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INDEX

Emory Events Calendar, Page 2

Police Record, Page 2

Candidate Endorsements, Page 8

Candidate Statements, Page 9

Arts & Entertainment, Page 9

On Fire, Page 11

THE EMORY WHEEL Since 1919

The Independent Student Newspaper of Emory University www.emorywheel.com

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Every Tuesday and Friday SPEAKER

PUPPY PLAYTIME

Chipper Jones Chosen To Speak at Class Day By Jordan Friedman Executive Editor

A

Liqi Shu/Staff

lpha Phi Omega, Kappa Sigma, Gamma Phi Beta and Alpha Delta Pi hosted Puppies on the Porch Friday evening in front of the sorority lodges on Eagle Row. The proceeds will go toward the non-profit PAWS Atlanta organization as well as Atlanta Pet Rescue and Adoption (APRA).

DINING

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Clairmont Bill for Wagner ‘Confidence’ Vote Fails Offers New Breakfast Option By Nicholas Sommariva News Editor and Dustin Slade Asst. News Editor

By Lydia O’Neal Staff Writer Clairmont residents now have access to a quick and convenient breakfast option at the Emory Market at Clairmont Campus because of a recent collaboration between the Residence Hall Association (RHA) and the Food Services Administration (FSA). Available from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m., the pilot program —— spearheaded by RHA President and College junior Niketu Patel —— began March 18. Students can pay using meal swipes, Dooley Dollars, Eagle Dollars and any normal form of payment. The menu features different types of breakfast sandwiches on a weekly basis, as well as pastries, tea, coffee and a variety of sides like a yogurt parfait or fruit cup. Every item on the menu costs less than $3. Patel said RHA councils at Clairmont and many others he spoke with expressed a need for coffee and breakfast at the Student Activity and Academic Center (SAAC). He met regularly with Dave Furhman, the senior director of Emory’’s FSA, in an effort to meet student demand for an accessible and convenient morning meal at Clairmont. Both Patel and Furhman also communicated with Sodexo, Emory’’s food-service provider. Patel said that when he heard Sodexo had already planned on improving dining options at the SAAC, he took action. ““Our plans meshed together,”” he said. Before the new option’’s implementation, the Emory Market offered mainly fast-food meals, such as burgers, pizza, subs, wraps and soft drinks, from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., but no breakfast foods or coffee were ever provided. ““Although Clairmont apartments have kitchens, many students are just too busy to make breakfast,”” Furhman said. ““By providing breakfast at the SAAC, students now have quick and easy access to the most important meal of the day.”” In a first-week report on breakfast and coffee at the SAAC, Timber Hines, the associate director of the

See DINING, Page 5

The Student Government Association (SGA) voted down a bill Monday evening that would have added an option to vote no confidence in the direction the University is headed in last night’’s student leadership elections electronic ballot. The bill was amended to shift its focus from University President James W. Wagner’’s leadership specifically to Emory’’s direction as a whole.

The bill, authored by fourthyear student in the Laney Graduate School Andy Ratto, was tabled during the previous two SGA legislative sessions. The SGA legislature debated the bill for about an hour on Monday evening. ““This is an opportunity for SGA to make clear that SGA needs to be heard,”” Ratto said as he addressed all SGA legislators and executive officers. ““It’’s about saying, ‘‘Do we want the student body to have a say in the leadership of governance in this University?’’””

After much deliberation, an amendment changed the language of the bill so that the ballot would ask ““Do you have confidence in the direction of the University?”” rather than ““Do you have confidence in President James Wagner?”” The amendment was approved by a vote of 16-9. The amended bill, however, was ultimately voted down with a vote of 6-14-3. Before the amendment, SGA President and College senior Ashish

See UNDERGRAD, Page 5

VILLAGE

It all started when high school math teacher Kasita McCloud could no longer fit a ““truckload”” of fashion merchandise in her apartment. Now, McCloud owns and operates You’’re a Hanger, one of the Emory Village’’s newest additions and a clothing store where no two items are the same. McCloud, a full-time accelerated mathematics teacher at the math-andscience-focused Benjamin E. Mays High School, began catering to students’’ sartorial needs long before the opening of her shop, located next door to Saba, a small pasta restaurant. ““It started when I would go shopping for myself at thrift stores,”” she said. ““I have some students who I thought, ‘‘This would look good on her, that would look good on her.’’”” After buying one-of-a-kind pieces from a flea market seamstress and struggling to use her apartment as a surrogate boutique, McCloud realized that she needed more space. Today, mannequins in exotic-print dresses adorn the outer windows of You’’re a Hanger. Pink, yellow and purple balloons billow from chalkboard signs reading ““Easter Day Sale,”” a promotion that takes place on March 30. McCloud also advertises her permanent discount: the ““$5 Rack”” is just $3 for college students. ““It’’s just a way to say, ‘‘thank you,’’ because I know they’’re on a budget,”” she said of her college customers. Inside, garments reminiscent of every era, from Victorian to modern, line McCloud’’s racks. An eyepopping 1980s cobalt pantsuit hangs inches from a puffy-sleeved fairy tale

NEWS EMORY INSTALLS

NEW FMRI MACHINE TO EXPLORE HUMAN THOUGHTS

... PAGE 3

prom gown on an adjacent display. Color-block shifts one might see on the set of ““Mad Men”” accompany floral knee-length sundresses that could have belonged to Grace Kelly or Marilyn Monroe. At the center of the store, a mannequin donning an extravagant baroque-era gown sits perched atop a shelf of leather purses, totes and a mink fur scarf. The frilly skirts of the gilded dress drape over the display’’s collection of accessories. Nakeda, a sophomore at Benjamin E. Mays and a student of McCloud’’s, emerged from a ruby-curtained dressing room holding a white satin blouse. She had asked her mother to take her to the store after her teacher told her about it. ““It’’s really unique,”” Nakeda said of You’’re a Hanger. ““There are so many little treasures.”” Her mother paid for the blouse, as well as an ornate button cap she found among a tray of broaches. ““I had to explain to her what a button cap is,”” Julie Boyle, a friend of McCloud’’s and the store’’s cashier du jour, said with a smile. ““In the 80s, people could get these button caps and would buy them in sets to decorate the buttons on their shirts.”” Nakeda’’s nickel-sized button cap, decorated with the black silhouette of a woman’’s profile, resembled an antique locket. Boyle offered her a plastic egg from the Easter basket sitting on the cashier’’s desk. She cracked it open to find a little handwritten note reading ““$3 off!”” Nakeda’’s small spree ended when she finished off the sugar cookies and

See MCCLOUD’S, Page 5

OP-EDS COMMITTEE

ENDORSES STUDENT GOV. CANDIDATES

...

PAGE 8

Retired Atlanta Braves third baseman Chipper Jones will address students at Class Day, an annual event for graduating seniors, on Thursday, May 9. Jones, who played for 19 seasons with the Braves starting in 1993, holds the Braves’’ record for career on base percentage and places third in the team’’s all-time home run list. In addition, he received the National Baseball League’’s Most Valuable Player Award in 1999 and the National League Silver Slugger Award in both 1999 and 2000. Michael Kloss, Emory’’s executive director of University events and chief of protocol, wrote in an email to the Wheel that Jones’’ career with the Braves ““should be an inspiring story to the senior class.”” He noted that loyalty to a single employer —— or team, in this case —— is ““not necessarily the expectation of many entering the workforce today.”” ““[It] will be a story worth hearing,”” Kloss wrote. Goizueta Business School senior Bukie Adebo, who served as the chair of the Class Day speaker student selection committee, mentioned that Jones is an excellent Atlanta connection, with many Emory students having watched him play during their childhoods. ““He was thrilled when we first contacted him,”” Adebo said. ““He was so excited and very enthusiastic.”” Kloss wrote that Jones has also offered to help encourage seniors to participate in their schools’’ class gift campaigns. Seniors in Emory College, the Goizueta Business School and the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing who participate in this cam-

Chipper Jones, a former Major League Baseball third baseman, played 19 seasons with the Braves. paign by April 19 will be able to partake a drawing to win four tickets for Jones’’ personal seats in the SunTrust section at an upcoming Braves game as well as a baseball bat signed that Jones has signed, Kloss wrote. The tickets, worth $1,200, will include all-you-can-eat-and-drink privileges. ““He did [this] all on his own which is pretty awesome,”” Adebo said. She said the selection process for the Class Day speaker involved the formation of a committee consisting of students who have been heavily involved on campus in the past four years. After compiling a list of possible speakers and sending out a link at which students could vote, the University reached out to different agents to determine who was available in Emory’’s Class Day time frame and price range. According to Adebo, Emory also considered Bill Nye ““The Science Guy”” and actor and director Tyler Perry. This year, though, is not the first time that Emory will bring an Atlanta Braves player to campus. In 1995, Kloss expained, Emory awarded an honorary degree to Henry ““Hank”” Aaron. The last Class Day to feature an athlete was Peyton Manning in 2005.

Asst. News Editor Dustin Slade contributed reporting. —— Contact Jordan Friedman at jordan.m.friedman@emory.edu

CELEBRATING CULTURE

You’re a Hanger Thrift Store Opens in Village By Lydia O’Neal Staff Writer

Volume 94, Issue 39

E

Joanna Chang/Staff

mory student organizations and performing groups presented aspects of their cultures in Asbury Circle for this week’s Wonderful Wednesday. Students at several booths handed out prizes and held raffles. In addition, cultural groups competed for a $100 prize for the best booth.

PANEL

Social Justice Panel Explores Bullying By Elizabeth Howell Student Life Co-Editor Social Justice Week 2013 began on Friday with a panel discussion focusing on recognizing bullies’’ humanity and showing compassion for them. College Council (CC) is sponsoring the week-long program to raise awareness about discrimination against minority groups on campus. The event, which took place in White Hall, featured panel members including motivational speaker Sarah Vitorino (’’11PhD), who led the dis-

A&E DANCE COMPANY

SCHWARTZ CENTER FOR PEROFMRING ARTS... PAGE 10 PERFORMS IN

cussion; Michelle Lane Valigursky, the author of the young adult novel Lili; and Sierra Dowd, co-founder of the anti-bullying organization ““Be More Heroic.”” Vitorino began the discussion by acknowledging that people often think of bullies as inherently violent but neglect to consider that they may have been victimized themselves. She asked the panel how to find compassion for bullies and said that in order to foster positive social behavior, it is necessary to work with perpetrators of violence.

SPORTS MEN’’S AND WOMEN’’S SWIMMING AND DIVING WIN AT NCAA ... BACK PAGE

Vitorino added that she thought the best way to create an environment without bullying improve their self-confidence. ““The more people feel empowered and good about themselves, the less likely they’’ll feel like they need to make others feel inferior,”” she said. Valigursky agreed, adding that she felt the best way to empower children is to teach them to have a strong sense of self and appreciate their own strengths. She said she personally tries to do so through writing.

See PANEL, Page 4

NEXT ISSUE

ELECTIONS TO BE HELD THIS THURSDAY ... FRIDAY


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NEWS ROUNDUP National, Local and Higher Education News •• Hundreds of thousands of protesters marched Grande-Armée Avenue up to the Arc de Triomphe on Sunday, March 24 in opposition to a bill passed by the lower house of the French parliament that would legalize same-sex marriage and adoption. France’’s Senate, dominated, along with the lower house, by President Francois Hollande’’s Socialist Party, will debate the bill next month. The protesters were banned by police from the Champs-Elysées, but broke through to the avenue, only to face officers with tear gas and batons. Some of the demonstrators, mainly from far-right groups, held banners reading, ““We want work, not gay marriage.”” •• The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced plans on Friday, March 22 to close 149 air traffic control towers at small airports by April 7. The closures, a response to $85 billion in federal spending cuts that took place March 1, will force pilots to coordinate takeoff and landing by themselves using a shared radio channel. Critics of the removal of the towers, once staffed

THE EMORY WHEEL

NEWS

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

with private contractors, fear a lack of passenger safety. The FAA, however, promises to ensure safe operations and is required to find $637 million in savings by the end of the fiscal year on Sept. 30. Five of the 149 affected towers stand at small Georgia airports. •• On Friday, March 22, Brunswick, Ga. police arrested two teenage boys accused of shooting an infant in the face after wounding and attempting to mug his mother. Sherry West was pushing her son, Antonio Santiago, in a stroller on the way home from the post office Thursday, March 21, when two boys asked for her money. When she told them she had no cash with her, one of the teens fired four shots, grazing West’’s ear and hitting her leg, before fatally shooting 13-month-old Santiago. West identified 17-year-old De’’Marquis Elkins and a 14-year-old who was not identified because he is a juvenile. The act, which shocked Brunswick County residents, is still under investigation.

—— Compiled by Staff Writer Lydia O’’Neal

Corrections The Wheel reports and corrects all errors published in the newspaper and at emorywheel.com. Please contact Editor-in-Chief Arianna Skibell at arianna.skibell@emory.edu.

THE EMORY WHEEL Volume 94, Number 39 © 2013 The Emory Wheel

Dobbs University Center, Room 540 605 Asbury Circle, Atlanta, GA 30322 Newsroom (404) 727-6175 Editor in Chief Arianna Skibell (404) 435-1787 Founded in 1919, The Emory Wheel is the financially and editorially independent, student-run newspaper of Emory University in Atlanta. The Wheel is a member publication of Media Council, Emory’’s organization of student publications. The Wheel reserves the rights to all content as it appears in these pages, and permission to reproduce material must be granted by the editor in chief. The Wheel is published twice weekly on Tuesdays and Fridays during the academic year, except during University holidays and scheduled publication intermissions. A single copy of the Wheel is free of charge. To purchase additional copies, please call (404) 727-6178. The statements and opinions expressed in the Wheel are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Wheel Editorial Board or of Emory University, its faculty, staff or administration. The Wheel is also available online at www.emorywheel.com.

TUESDAY

EVENTS AT EMORY

Event: Emory Women’’s Club Meeting Time: 10 a.m. —— 12 p.m. Location: Houston Mill House Event: Mandala Sand Painting Live Exhibition with Drepung Loseling Monks Time: 10 a.m. —— 5 p.m. Location: Carlos Museum Reception Hall Event: Public Scholarship and Social Media Time: 11:45 a.m. —— 12:45 p.m. Location: Center for Ethics room 162 Event: George Painter, PhD —— ““The Development of a Broadly Active Drug for the Prophylaxis and Treatment of dsDNA Virus Infections”” Time: 12 —— 1 p.m. Location: 5052 Rollins Research Center Event: Meet Me @ Lullwater Walking Group Time: 12:15 —— 1 p.m. Location: Lullwater Preserve Event: Athletics —— Baseball Time: 3 —— 6 p.m. Location: Chappell Park

This Week In Emory History March 31, 1995 More than 600 students chanted ““stop the cuts”” at a Dobbs University Center protest Wednesday, March 29, 1995. The rally against proposed financial aid cuts, sponsored by the Student Government Association and the Ad Hoc Committee on Multicultural Education, featured banners and speeches targeting national legislators. Director of Financial Aid Anne Sturtevant, one of the demonstration’’s key speakers, expressed the potentially ““traumatic”” effects of a House bill that would dramatically cut financial aid for the following school year. Even then president William M. Chace took a stance against Congress in an address to students.

