SRT2018 Workshop Proceedings

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3rd International Research Workshop

Sunday 9th and Monday 10th December 2018


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A NEW BREED OF JUMP SADDLE

Features Albion’s unique Adjusta-Tree™

www.albionengland.co.uk


Saddle Research Trust

Workshop Programme Saddle Research Trust International Researchers’ Workshop 2018 Generously sponsored by Albion Saddlemakers

Horse, rider, saddlery interactions : Welfare and Performance Sunday 9th and Monday 10th December 2018

8.30

Sunday Sessions – Day 1 – Sharing Problems and Being Part of the Solution Welcome from the facilitator

Prof. Pat Harris

Delegate introductions

8.50

Welcome from the Title Sponsor, Albion Saddlemakers

Paul Belton

8.55

Welcome from the SRT Director – what has been achieved since our inaugural meeting?

Dr. Anne Bondi

9.05

Introduction from the Chair – what are the aims of this meeting?

Prof René van Weeren

9.15

The Saddle Fitting Steering Group

Brig. Phillip Napier

9.30

Presentations: Saddle fit and performance – what are the challenges faced by:

Prof. Hilary Clayton

9.30

1. The saddlery fitting profession

Sue Norton

9.40

2. The saddlery manufacturing industry

David Kempsall

9.50

3. Saddlery designers

Dr. Pauline Martin

10.00

4. Saddlery fitting trainers

Laurence Pearman

10.10

5. Researchers in the field

Dr. Anne Bondi

10.20

Discussion

11.00 11.30

Coffee Breakout session : Saddle fit and performance

Auditors

Group Leaders

Prof. René van Weeren

12.45

Prof. Lars Roepstorff

Prof Pat Harris

Dr. Thilo Pfau

Dr Sue Dyson

Dr. Jan Birch

Lunch

1.45

Group reports

2.25

Discussion

3.30 4.00

Prof Hilary Clayton

Dr. Anne Bondi

Tea Presentations: Research technology

4.00

1. What’s new and interesting in the field?

David Doherty

4.10

2. Current systems, limitations and user attitudes to riding simulators

Dr. Anna Walker

4.20

3. The next generation of riding simulators

Prof. Heikki Handroos

4.30

Discussion

4.50

Summary from the Chair

5.00

Prof. René van Weeren

Finish

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Saddle Research Trust

Workshop Programme Saddle Research Trust International Researchers’ Workshop 2018 Generously sponsored by Albion Saddlemakers

Horse, rider, saddlery interactions : Welfare and Performance Sunday 9th and Monday 10th December 2018

Monday Sessions – Day 2 – How can industry and science work together?

8.30 Opening comments from the Chair 8.45 Presentations: The challenges of research in horse, saddle and rider interaction

Prof. René van Weeren

8.45

1. Assessment of horse, saddle and rider interactions

Prof. Agneta Egenvall

9.00

2. Rider assessment and their effect in the interaction

Dr. Anne Bondi

9.15

3. Objective performance assessment

Dr. Thilo Pfau

9.30

4. What scientific evidence is needed to inform industry best practice?

Prof. Hilary Clayton

9.45

5. How can research address the performance challenges faced by coaches and riders?

Richard Davison

10.00 Discussion 10.45 11.15

Coffee Breakout session : Horse, saddle and rider interaction – what are the priorities for future research? Auditors Group Leaders Prof. René van Weeren Prof Hilary Clayton Dr. Anne Bondi

Prof. Lars Roepstorff

Prof Pat Harris

Dr. Thilo Pfau

Dr Sue Dyson

Dr. Jan Birch

12.30 Group reports and discussion 1.15

Lunch and feedback forms

2.15 Summary from the Facilitator – what are the meeting outcomes?

Prof. Pat Harris

2.30 Summary from the Chair – have we achieved the meeting aims?

Prof. René van Weeren

2.45

Finish

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Saddle Research Trust

SRT Committee THE AIMS OF THE SADDLE RESEARCH TRUST 2018 • To promote the welfare of the ridden horse • To raise awareness of the widely underestimated issues surrounding the interactions between horses, saddles and riders. • To educate and inform the stakeholders within the equine industry – Riders, coaches, horse owners, professional healthcare practitioners, saddle professionals and other welfare organisations. • To support humane scientific research, the translation of scientific research and the dissemination of information.

