyahara, Júlia

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 320 — 11:15 a.m.

99

Mohamed, Ahmed

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

56

Montgomery, Courtni

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 320 — 10:30 A.M.

Montgomery, Courtni

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

104

Morgan, Clarissa

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

105

Morrissey, Sierra

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Auditorium — 2 p.m.

67

Mufarreh, William

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Auditorium — 11:30 a.m.

89

Muhammed, Fajr

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 320 — 10:45 a.m.

73

Neet, Ryan

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

70

Nichols, Elijah

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 330 — 3:30 p.m.

87

Niedermier, Marilyn

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

51

Nieman, Mary Rose

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Auditorium — 10:30 a.m.

Nolan, Ketelyn

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Norris, Justin

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 350 — 11:15 a.m.

Nowacki, Emily

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

O'Brien, Rita

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

O'Donnell, Delainey

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

O'Flynn, Patrick

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

139

Oard, Kirsten

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

105

Oliva, Jordan

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

36

Opdycke, Lacey

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m.— Room 204 — 9:30 a.m.

83

Overla, Stephanie

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Page, Jamie

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

105

Pakray, Sarah

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m.— Student Art Gallery — 11:30 a.m.

139

Palczynski, Oksana

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 304 — 2 p.m.

127

Parker, Chelsey

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Auditorium — 9:45 a.m.

Parker, Taylor

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Pasini, Madison

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

127

Passarelli, Tessa

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

45

Penrose, Katie

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

37

Perdomo Garcia, Maria

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 350 — 10 a.m.

99

Perrotta, Gemma

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

37

Perry, Gabriella

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m.— Student Art Gallery — 3:30 p.m.

Perry, Taylor

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Petelka, Leijah

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 304 — 2:15 p.m.

76

Peters, Jocelyn

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

34

Peterson, Jamie

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 330 — 1:45 p.m.

71

Petroff, Christina

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

37

Pettiford, Kendra

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

34

Petzold, Timothy

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 320 — 3:45 p.m.

57

Poikey, Tara

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 320 — 9:15 a.m.

123

91

75

91 150 56 80 138 57

80

91 137, 139

75 35, 37

INDEX 167


INDEX 168

Pollens-Dempsey, Jonah

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 352 — 2:15 p.m.

94

Popa, Alla

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

57

Pottschmidt, Lauren

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Powdhar, Ariel

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

144

Powers, Justin

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 320 — 3 p.m.

58

Powers, Justin

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

58

Prantzalos, Katrina

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

87

Prantzalos, Katrina

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Prantzalos, Katrina

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

108

Prebola, Madelyn

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 320 — 1:30 p.m.

132

Presbie, Jeffrey

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

144

Price, Deanna

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Prince, Melanie

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m.— Student Art Gallery — 9:45 a.m.

Proietti, Joseph

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 320 — 2:30 p.m.

Protcheva, Dariya

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Room 204 — 2 p.m.

153

Przeslawski, Hannah

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

133

Pyle, Nathaniel

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 304 — 10:30 a.m.

100

Quasem, Khaleel

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Rayle, James

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Auditorium — 11 a.m.

Reasoner, Sarah

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m.— Room 204 — 9 a.m.

140

Redfield, Nicole

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

34

Reinhardt, Roxanne

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m.— Room 204 — 10 a.m.

Reinhardt, Roxanne

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 330 — 11:30 a.m.

Richards, Lillian

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Richardson, Andrew

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 352 — 1:45 p.m.

Rickerd, Jacob

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

145

Ridley, Rodney

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

144

Rielinger, Amanda

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Rife, Victoria

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

140

Rivera, Maria

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

119

Roberts, Jacquelyn

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Roberts, Mel

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 352 — 3:30 p.m.

Robinson, Desmine

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m.— Student Art Gallery — 10:45 a.m.

Robinson, Desmine

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Robinson, Sean

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 320 — 11:30 a.m.

Rodziewicz, Emily

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Roemmele, Rachel

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

116

Romero, Nikkolo

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

134

Russell, Meagan

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

140

Sabala, Jaycie

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Auditorium — 3 p.m.