Event: Guest Lecture by Dr. Davesh Soneji Time: 4 —— 5:30 p.m. Location: Bowden Hall room 323 Event: Chapel Tea with Dr. Nitya Jacob Time: 4:30 —— 5:30 p.m. Location: Formal Lounge, Cannon Chapel Event: Hommage à Philippe Bonnefis Time: 4:30 —— 6 p.m. Location: PAIS Building room 290 Event: Tibet Week Meditation Time: 5 —— 6 p.m. Location: Carlos Museum Reception Hall Event: Feminists Founders Reading Series and Book Signing by Emory Assistant Professor Jericho Brown Time: 6:30 —— 7:30 p.m. Location: Jones Room, 311 Woodruff Library Event: State of Race Time: 7 —— 9 p.m. Location: Cox Ballroom Event: Self-Immolation: The NonViolent Protest of Last Resort Time: 7:30 —— 9 p.m. Location: Carlos Museum Reception Hall

WEDNESDAY Event: Mandala Sand Painting Live Exhibition with Drepung Loseling Monks Time: 10 a.m. —— 5 p.m. Location: Carlos Museum Reception Hall Event: Pascal Quignard, l’’errant Time: 12 —— 1 p.m. Location: Callaway Center, Room C202 Event: The Rights of the Needy: The Power of Mercy in Biblical Law Time: 12:30 —— 1:30 p.m. Location: Candler School of Theology room 252 Event: Colloquium: Jericho Brown, poet Time: 2 —— 3 p.m. Location: Callaway Center, Room N301 Event: Information Session: Graduate Certificate Program in Mind, Brain, and Culture Time: 4 —— 5 p.m. Location: PAIS, Room 464 Event: John McMillian: ““The Sixties Underground Press and the Rise of Alternative Media in America”” Time: 4 —— 6 p.m. Location: Bowden Hall, Room 323

Event: On the Limits of Rights and Representation: The Moral Challenge of Blackness Time: 4 p.m. Location: Center for Ethics Commons 102 Event: Tibet Week Meditation Time: 5 —— 6 p.m. Location: Carlos Museum Reception Hall Event: DareHablar —— Spanish Conversation Club Time: 6 —— 7 p.m. Location: White Hall Main Lobby Event: Unpacking Your Study Abroad Experience! Time: 6 —— 7 p.m. Location: The Career Center at Emory Event: Sukyi Nyima in Context: The Performance of Tibetan Folk Opera Time: 7:30 —— 9 p.m. Location: Carlos Museum Reception Hall Event: Mandala Sand Painting Live

THURSDAY Exhibition with Drepung Loseling Monks Time: 10 a.m. —— 5 p.m. Location: Carlos Museum Reception Hall

Police Report: Emory Police Department (EPD) Lieutenant Cheryl Elliott was not available by press time. Therefore, the Wheel will not run a crime report this week.


NEWS

THE EMORY WHEEL SCIENCE

A newly funded functional magnetic resonance imaging machine (fMRI) called the Siemens Trio 3-Tesla fMRI is being installed on the ground floor of Emory’’s Psychological and Interdisciplinary Studies building and will be fully operable for research in April. The new machine will be a part of the Facility for Education and Research in Neuroscience (FERN) at Emory, which explores the neural basis for human thoughts and behaviors. This project was partially funded by a $1 million grant from the U.S. Office of Naval Research as part of the Department of Defense’’s Human, Social, Cultural, Behavioral Modeling program —— a part of a larger initiative aiming to broaden people’’s understanding of how humans think. According to Gregory Berns, a professor of economics in the College and the director of FERN, with the fMRI machine student and faculty researchers will combine the study of behavior and the study of the brain, investigating issues of attention, memory, emotion and the ways in which individuals process social and cultural information today using neuroimaging technology. He also explained that the Siemens Trio 3-Tesla is one of the most popular MRIs used for research and clinical imaging. ““F”” stands for ““functional,”” and refers to a particular type of imaging that is used to study changes in blood flow and oxygenation, which are related to neuronal activity, Berns said. The new approach allows researchers to identify areas of the brain that are most active, according to a March 6 University press release. For instance, an fMRI can illustrate when people are thinking about emotions as opposed to solving math problems. Before the installation of the machine, Emory researchers did not always have access to such neuroimaging technology, as there is only one other fMRI facility at Emory University Hospital.

Berns said the new fMRI machine is an element of FERN’’s mission to create a friendly learning environment for people of any field or college major to understand the brain with the fMRI as a fundamental tool. ““A major part of our mission is education,”” Berns said. Undergraduate courses in how to use the fMRI, workshops and training for faculty who want to integrate this tool into their research will be implemented as a part of the education mission, according to Berns. According to the press release, instead of using hired technicians to operate the scanner, FERN will train students and faculty to become involved in all aspects of the research, from experiment design to data collection and data analysis. FERN plans to allow already trained students and faculty to teach others as well as to assist in experiments so that using the fMRI machine will be as hands-on, userfriendly and educational as possible, the press release states. ““From anthropology to economics, political science, music and literature, students and faculty from virtually every discipline we have on campus now have the ability to examine the brain in relation to their area of interest,”” Patricia Bauer, an Emory psychologist and senior associate dean of research at the College, said in the press release. Berns said this tool can be used to reveal how humans think, as researchers will be able to discover anything from emotions, attention span or memory in ways they could not find before. An fMRI machine works by using a large magnetic field that aligns with protons in the water and tissues of the human body, Berns explained. Protons, which are positively charged ions, start ““wobbling”” in the presence of a strong magnetic field. Thus, the fMRI machine uses this ““wobbling”” property to map areas of the brain with radio waves. The machine was delivered in late February and is currently being tested by Siemens’’ technicians.

—— Contact Mallika Manyapu at mmanyap@emory.edu

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FOR THE KIDS

New fMRI Machine to Aid in Brain Research By Mallika Manyapu Staff Writer

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

B

Isabel Kurzner/Staff

usiness School Sophomore Jesse Kramer (right) joins forces with members of the Boys and Girls Club of Metro Atlanta to compete at Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity and Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority’s annual philanthropy event called The Dooley Games. The Dooley Games raises money for the Boys and Girls Club and Court Appointed Special Advocates (C.A.S.A.).

ADMINISTRATION

Wainwright Named to Vice Provost, Halle Institute Director Positions By Harmeet Kaur Staff Writer Philip Wainwright has been appointed vice provost of international affairs and director of the Halle Institute for Global Learning. Wainwright assumed the position on March 1, replacing Holli Semetko as vice provost through an internal search process that took place in the fall. Prior to the appointment, he was the associate dean for the Office of International and Summer Programs (OISP) in the College. Claire Sterk, Emory’’s provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said one of Wainwright’’s primary new duties is leading an effort to develop a global strategy for Emory. In addition, Sterk said Wainwright would finalize an optimal structure for the various offices that he oversees as well as create a governing council consisting of faculty representatives and key administrative leaders.

Philip Wainwright has been named vice provost of international affairs and Halle Institute director. Wainwright indicated that as vice provost, his plans for Emory’’s future would focus on Emory’’s international engagement. He said that while Emory is internationally engaged in numerous ways, its increasing worldwide involvement requires a new agenda and a change in priorities. ““In upcoming months, I’’ll be articulating a vision of where Emory wants to be five to 10 years in the future and coming up with a plan to get us there,”” Wainwright said. Wainwright said that internationalization was one of the framing principles of this strategic plan. He said that this involved evaluating Emory’’s

current global position as well as where and how it should be engaged internationally. In this strategic planning process, however, Wainwright said that identifying Emory University’’s strengths and weaknesses in terms of international engagement would be a challenge. ““It’’s going to require putting into place infrastructure and a strategy that supports [internationalization],”” Wainwright said. ““There are all kinds of ways that Emory is connected internationally but articulating a central message around how Emory uses that engagement as an institution will be a challenge.”” Although Wainwright has worked closely in enhancing Emory’’s role in the international community, he said his new appointment requires him to have a broader view of internationalization at the University. Wainwright, who is an Emory alum, returned to Emory in 1996 to work with the then-newly formed Center for International Programs

Abroad (CIPA). Wainwright said he was involved in CIPA program’’s early growth and developed several programs that are still implemented. OISP, such as the Academics and Culture at Emory (ACE) program for international students and the MD Summer Experience at Emory (MD-SEE) program. In an announcement to the Emory faculty, Sterk expressed optimism about Wainwright’’s recent appointment. She cited his experience with Emory’’s engagement with the international sphere. ““I am confident that he and his team will ensure that our faculty and students realize the transformative power of international experiences in teaching, learning and research,”” Sterk wrote. ““He understands the depth and scope of the University’’s engagement in countries around the world.””

—— Contact Harmeet Kaur at hbhagra@emory.edu


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NEWS

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Courtesy of Tom Brodnax

Co-Founder of “Be More Heroic” Sierra Dowd (left), Emory Alumni Asst. Director of Marketing Communications Michelle Valigursky (center) and motivational speaker and alumnus Sarah Vitorino discussed bullying at Friday’s panel which kicked off Social Justice week.

Panel Discusses Bystander Responsibility in Bullying Continued from Page 1 ““I have a really strong need to connect with young people and explore through writing, talking and journaling the biggest questions that can be so difficult,”” she said. The panel then discussed the responsibility of the bystander, someone who witnesses bullying. Dowd said she refers to the bystander as an ““upstander”” in order to hold them more accountable. She added that she encourages the ““upstander”” to have compassion for not only the victim but the bully as well. She added that bullying will only continue unless individuals seek to understand what factors encourage bullying in the first place. After asking the panel to discuss how to promote healing in the lives of victims, Vitorino redefined such victims as ““survivors,”” which she said is a more empowering term. Dowd then noted that she encourages survivors of bullying to try to turn the experience into a learning opportunity. She added that while survivors

should not let bullying define them, they also should not ignore what has happened to them. Survivors should find a person they trust to confide in about their issues, she said. Valigursky suggested that survi-

“I have a really strong need to connect with young people and explore through writing, talking and journaling the biggest questions that can be so difficult.” — Michelle Lane Valigursky, author

vors allow some time to feel bad about what happened but then step outside of their comfort zone and find a new skill, interest or friend. Additionally, Valigursky said she suggests journaling about the survivor is good at or wants to accomplish. Dowd and Vitorino further

explained to the audience the ways and reasons that they personally became involved with their work. Dowd said she wanted financial stability when she graduated from college —— which, she said, she did not have growing up. However, she also had to figure out how to balance financial stability with her own personal fulfillment. After asking herself what she would do with her life if money did not matter, Dowd knew she wanted to devote her time to ““Be More Heroic,”” she said. She added that she has never felt more fulfilled since making this decision. Vitorino, who conducts research in prisons, said she has met many people through her work who have helped her learn to recognize the humanity in others. Additionally, she encouraged people to find forgiveness and hope for others and themselves. ““Shame and regret are useless,”” she said. ““You should be proud of who are and embrace your mistakes and fold them into your identity.””

—— Contact Elizabeth Howell at ehowel5@emory.edu

THE EMORY WHEEL


NEWS

THE EMORY WHEEL

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

5

Dining Officials, Students React to McCloud’s Undergrad, Grad Students Express Opposing Views on Bill New Clairmont Breakfast Initiative Clothing Store Continued from Page 1 SAAC, referred to the program as a ““huge success,”” with an average of about 40 students daily. On Tuesday, its second morning, 51 students purchased a morning meal at the Emory Market in Clairmont. Timber described a ““community feel”” at the Emory Market each morning, where students are ““hanging out, studying and meeting up with friends for coffee.”” However, while Furhman describes the option as ““designed for convenience,”” some students said they beg to differ. ““You can’’t use it if you’’re in a rush,”” William Matheson, a Goizueta Business School junior and Clairmont resident, said of the option, citing the fact that eating food on the Cliff Shuttles is prohibited. ““If you’’re waking up that early, you’’re probably going to class, in which case you’’d be going to the [Dobbs University Center (DUC)] or Cox [Hall].””

Matheson said that the food ““wasn’’t bad,”” though he added that he feels there is a greater variety of food options at the DUC and Cox. As for whether or not this option will stick around, Furhman said the FSA will rely predominantly on student feedback. ““We’’re hoping for a great response from the Clairmont Campus community that will allow this program to become a permanent feature at the SAAC,”” he said. The program will continue if students utilize it, Patel said. To him, the most crucial aspect of the new Clairmont breakfast option is a college-student staple: coffee. ““The coffee option will be available all day, so it is useful for all residents that do not have a coffee machine or want to go off Clairmont campus for coffee,”” he said. ““This program has an extremely high potential to be successful.””

—— Contact Lydia O’’Neal at lmoneal@emory.edu

Targets Youth

Continued from Page 1 glass of water Boyle gave her and said her goodbyes. ““[McCloud] is trying to target young people, a diverse group of shoppers,”” Boyle said. ““Some things are prep, retro, vintage. We’’re trying to target prom shoppers and also people looking for clothes for theme parties on Emory’’s campus.”” She gestured toward a pair of bird-ofparadise print linen pants. As for McCloud’’s future range of customers, she hopes to bring menswear into the picture in just a few weeks . ““It’’s not like you’’re going to find three of the same thing,”” McCloud said. ““The clothes I provide are one-of-a-kind.”” You’’re a Hanger is open from Monday to Friday from 6 to 9 p.m. and 12 to 6 p.m. on Saturday,

—— Contact Lydia O’’Neal at lmoneal@emory.edu

Continued from Page 1

Gandhi, who is not allowed to vote on any bills, stood in opposition to the bill. ““In my perspective, this has come in the aftermath of the Three-Fifths [Compromise] article [in Emory Magazine], not just the [department changes], or this could have happened three for four months ago,”” Gandhi said. ““The people who were directly affected by that comment, those who are African American —— they have all forgiven him.”” Largely, the bill’’s supporters consisted of graduate representatives of SGA, while opposition mainly came from SGA’’s undergraduate legislators. ““There is an issue,”” Laney Graduate student and SGA Laney Graduate School representative Chris Brown said. ““It’’s not good enough to say everything is fine. There is an issue around leadership at Emory, and President Wagner as president of

the University is cemented in that.”” College junior Shaunesse Jacobs, an SGA junior class representative, acknowledged the difference in perspectives among undergraduate and graduate students. ““Grad students have a very different perspective from Emory undergraduate students, but we have addressed the problem,”” Jacobs commented. ““We’’ve decided that we want to move beyond this and set up ways to come together cohesively and address the problem so it doesn’’t happen again.”” Undergraduate students raised concerns regarding the effectiveness and purpose of the bill and whether it was appropriate to hold such a vote alongside Thursday’’s vote for student leaders. ““I hear people say a lot that we need to hear a student perspective on [leadership], but this is a college campus,”” SGA assistant vice president of alumni relations and Goizueta Business School junior Jordan Angel

said. ““Students are allowed to voice their opinion at any point at time.”” Four graduate students attended the meeting and held up signs asking SGA members to support the bill. ““Students are not going to be leading; they are just going to be reacting,”” said Andrew Zonderman, a second-year history graduate student and a supporter of the bill who attended the meeting. ““We’’re just going to have to take decisions that are made by faculty and administration.”” Following the meeting, Gandhi wrote in an email to the Wheel: ““I think most of SGA voted against this bill because it would not have been constructive for the community. The department changes happened last semester —— we have learned from that process.”” Following the conclusion of the meeting, Ratto declined to comment. —— Contact Nick Sommariva at nicholas.sommariva@emory.edu and Dustin Slade at dpslade@emory.edu


EDITORIALS THE EMORY WHEEL

CONTRIBUTE

Tuesday, March 26, 2013 Editorials Editor: Priyanka Krishnamurthy (pkrish4@emory.edu)