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Saddle Research Trust

Saddlefitfitand andperformance performance Saddle Saddle fit and performance Presenters Presenters / Presenters abstracts abstracts Presenters abstracts Saddle fit and performance Presenters abstracts

/ SueNorton Norton––Presenter Presenter Sue

Sue Norton – Presenter

Suehas hasserved servedononthe theSociety SocietyofofMaster MasterSaddlers Saddlers executive board directors 10 years and completed an Sue executive board of of directors forfor 10 years hashas justjust completed Sue has and served on the Society ofanMaster Saddlers executive board of directors for 10 years and has j extendedperiod periodasasPresident. President.Her Herfamily familybusiness businesshas hasevolved evolved over years meet changing customer needs. Sue Norton Presenter extended over thethe years to to meet changing customer needs. As As extended period as – President. Her family business has evolved over the years to meet changing cu RegisteredQualified QualifiedSaddle SaddleFitters Fitters and Master Saddlers with excellent bench skills, they provide a full range services, Registered and Master Saddlers with excellent bench skills, they provide a full range of of services, Registered Qualified Saddle Fitters and Master Saddlers with excellent bench skills, they provide a full includingallallrepairs repairs and saddle adjustments. During years business Sue has been closely involved with horses including and saddle adjustments. During herher 4545 years in in thethe business Sue has been involved with horses including all repairs and Society saddle adjustments. During executive her 45 years in the Sue hasclosely served on the of Master Saddlers board of business directorsSue for has 10 been years closely and hasinvj andriders. riders.Having Having enjoyed hacking, hunting and competing disciplines with own horses, Sue’s daughters followed and enjoyed hacking, hunting and competing in in allall disciplines with herher own daughters followed andhorses, riders.Sue’s Having hacking, and competing in all disciplines with her Sue’scud extended period asenjoyed President. Her hunting family business has evolved over the years to own meethorses, changing suit at an early age. Through Pony Club days Sue served on a local committee for 18 years, four of which as District suit at an early age. Through Pony Club days Sue served on a local committee for Registered 18 years, of which as District suit at an four early age. Through Ponyand ClubMaster days Sue served onexcellent a local committee 18 provide years, four of Qualified Saddle Fitters Saddlers with bench skills,forthey a full Commissioner, later becoming a Riding and Road Safety trainer and examiner for the BHS. Since the early days of the SMS Commissioner, later becoming a Riding and Road Safety trainer and examiner for the BHS. Since all therepairs early of the SMS including and saddle During her 45 yearsand in the business been closely inv Commissioner, laterdays becoming aadjustments. Riding and Road Safety trainer examiner forSue the has BHS. Since the earl Saddle fitting courses and qualification assessments in the mid 90’s, Sue has been a key lecturer and assessor for the Society, Saddle fitting courses and qualification assessments in the mid 90’s, Sue has been a key lecturer and Having assessor for thequalification Society, hunting and riders. enjoyed hacking, and competing all disciplines with aher horses, d Saddle fitting courses and assessments in the midin90’s, Sue has been keyown lecturer andSue’s assess and part the team responsible promoting the advancement knowledge required changes. British suit atthe anofindustry early age. Through Pony Club days the Sueadvancement served on aoflocal committee for 18 years, four of and part ofof the team responsible forforpromoting the advancement of of knowledge required as as the industry changes. TheThe British and part the team responsible for promoting knowledge required as the industry ch manufacturersininWalsall, Walsall,have havebeen beenkey keytotomany many improvements saddle design made with reference to experienced Commissioner, later becoming Riding and trainer andtoexaminer for the made BHS. Since the earl manufacturers improvements to to saddle design made with reference to experienced manufacturers in Walsall, haveabeen key toRoad manySafety improvements saddle design with referenc qualifiedfitters fittersand andalso alsotototechnology technologyand and scientific studies that part now and important the welfare Saddle fitting courses and qualification in the mid 90’s, a key and assess qualified scientific studies that areare part of of lifelife now and important to to the welfare andand assessments qualified fitters and also to technology and scientific studies that Sue are has partbeen of life nowlecturer and important t demandsofof the modern horse. and part ofofthe responsible demands the modern horse. demands theteam modern horse. for promoting the advancement of knowledge required as the industry ch

manufacturers in Walsall, have been key to many improvements to saddle design made with referenc qualified fitters and also to technology and scientific studies that are part of life now and important t demands of the modern horse.