117

Sabri, Nadine

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

84

Sadows, Colleen

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 352 — 10:45 a.m.

Samir, Mariam

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 350 — 2:15 p.m.

117

Sarker, Sadia

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Auditorium — 2:30 p.m.

87

Savard, Bradley

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

47

Schafer, Emily

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Auditorium — 9:45 a.m.

91

Schaus IV, Harold

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

67

Schlueter, Scotty

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

66

Schlueter, Scotty

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 304 — 1:45 p.m.

68

66

46

58 128 46

46 91

83 113 58, 80 94

47

59 122 32, 76 66 100 35

67


Schmitzer, Franklin

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Sears, Megan

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Kiva — 2 p.m.

145

Seif, Masa

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Selle, Alissa

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Serna, Kristal

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Serrato, Guadelupe

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

116

Servin Olivares, Jenipher

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 304 — 9:45 a.m.

106

Shaw, Sarell

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

38

Shimu, Tahsina

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

47

Shoukat, Ifrah

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 304 — 10 a.m.

60

Siegel, Samuel

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

77

Sikes, Alexis

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Auditorium — 9:45 a.m.

91

Simpkins, Ashlee

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m.— Student Art Gallery — 3:15 p.m.

Simpkins, Ashlee

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Smith, Elizabeth

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Smith, Ethan

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 350 — 9:15 a.m.

Smith, Heather

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

37

Smith, Jesse

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

60

Smith, Joshua

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Student Art Gallery — 2:15 p.m.

68

Smith, Tilmira

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Solmon, Kimberly

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

106

Souders, Kevin

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

143

Spangler, Chelsea

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Springer, Gayle

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Stahl, Terrence

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Stefl, Jordan

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

153

Steur, Caitlyn

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

122

Stevenson, Micaela

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Kiva — 1:30 p.m.

115

Stevenson, Micaela

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Kiva — 2:30 p.m.

113

Stoddard, Vanessa

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 350 — 4 p.m.

77

Suisham, Christopher

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m.— Student Art Gallery — 10:30 a.m.

32

Swinehart, Alyssa

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

48

Swinehart, Alyssa

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

48

Swinehart, Ashleigh

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Sylvia-Moals, Breyanna

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

137, 139

Talbot, Cameron

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

62

Talley, Jayla

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Room 204 — 1:30 p.m.

33

Tanbour, Razan

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

62

Tanjong, Harel

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

81

Tapley, Jessica

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 304 — 3:45 p.m.

77

Taylor, Deziray

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 320 — 10:30 A.M.

Taylor, Deziray

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Taylor, Jaylen

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Taylor, Karess

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

107

Taylor, Rachel

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

107

Terry, Anthony

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 330 — 2 p.m.

107

Terry, Anthony

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

108

Tezak, Rosalie

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 352 — 1:30 p.m.

93

Thomas, Remell

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

49

76 59 124 38

72 124 68 100

48

34 141 61

35

75 141 62

INDEX 169


INDEX 170

Thuernau, Scott

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

34

Tompkins, Lorian

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 350 — 1:30 p.m.

69

Townsley, Cody

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

49

Tubbs, Emily

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

43

Vael, Lilly

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 330 — 3:15 p.m.

88

Vajda, Louis

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Auditorium — 9:15 a.m.

92

Valdez, Yeliani

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Room 352 — 3:45 p.m.

113

VanLandingham, Leah

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

VanLandingham, Leah

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

147

Vargo, Carly

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

141

Vaughan, Hope

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Vermeulen, Abigail

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 352 — 11:30 a.m.

Vernham, Constance

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Vigliotti, Anthony

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Auditorium — 11:15 a.m.

Visscher, Marri

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Vought, Ashley

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 330 — 9 a.m.

Waldecker, Catherine

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m.— Room 204 — 9:15 a.m.

Walker, Delaney

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

Walker, Ryan

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 352 — 2 p.m.

Wasunyk, Amanda

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m. — Room 352 — 11:15 a.m.

Watson, William

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Webster, Sina H.