Email: pkrish4@emory.edu

Giving New Life to The Beauty of College Basketball The Iron Curtain ROSS FOGG

The Return of Communism in Czech Republic BEN SOLLENBERGER ““Is the Iron Curtain still a thing?”” quipped a friend in an email I received last week. My initial reaction was to write back ““LOL there are no curtains here —— too bourgeoisie.”” Though in the immediate aftermath of the Czech Republic’’s presidential elections, this ““joke”” deserves a more serious response. At the conclusion of WWII, Czechoslovakia fell into the Soviet sphere of influence. From that point on, communism dominated the political, economic and cultural aspects of everyday life in Eastern Europe. Following the ““fall”” of the Iron Curtain in the late 1980s, Czechoslovakia broke into two separate democratic states —— the Czech Republic and Slovakia. While the Czech Republic has democratically elected almost all of its politicians since its formation, the 2013 elections mark the first time that the president was chosen by popular vote. Ex-Communist Milošš Zeman’’s victory over Karel Schwarzenberg in the Czech presidential elections indeed raises a few red flags. While Zeman claims he is a ““EuroFederalist,”” his pro-continental views only look better in contrast to those held by outgoing president Vaclav Klaus. During his tenure in office Klaus deeply distrusted the European Union (EU) and isolated the Czech Republic from Western Europe. Zeman, however, states he is committed to putting the Czech Republic back into the EU bloc and renewing relations with the West. But what kind of internationalist blatantly exploits Czech xenophobia about Sudeten Germans —— expelled from the former Czechoslovakia after encouraging Hitler to annex the Sudetenland —— by making ludicrous suggestions that Karl Schwarzenberg will actually help the descendants of Sudeten Germans take property away from Czechs? What to make of Zeman when he calls for stronger bonds with the EU and then criticizes Schwarzenberg for his time in exile during repressive Communist Rule and his wife’’s Austrian nationality? Adding a little more context helps clarify Zeman’’s nebulous foreign policy views. The success of his campaign seems to fit in with growing anti-democratic tendencies, a rebirth of nationalism and an overall shift away from the West in the Czech Republic and Eastern Europe. Communism has been resurrected in the Czech Republic. During local elections last October the Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia finished in first in two of the 13 regions and won 182 seats on the regional assemblies. Around 20 percent of the population now identifies with the Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia. As such, it is the second most popular party in the country and by far the fastest growing one. The Czech Republic case is not an outlier. After doubling its share of voters from five to 10 percent, the communists in Ukraine

are also on the rise. The communist party in Belarus —— ““A Just World”” —— saw similar gains and garnered enough support to run as one of the three opposition parties that competed in the 2012 presidential elections. Besides Zeman and the Communists, other Central and Eastern European leaders threaten to distance their nations from Western political and economic institutions. Named by the German weekly Der Spiegel as one of Europe’’s most dangerous politicians, Prime Minister Viktor Orbán vehemently opposes the EU, the IMF and transnational businesses. An unapologetic isolationist, Orbán questions the influence of the EU: ““Who is to rule Hungary? Brussels or the Hungarian government?”” Orbán feels the ““future lies in the East,”” and for good reason. Economically, the Iron Curtain threatens to divide the continent again as Europe now largely depends on Russia for natural gas and energy. Putin’’s autocratic regime continues to build up the Eurasian Economic Community (EAEC) and aims to expand its influence in Eastern Europe and the South Caucasus; Belarus and Kazakhstan entered a customs union with Russia in 2009, with Serbia and Montenegro expected to join soon. Bulgaria’’s government has fought Russia’’s recent attempt to build more dangerous and unprofitable long-term natural gas pipelines projects in Bulgaria. Last January energy prices skyrocketed —— likely due to Russian energy companies conspiring to provoke public outrage —— and Prime Minister Boyko Borisov was forced to resign. In 1989 the celebrated poet and former president of the Czech Republic, Václav Havel, ran for office under the slogan, ““Love and truth conquer hatred and lies.”” Last year Havel died, along with his work to heal the economic, social and spiritual wounds inflicted by Communist rule —— which through today has still not apologized for its 40 years of repressive and authoritarian rule over the Czechs. But the alternatives are no better: cronyism, lack of integrity and political scandals have marred the government’’s reputation and catapulted the Czech Republic to the 22nd highest corruption rate in the EU. The people of the Czech Republic and Central Europe simply don’’t know who to turn to, who to trust. Democracy is failing in Central and Eastern Europe: from corruption and communism in the Czech Republic and Ukraine, to the oneman rule of Hungary, and, most recently, the Belarusian and Bulgarian economic unification with the Kremlin. Reversing these autocratic and communist trends need to figure into the immediate calculus of policy makers, both in Europe and America. Ultimately, though, the responsibility falls onto the ordinary citizens of Central Europe to speak out against anti-democratic and unrepresentative governance —— a la Pussy Riot —— before they no longer have a say.

March Madness: It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year On the surface, it seems like a humdrum activity —— the annual tradition of filling out a bracket, enduring obnoxious fans and TV coverage. But nothing is more exciting or unique than 68 teams from across the country with new rosters each year competing in March Madness. In fact, it is far and away the best major sports competition in the country. March Madness, by virtue of its structure, provides more excitement than any other championship. Of course, everyone loves to see a good upset, but what many people do not consider is that much of the madness associated with the tournament comes from the pairing of teams that rarely, if ever, would play each other in the regular season. Who would ever pair Ole Miss against Wisconsin or Illinois against Colorado? The result, despite what ESPN analysts or Nate Silver’’s closely calculated predictions say, is a completely unpredictable field. This year is even more unpredictable than usual, considering there have been five number oneranked teams this season. 2008 was the only time that all four number-one seeds reached the Final Four. And in recent years, who can honestly say they predicted a Final Four appearance by George Mason in 2006, Virginia Commonwealth in 2011 or for Butler to reach the championship game in both 2010 and 2011? Each year, the NCAA tournament also invites a renewal of the endless debate as to whether the NCAA competition is superior to that of the NBA. The answer is a resounding yes. Despite how paradoxical it seems that an amateur league is more fun to watch than a profession league, especially to those outside the United States, there is no comparison between March Madness and the N.B.A.

Ben Sollenberger is a College junior from Winston-Salem, N.C.

Editorial Roundup

College editorials from across the country The Daily Princetonian Princeton University Friday, March 15, 2013 In its staff editorial, titled ““On P/D/F Language Classes”” the editorial board of The Daily Princetonian discusses the importance of intellectual growth through certain classes that are required for students. While Princeton students are able to fulfill distribution requirements with numerous courses that can be taken pass/D/fail, students are required to take all introductory level language courses on a graded, no-P/D/F scale. The Editorial Board agrees that a letter grade should be required for fulfilling the University language requirement. However, the Board believes that students who have already completed the University foreign language requirement should be allowed to P/D/F in-

Katrina Worsham | Staff

troductory level classes for additional foreign languages. The justification for maintaining the lettergrading scheme for students initially fulfilling their language requirement is important and valid. Learning any foreign language is a difficult skill, and first-time language learners need to fully commit to this multifaceted challenge. The letter-grading scheme helps provide this incentive —— students are generally more willing to work harder in courses where the grades matter more. Moreover, because introductory courses are typically small and discussion is emphasized, all students in the course benefit when their peers are investing themselves in the language. By contrast, if a student P/D/F-ed a language course and did not devote the necessary time, he or she would be adversely impacting the rest of the class.

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“Perhaps the most important part of what makes college basketball unique is the passion intrinsic in the game.” Conversely to the unpredictability of March Madness, since 1984 only eight NBA teams have won the championship. The single-elimination format makes each game matter and to a degree, levels the playing field. The only other notable single-elimination playoff in American sports is the NFL and granted there is no comparison between Super Bowl viewership and that of the NCAA championship, but no one ever referred to the NFL playoffs as ““madness.”” Although NCAA programs spend millions upon millions on coaching, TV deals and facilities, money is largely out of the equation

for players, which eliminates much of the distractions of professional play and allows for more focus on basketball. There isn’’t any fuss about a salary cap, trades, free agency and disputes between teammates or coaches are simply not tolerated. There aren’’t nearly as many fistfights or off-the-court illegal activities in NCAA basketball as there are in the NBA. And there isn’’t nearly the controversy of the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) bowl games and seeding that has plagued college football in recent years——any team that proves itself in the regular season has a legitimate shot at the title in NCAA basketball. Case in point——Florida Gulf Coast University. Amazing. Perhaps the only fundamental flaw with NCAA basketball is the John Calipari system in which increasing numbers of players do not graduate and instead, opt for the NBA. Former coach, Bob Knight, has championed a stipulation that players must complete at least three years of college play to become eligible for professional play and this is an important prescription for the integrity of college basketball. But short of that, the amount of unrefined competition in this tournament is unparalleled. So whether you have no knowledge about college basketball or are an avid fan, if your bracket looks like a failed test or should be framed, enjoy these next weeks of some one the best sport anywhere. The tournament comes only once a year and provides some of the most memorable plays, upsets and teams in all of sports. One last thing —— go Indiana!

Ross Fogg is a College junior from Fayetteville, Ga.

WILLIAM HUPP

A Response to the Use of Drones On Foreign Policy: From One Staff Writer to Another

In the previous edition of The Wheel, a fellow staff writer, Ross Fogg, penned an editorial discussing the benefits of the U.S.’’s drone program. This is an issue about which I feel very strongly, having written a column about Anwar al-Awlaki’’s assassination several weeks ago. I am happy that Fogg has continued the discussion because it is certainly an important one to have. As such, I would like to take this opportunity to address the points Fogg makes while offering more clearly my own take on the matter. It is true that there has recently been significant media coverage about Obama’’s drone policy——it appears to be one of the few things upon which Rachel Maddow and Bill O’’Reilly can agree, at least to some extent. HE MORY HEEL With Rand Paul’’s almost 13-hour filibuster of John Brennan’’s nomination as Director of Arianna Skibell EDITOR-IN-CHIEF the CIA came revived conversations and new Jordan Friedman Executive Editor questions from the media due to Brennan’’s Volume 94 | Number 39 oversight of the drone program. Lane Billings Managing Editor Unfortunately, Fogg works under the false Asst. Sports Editors Copy Chief Business and Advertising assumption that the U.S. must be at war: Ryan Smith Sonam Vashi Bennett Ostdiek News Editor Glenys Fernandez BUSINESS MANAGER Either U.S. troops are fighting on the ground Asst. A&E Editor Nicholas Sommariva or U.S. drones are flying through the air. He Emelia Fredlick Editorials Editor Blaire Chennault Sales Manager Photo Editors Priyanka Krishnamurthy fails to take into account that the objection Alexandra Fishman Design Manager Emily Lin Sports Editor to the use of drones in foreign countries may James Crissman Nathaniel Ludewig Account Executives Student Life Co-Editors Associate Editors be an objection to U.S. intervention more Bryce Robertson, Lena Erpaiboon, Salaar Ahmed, Adam Jenna Kingsley Mandy Kline Harris, Diego Luis broadly. While I cannot speak for all oppoElizabeth Howell Justin Groot Arts & Entertainment Editor Vincent Xu nents of drones, I am of the belief that neither Business/Advertising Office Number Annelise Alexander Online Editor U.S. troops nor U.S. drones ought to be carAsst. News Editors Ross Fogg (404) 727-6178 Karishma Mehrotra rying out military actions in countries like Dustin Slade Afghanistan. Furthermore, there are several countries with which we are not at war, like The Emory Wheel welcomes letters and op-ed submissions from the Emory community. Pakistan and Yemen, in which drones target Letters should be limited to 300 words and op-eds should be limited to 700. Those selected people. Here Fogg’’s proposed troop/drone may be shortened to fit allotted space or edited for grammar, punctuation and libelous content. dichotomy falls short. Submissions reflect the opinions of individual writers and not of the Wheel Editorial Board Rather, drones make war (and warlike or Emory University. Send e-mail to askibel@emory.edu or postal mail to The Emory Wheel, actions) easier for politicians to justify: Not only are we eliminating our enemies, but we Drawer W, Emory University, Atlanta, Ga. 30322.

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Playoffs. Perhaps the most important part of what makes college basketball unique is the passion intrinsic in the game. Players have everything to prove and play their hardest each game, fans have a particular connection to their teams not seen on the professional level, students wait all day in preparation for games and are enthusiastic for each of the 40 minutes, and of course, a hallmark of college basketball that will never happen in the NBA is rushing the court after an important win. And that all happens before the NCAA tournament.

are doing so without putting any troops in harm’’s way. It is for this reason that drones are so sinister. Combine this with the fact that drones are not 100% effective at targeting terrorists——some reports put the percentage as low as 2%——and we are left with a lethal cocktail of civilian casualties and shattered reputation across the globe.

“Given a choice between U.S. troops and U.S. drones, I will instead argue for peace.” Going to war should never be an easy decision to make. The Just War Theory stipulates that war always ought to be a last resort, only to be considered after steps like sanctions and diplomacy have failed. War is so undesirable in part because it causes the deaths of unpredictable numbers of people. Fogg himself mentions how the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have been less publicly renounced than the Second World War or Vietnam. However, if the U.S. had disposable army of unmanned robots with which to fight, as Fogg seems to advocate, there would be almost no ostensible reason for a war hawk to reconsider deploying squadron after squadron of drones anywhere in the world. The related objection to Obama’’s drone policy, then, is one of precedent. While what Obama is doing may not be prima facie objectionable for some people, a more belligerent president may justify future drone strikes in

other countries which could have more dangerous consequences. Fogg also defends Obama’’s policy of targeting American citizens with drone strikes, arguing that an American citizen like Anwar al-Awlaki deserved to die because of his involvement with al-Qaeda. Even if this were so, the Fifth Amendment of the Constitution ensures American citizens due process. While I am certainly no lawyer, being killed by a drone without being informed of the crime with which you are charged does not seem like due process to me. Fogg draws the comparison to the death penalty: The U.S. government already kills hundreds of its citizens; what difference does it make whether it does so with a drone or lethal injection? The difference, of course, is that a person on death row has presumably benefited from extensive judicial review with a trial by a jury of his peers and the right to appeal his case. Furthermore a person facing the death penalty knows beyond a doubt that he or she is facing the death penalty. It is highly unlikely that Anwar al-Awlaki or his 16-year-old son Abdulrahman saw any vestige of due or judicial process before the U.S. government chose to kill them. Fogg concludes that drones are essentially the lesser of two evils. I fundamentally disagree with his assessment based on this logic of limitations. Given a choice between U.S. troops and U.S. drones, I will instead argue for peace. After all, last week marks the tenth anniversary of the beginning of the Iraq War, reminding us all of just how long we have been trying to establish peace in the region. It is time we start leading by example.

William Hupp is a College sophomore from Little Rock, Ark.


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SUDOKU


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ELECTIONS

ENDORSEMENTS

endorsements of student government candidates are designed to help the student body elect its representatives in a more informed manner, as well as to offer the Wheel’’s opinion on each race. The Wheel endorsement committee came to the opinions expressed here after observing and reporting on student government, studying student concerns and interviewing the candidates. The committee discussed each candidate, and endorsees were selected by majority vote. We believe that as the student newspaper, and one of the natural checks on student government, it is our responsibility to research every candidate and provide our best-informed opinion to voters. HESE

THE EMORY WHEEL

Endorsement Committee Members Arianna Skibell Jordan Friedman Lane Billings Sonam Vashi Vincent Xu Nick Bradley Annelise Alexander Mandy Kline James Crissman Bennet Ostdiek

Ryan Smith Nathaniel Ludewig Emelia Fredlick Jenna Kingsley Lizzie Howell Justin Groot Emily Lin Ross Fogg Priyanka Krishnamurthy

Matthew Willis: Innovative and Experienced Adeyemo Equipped to Dedication and Ideas Qualify Willis for SGA President

Amid a trying semester for Emory University, we at the Wheel would like to endorse College junior Matthew Willis for the position of Student Government Association (SGA) president due to his innovative nature and initiatives that can serve the Emory community well. Since transferring to Emory University during his sophomore year, Willis has served as the Student Government Association (SGA) secretary and chief of staff. With this SGA experience under his belt — along with his involvement in several other organizations on campus — Willis has forged relationships with University administrators, taken action to help renovate the Dobbs University Center (DUC) and played a role in restructuring SGA’s Thanksgiving break shuttle initiative, among several other accomplishments. Willis plans to oversee new initiatives if elected while also continuing his work from the past year. He has taken extensive action to turn the DUC into the “living room of campus,” first conducting research on the best way to do so by exploring similar processes at other colleges

Matthew Willis, College junior and SGA chief of staff, has adequate experience under his belt and is qualified to be SGA president, as evidenced by his DUC renovations initative. and universities, and then creating a task force that led to the hiring of consultants to examine the feasibility of such renovations at Emory. His effort to turn the DUC into a more comfortable environment for students is one example of a project through which Willis has illustrated his passion for and dedication to the Emory student body. In addition, Willis has presented concrete, feasible ideas to increase SGA’s presence on campus, a goal that we feel is important in maintaining transparency within the organization. For example, Willis plans to implement two new social media initiatives in an effort to effectively communicate with the stu-

dent body: one that would display an SGA social media feed to the student body on television screens in the DUC and another that would allow students to voice concerns to SGA through an open forum on the organization’s website. In terms of transparency and communication, Willis also plans to condense the SGA legislative body, which could make the organization more efficient and accountable for its actions. Furthermore, he plans to implement a new Community Code of Expectations, openly stating what students should expect from administrators when decisions like the recent department changes are announced. We at the Wheel feel that Willis’ planned initiatives could benefit Emory in a time when many are calling for increased transparency from administrative posts. This transparency is an important quality among both faculty and student governance committees. Willis’ platform also addresses what many see as a racism issue on campus — from the airing of controversial “Dooley Show” episodes online to University President

James W. Wagner’s column about the Three-Fifths Compromise in Emory Magazine. He maintains racism is a problem on campus for which SGA needs to take action. Specifically, Willis hopes to create an environment in which the issues facing individuals of all races are heard, whether that means supporting student-led rallies or listening to the concerns of the black fraternities that have been removed from campus. Willis is knowledgeable about the inner-workings of SGA and has worked tirelessly with University administrators during his time here, illustrating that he truly cares about the success and the future of Emory as a whole. He has worked to create a community in which students of different cultures, ideas and identities can interact under one roof in the DUC and hopes to establish projects that are relevant to the community after a difficult year. Amid the controversies that have hit the University since last semester, the Wheel endorsement committee feels that Willis is fit to serve as SGA president.