psall Presenter sall - -Presenter

David Kempsall - Presenter

sMD MDofofFirst FirstThought ThoughtEquine Equinewhich whichwas wasset setupupinin1996 1996 design and manufacture David Kempsall - Presenter David Kempsell ismanufacture MD of First Thought Equine which was set up in 1996 to design and manufacture totodesign and cts to increase the horse’s comfort and performance. Formerly a telecommunications innovative products to increase the horse’s comfort and performance. Formerly a telecommunications ts to increase the horse’s comfort and performance. Formerly a telecommunications hehas hasturned turnedhis hislogical logicaldesign designtechniques techniquesand and passion riding to problems of saddlery. David Kempsell is MD of Firsthis Thought Equinetechniques which wasand setpassion up in 1996 to design and manufacture design engineer, heof has turned logical design for riding to problems of saddlery. e passion forfor riding to problems saddlery. f theseproducts productsisisthe themodular modularWOW WOWsaddle, saddle,which which incorporates many innovations, innovative products to increase horse’s comfort performance. Formerlymany a telecommunications The best known ofhis these productsthe is the modular WOWand saddle, which incorporates of his innovations, these incorporates many ofof his innovations, design engineer, he has turned his logical design techniques and passion for riding to problems of saddlery. de. patented worldwide. de. The best knownone of these products is the modular WOWhas saddle, which incorporates many ofare his constructed, innovations, nefoot footininthe thetraditional traditionalcamp campWOW WOWhas hasrevolutionised revolutionisedthe the way saddles are constructed, Whilst keeping foot in the traditional camp WOW revolutionised the way saddles e way saddles are constructed, patented worldwide. dfitted. fitted.David Davidisisa afirm firmbeliever believerininusing usingtechnology technologytotoimprove improveequestrian equestrian equipment, manufactured and fitted. David is a firm believer in using technology to improve equestrian equipment, equipment, Whilst keeping one foot in the traditional camp WOW has revolutionised the way saddles are constructed, bout educatingsaddle saddlefitters, fitters,trainers trainersand andriders riderstotosee seeand andaddress address equine welfare and passionate about educating saddle fitters, trainers and riders to see and address equine welfare and out educating equine welfare and manufactured and fitted. David is a firm believer in using technology to improve equestrian equipment, es. performance issues. s. and passionate about educating saddle fitters, trainers and riders to see and address equine welfare and uine memberofofThe TheSociety SocietyofofMaster MasterSaddlers Saddlersand andDavid David is SMS qualified saddle of The Society of Master Saddlers and David is an SMS qualified saddle First isThought Equine is asaddle member ne isisa amember anan SMS qualified

performance issues. fitter. First Thought Equine is a member of The Society of Master Saddlers and David is an SMS qualified saddle ndasasa aspeaker; speaker;his hismany manysymposia symposiaand andconference conferencesessions sessions include theEuropean European VET David is in demand as a speaker d include the VET fitter. elopment; BHSWelfare WelfareConference; Conference;“Horses “HorsesInside InsideOut”; Out”; and Equitana (Essen, Germany). Professional Development; BHS Welfare Conference; Inside Out”; and Equitana (Essen, Germany). opment; BHS and Equitana (Essen, Germany). David is in demand as a speaker; his many symposia“Horses and conference sessions include the European VET Professional Development; BHS Welfare Conference; “Horses Inside Out”; and Equitana (Essen, Germany).

Dr.Pauline PaulineMartin Martin- -Presenter Presenter Dr.