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 350 — 1:45 p.m

115

Weeks, Jordan

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m.— Student Art Gallery — 11:15 a.m.

101

Wehrmeister, Kim

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

Weiman, Mark

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Student Art Gallery — 2:30 p.m.

Weitzmann, Desiree

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 330 — 9:30 a.m.

81

West, Regine

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

49

Westcott, Mary

Design Expo Exhibit — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Room 300

35

Wheeler, Josh

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

70

White, Amber

Oral Session D, 3-4:15 p.m. — Auditorium — 3:45 p.m.

White, Brandon

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m.— Room 204 — 2:15 p.m.

Wilhelm, Kyle

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 352 — 1:45 p.m.

Wilkerson, Mike

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

144

Williams, Faith

Oral Session C, 1:30-2:45 p.m. — Room 350 — 2 p.m.

115

Williams, Jessica

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m.— Room 204 — 10:30 a.m.

Williams, Lauren

Oral Session B, 10:30-11:45 a.m.— Room 204 — 10:45 a.m.

Wills, Haylee

Poster Group 3: 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

114

Wolinsky, Shaina

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

114

Woods, Ciara

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

125

Wroblewski, Alec

Poster Group 3, 2:45-4:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Yassine, Reem

Poster Group 2: 11-11:45 a.m./1:30-2:15 p.m. — Room 310 A/B

Young, Brianna

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

135

Zahor, Dorothy

Poster Group 1, 9-10:30 a.m. — Room 310 A/B

50

Zayed, Yasmin

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m. — Room 320 — 9 a.m.

Zydeck, Megan

Oral Session A, 9-10:15 a.m.— Student Art Gallery — 9 a.m.

59, 80

63 101 39 92 101 81 84 124 93 78 34, 35

34 146

69 153 94

78 84

50 50

88 127


Dr. Christopher Gellasch We are proud to welcome Dr. Christopher Gellasch as our keynote speaker for the 38th Undergraduate Symposium. He graduated from EMU in 1992 with a BS degree in Geology, earning double Honors (Basic Studies and Geology), and was commissioned as an Army officer through EMU ROTC. During his Eastern Michigan University undergraduate studies, he presented at the Undergraduate Symposium three times (1990-1992) with three different faculty mentors, including the individual who nominated him to be this year’s keynote speaker, Dr. Steven LoDuca. Most of his 23-year Army career was spent as an Army Environmental Science and Engineering Officer solving environmental and public health challenges with a focus on water quality. Some of his assignments included serving as faculty in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at the U.S. Military Academy (West Point), a 12-month deployment to Afghanistan, and as an environmental division chief responsible for the 19-state western region. Throughout his career Dr. Gellasch has mentored dozens of students and environmental professionals in both academic and applied settings. In 2012 Dr. Gellasch completed an Army-funded PhD in Hydrogeology at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. He then served his final five years in the Army as the Director of the Environmental Science Graduate Program at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, MD. He retired from the Army in July 2017 at the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and this past fall he returned to Eastern Michigan University as an assistant professor in the Department of Geography and Geology. His research combines aspects of hydrogeology and environmental engineering to determine the most likely pathways for chemical and biological contaminants to migrate through the subsurface and impact either groundwater or surface water bodies. This is critical research within the State of Michigan with impact across the nation and globally. Dr. Gellasch is continuing his research at EMU and currently mentors several EMU undergraduate research projects. Dr. Gellasch cites his experience conducting undergraduate research and presenting at the Symposium as the primary reason he became interested in graduate school and a career that combines mentoring and research. We are pleased that research opportunities at EMU impacted his educational choices and his impressive Army career. As today’s keynote speaker Dr. Gellasch will share his experiences with fellow Symposium student presenters as he strives to mentor and instill the excitement of research to EMU students in his newest and latest role as a member of the EMU faculty.


Profile for EMU Graphic Design

Eastern Michigan University 2018 Undergraduate Symposium  

Program guide for EMU's 38th Undergraduate Symposium.

Eastern Michigan University 2018 Undergraduate Symposium  

Program guide for EMU's 38th Undergraduate Symposium.

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