Meena Iyer Primed to Serve as SPC President Pinard Proves Best For SPC VP Although it was a close call among the Wheel endorsement committee, we confidently endorse College junior Kerry-Ann Pinard for the position of Student Programming Council (SPC) vice president. This year, Pinard served as both SPC special events chair and SPC Beyond chair. SPC Beyond is a subcommittee of the organization that is dedicated to collaborating with other groups on campus. Through chairing these Kerry-Ann committees simultaPinard neously, Pinard has distinguished herself as a dedicated, hardworking and successful candidate. During her three years as a member of SPC, Pinard has held two executive positions and has spearheaded successful events such as the Think Pink 5K run, Starbucks coffee breaks during exam week, free massages during exam study time and Screen on the Green, among many others. As SPC vice president, Pinard plans to execute three main initiatives, one of which includes plans to diversify SPC’s oncampus presence by providing an array of events throughout the academic year that cater to a diverse student body. These events would be held in addition to the traditional Dooley’s Week and Homecoming. Pinard also plans to continue connecting SPC with other organizations on campus through the SPC Beyond initiative, helping other organizations — some of which may not have the funds or know-how — plan their own successful events on campus. This can be accomplished through training sessions or co-sponsoring such events. Her final initiative concerns SPC’s ability to inform the student body when certain events are taking place. A typical student complaint about missing an SPC event is that they were unaware that it was happening on campus. Pinard is dedicated to ensuring, through various social media avenues, that every Emory student is informed of when and where these events are occurring. For instance, she plans to increase SPC’s online presence through Facebook and the SPC website. Although both Pinard and her opponent stood out as excellent candidates for SPC vice president, the Wheel felt that Pinard’s vast experience and laundry list of accomplishments distinguished her as a more qualified candidate. However, we would encourage Pinard to incorporate the aspect of sustainability into her initiatives, a platform point heavily stressed by her opponent. It is Pinard’s passion, drive and, above all, commitment to turning ideas into reality that make her the best candidate for this position.

With initiatives such as increased cultural inclusivity and tradition-building, College junior Meena Iyer seeks to add further dynamism to the Student Programming Council (SPC). Based on her innovative ideas and visions of SPC’’s role at Emory, the Wheel enthusiastically endorses Iyer for SPC president. Iyer transferred from Occidental College after her freshman year, where she participated in student programming. After cultivating a passion for programming, Iyer joined SPC in the fall of 2011. Iyer has distinguished herself as a candidate with tremendous follow-through, as evidenced by the success of the ““End of the World””-themed Dooley’’s Week Wonderful Wednesday, which she co-organized. She also co-chaired Homecoming week this past fall, which featured musical performances from Slightly Stoopid and Cazzette. Emory’’s first Chili Cook-off was co-organized by Iyer, and this year, she has also focused her efforts on expanding SPC’’s outreach and partnerships.

Meena Iyer, College junior and SPC Homecoming cochair, demonstrates a perfect combination of passion, dedication and follow-through.

Iyer envisions the creation of a more inclusive campus culture as a central role for SPC. This includes partnerships with two to three cultural groups a semester to not only recognize the achievements of such groups but also to promote culture at Emory. Iyer seeks to increase the transparency of SPC, holding the organization to a higher standard of accountability by immediately announcing finalized event dates and publishing a quarterly report. This report would recap past SPC events and allow students to evaluate SPC’’s work. In addition, Iyer sees SPC as an organization responsible for continuing to foster tradition at Emory. Iyer plans on

enhancing Welcome Weekend, generating Emory pride for new and returning students by sponsoring events such as artist performances or alternatively a small circus act with music and food. The SPC president is not only an internal executive in the organization but also serves as an external head of programming. Iyer’’s achievements have demonstrated her ability to organize large-scale events. Given the debauchery rampant at large student events, risk management is a top priority for Iyer. She is also looking to step up SPC’’s responsibility by emphasizing sustainability. This initiative would include establishing a sustainability chair as part of an effort to have all SPC events be zero-waste. With a proactive mentality and a passionate, dedicated approach, Iyer is the candidate best suited for SPC President —— one who is aware of the organization’’s role in the Emory community. She seeks to leverage SPC’’s wide reach and resources to make Emory an exciting school that students are proud to attend.

Ye Ji Kim Shows High Potential

Diversity Plan Demonstrates Preparation for SGA VP Based on her concrete initiatives regarding diversity and increased communication throughout campus, the Wheel endorses College junior Ye Ji Kim as the next Student Government Association (SGA) vice president. Although Kim has no prior experience within SGA specifically, we feel that her time served as a divisional treasurer of College Council (CC) and on the President’s Commission on Race and Ethnicity makes her a qualified candidate who can effectively deal with a variety of student concerns. Kim aims to promote racial, religious and cultural awareness through a mandatory diversity-training program for student leaders, which would also be open to members of the larger student body and the administration. The Wheel endorsement committee believes that this centerpiece of Kim’s platform is a necessary and very feasible initiative, especially in our current climate regarding diversity. Though it was a close call on who would receive the Wheel endorsement for this position, Kim’s specific, practical ideas and explicit awareness of relevant problems on campus won over the majority of the endorsement committee. However, we do advise Kim to create a more organized plan of action for the ideas on her platform if elected. Kim has been an active member of the Student Hardship Fund, which is a

Ye Ji Kim, College junior and CC divisional treasurer, plans to implement much-needed diversity traning if elected. This plan is easily obtainable and neccesary. monetary committee that aims to help students who experience sudden financial emergencies, as well as New Student Orientation and the implementation of this year’s Social Justice Week. With these varied experiences behind her, Kim expresses an enthusiasm for improving the Emory community that makes her a strong candidate for SGA vice president. In her platform, Kim proposes specific, innovative ideas for increasing open communication and dialogue on campus, including hosting forums and public events to discuss modern social justice, race, religion and sexual assault. She has already implemented some ways of improving communication within student government, including setting up weekly office hours where student leaders and members of the student body can voice their concerns.

Kim also hopes to focus on the internal workings of SGA, allowing her to enhance the role of committees in responding to student concerns. She wants the central leadership of SGA to act as a support system for the organization as a whole and to make a stronger effort to reach out to committees, which would then communicate their projects to the student body and larger Emory community. Like other candidates, Kim plans to increase transparency and communication between SGA and the student body, but she also wants to hold events similar to office hours, during which students could give real feedback on their feelings about SGA’s initiative and projects, which is unique to her platform. As a CC officer, Kim has a strong sense of dedication and passion, as well as a straightforward and direct manner of speaking, which we feel to be important in communicating to large groups. We hope Kim will enhance these qualities if elected to this leadership role. The endorsement committee feels that Kim’s goals are ones that are very pertinent to current student concerns in the Emory community and that are realistically attainable within a year’s time, and these qualities, coupled with her passion for bettering the University, make her a strong candidate for SGA vice president.

Be Next CC President

The Wheel is pleased to endorse College junior and current College Council (CC) assistant to the vice president of programming/junior legislator Bisi Adeyemo. Her in-depth, feasible platform along with her history of executing initiatives successfully makes Adeyemo an excellent candidate for CC president. Adeyemo’s platform consists of seven areas of campus that she plans to work on, including transparency, community, sustainability, academia, programming, transportation and parking and the internal organization of CC. Each of these areas delineates a clear plan of action for how Adeyemo will implement these changes if elected. As CC president, Adeyemo will do all in her power to improve the issue of inclusivity on this campus. This initiative will strive to make every organization on campus feel more central to the Emory experience — whether that be cultural organizations, Emory Athletics, Oxford continuees or the University offices. Adeyemo has already started accomplishing this goal as is evident through the Willy’s Mexicana Grill Tailgate she planned with Emory Athletics several weeks ago, actively engaging the athletic community. She has also proposed the idea of using more CC resources to promote cultural events, such as Free Tibet Week. Additional programming includes movies on McDonough Field in conjunction with Late Night, an International Day with the Office of Multicultural Programs and Services (OMPS) during unity month and expanding Social Justice Week to include all University offices. Adeyemo intends to establish more intentional engagement with club liasons by including them in budget committee meetings and extending promotional resources to help increase attendance at events. Internally, she plans to foster an inclusive community within CC by requiring Sensitivity and

Bisi Adeyemo, College junior and CC junior legislator, has distinguished herself as the most appropriate candidate for CC president through her dedication. Sexual Assault Peer Advocacy Training for all CC members. Adeyemo is committed to opening up avenues of communication between CC, the administration and the student body. CC presidents meet with key administrators on a regular basis, and the occurrences of these meetings are rarely discussed beyond closed doors. Adeyemo is interested in announcing to the student body when those appointments take place and allowing students to submit ideas for topics of discussion. With the decline of LearnLink as a way for students to communicate with other students on a wide scale, Adeyemo proposes the establishment of an electronic syllabus datacase through which students can view past course syllabi. This will go hand-in-hand with the recent decision by the Office of Undergraduate Education to publicize students’ class evaluation forms. With this initiative, students will be able to crossreference a class’ syllabus and students’ opinons about the class. Additionally, we would like to commend Adeyemo for her efforts to make our campus more sustainable. She has proposed an additional Green Bean Coffee Cart on Clairmont campus. She also plans to establish recycling locations for batteries and ink cartridges. Adeyemo’s faithful commitment to the betterment of the College through CC is admirable. Her dedication is evident through her accomplishments, and the Wheel is proud to endorse Adeyemo for CC president.

Reuben Does Not ‘Lack’ Experience Needed for the CC VP Position The Wheel firmly endorses College freshman Reuben Lack for College Council (CC) vice president. Lack is a freshman CC legislator and an active participant in Emory’s Barkley Forum. Although his time on CC has been short, Lack spent his first term revising College Council’s monetary policy to reign in excess spending from the Executive Fund. This new policy frees a substantial amount of money to be given to clubs in need. Lack has also been heavily involved on a task force to address issues regarding free speech on campus. He will present a policy proposal, inspired by the University of Pennsylvania’s free speech policy, to the Emory University senate at the end of this summer. Although Lack, like most other candidates, has emphasized the apparent need for transparency in Emory’s student government system, he has also presented feasible and unique solutions to combat this issue. Lack has suggested the posting of video minutes of CC meetings and the publication of internally-circulated documents regarding monetary allocations on the council’s website. He has also recommended that the CC website include added functionality such as professors’ syllabi and a well-moderated forum for class comments. Lack suggested that CC establish a permanent forum, working in tandem with the Barkley Forum, for the discussion of prescient issues such as race, sexual harassment, free speech and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) rights. His platform also proposes an educational campaign on tolerance and meaningful inclusion that would engage the support of the many clubs on campus. Furthermore, Lack has emphasized the need for CC to become an organization that advocates for students on matters of significant campus interest, such as the recent department changes. He

Reuben Lack, College freshman and freshman legislator, has demonstrated in just one year that he has the drive and follow-through to qualify as a viable candidate for CC vice president. recommends that CC adopt a stance on pressing campus issues and use its power to support movements that benefit students. His platform also suggests the organization of an action committee within the council to organize student activists in the event that the University administration has not taken sufficient action. We believe that Lack’s approach to CC’s role on campus is unique and has the potential to do much good on campus. However, we caution moderation in using CC as a means of facilitating student activism. Many campus issues can be divisive, and we are concerned that the council might take action in situations where the student body’s opinion is too varied to unify behind a single organization. CC should not be the vehicle for one person’s political beliefs. Instead, it should speak for the student body, and we advise the concerted use of consensus in decisions of a more volatile political nature. Lack has impressed us with his ability to take action and achieve tangible change in such a short period of time. He has demonstrated a knack for getting things done, which we feel is crucial to the success of student government organizations like CC. He and his platform are well-organized and present viable means to enact change both within CC and on campus. We wish Lack the best of luck in the upcoming election.


THE EMORY WHEEL

ELECTIONS

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

9

CANDIDATE STATEMENTS SGA PRESIDENT

CC PRESIDENT

Raj Patel

Jeremiah (Jerry) Lau

My name is Raj Patel, and I’’m running to be your next SGA President to ensure that all voices from our diverse student body are heard and because of the experience and passion that I have in making our university a better place. Currently, I’’m your SGA Governance Committee Assistant Chair and Representative-at-Large. Over the past year, I authored the proposals that led to current Oxford sophomores being able to vote in College Council elections, formally taking a stance against guns on campus and writing the resolutions and bills to support the Graduate Student Retention & Recruitment Early Childhood Education Initiative. All of these initiatives took collaboration among many student groups, and that is exactly what I intend to do in making our university a more inclusive university, gaining student input in administrative decisions, implement a printing stipend, improving SGA & student groups’’ relations and including the original campus (Oxford College) in our Founders’’ Week celebrations. Let’’s ““Say BYE to APATHY!””

Matthew Willis I am running for SGA President because now, more than ever, there is a need for a strong student government with a clear vision and focused deliverables. As chief of staff for the current SGA, I have learned so much about the institution and the possibilities. If elected president, I will introduce plans to create a Code of Expectations for the University that will outline our expectations, as students, of how decisions and overall communication should be accomplished. Additionally, I will create a committee to work with administrators on a review of the University Mission Statement. These are important steps but not the ultimate solution. SGA needs to be transparent in ways we have never before attempted. When issues arise, SGA should organize town halls, followed by University-wide statements on clear steps of action. I am running to tackle current issues and issues that are still to come. I understand that SGA is a reactionary organization, and I hope that with your vote, I can be the next SGA President. To learn more about what I’’ve done and what I’’m planning, please visit meetmatthewwillis.com.

SPC PRESIDENT Meena Iyer

Raghvi Anand

Emory is in need of a more inclusive campus culture. In light of recent events, it is imperative that a highly visible organization like SPC makes a strong commitment to support programs that foster a socially-engaged student body. To do this, I want to partner with at least two cultural or diversity programs each semester. Additionally, through the implementation quarterly reports, I hope to increase the accountability and transparency of SPC in the eyes of students. In my heart, I know I can actualize these visions. I joined SPC in the fall of 2011 and after just one year, I was appointed to co-chair of Homecoming Week 2012. Six months of planning later, we created the largest Homecoming Week this campus has ever seen. My ability to dream big, my proactive nature and my passion are the three things that have and will continue to allow me to succeed as SPC president.

Hello my fellow Emory students! My name is Raghvi Anand, and I would be honored to serve as your next Student Programming Council (SPC) president. As a third-year SPC member, I have had the privilege of serving as secretary, sponsorship chair, Taste of Emory co-chair 2012 and Dooley’’s Week co-chair 2013, bringing you artists such as Kendrick Lamar and 3Lau. Given my experience with this organization and my vision for the future SPC, I will be able to drive this organization to work more closely with the entire Emory community. By implementing a new ““Campus Outreach”” position and creating a new, user-friendly website, SPC will be more visible to the entire campus, and more members of the community will have the opportunity to voice their opinions on SPC events. I am passionate about SPC and will to continue to provide quality entertainment that drives Emory’’s spirit.