Dr. Pauline Martin - Presenter

Dr. Pauline Martin - Presenter

Paulinegraduated graduatedininBiomechanics Biomechanics& &Bio-Materials Bio-Materialsengineering engineeringfrom fromthe the University Technology Pauline graduated in Biomechanics & Bio-Materials engineering from the University of Pauline University of ofTechnology of of Compiègne. Following abetween PhD in the field of equine biomechanics, focussing on the intera Compiègne.Following Followinga aPhD PhDininthe thefield fieldofofequine equinebiomechanics, biomechanics, focussing interactions Pauline graduated in between Biomechanics & Bio-Materials engineering from the University of Compiègne. focussing onon thethe interactions Compiègne. Following a PhD in the field of equine biomechanics, focussing on the intera the horse and the saddle during exercise, she then moved to Leather in Motion France. T the horse and the saddle during exercise, she then moved to Leather in Motion France. There she works the horse and the saddle during exercise, she then moved to Leather in Motion France. There she works the horse the saddle she moved to Leather in Motion France. aT within acomfort R and & Dand team of 11 during peopleexercise, whose aim is then to use innovation to improve the comfort withina aR R&&DDteam teamofof1111people peoplewhose whose aim use innovation improve the and performance within aim is is toto use innovation toto improve the comfort performance within a composite Rand & Drider. teammaterials of 11involves people whose aim is biomechanics, to use innovation improve the a of of horse This thetointegration of comfort composit horseand andrider. rider.This Thisinvolves involvesergonomics, ergonomics,biomechanics, biomechanics,the theintegration integration of into ergonomics, ofofhorse composite materials into of horse and rider. This involves biomechanics, thesaddle integration of composit saddle manufacture and the use ofergonomics, digital technology (e.g iJump and iPulse girth). LI saddlemanufacture manufactureand andthe theuse useofof digital technology (e.g iJump saddle and iPulse girth). LIM France works saddle digital technology (e.g iJump saddle and iPulse girth). LIM France works saddle and theCWDuse of digital technology saddle andresearch iPulse girth). LI in research closemanufacture collaboration with academic institutions and(e.g hasiJump created its own labora closecollaboration collaborationwith withacademic academicinstitutions institutionsand andhas hascreated created own laboratory, the ininclose itsits own research laboratory, the CWDin close with collaboration with School academic institutions and has created its own research labora VetLab, the Veterinary of Maisons-Alfort. Pauline co-directs the laboratory along VetLab,with withthe theVeterinary Veterinary School Maisons-Alfort. Pauline co-directs the laboratory alongside Prof. Henry VetLab, School ofof Maisons-Alfort. Pauline co-directs the laboratory alongside Prof. Henry VetLab, School of Maisons-Alfort. co-directs the laboratory along Chateauwith withthe theVeterinary aim of using innovation to improve Pauline equestrian performance. Chateauwith withthe theaim aimofofusing usinginnovation innovation improve equestrian performance. Chateau toto improve equestrian performance. Chateau with the aim of using innovation to improve equestrian performance.