Hello! My name is Jerry Lau, and I am running for College Council President. Having served on College Council for three years as a legislator and an executive board member as Chief of Staff, I have the experience and initiative to recognize what can be improved. I believe I can effectively serve the student body by increasing transparency, collaboration and results. As President, I will hold office hours so I can respond to students’’ concerns and take action to resolve them. I will bring more speaker events to campus, create more schoolspirited events, establish free laundry in all residence halls and increase shuttles at nights and weekends. Most importantly, I am wholeheartedly dedicated to making your experience at Emory my top priority. Please vote for me next Thursday, March 28.

Andrew Casso

This school year has proven that a positive change is desperately needed in order for Emory to gain the inclusive, unified community that we yearn for. If elected president of College Council (CC), I will work for stronger transparency between administrators and the student body by encouraging students to send their concerns so I can be their voice during meetings. I will also work vigorously with the Campus Life Compact and ensure that the student body’’s voice is present and actions are taken on the concerns that we have as students. These are just a few things that I hope to address if elected. However, none of this is possible without you! My role if elected is to represent you —— being your voice and your advocate. I am running for CC president because I am passionate about Emory, and I am confident that a positive change can happen in our student body if we work together.

Niketu Patel

I’’m running for President of College Council (CC) to help students save on textbooks. CC currently possesses $200,000 in savings, plus $130,000 allocated to the Executive Board and over $400,000 preserved for club operations and programming. While preserving the funds specifically allocated to student organizations, I will reprioritize surplus spending to create a new ““Student Savings Account.”” After $100,000 is saved, CC will distribute Barnes & Noble vouchers to all Emory undergraduates to spend at the bookstore and use its massive purchasing power to negotiate low prices. For example, if we collectively spend a total of $100,000 on vouchers, this would bring so much profit to B&N that they would have an incentive to give back an even greater sum —— say $130,000 in returns. Students who purchase their textbooks online will be eligible to apply for Eagle Dollars in substitution. As President, my priority will be putting students first!

I’’m a junior and a psychology major and English minor. Currently, I am the president of the Residence Hall Association (RHA). I’’ve been part of RHA for the past three years as the President of Fevans, VP of Programming and the President. I want to change how College Council (CC) is viewed. Many students don’’t know what CC does or do not want to seek money from CC. Monthly letters should be sent out by a different CC Rep each time to inform students what we are up to. I want to coordinate with the college to create a class syllabi database, improve shuttles to Clairmont and Emory Point over the weekends and make it easier to ask for money from College Council. I want better collaboration with our chartered organizations and am willing to supplement organizations that need extra financial need for events.

SGA VICE PRESIDENT Calvin Li As a university, we have experienced a turbulent and revealing period this past year. The resiliency and willingness to embrace the challenges that face us I have seen from every part of the university and greater community has inspired me to run for SGA Vice President. The student body deserves a SGA that has the vision to lead the university in a new direction and the experience to deliver on promises. I offer the vision to focus on accessibility to all divisions, advocacy for our students and the improvement of the value of your Emory degree. I offer two years of experience in SGA and the connections with Student Alumni Board, RHA and ResLife to make the vision a reality. Emory, the time has never been more apt, the opportunity never greater and the path never clearer than now. We have an opportunity to redefine Emory, together. Let’’s do this.

Ye Ji Kim

CC VICE PRESIDENT Adam Chan

Reuben Lack

Greetings everyone! I’’m running for your College Council (CC) vice president. I currently serve as your sophomore legislator and a member of the Administration committee on CC. Throughout this year, I have worked with FACE to help reform dining services, helped plan and organize Thank Dooley It’’s Friday and Tailgate, chartered and funded a multitude of organizations and most importantly, bridged gaps with transparency between governing bodies and the student body. I am running for this position to enact change and build unity within the Emory community, because I believe that I am relatable, individualistic and purpose-driven. On March 28, please vote and join me as we write our own chapter of the Emory story.

If you’’re reading these statements, you’’re probably extremely confused. There are so many candidates running for so many things. So, what’’s different about me? Our campus is at a turning point. College Council has the potential to do so much good. But we can only have an impact if you elect leaders that see College Council as a force to advocate and actually lobby on behalf of students. In that capacity, I have a proven record. I’’m the only candidate who voted in favor of taking action on the department cuts. But with your help, we can fix that. We can establish forums to discuss issues of race on a continuous basis, rather than be forced to react. We can listen to students’’ concerns and respond, but only with leaders willing to commit to take action. Support that vision this Thursday, and together we will build a movement for change.

SPC VICE PRESIDENT

Bisi Adeyemo

The main drive to run for SGA vice president comes from my passion for the betterment of the Emory community and humanity. I seek to provide an experience that embraces the unique diversity of our university and share the campus culture of community development and inclusion. My experiences on the College Council (CC) in the last three years have also been consistent with these issues. Taking an active participation in the creation of CC’’s Social Justice Week and serving as an Orientation Captain has made me recognize the opportunities for growth in the overall student body. I seek to design a program including diversity trainings for leaders as well as any other member of the community that are interested. This is one of the efforts that I will make with SGA to create an inclusive environment and provide opportunities for Emory students to become more culturally aware and sensitive.

Ted Guio The Student Government Association (SGA) is the voice of the students. I am running for SGA vice president because I can be that voice, our voice. I believe in an Emory family, a community walking towards individual and group progress. I believe in a community that fosters dialogue, unity and achievement. Together we can make SGA the voice it should be. I am ready to implement fresh ideas that would make our Emory experience unique. Facts about Ted: (1) in SGA since 2011 as a freshman and sophomore representative and governance committee chairperson; (2) lived in Colombia for 15 years; (3) joint major in psychology and linguistics; (4) business concentration in strategy and management. Platform highlights are: (1) Half-a-Toast Ceremony for a third-year Coke toast; (2) Club Emergency Committee, which would be designed for clubs with emergencies requiring last-minute funding; (3) Emergency Family Fund, designed to temporarily aid the most urgent cases where students are in need of childcare support while encouraging ongoing talks with the University administration; (4) Re-design LearnLink’’s classifieds to have an easy way to trade.

Kadean Maddix

Graham Brooks I am running for SPC vice president because I am ecstatic about the potential growth and direction of SPC. As a three-year member of SPC, I have had the great opportunity to co-chair both Homecoming and Dooley’’s Week. As vice president, I would advocate for increased diversity of our programming, encourage involvement from the entire Emory community and prioritize creative ways to increase our outreach and publicity, especially to graduate students. I would promote a continued commitment to partnership and collaboration. I would advocate for sustainable and zero-waste programming events. I would champion spirit and work with the Emory community to further promote the unique pride and spirit that exists throughout our University. Most importantly, we must work together to make our University an even more fun, exciting and inclusive community. I am excited and energized about the future of not only SPC but Emory as a whole.

Kerry-Ann Pinard Friends, Take a moment to look around our beautiful campus. What do you see? What do you feel? I see a second home. I feel a deep connection and love for my university. Sadly, I am aware that many students do not have this same sense of school spirit or pride, so my mission as your next SPC vice president is simple: change that. I want to create a community —— a true community —— within Emory. I believe that one of the best ways to do this is by increasing the number and range of events we have as well as diversifying the location of these events so that every corner of our campuses, from Oxford to the Law School, is utilized. I have already started this work in my three years of SPC experience and as current Special Events chair and SPC Beyond chair, and I will wholeheartedly continue and strengthen this effort as your SPC VP!

Akshay Goswami

I have been a member of RHA for 3 years. We have come so far as an organization, working to make the residential experience a memorable one. However, I believe RHA is at a crossroads. Change is never easy. As president, I want to hold on to the ideals that make this organization successful. But I believe that there needs to be some fundamental restructuring and re-evaluation of programming. For too long we have neglected the residential experience of upperclassmen. I want to fix that. I want to make RHA more transparent. To do this, we need to promote RHA and what we stand for. We can achieve these goals if we are courageous enough to address them. I want to continue advocating for all residents. If elected, these are the ideals that will guide my decisions. I hope you will join me in this effort for a better RHA.

My name is Akshay Goswami, and I’’m running to be your RHA President for the upcoming year. The core values of my candidacy are vision, passion and experience. My vision is for RHA to play a more collaborative role with other governing bodies to enhance the Emory experience for our students. I plan to bolster RHA’’s presence around campus via having a stronger collaboration with the Greek community and other organizations, along with increasing our role among upperclassmen at Clairmont Campus. My experience lies in the fact that I have been and am part of diverse organizations around campus with a leadership role, due to which I have the knowledge and skills necessary to take RHA to the next level. In addition to increasing RHA’’s collaborative efforts, I plan on bringing printers to our residence halls in order to meet the growing needs of our residents. Let’’s make Emory a better experience together!

RHA PRESIDENT

Alex Elkins

As RHA president, I want to focus on meeting the expectations students have for their Emory careers. Recently, RHA has focused on the freshman experience, with the Greek and Clairmont communities losing their voice in the process. Many of our programs do not cater to events that all Emory residents want to participate in. RHA has not taken advantage of its unique structure with both programming and advocacy aspects together. By utilizing both, we can produce the programs and experience that students want. First, by assessing feedback from residents, we can base our programming schedule around that information. I am energetic, creative and determined. I have served as Dobbs Hall President, Greek Liason and VP of Advocacy on RHA. In that time, I have been a part of programming and advocacy, creating a memorable Dobbs’’ Friday Night Lights Fall Fiesta, worked on the Phoenix Plan and helped develop programs within dining and athletics.

Jessica Simon

I can still remember the first time I heard about RHA at the Activities Fair my freshman year: the moment I got hooked. Formerly the President of Fevans and as VP of Programming this year, I committed myself to the mission of fostering collaboration at Emory. Through approaching organizations like the Student Hardship Fund, SPC and the Student Alumni Board to co-program, I helped make RHA more approachable and built relationships with prominent leaders that leave me with the tools needed to achieve my vision as president. Next year, I will continue this collaborative trend to plan bigger and better programs and use the relationships I spent this year building to tap into the unique influences and problem-solving skill sets other organizations have to offer from an advocacy perspective. Ultimately RHA and the organizations it works with will better and more effectively echo the needs and desires of our residents. For me, it’’s all about enhancing their experience.

SGA REPRESENTATIVE-AT-LARGE Tyler Van Dusen There are thousands of voices at Emory, and I desire to ensure that each has an opportunity to be heard and to have influence upon this community’’s future. To this end, I, Tyler Van Dusen, am running for your SGA representative-at-large. As your representative, I would seek to advocate greater transparency of SGA and even SPC activities in order to foster greater representation of the student body. I will continually strive to engender greater communication and more convenient access to SGA members and representatives through a variety of means including, but not limited to, Wonderful Wednesday and email. I will use my experience working with the College Council Student Concerns Committee to ensure that pressing issues are communicated to SGA and dealt with in an expedient manner. With your support, I will work with you and for you to ensure a more active, connected and positive Emory.

Shraya Sharma My name is Shraya Sharma, and I’’m running for representative-at-large on Student Government Association (SGA). As a SGA class representative for the past two years, I have gained the experience, knowledge and understanding of SGA that can guide me in representing the collective interests of both graduate and undergraduate students. As a representative-at-large, I will push efforts to promote events that engage the entire Emory community, facilitate dialogue between SGA and the student body, increase campus safety, make SGA more approachable and provide students with more opportunities to enjoy our campus’’ intellectually- and culturally-enriching experiences. Furthermore, it is my personal goal to promote the growth of numerous organizations as well as the student body that comprises them. It is the diversity of these student-led groups that makes up the heart of Emory, and, with your support, I want to continue that tradition in my third year on SGA as your representative-at-large.

Sumaali Chheda I am running for SGA rep-at-large. I’’m Sumaali Chheda, currently one of three Student Government Association (SGA) legislators for the freshman class. After representing students in government for the past nine years, I would like to continue doing this in order to carry on improving your Emory experience. This year, I worked on three major initiatives: (1) improving cell phone service on campus, and Woodruff Library and the new residence halls will receive better cell phone reception starting next semester; (2) helping set up shuttles to the airport from Emory’’s campus during Thanksgiving break; (3) arranging to have the outlets on Level One of the Woodruff Library fixed. In the upcoming year as representative-at-large, I hope to pursue the following initiatives: (1) expanding the improved cell phone service initiative to various locations including Cox, the DUC, Oxford Campus and various Graduate School buildings; (2) making the Emory Unplugged more reliable across both the Atlanta and Oxford campuses; (3) arranging to have the remaining electrical plugs in the rest of the Woodruff Library fixed.

Zeeshan Anwar Hey y’’all! I’’m Zeeshan Anwar, and I’’m going to be a senior next year. Although I have never served on student government, I have been actively involved on campus since my freshman year for various organizations, involving the presentation of bills to and requesting funding from College Council and SGA. I have seen the ““other side of things”” and noticed great potential for improvement, including increasing ease of access, convenience and transparency on both ends. Working with cultural, leadership, career and housing organizations, I hope to bring my diverse experience to SGA —— fostering a fresh, external perspective. A lot of people have asked me, ““Why now?”” My answer to this is simply because it never crossed my mind before but now having garnered experience over the past three years, I believe I can sufficiently make a difference to leave behind a better Emory. Thank you.

Raj Tilwa A few major changes or movements marred this academic year, and arguably the biggest was the departmental restructuring or cuts. That episode was very close to our hearts, and it demonstrated to us the shortage in communication between the administration and the student body. If elected as your representative-at-large to the Student Government Association (SGA), I will seek to build bridges between the different populations of the university. I believe that increased transparency and communication between the student body and the administration is key to a thriving and successful university. In order to do this, one of my platforms is to set up action committees to investigate recent or proposed changes and prepare monthly reports to educate the student body. I also intend to foster Emory spirit through initiatives like SGA T-shirt Exchange, which I introduced as a current freshman representative on SGA. So, vote Raj Tilwa for rep-at-large.


THE EMORY WHEEL

ELECTIONS

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

9

CANDIDATE STATEMENTS SGA PRESIDENT

CC PRESIDENT

Raj Patel

Jeremiah (Jerry) Lau

My name is Raj Patel, and I’’m running to be your next SGA President to ensure that all voices from our diverse student body are heard and because of the experience and passion that I have in making our university a better place. Currently, I’’m your SGA Governance Committee Assistant Chair and Representative-at-Large. Over the past year, I authored the proposals that led to current Oxford sophomores being able to vote in College Council elections, formally taking a stance against guns on campus and writing the resolutions and bills to support the Graduate Student Retention & Recruitment Early Childhood Education Initiative. All of these initiatives took collaboration among many student groups, and that is exactly what I intend to do in making our university a more inclusive university, gaining student input in administrative decisions, implement a printing stipend, improving SGA & student groups’’ relations and including the original campus (Oxford College) in our Founders’’ Week celebrations. Let’’s ““Say BYE to APATHY!””

Matthew Willis I am running for SGA President because now, more than ever, there is a need for a strong student government with a clear vision and focused deliverables. As chief of staff for the current SGA, I have learned so much about the institution and the possibilities. If elected president, I will introduce plans to create a Code of Expectations for the University that will outline our expectations, as students, of how decisions and overall communication should be accomplished. Additionally, I will create a committee to work with administrators on a review of the University Mission Statement. These are important steps but not the ultimate solution. SGA needs to be transparent in ways we have never before attempted. When issues arise, SGA should organize town halls, followed by University-wide statements on clear steps of action. I am running to tackle current issues and issues that are still to come. I understand that SGA is a reactionary organization, and I hope that with your vote, I can be the next SGA President. To learn more about what I’’ve done and what I’’m planning, please visit meetmatthewwillis.com.

SPC PRESIDENT Meena Iyer

Raghvi Anand

Emory is in need of a more inclusive campus culture. In light of recent events, it is imperative that a highly visible organization like SPC makes a strong commitment to support programs that foster a socially-engaged student body. To do this, I want to partner with at least two cultural or diversity programs each semester. Additionally, through the implementation quarterly reports, I hope to increase the accountability and transparency of SPC in the eyes of students. In my heart, I know I can actualize these visions. I joined SPC in the fall of 2011 and after just one year, I was appointed to co-chair of Homecoming Week 2012. Six months of planning later, we created the largest Homecoming Week this campus has ever seen. My ability to dream big, my proactive nature and my passion are the three things that have and will continue to allow me to succeed as SPC president.