Laurence Pearman Pearman –– Presenter Presenter Laurence

Pearman Presenter earman ––Presenter

Laurence completed a saddlery saddlery apprenticeship at W WG G Hayes Hayes of of Cirencester Cirencester to to eventually eventually become become aa Master Master Saddler. Saddler. In In 1981 1981 he he took took saddleryapprenticeship apprenticeship Hayes Cirencester eventually become a Master Saddler. 1981 he took Laurence completed a apprenticeship at a asaddlery atat WW GG Hayes ofof Cirencester toto eventually become a Master Saddler. In In 1981 he took BHS levels levels 1, 2 2 and and 3 Horse Horse Knowledge whilst riding riding at at Talland Talland School School of of Equitation Equitation and and competed competed in in Hunter Hunter Trials Trials and and Team Team Chasing. Chasing. 3Horse HorseKnowledge Knowledge whilst riding Talland School Equitation and competed Hunter Trials and Team Chasing. BHS 1, 3 Knowledge whilst whilst riding atat Talland School ofof Equitation and competed in in Hunter Trials and Team Chasing. This background background has has given given him him aa better better understanding understanding of of performance performance of of horse, horse, saddle saddle and and rider. rider. This givenhim hima abetter better understanding performance horse, saddle and rider. given understanding ofof performance ofof horse, saddle and rider. Acourse, registered Society of Master Master Saddlers Qualified Saddle Saddle Fitter Fitter and and an an Assessor Assessor of of the the QSF QSF course, course, Laurence Laurence is is also also an an Assessor Assessor for for A registered Society of Saddlers Qualified MasterSaddlers SaddlersQualified Qualified Saddle Fitter and Assessor QSF Laurence is also Assessor ofofMaster Saddle Fitter and anan Assessor of of thethe QSF course, Laurence is also anan Assessor forfor the City and Guilds Saddlery exams.Dedicated to the Industry, he is a member of the SMS Executive Committee, where he serves on Saddlery exams.Dedicated the Industry, a member SMS Executive Committee, where serves ddlery exams.Dedicated toto the Industry, hehe is is a member of of thethe SMS Executive Committee, where hehe serves onon several sub committees thatof work to support and develop the saddlery trade and saddle fitting. Laurence was president of the SMS in eesthat thatwork worktoto support and develop the saddlery trade and saddle fitting. Laurence was president SMS es support and develop the saddlery trade and saddle fitting. Laurence was president of thethe SMS in in 2004 and 2012, and is Chair of the SMS South West region, a role he took up in 2006. Laurence is a member of the Worshipful Company s Chair the SMS South West region, a role took 2006. Laurence a member of the Worshipful Company Chair ofof the SMS South West region, a role hehe took upup in in 2006. Laurence isof aismember of the Worshipful Company Saddlers and in 2005 was granted the Freedom of the City of London in acknowledgement of his services to the trade. In 2009 he 005was wasgranted grantedthe theFreedom Freedom the City London acknowledgement of his services to the trade. In 2009 05 ofof the City ofof London in in acknowledgement of services trade. he he Company of Saddlers, being made a Steward in 2015. In 2017 Laurence became a Fellow washistaken into to thethe Livery of In the2009 Worshipful very of the Worshipful Company of Saddlers, being made a Steward in 2015. 2017 Laurence became a Fellow ery of the Worshipful Company of Saddlers, being made a Steward in 2015. In In 2017 Laurence became aat Fellow of the SMS receiving his award Saddlers’ Hall of the SMS receiving his award at Saddlers’ Hall in in London London from from HRH HRH The The Princess Princess Royal. Royal. awardatatSaddlers’ Saddlers’ Hall London from HRH The Princess Royal. hishisaward Hall in in London from HRH The Princess Royal. In Laurence became a of In 2008 2008 Laurence became a member member of Capel Capel Manor Manor Advisory Advisory Board Board to to advise advise on on saddlery saddlery training. training. Also Also in in that that year year he he won won the the Master Master came a member of Capel Manor Advisory Board to advise on saddlery training. Also in that year he won the Master me a member of Capel Manor Advisory Board to advise on saddlery training. in that year the and Apprentice class at the annual andAlso Apprentice classhe atwon the SMS SMSMaster annual competition, competition, aa title title he he and and his his apprentice apprentice won won again again in in 2018. 2018. satatthe theSMS SMSannual annual competition, a title he and his apprentice won again in 2018. competition, a title he and his apprentice won again in Laurence 2018. is Laurence is very very much much aa working working saddler saddler dividing dividing his his time time between between workshop workshop and and saddle saddle fitting fitting and and finding finding time time for for teaching, teaching, assessing assessing ha aworking working saddler dividing time between workshop and saddle fitting andbeing finding time for teaching, assessing and part of various assessing committees.He combines his traditional skills of saddlery with new and innovative ideas. He says that at saddler dividing hishis time between workshop and saddle fitting and time forthe teaching, andfinding being part of the various committees.He combines his traditional skills of saddlery with new and innovative ideas. He says that at evarious variouscommittees.He committees.He combines his traditional skills of saddlery with new and innovative ideas. He says that at times fitting can He be very because so much is involved in getting the right outcome for the horse and rider. combines his traditional skills of saddlery with new and saddle innovative ideas. says challenging that at times saddle fitting can be very challenging because so much is involved in getting the right outcome for the horse and rider. can verychallenging challenging because much involved getting right outcome horse and rider. n bebevery because soso much is is involved in in getting thethe right outcome forfor thethe horse and rider.

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Saddle Research Trust

Saddlefitfitand andperformance performance Saddle fit and performance Saddle Presenters / Presenters Presenters Saddle fit and performance abstracts/ abstracts abstracts Presenters Presenters abstracts