Hello my fellow Emory students! My name is Raghvi Anand, and I would be honored to serve as your next Student Programming Council (SPC) president. As a third-year SPC member, I have had the privilege of serving as secretary, sponsorship chair, Taste of Emory co-chair 2012 and Dooley’’s Week co-chair 2013, bringing you artists such as Kendrick Lamar and 3Lau. Given my experience with this organization and my vision for the future SPC, I will be able to drive this organization to work more closely with the entire Emory community. By implementing a new ““Campus Outreach”” position and creating a new, user-friendly website, SPC will be more visible to the entire campus, and more members of the community will have the opportunity to voice their opinions on SPC events. I am passionate about SPC and will to continue to provide quality entertainment that drives Emory’’s spirit.

Hello! My name is Jerry Lau, and I am running for College Council President. Having served on College Council for three years as a legislator and an executive board member as Chief of Staff, I have the experience and initiative to recognize what can be improved. I believe I can effectively serve the student body by increasing transparency, collaboration and results. As President, I will hold office hours so I can respond to students’’ concerns and take action to resolve them. I will bring more speaker events to campus, create more schoolspirited events, establish free laundry in all residence halls and increase shuttles at nights and weekends. Most importantly, I am wholeheartedly dedicated to making your experience at Emory my top priority. Please vote for me next Thursday, March 28.

Andrew Casso

This school year has proven that a positive change is desperately needed in order for Emory to gain the inclusive, unified community that we yearn for. If elected president of College Council (CC), I will work for stronger transparency between administrators and the student body by encouraging students to send their concerns so I can be their voice during meetings. I will also work vigorously with the Campus Life Compact and ensure that the student body’’s voice is present and actions are taken on the concerns that we have as students. These are just a few things that I hope to address if elected. However, none of this is possible without you! My role if elected is to represent you —— being your voice and your advocate. I am running for CC president because I am passionate about Emory, and I am confident that a positive change can happen in our student body if we work together.

Niketu Patel

I’’m running for President of College Council (CC) to help students save on textbooks. CC currently possesses $200,000 in savings, plus $130,000 allocated to the Executive Board and over $400,000 preserved for club operations and programming. While preserving the funds specifically allocated to student organizations, I will reprioritize surplus spending to create a new ““Student Savings Account.”” After $100,000 is saved, CC will distribute Barnes & Noble vouchers to all Emory undergraduates to spend at the bookstore and use its massive purchasing power to negotiate low prices. For example, if we collectively spend a total of $100,000 on vouchers, this would bring so much profit to B&N that they would have an incentive to give back an even greater sum —— say $130,000 in returns. Students who purchase their textbooks online will be eligible to apply for Eagle Dollars in substitution. As President, my priority will be putting students first!

I’’m a junior and a psychology major and English minor. Currently, I am the president of the Residence Hall Association (RHA). I’’ve been part of RHA for the past three years as the President of Fevans, VP of Programming and the President. I want to change how College Council (CC) is viewed. Many students don’’t know what CC does or do not want to seek money from CC. Monthly letters should be sent out by a different CC Rep each time to inform students what we are up to. I want to coordinate with the college to create a class syllabi database, improve shuttles to Clairmont and Emory Point over the weekends and make it easier to ask for money from College Council. I want better collaboration with our chartered organizations and am willing to supplement organizations that need extra financial need for events.

SGA VICE PRESIDENT Calvin Li As a university, we have experienced a turbulent and revealing period this past year. The resiliency and willingness to embrace the challenges that face us I have seen from every part of the university and greater community has inspired me to run for SGA Vice President. The student body deserves a SGA that has the vision to lead the university in a new direction and the experience to deliver on promises. I offer the vision to focus on accessibility to all divisions, advocacy for our students and the improvement of the value of your Emory degree. I offer two years of experience in SGA and the connections with Student Alumni Board, RHA and ResLife to make the vision a reality. Emory, the time has never been more apt, the opportunity never greater and the path never clearer than now. We have an opportunity to redefine Emory, together. Let’’s do this.

Ye Ji Kim

CC VICE PRESIDENT Adam Chan

Reuben Lack

Greetings everyone! I’’m running for your College Council (CC) vice president. I currently serve as your sophomore legislator and a member of the Administration committee on CC. Throughout this year, I have worked with FACE to help reform dining services, helped plan and organize Thank Dooley It’’s Friday and Tailgate, chartered and funded a multitude of organizations and most importantly, bridged gaps with transparency between governing bodies and the student body. I am running for this position to enact change and build unity within the Emory community, because I believe that I am relatable, individualistic and purpose-driven. On March 28, please vote and join me as we write our own chapter of the Emory story.

If you’’re reading these statements, you’’re probably extremely confused. There are so many candidates running for so many things. So, what’’s different about me? Our campus is at a turning point. College Council has the potential to do so much good. But we can only have an impact if you elect leaders that see College Council as a force to advocate and actually lobby on behalf of students. In that capacity, I have a proven record. I’’m the only candidate who voted in favor of taking action on the department cuts. But with your help, we can fix that. We can establish forums to discuss issues of race on a continuous basis, rather than be forced to react. We can listen to students’’ concerns and respond, but only with leaders willing to commit to take action. Support that vision this Thursday, and together we will build a movement for change.

SPC VICE PRESIDENT

Bisi Adeyemo

The main drive to run for SGA vice president comes from my passion for the betterment of the Emory community and humanity. I seek to provide an experience that embraces the unique diversity of our university and share the campus culture of community development and inclusion. My experiences on the College Council (CC) in the last three years have also been consistent with these issues. Taking an active participation in the creation of CC’’s Social Justice Week and serving as an Orientation Captain has made me recognize the opportunities for growth in the overall student body. I seek to design a program including diversity trainings for leaders as well as any other member of the community that are interested. This is one of the efforts that I will make with SGA to create an inclusive environment and provide opportunities for Emory students to become more culturally aware and sensitive.

Ted Guio The Student Government Association (SGA) is the voice of the students. I am running for SGA vice president because I can be that voice, our voice. I believe in an Emory family, a community walking towards individual and group progress. I believe in a community that fosters dialogue, unity and achievement. Together we can make SGA the voice it should be. I am ready to implement fresh ideas that would make our Emory experience unique. Facts about Ted: (1) in SGA since 2011 as a freshman and sophomore representative and governance committee chairperson; (2) lived in Colombia for 15 years; (3) joint major in psychology and linguistics; (4) business concentration in strategy and management. Platform highlights are: (1) Half-a-Toast Ceremony for a third-year Coke toast; (2) Club Emergency Committee, which would be designed for clubs with emergencies requiring last-minute funding; (3) Emergency Family Fund, designed to temporarily aid the most urgent cases where students are in need of childcare support while encouraging ongoing talks with the University administration; (4) Re-design LearnLink’’s classifieds to have an easy way to trade.

Kadean Maddix

Graham Brooks I am running for SPC vice president because I am ecstatic about the potential growth and direction of SPC. As a three-year member of SPC, I have had the great opportunity to co-chair both Homecoming and Dooley’’s Week. As vice president, I would advocate for increased diversity of our programming, encourage involvement from the entire Emory community and prioritize creative ways to increase our outreach and publicity, especially to graduate students. I would promote a continued commitment to partnership and collaboration. I would advocate for sustainable and zero-waste programming events. I would champion spirit and work with the Emory community to further promote the unique pride and spirit that exists throughout our University. Most importantly, we must work together to make our University an even more fun, exciting and inclusive community. I am excited and energized about the future of not only SPC but Emory as a whole.

Kerry-Ann Pinard Friends, Take a moment to look around our beautiful campus. What do you see? What do you feel? I see a second home. I feel a deep connection and love for my university. Sadly, I am aware that many students do not have this same sense of school spirit or pride, so my mission as your next SPC vice president is simple: change that. I want to create a community —— a true community —— within Emory. I believe that one of the best ways to do this is by increasing the number and range of events we have as well as diversifying the location of these events so that every corner of our campuses, from Oxford to the Law School, is utilized. I have already started this work in my three years of SPC experience and as current Special Events chair and SPC Beyond chair, and I will wholeheartedly continue and strengthen this effort as your SPC VP!

Akshay Goswami

I have been a member of RHA for 3 years. We have come so far as an organization, working to make the residential experience a memorable one. However, I believe RHA is at a crossroads. Change is never easy. As president, I want to hold on to the ideals that make this organization successful. But I believe that there needs to be some fundamental restructuring and re-evaluation of programming. For too long we have neglected the residential experience of upperclassmen. I want to fix that. I want to make RHA more transparent. To do this, we need to promote RHA and what we stand for. We can achieve these goals if we are courageous enough to address them. I want to continue advocating for all residents. If elected, these are the ideals that will guide my decisions. I hope you will join me in this effort for a better RHA.

My name is Akshay Goswami, and I’’m running to be your RHA President for the upcoming year. The core values of my candidacy are vision, passion and experience. My vision is for RHA to play a more collaborative role with other governing bodies to enhance the Emory experience for our students. I plan to bolster RHA’’s presence around campus via having a stronger collaboration with the Greek community and other organizations, along with increasing our role among upperclassmen at Clairmont Campus. My experience lies in the fact that I have been and am part of diverse organizations around campus with a leadership role, due to which I have the knowledge and skills necessary to take RHA to the next level. In addition to increasing RHA’’s collaborative efforts, I plan on bringing printers to our residence halls in order to meet the growing needs of our residents. Let’’s make Emory a better experience together!

RHA PRESIDENT

Alex Elkins

As RHA president, I want to focus on meeting the expectations students have for their Emory careers. Recently, RHA has focused on the freshman experience, with the Greek and Clairmont communities losing their voice in the process. Many of our programs do not cater to events that all Emory residents want to participate in. RHA has not taken advantage of its unique structure with both programming and advocacy aspects together. By utilizing both, we can produce the programs and experience that students want. First, by assessing feedback from residents, we can base our programming schedule around that information. I am energetic, creative and determined. I have served as Dobbs Hall President, Greek Liason and VP of Advocacy on RHA. In that time, I have been a part of programming and advocacy, creating a memorable Dobbs’’ Friday Night Lights Fall Fiesta, worked on the Phoenix Plan and helped develop programs within dining and athletics.

Jessica Simon

I can still remember the first time I heard about RHA at the Activities Fair my freshman year: the moment I got hooked. Formerly the President of Fevans and as VP of Programming this year, I committed myself to the mission of fostering collaboration at Emory. Through approaching organizations like the Student Hardship Fund, SPC and the Student Alumni Board to co-program, I helped make RHA more approachable and built relationships with prominent leaders that leave me with the tools needed to achieve my vision as president. Next year, I will continue this collaborative trend to plan bigger and better programs and use the relationships I spent this year building to tap into the unique influences and problem-solving skill sets other organizations have to offer from an advocacy perspective. Ultimately RHA and the organizations it works with will better and more effectively echo the needs and desires of our residents. For me, it’’s all about enhancing their experience.

SGA REPRESENTATIVE-AT-LARGE Tyler Van Dusen There are thousands of voices at Emory, and I desire to ensure that each has an opportunity to be heard and to have influence upon this community’’s future. To this end, I, Tyler Van Dusen, am running for your SGA representative-at-large. As your representative, I would seek to advocate greater transparency of SGA and even SPC activities in order to foster greater representation of the student body. I will continually strive to engender greater communication and more convenient access to SGA members and representatives through a variety of means including, but not limited to, Wonderful Wednesday and email. I will use my experience working with the College Council Student Concerns Committee to ensure that pressing issues are communicated to SGA and dealt with in an expedient manner. With your support, I will work with you and for you to ensure a more active, connected and positive Emory.

Shraya Sharma My name is Shraya Sharma, and I’’m running for representative-at-large on Student Government Association (SGA). As a SGA class representative for the past two years, I have gained the experience, knowledge and understanding of SGA that can guide me in representing the collective interests of both graduate and undergraduate students. As a representative-at-large, I will push efforts to promote events that engage the entire Emory community, facilitate dialogue between SGA and the student body, increase campus safety, make SGA more approachable and provide students with more opportunities to enjoy our campus’’ intellectually- and culturally-enriching experiences. Furthermore, it is my personal goal to promote the growth of numerous organizations as well as the student body that comprises them. It is the diversity of these student-led groups that makes up the heart of Emory, and, with your support, I want to continue that tradition in my third year on SGA as your representative-at-large.

Sumaali Chheda I am running for SGA rep-at-large. I’’m Sumaali Chheda, currently one of three Student Government Association (SGA) legislators for the freshman class. After representing students in government for the past nine years, I would like to continue doing this in order to carry on improving your Emory experience. This year, I worked on three major initiatives: (1) improving cell phone service on campus, and Woodruff Library and the new residence halls will receive better cell phone reception starting next semester; (2) helping set up shuttles to the airport from Emory’’s campus during Thanksgiving break; (3) arranging to have the outlets on Level One of the Woodruff Library fixed. In the upcoming year as representative-at-large, I hope to pursue the following initiatives: (1) expanding the improved cell phone service initiative to various locations including Cox, the DUC, Oxford Campus and various Graduate School buildings; (2) making the Emory Unplugged more reliable across both the Atlanta and Oxford campuses; (3) arranging to have the remaining electrical plugs in the rest of the Woodruff Library fixed.

Zeeshan Anwar Hey y’’all! I’’m Zeeshan Anwar, and I’’m going to be a senior next year. Although I have never served on student government, I have been actively involved on campus since my freshman year for various organizations, involving the presentation of bills to and requesting funding from College Council and SGA. I have seen the ““other side of things”” and noticed great potential for improvement, including increasing ease of access, convenience and transparency on both ends. Working with cultural, leadership, career and housing organizations, I hope to bring my diverse experience to SGA —— fostering a fresh, external perspective. A lot of people have asked me, ““Why now?”” My answer to this is simply because it never crossed my mind before but now having garnered experience over the past three years, I believe I can sufficiently make a difference to leave behind a better Emory. Thank you.

Raj Tilwa A few major changes or movements marred this academic year, and arguably the biggest was the departmental restructuring or cuts. That episode was very close to our hearts, and it demonstrated to us the shortage in communication between the administration and the student body. If elected as your representative-at-large to the Student Government Association (SGA), I will seek to build bridges between the different populations of the university. I believe that increased transparency and communication between the student body and the administration is key to a thriving and successful university. In order to do this, one of my platforms is to set up action committees to investigate recent or proposed changes and prepare monthly reports to educate the student body. I also intend to foster Emory spirit through initiatives like SGA T-shirt Exchange, which I introduced as a current freshman representative on SGA. So, vote Raj Tilwa for rep-at-large.