DavidDoherty Doherty- -Presenter Presenter David

David Doherty - Presenter David Doherty - Presenter

David studied medicine while living above a rural vet clinic which gave him insights into the opportunity to see the David medicineto while David studied medicine while living above a rural vet clinic which gave him insights intostudied the opportunity see living the above a rural vet clinic which gave him insights into the oppo advantages of taking a OneHealth approach to medicine. In 2006 he launched the world's first taking service to let Patients David studied medicine while living above a rural vet clinic which gave him insights into the opport OneHealth advantages of taking a OneHealth approach to medicine. In 2006 he launched theadvantages world's firstof service toa let Patients approach to medicine. In 2006 he launched the world's first serv advantages ofoftaking a OneHealth approach to medicine. In 2006 he launched the world's first servic mobile video consult with registered Doctors and he consults on the use of tech to many the world's leading mobile video with leading registered Doctors and he consults on the use of tech to many of th mobile video consult with registered Doctors and he consults on the use of tech to many of consult the world's mobile video consult withinregistered Doctors and he consults on the use of tech to many of the technology brands. In 2017 he launched the HorseTech Conference at the Royal Veterinary College London technology brands. In 2017 he launched the HorseTech Conference at the Royal Veterinary C technology brands. In 2017 he launched the HorseTech Conference at the Royal Veterinary College in London technology brands. In and 2017valuable he launched the HorseTech Conference at the Royal Veterinary Col bringing together speakers from around the world who use technology with thebringing world's most talented together speakers from around the world who use technology with the world's most tale bringing together speakers from around the world who use technology with the world's most talented and valuable bringing together speakers from the around the world who use technology with the world's most talent horses. The event was sold out and it's free livestream attracted audiences from around the world. In 2018 horses. Thethe event wasInsold out and it's free livestream attracted audiences from around the w horses. The event was sold out and it's free livestream attracted audiences from around world. 2018 the horses. The event was sold out and it's free livestream attracted audiences from around the wo HorseTech Conference was ran at the Dubai International Horse Fair at the invitation under the patronage of the HorseTech was ranthe at the the Dubai Dubai International InternationalHorse HorseFair Fairatatthe theinvitation invitationunder under the HorseTech Conference was ran at the Dubai International Horse Fair at the invitation underConference the patronage HorseTech Conference was of ran at the p Dubai Royal Family. In 2019 there will be HorseTech Conferences in Dublin (Ireland), Dubai and China. Davidthere curated Dubai Royal will be beHorseTech HorseTechConferences ConferencesininDublin Dublin(Ireland), (Ireland), Dubai and Ch Dubai Royal Family. In 2019 there will be HorseTech Conferences in Dublin (Ireland), Dubai andFamily. China. In David Dubai Royal Family. In 2019 2019curated there will Dubai and China the Global HorseTech Market Report, a 250 page analysis of the HorseTech market and the key innovations. You the Market Report, aa 250 250 page pageanalysis analysisofofthe theHorseTech HorseTechmarket marketand andthe the key the Global HorseTech Market Report, a 250 page analysis of the HorseTech market and theHorseTech key innovations. the Global Global HorseTech Market You Report, key in can download a free copy of this report at HorseTechConference.com can of this this report report at at HorseTechConference.com HorseTechConference.com can download a free copy of this report at HorseTechConference.com candownload download aa free free copy copy of

alker- -Presenter Presenter alker

Dr.Anna AnnaWalker Walker--Presenter Presenter Dr.