Arts&Entertainment THE EMORY WHEEL

Tuesday, March ,  A&E Editor: Annelise Alexander (annelise.alexander@emory.edu)

EMORY DANCE

Dancers Explore Instinct ‘Versus’ Interpretation By Emelia Fredlick Asst. A&E Editor Though nearly impossible, sometimes it’’s best to go into a performance knowing absolutely nothing about it. And that was exactly how ““Versus,”” which premiered this weekend at Emory’’s Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, needed to be experienced. Choreographed by Emory Dance Department Senior Lecturer George Staib and performed by his independent company Staibdance, ““Versus”” was both entrancing and daunting. In Dance Department Director Lori Teague’’s opening address, she instructed audience members not to think too hard about the dance —— just ““feel.”” But it can be difficult to turn off the impulse to interpret. So naturally, I ignored Teague’’s cautions and spent the majority of ““Versus”” trying to ““figure it out.”” And at the performance’’s end, I still had no idea what was going on. But I absolutely enjoyed it. As soon as the lights went up, you could tell there was going to be something special about this show. The first of the three sections of ““Versus,”” titled ““I: Crevasse,”” opened to reveal Staibdance company member Claire Molla kneeling in a muted spotlight, motionless, as the other dancers stood in darkness behind her. Molla quickly broke into dance, effortlessly alternating between stillness and suspension to quick, agile movement. Molla is a captivating performer, her movements feel organic and pure. The other two sections of ““Versus,”” titled ““We: Touché”” and ““Them: Mob”” followed a similar mindset: undefined yet stimulating, puzzling yet mesmerizing. For its part, the second segment provided the show’’s most concrete offerings. Voiceovers offered a recitation of

a police record, audio snippets from soap operas and sound effects from commercials. As the melodramatic, satirical sounds played, the dancers migrated in a circle around the perimeter of the stage, ““chugging along”” in a line. And in an unexpected turn of events, they began slapping each other. Seriously. Slapping, pushing, kicking and throwing. Though intriguing at first, this portion seemed to drag on just a bit too long: the novelty of on-stage combat quickly wore off, and the dancers’’ pained reactions to the violence became irritating. Perhaps this irritation was the point, but it proved a vicious circle, repetitive and maddening, but by all means inescapable. After all the dancers had traveled around the circle and sufficiently hurt one another, they joined forces. One by one, each dancer joined the pack as they changed direction, marching forward in a configuration resembling an army. Once they had assembled the team, they stopped to face the audience in a confrontational manner —— defiantly transitioning from provoking each other to being the ““we”” referenced by the section’’s title. Though a piece of an entirely different nature, particular praise is owed to Nicholas Surbey (’’10C) and Staibdance company member Erik Thurmond, who followed that striking section with a plain, simple duet. They employed no theatrics, no gimmicks, not even a smidgen of humor. Just the two of them alongside an exquisite piano accompaniment, easily commanding the stage. After the intensity of the preceding segment, this duet was a welcome shift in tone, thanks to its simplicity, vitality and serenity. And finally, ““Them: Mob”” integrated the themes of the previous two sections, as the dancers moved both

Courtesy of Anton Molla

Nicholas Surbey (above) was just one member of the ensemble cast that brought Emory dance department faculty member George Staib’s “Versus” to life last weekend. in impeccable unison and occasionally on their own. On numerous occasions, they reached for one another in unusual manners: a hand grasping for a foot, a head rested on a chest. And in these curious movements, it was often unclear whether they were assisting or obstructing one another, if they were struggling together or against each other. After 70 minutes of non-stop dancing, ““Versus”” concluded just as swiftly as it had begun. On a dimly-

lit stage, the group of dancers flowing through space suddenly stopped moving to stand in a line facing forward. They stood up straight and gently walked backwards into the darkness, laughing knowingly at the audience. And then, all of a sudden, that was it. It was a jarring, unexpectedly quick conclusion to the dance, leaving a sense of tenseness and uncertainty in the air. It is moments like that one which

ALBUM REVIEW

illuminate why we’’re always attempting to decipher dance —— because the art form is, by nature, so conceptual. There are no concrete words to tell us what’’s going on, yet there are so many deliberate choices that define the performance: music, costumes, lighting, moments like this ending. Maybe that intangibility is part of why ““Versus”” was so challenging to process. It wasn’’t a specific story; it didn’’t follow one character’’s clashes with these issues. Rather, ““Versus””

spoke universally to issues of conflict and resolution, harmony and turbulence. And when the performance is centered on such an immense notion, maybe the only way to grasp that concept is by absorbing it emotionally rather than intellectually. That can be hard to accomplish, but in the case of ““Versus,”” it made the viewing experience all the more worthwhile.

—— Contact Emelia Fredlick at emelia.j.fredlick@emory.edu

MUSIC REVIEW

Timberlake Matures with ‘Experience’ Vampire Weekend Stays True to Self By Jordie Davies Staff Writer

Attention, everyone: Justin Timberlake is head-over-heels, ecstatic and deeply in love and his new album The 20/20 Experience tells the world about his amazing euphoria. The album is loaded with R&B goodies dedicated to making love and finding a connection that lasts forever. Timberlake is notably working in the same style of music rather than crossing over to the electronic hits currently topping the charts. Even so, this album is a bit cleaner, more mature and more focused than his previous album FutureSex/

By Logan Lockner Staff Writer

LoveSounds. 20/20’’s opening track ““Pusher Love Girl”” greets listeners with dramatic violins and then reels them in with a sexy, thumping base —— Timberlake’’s voice cooing to his ““little pusher love girl.”” Background vocalists aid Timberlake’’s easy falsetto with soul and rhythm, along with trumpets enticing and adding to the drama of the song. Fabulous riffs are provided by an organ, and listeners immediately know Timberlake pulled out all the stops for this album. All of the songs on the album are around six or seven minutes, and listeners get the sense that Timberlake is genuinely enjoying himself in the studio, putting everything he can into each track. Even the simpler songs, like ““Don’’t Hold the Wall”” and ““Let the Groove Get In”” are destined to be party-starting, club-thumping jams, once the inevitable electronic remixes are made. Otherwise, every song is a sweet ode to love. The album is full of baby-making music, like ““Spaceship Coupe,”” where Timberlake wants to take his lady love on a trip to ““make love on the moon,”” or ““Tunnel Vision”” where Timberlake only has eyes for one girl in the whole world. Of course, The 20/20 Experience has Timberlake’’s hit ““Suit & Tie”” and all its Tom Ford glory. Honestly, when I first heard the song, it was not my favorite. I thought it was a bit silly and trite. Still, the song is fun to sing and come on, it

Courtesy of Wikipedia

Justin Timberlake’s latest album, The 20/20 Experience, debuted last week. The album is Timberlake’s third solo album since breaking away from his ‘N Sync roots. features Jay-Z! ““Suit & Tie”” is a bit old-school, with Timberlake wanting to ““show you a few things.”” This makes me think that Timberlake has done some growing, and the song picks charm over allure, love over sex, like much of Timberlake’’s album. Whereas FutureSex/LoveSounds was made up of hasty club songs, many of the tracks on 20/20 are slow jams. ““That Girl”” is one of the best slow jams on this record, with Timberlake being introduced ““all the way from Memphis, Tennessee”” with the Tennessee Kids. This song sounds like Al Green and Marvin Gaye took Timberlake aside and taught him how to sing love songs. ““That Girl”” is dripping with sincerity and soul as well as clarity. Timberlake is sure of what he wants, declaring ““I’’m in love with THAT girl.”” This is it; Timberlake has the love of his life. Sorry everyone, the man is taken. Of course, Timberlake has invit-

ed us to share the love, penning ““Mirrors,”” the most romantic song on the album. The song is reportedly inspired by the love between his grandparents and is about a deep relationship that lasts a lifetime. ““Mirrors”” is about that person that is an extension of oneself, the other half, the one you can’’t live without. The song is lovely, with a lively chorus of violins and an emotional moment of a cappella. In the very sweet second half, the most moving lyric is perhaps when Timberlake, over the refrain ““You are the love of my life,”” sings ““Now I say goodbye to the old me.”” Another notable song is the last one, which is entitled ““Blue Ocean Floor.”” This song departs from the rest of the album in sound, but maintains the overall love theme. ““Blue Ocean Floor”” sounds like water, giving and taking, swelling and falling. With faint beach sounds in the background, this song is quite personal, and Timberlake whispers passionate

reassurances to his love, promising to always be there for her and neatly punctuating the album. Timberlake’’s 20/20 Experience is a wonderful album, reflecting his musical growth but maintaining the R&B infused pop hits he’’s known for. There is something for everyone on this album, and Timberlake puts his heart and soul into every track. 20/20 once again establishes his musical staying power and relevance: his undeniable talent gives Timberlake the ability to release albums seven years apart and still be successful. Word on the street is that there is a second volume of The 20/20 Experience to be released later this year. While we wait, listeners can suit up for classy time with Timberlake’’s fabulous new album of love songs and fantasize about the special someone in their life —— or be compelled to go find them.

—— Contact Jordie Davies at elizabeth.davies@emory.edu

Vampire Weekend, the quartet famed for their Columbia diplomas and for their distinctive blend of Afro-pop and twee sensibilities, delighted legions of fans earlier this week with the release of two previously unheard tracks from their forthcoming album Modern Vampires of the City, which is due out on May 7. The pair of songs, entitled ““Step”” and ““Diane Young,”” follows ““Unbelievers”” as the second and third tracks to be released from Modern Vampires of the City. The band debuted ““Unbelievers”” while wearing Day of the Dead-inspired face makeup on the Halloween episode of ““Jimmy Kimmel Live”” last October. Featuring frenzied keys, a string section and vocals from frontman Ezra Koenig and keyboardist Rostam Batmanglij, ““Unbelievers”” seems to be pretty standard Vampire Weekend fare —— which is by no means a complaint. The fact that the song doesn’’t necessarily stray from what listeners have come to expect from the band only draws more attention to how fresh ““Step”” and ““Diane Young”” are. From the opening of ““Step,”” which features a vocal sample from the track ““Step to My Girl”” by the 1990s rap group Souls of Mischief, there’’s a marked departure from Vampire Weekend’’s earlier style. References to hip-hop aren’’t necessarily new for the band (remember Koenig’’s shout out to the rapper Lil Jon’’s song ““Get Low”” in ““Oxford Comma?””), but the tune of ““Step”” is actually a re-orchestration of the sax line in the back of ““Step to My Girl.”” But instead of appearing as a cheap musical ploy —— as it easily could have in the hands of less mature or talented musicians —— this specific reference becomes a poignant aspect of the narrative Koenig describes in ““Step.”” He sings about listening to ““tapes from L.A. / Slash San Francisco / But actually Oakland,”” which was the home

of Souls of Mischief. The sample of ““Step to My Girl”” functions, therefore, as a compelling narrative layer of the story Koenig is telling about a younger version of himself, inserting the listener into the consciousness of the character being described in the song. As it displays Vampire Weekend’’s maturation as musicians and storytellers, ““Step”” is itself a reflection on the process of personal, emotional and intellectual maturation. It’’s a topic the band has visited before —— most memorably in ““Giving Up the Gun”” (from the album Contra) —— but never with the level of sincerity and emotional directness present in ““Step.”” Koenig questions the relationship between aging and wisdom, with each chorus beginning ““The gloves are off / The wisdom teeth are out.”” In the song’’s finest verse, he muses ““Wisdom’’s a gift but you’’d trade it for youth / Age is an honor —— it’’s still not the truth”” and continues, ““Everyone’’s dying but girl —— you’’re not old yet.”” This exploration of aging persists in ““Diane Young”” —— quite obviously, considering the title is a play on the phrase ““dying young.”” Near the song’’s end, Koenig cries, ““Nobody knows what the future holds / It’’s bad enough just getting old,”” and he remarks earlier that the person he’’s addressing has ““the luck of a Kennedy.”” ““Diane Young”” is as frantic as ““Step”” is smoothly-controlled, with a passage of manic keys and screamed vocals that recalls the climax of ““Walcott”” from the band’’s debut album. There’’s sure to be much speculation about this new album’’s remaining nine unheard tracks in the months leading up the release of Modern Vampires of the City but based on what has been released thus far, fans should expect doses of the classic Vampire Weekend sound as well as plenty of innovative material to provide the soundtrack for this summer.

—— Contact Logan Lockner at llockne@emory.edu


E

THE EMORY WHEEL

agle xchange WED 27

THUR 28

vs. Berry College 3 p.m. Chapell Park

FRI 29

SAT 30

Covenant College 3 p.m. Cooper Field

at Covenant College 1/4 p.m. Lookout Mountain,

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Emory Classic All Day WoodPEC

Emory Classic All Day WoodPEC

Emory Classic All Day WoodPEC

Emory Classic All Day WoodPEC

Chase Fieler is sooo dreamy...

Women’s Tennis Goes 2-1 at The Fab 7 D-III Tournament Christine Hines/Staff

Continued from The Back Page

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in their match, losing in third doubles, 9-7. definitely have the capability to pull ““I performed well this weekend,”” through and come out with the win Clark said. ““My doubles partner when we see them at Nationals in a Annette Sullivan and I played really few months.”” well together ... and I’’m excited for On Saturday, rain forced play to us to keep getting better and playing be moved to the indoor courts at the other competitors.”” Woodruff P.E. Center (WoodPEC), In first singles, Clark picked but the Eagles did not skip a beat in up a quick point winning 6-0, 6-1 the match. to increase Emory’’s lead to 3-1. They beat No.12-ranked Freshman Marissa Levine bested her Washington University at St. Louis opponent in second singles 7-6 (2), (Mo.). 6-4. Emory won every doubles conRosen gave Emory the team victest against its contory by winning in ference rival, with third singles 6-2, Clark and freshman “My doubles partner An- 6-3. Annette Sullivan Emory gained winning first dou- nette Sullivan and I played its sixth point from bles 8-4, Wylie and really well together ... and Gordon’’s win 6-1, Gordon earning an I’m excited for us to keep 6-3 in sixth singles. 8-4 victory in sec- getting better and playing Clark said she ond doubles, and was very pleased other competitors.” Kelly and freshwith her team’’s man Emma Taylor ability to come back — Gabrielle Clark, and win. rounding out the sweep by winning ““It felt great to junior 8-2 in third doubles. come back and win This is the fifth the next two days,”” time this season Clark said. ““It is that Emory has swept the doubles important that we gain experience matches in a dual match. playing multiple days in a row and The Eagles then needed only two well because we will need the endurwins to claim a triumph. ance come Nationals.”” Clark scratched the first victory After resting this upcoming week, with a 6-0, 6-3 in first singles, and the Eagles will hit the road for a threeKelly clinched the team victory with day trip to New England where they 7-5, 6-4 success. will face No. 7-ranked Middlebury Emory capped off the tourna- College (Vt.), No.10-ranked Bowdoin ment by upsetting top ranked Johns (Maine) and No. 3-ranked Williams Hopkins University (Md.) 6-3.The College (Mass.) on April 3, 4 and 5, Eagles claimed a key edge after dou- respectively. bles play by winning two of the three ““Emotionally and physically, we matches. are just beat up,”” Bryant said. ““We Clark and Sullivan came from are definitely going to be practicing behind to win 8-6 in first doubles, but taking it easy at the same time. It while Wylie and Gordon defeat- is a delicate balance, but we will be ed their opponents 8-4 in second ready for New England.”” doubles. —— Contact Alexander Del Re at Kelly and Taylor were just edged alexander.del.re@emory.edu

BENNETT OSTDIEK

Freshman infielder Hannah Sendel swings at a pitch in a game earlier in the season. Sendel went 0-for1 with a walk and an RBI as the designated hitter in the second of two games against Covenant College (Ga.).

Offense Helps Top-Ranked Eagles Extend Win Streak to 16 By Nicola Braginsky Staff Writer

Friday marked the 15th straight victory for the No. 2-ranked softball team as the women beat Covenant College (Ga.) twice in a double-header. The Eagles walked away with a six-inning 9-0 decision in the opener followed by an 11-0 shutout in five innings. Both games were played at Emory’’s Cooper Field. ““I think we started off slow but really picked it up as the first game went on and into the second game,”” freshman pitcher Sydney Carpenter said. In the first game, sophomore catcher Micah Scharff started Emory’’s offensive attack with an impressive five RBIs and three extrabase hits. ““We have the energy, and if we keep giving each game our all, I have no doubt that we will be exactly where we want to be at the end of this season,”” Scharff said. Scharff gave the Eagles a 3-0 lead with a three-run homer and later allowed her teammate, junior Ally Kersthold, to score with a two-out double in the sixth inning. ““We scored near the beginning of both games and kept the pressure on throughout the entire game,”” junior first baseman Megan Light said. ““That is something we need to continue to do to be successful

RYAN SMITH

Assistant Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor

throughout the rest of the season and into the postseason.”” Freshman Alyssa Pollard hit safely twice as well, while Carpenter picked up her sixth win after throwing six scoreless innings. She struck out eight opposing batters. ““We did a good job of stringing things together on Friday,”” Light said. ““Many different people came through with hits when we needed it. It was definitely a team effort. We played really good defense which helped us remain way ahead throughout both games.”” In the second nightcap, the Eagles continued the offensive show. ““We kept our energy up through the second game and were scoring runs up until the last inning we played, which is something we normally struggle with,”” Carpenter said. With a two-run double, Light got the Eagles going early in the top of the first inning. Light shined offensively, going 3-for-3 at the plate with three RBIs, paving the way for a big day for Emory’’s offense. ““We definitely needed the first game to serve as preparation for the night game,”” Scharff said. ““We went in with energy already flowing, and all of the players demonstrated solid performance throughout play time.”” Junior second-baseman Claire Bailey and Kersthold drove in two runs each while freshmen Katelyn Gibson and Courtney Sugihara each

NATHANIEL LUDEWIG

EVAN MAH

Sports Editor

Friend of the Section

Who did you pick to win the NCAA Tournament?

Florida

Indiana

Indiana Hoosiers

When does that start?

Will FGCU continue its run?

AAAAAAOOOOO

Absolutely

Not a chance

I’’ve never been to Florida so I can’’t comment

What’s your favorite fast food place?

Honey Bun from BP

Chipotle

McDonald’’s

A burrito bowl from Chipotle is pretty good

Salma Hayek

3/5ths

The 3/5ths one was bigger news

Definitely the 3/5ths

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Cartman

News, easily

Content-wise: Student Life; people-wise News

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James Wagner

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11

On Fire

SOFTBALL

Rhodes College Tournament All Day

WOMEN’S MEN’S TRACK TRACK AND SOFTBALL AND FIELD FIELD

BASEBALL

TUE 26

SPORTS

contributed a pair of hits. The Eagles’’ progress did not slow in the second inning of the game, as Emory scored six more times with a two-run single by Bailey and a tworun double by Kersthold. An RBI single from Light, followed by a double from Gibson which scored senior first-baseman Ellyn Kocoloski, upped Emory’’s lead to 10-0 in the fourth inning. Gibson was pleased with the quick start. ““We were able to jump on Covenant early in the second game and continued throughout with our hitting,”” she said. Junior Amanda Kardys pitched all five innings. Kardys struck out four batters and did not allow a run to score, raising her personal record to 19-1. ““Every game is a stepping stone to our ultimate goal, which is to win the NCAA championship,”” Gibson said. ““We still have a lot of room to grow and improve, but we have come together as a team, and we are ready to take any challenge that is thrown at us together.”” With a current mark of 34-1, the Eagles will return to action on Saturday, March 30, on the road in Memphis, Tenn. The women will be playing against Rhodes College (Tenn.) and Fontbonne College (Mo.). —— Contact Nicola Braginsky at nbrags@emory.edu

Track Squads Compete At Emory Invitational Continued from The Back Page Crane, who won the 800-meter run in 2:16.20, junior Morgan Monroe, who won the 100-meter hurdles in 14.49, and junior Meredith Lorch in the 3000-meter steeplechase (11:31.18). The 4x800-meter relay team of sophomore Marissa Gogniat, freshman Julie Williamson, senior Calley Edwards and Crane also earned a first place finish with a time of 9:25.98. The men’’s team totaled 57 points. Marian University (Ind.) won the meet with 97 points, while Hope and Buffalo State (N.Y.) tied for second with 94. The only male Eagle to earn a victory was sophomore James Bassen in the javelin throw. He threw for a distance of 58.11 meters, which is the fourth best distance in school history. ““The most exciting performance of the weekend was James in the javelin,”” Curtin said. ““He had a Nationals caliber throw on Friday, over 190 feet. This was a big breakthrough for him, a huge personal best and one of the top throws in program history.”” The Eagles will compete again next weekend in the Emory Classic, which they will host this coming Friday and Saturday. —— Contact Bennett Ostdiek at bostdie@emory.edu

This one is for you, Florida Gulf Coast. The Eagles became the first No. 15 seed to advance to the Sweet 16 this week, and in doing so, they gave hope to all the boys who were beat up in middle school and had their lunch money stolen that better things do come. You cannot make a story like this up. Cinderella may have lived in a chimney (or at least near one —— your On Fire correspondent is not exactly sure of the details, but Cinderella was definitely near some cinders), but Florida Gulf Coast is from Dump City, Fla. That sounds like something you would say in the middle of a streetball game —— your On Fire correspondent can hear the memories from his (or her) youth on the streets of a white upper-middle class neighborhood. ““Hey man, you play frisbee (your On Fire correspondent played a very different sort of street-ball than the players for Florida Gulf Coast presumably did, but the principle remains constant) so badly. Where are you from, Dump City?”” Your On Fire correspondent appears to have misinformed by his friend at dinner Saturday night. In doing some cursory research to corroborate the statements made in the previous paragraph, your intrepid On Fire correspondent discovered that Florida Gulf Coast is actually located in Fort Myers, Fla. Furthermore, they dunk a lot and are thus sometimes referred to as Dunk City. An innocent mistake. A lesser journalist would be tempted to go back and remove the previous paragraph. But your On Fire correspondent is made of stronger stuff. As someone once said, beneath the thought, there is the afterthought. And even if the thought of the above paragraph is no longer correct, the fact that Florida Gulf Coast has previously been such a joke that your On Fire correspondent would believe this story is very telling. And the fact that he (or she) would take the two seconds to verify this story is very telling as to the journalistic integrity of your On Fire correspondent. Still, we must take back our earlier statement. It appears that you can make a story like this up (or at least part of it). Here is a short list of things your On Fire correspondent came up with when he (or she) could not sleep last night that were more likely than Florida Gulf Coast making the Sweet 16: The DUC is more likely to serve a delicious meal than Florida Gulf Coast was to make the Sweet 16. This is no light statement. Over his (or her) Emory career, the standards of deliciousness of your On Fire correspondent have changed dramatically. We are not talking about closing your eyes and shoving it down your throat. We are not talking about holding your nose and gingerly sticking out your tongue. We are not talking about taking a bite and saying, in surprise, ““Wow, that was not so bad.”” We are talking about something you would be willing to choose over, say, Chili’’s. We were going to say Waffle House but decided that would be an impossible standard. Florida Gulf Coast made it to the Sweet 16. So the ball is in your court now, DUC. Students at Emory are more likely to have spirit than Florida Gulf Coast was to make the Sweet 16. Every year, we see prospective student government officers say that they have figured out what is wrong with Emory —— it has no spirit. But never fear! They have a plan to fix it, and if you vote for them, you will not be able to tell the difference between here and UGA. And every year students at Emory yawn and say that they do not care what their student leaders have to say, because they have a B-School meeting to attend and then they are hitting up Mags. Florida Gulf Coast made it to the Sweet 16. The ball is in our court, Emory students. The Emory football team is more likely to make the Sweet 16 than Florida Gulf Coast was. This would require Emory first getting a football team. Thirty-two teams play in the NCAA Division III Football Tournament, but there is not much literature on the subject, and your On Fire correspondent was unable to determine if the second round is called the Sweet 16. If it is not, then that would have to start happening too. And then maybe the students would find some spirit in the football team. And good food would be served at the game. Or maybe not. We would think about it more, but we are hungry and want to go to Waffle House before Maggie’’s.


SPORTS THE EMORY WHEEL

Tuesday, March ,  Sports Editor: Nathaniel Ludewig (nludewi@emory.edu)

SWIMMING & DIVING

Courtesy of Emory Athletics

The women’s swimming and diving team celebrates at the podium after winning its otherworldly fourth consecutive Division III national championship. The victory is the sixth national championship in the program’s history, the most of any athletics program at Emory. The Eagles totaled 619 total points throughout the four days of competition, well ahead of second place Kenyon College (Ohio), which earned a total of 483 points.

Women Win Fourth Straight Title By Ryan Smith Asst. Sports Editor

The men’’s and women’’s swimming and diving teams finished off their seasons in spectacular fashion last weekend at the NCAA Division III Championships in Shenandoah, Texas, with the women claiming their fourth consecutive national championship and the men earning a fifth-place finish. It was the sixth national title in program history for the women’’s team —— the most of any Emory athletic program —— and it was not even close. The Eagles racked up 619 points during the meet’’s four days, comfortably topping second-place Kenyon College (Ohio), who earned 483 points. Although the Eagles led throughout the entirety of the four-day meet, the lead was not safe until the final day of competition. Kenyon trailed Emory by just 53.5 points after three days. Their highlight performance —— and the one that clinched the national title —— came in the meet’’s last event, the 400-yard freestyle relay, where the Eagles’’ team of senior Renee Rosenkranz, sophomore Nancy Larson, senior Ann Wolber and senior Anna Dobben

claimed a victory with a Division III record time of 3:21.28. The same team also earned first place in the 200-yard freestyle relay. It was a fitting way for Wolber, Rosenkranz and Dobben to end the Emory swimming careers. Wolber earned her sixth first-place national finish, while Rosenkranz and Dobben finished with two apiece. The Eagles also turned in a startling 26 All-American performances. Dobben, Rosenkranz and Larson all added to an already fantastic meet by earning All-America honors in the 100-yard freestyle finished fourth, fifth and sixth, respectively. Sophomore McKenna NewsumSchoenberg placed sixth in the 1,650-yard freestyle, with junior Courtney McDermott right on her tail in seventh place. Both earned All-America honors, while freshman Mikayla Carnley was named as an honorable mention with a ninth-place finish. Meanwhile, junior Sadie Nennig continued her dominance in the 200-yard backstroke with her third straight All-America performance. She finished fifth in the event with a time of 1:59.21. The 200-yard breaststroke was another key event for Emory, with five Eagles placing.

Junior Kylie McKenzie led the way in sixth place, closely followed by sophomore Megan Beach in seventh, junior Brooke Woodward in eight, freshman Elizabeth Aranoff in ninth and senior Mia Michalak in 12th place. Earning her first ever All-America certificate was sophomore Nina Zook, who finished fourth in the 200-yard butterfly with a time of 2:01.86, which broke the longest-standing Emory record, set by Leigh Psaris in 2006. All in all, the Eagles totaled two individual national championships, 31 All-America certificates between the individual and relay events and 15 honorable mentions. The men’’s team was nearly as dominant, putting up 280 points to fall just shy of fourth-place Johns Hopkins University (Md.). Kenyon won the meet with 499.5 points. The team earned 12 All-America certificates and eight honorable mentions. They too were fairly secure in their fifthplace position for the entirety of the meet. A strong final day solidified Emory’’s spot among the top five teams in the nation. The Eagles earned one individual national championship on the men’’s side, courtesy of senior Miller Douglas in the 200-yard butterfly. Douglas ended his Emory career with 10 All-America certificates.

Douglas credited his performance to a unique strategy. ““I recently discovered …… that singing a song while I’’m racing keeps my mind off my competitors,”” he said. ““That’’s what I was doing.”” Other seniors that put in strong performances in their final meet as an Eagle included Peter O’’Brien and Justin Beegle, who earned All-America honors in the 200-yard breaststroke. Freshman Andrew Wilson finished seventh in the event with a time of 2:01.46. O’’Brien finished his collegiate career with 12 All-America certificates and six honorable mentions. The Eagles’’ final event of the meet was yet another one to remember, as the relay team of Douglas, junior Jake Stephens, senior Jeff Simpson and junior Ross Spock also qualified for All-America status with a seventh-place finish in the 400 yard freestyle relay and a time of 3:01.51. Spock, though just a junior, has already built up an illustrious career as an Eagle. He earned his 14th All-America certificate during the weekend, tying him for third-most in program history. He needs just three more in his senior sea-

WOMEN’S TENNIS

Baseball The baseball team beat LaGrange College (Ga.) 6-1 on Saturday afternoon to move to 11-9 on the season. The Eagles have won three straight games. Sophomore right-handed pitcher Connor Dillman led the way with seven shutout innings, surrendering just four hits and six walks while striking out three. Dillman’’s record now stands at 2-2 on the season with an earned run average of 2.62. Junior shortstop Jared Kahn had a big game, knocking in the Eagles’’ first runs in the second inning and scoring in the third to run the lead to 3-0. The Eagles put the game away in the seventh inning with three runs, including an RBI single from junior outfielder Daniel Iturrey. The victory gave Emory Head Coach Mike Twardoski his 400th career victory. Twardoski, with a career record of 400-188-1, is the winningest in program history. A second game against LaGrange, scheduled for Sunday, was cancelled. The Eagles will next take the field on Tuesday when they host Berry College (Ga.) before opening a threegame series against Covenant College (Ga.).

son to tie the record, set by Justin Hake from 2002 to 2006. Additionally, Spock’’s time in the preliminaries of the 100-yard backstroke of 48.67 broke his own school record, set at last year’’s NCAA Championships. Senior Stephen Czaja was not far behind, placing 15th with a time of 50.45 seconds. It was Czaja’’s first career honorable mention. The future of the program appears bright as well. Wilson, just a freshman, made a splash in his first crack at national collegiate competition, not only earning All-America honors with a fourth-place finish in the 100yard breaststroke but also setting a new school record in the event with a time of 55.44. The meets closed out fantastic seasons for both teams that saw them breeze through their conference meets on en route to earning University Athletic Association (UAA) championships and adding another chapter to the impressive legacy of the Emory swimming and diving program. With a strong base of underclassmen that keeps toppling school records —— led by swimmers like Carnley and Wilson —— both teams should be formidable for years to come. —— Contact Ryan Smith at ryan.smith@emory.edu

TRACK & FIELD

Squads Host Eagles Fall to Amherst, Rebound vs. No. 1 Team Emory Invitational By Alexander Del Re Staff Writer

By Bennett Ostdiek Asst. Sports Editor

The No.4-ranked Emory women’’s tennis team competed in the Fab Seven Tournament this past weekend. The Eagles finished the tournament with a 2-1 record and improved their overall season record to 8 -3. ““I think they performed pretty well. I think we are starting to see improvements in all the things we are working on, and that is nice,”” Head Coach Amy Bryant said. ““We really came together well as a team. It is nice to see the camaraderie and team dynamic move in the right direction. Overall, I was very pleased with the weekend.”” In the opening match of the Fab Seven Tournament on Friday, Emory lost a close match to Amherst College (Mass.) 5-4. The match came down to the third set of the final singles contest. The loss was just the third on the season for Emory and their first to a Division III team. Battling back from an early doubles deficit, Emory tied the match 3-3 with victories from junior Gabrielle Clark in the first singles spot and freshman Beatrice Rosen at third

The men’’s and women’’s track and field teams opened their outdoor season at the Emory Invitational this weekend. Facing 18 other teams in rainy conditions, the women’’s squad finished the meet in first place, and the men’’s side came in sixth. ““This was a good start to the outdoor season,”” head coach John Curtin said. ““It was a big meet with a lot of real powerful programs. This first week was a good first step. We had a lot of kids run personal bests, and when you are doing that in the first meet of the year, that’’s pretty darn good.”” Over two days of competition, the Emory women cumulated a total of 165 points, defeating second place Hope College (Mich.) by 78.5 points. The women were led by senior Theresa Ford. After earning allAmerican honors in the long jump and high jump at the NCAA Divison III Indoor Track and Field National Championships earlier this month, she won those events this weekend. Her long jump distance was 5.47 meters, while in the high jump she cleared the bar at 1.66 meters, tied

Emily Lin/Photo Editor

Defending Division III national champion, junior Gabrielle Clark, prepares to return a serve. singles. Clark won 6-2, 7-5 while Rosen beat her opponent 6-3, 6-1. In fifth singles, freshman Madison Gordon lost 6-3, 7-6 (6), giving Amherst the lead, but senior Jordan Wylie struck back with a come from behind win 6-7 (2), 7-5, 6-4 win. Junior Brenna Kelly lost a close

three set match against Amherst’’s Gabby Devlin in three sets 5-7, 7-6 (3) 6-4. ““Amherst truly could’’ve gone either way. We are ready to fight and get the win when we play them at nationals,”” Rosen said. ““I know we

See WOMEN’S, Page 11

for the third highest jump in school history. ““I was pleased with my performances in the high jump and the long jump,”” Ford wrote in an email to the Wheel. ““Both were personal bests for my outdoor career, and I think these performances indicate good things to come for my season ahead. I hope to break the outdoor school record for the high jump this year.”” In addition to the two events she won, Ford also finished fifth in the discus throw and 14th in the 200meter dash. In addition to Ford, the Emory women recorded seven other first place finishes in the meet. The Eagles took home the top three spots in the 400-meter dash, with senior Kaele Leonard leading the way with a time of 56.62 seconds, the third fastest in the event in school history. In the 4x400-meter relay, Leonard, sophomore Electra Korn, freshman Alexandra Aiello and sophomore Debora Adjibaba combined for a firstplace time of 3:54. Winning individual events for the Eagles were sophomore Stephanie

See TRACK, Page 11


3.26.13