m the University of Bristol in 2005 with a BSc (Hons) in Equine Science. twofrom years working in petof Bristol in 2005 with a BSc (Hons) in Equine Science. After two years working in pet from the University Anna After graduated Anna graduated the University the University of Bristol in 2005 with a BSc (Hons) in Equine Science. After two years working in pet of Bristol in 2005 with a BSc (Hons) in Equine Science. After two years working in pet insurance opportunity arose for a PhD in 2007 at the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) in the Structure and Motion rtunity arose for a PhD in 2007 at the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) in theopportunity Structure and Motion for a PhD in 2007 at the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) in the Structure and Motion unity arose for a PhD in 2007 at the Royal Veterinary Collegeinsurance (RVC) in the Structure andarose Motion Laboratory (SML) entitledChanges ‘Biomechanics of lameness in Quadrupeds’ involving two main areas of study: Changes in ntitled ‘Biomechanics of lameness in Quadrupeds’ involving two main areas of entitled study: in Laboratory (SML) ‘Biomechanics of lameness in Quadrupeds’ involving two main areas of study: Changes in titled ‘Biomechanics of lameness in Quadrupeds’ involving two main areas of study: Changes in locomotion parameters associated with lameness in dairy cattle to develop a quantitative, automated, early lameness ters associated with lameness in dairy cattle to develop a quantitative, automated, early lameness locomotion parameters associated with lameness in dairy cattle to develop a quantitative, automated, early lameness ers associated with lameness in dairy cattle to develop a quantitative, automated, early lameness system; and kinematic gait analysis of horses in the field using inertial sensors, providing a clinically applicable gait nd kinematic gait analysis of horses in the field using inertial sensors,detection providing a clinically applicable gait system; andapplicable kinematic gait analysis of horses in the field using inertial sensors, providing a clinically applicable gait d kinematic gait analysis of horses in the field using inertial sensors,detection providing a clinically analysis tool. analysis tool.successful completion of her PhD studies Anna went on to lecture for three years at Moulton College, Following l completion of her PhD studies Anna went on to lecture for three years at Moulton College, successful completion of her PhD of studies went on to lecture for three at Moulton completion of her PhD studies Anna went on to lecture forFollowing three years at Moulton College, Northamptonshire. This included supervision a PhDAnna project investigating ‘The Use of theyears Aqua-treadmill in College, Equine This included supervision of a PhD project investigating ‘The Northamptonshire. Use of the Aqua-treadmill in Equine included supervision of a PhD project investigating ‘The Use of the Aqua-treadmill in Equine his included supervision of a PhD project investigating ‘The UseRehabilitation of the Aqua-treadmill in Equine and This Therapy’. herapy’. Rehabilitation and Therapy’. erapy’. Anna then returned to the RVC as a Postdoctoral Researcher in the SML, in collaboration with the British Racing School to the RVC as a Postdoctoral Researcher in the SML, in collaboration withreturned the British Racing School Anna then toRacing the RVC as a horse-rider Postdoctoral Researcher in the SML,and in the collaboration with the British Racing School where shethe ledBritish a study investigating interaction in racehorses impact of jockey experience. This study o the RVC as a Postdoctoral Researcher in the SML, in collaboration with School dy investigating horse-rider interaction in racehorses and the impact ofshe jockey This study involved both real horse and riding and led to multiple publications. where ledexperience. aexperience. study investigating interaction in racehorses and the impact of jockey experience. This study y investigating horse-rider interaction in racehorses and the impact of jockey Thissimulator study horse-rider orse and simulator riding and led to multiple publications. Now anboth Equitation Science and Programme of the BSc and MSc courses at Duchy College, Anna’s research involved real horse andLecturer simulator riding and ledManager to multiple publications. rse and simulator riding and led to multiple publications. cience Lecturer and Programme Manager of the BSc and MSc courses at Duchy College, Anna’s research interests still lie predominantly in locomotion with respect to performance, lameness and theatcomplex horse-rider interaction. Now Equitation Science and Programme Manager of the BSc and MSc courses Duchy College, Anna’s research ence Lecturer and Programme Manager of the BSc and MSc courses at an Duchy College, Anna’sLecturer research ominantly in locomotion with respect to performance, lameness and the complex horse-rider interaction. still lie predominantly in locomotion with respect to performance, lameness and the complex horse-rider interaction. minantly in locomotion with respect to performance, lameness andinterests the complex horse-rider interaction.

ProfHeikki HeikkiHandroos Handroos––Presenter Presenter Prof

Prof Heikki Handroos – Presenter

Prof Heikki Handroos – Presenter

Current position: Prof. of Machine Automation and Head of Laboratory of Intelligent Machines i

University of Technology , Finland since 1993. Past Positions 1984-1992: Research Assistant, Res Current position: Prof. of Machine Automation and Head of Laboratory of Intelligent Machines in Lappeenranta CurrentMachines position: Prof. of Machine Automation and Head of Laboratory of Intelligent Machine Current position: Prof. of Machine Automation and Head of Laboratory of Intelligent in Lappeenranta Assistant, Tampere Univ. of Technology. M.Sc (Eng.), D.Sc (Tech.), Tampere University University of Technology , Finland since 1993. Past Positions 1984-1992: Research Assistant, Researcher, Seniorsince Education: University of Technology Finland 1993. Past Positions 1984-1992: Research Assistant, R University of Technology , Finland since 1993. Past Positions 1984-1992: Research Assistant, Researcher,, Senior Finland University of Technology, Assistant, Tampere Univ. of Technology. Education: M.Sc (Eng.), D.Sc (Tech.),Assistant, Tampere Tampere Univ. of Technology. Education: M.Sc (Eng.), D.Sc (Tech.), Tampere Univers Assistant, Tampere Univ. of Technology. Education: M.Sc (Eng.), D.Sc (Tech.), Tampere University of Technology, Research interests: range from modeling, simulation and control of mechatronic systems to r Finland Finland Finland transmission and mobile machinery. He has published about 240 scientific journal and conferenc Research interests: range from modeling, simulation and control of mechatronic systems to robotics, hybrid Research interests: range from controlDissertations of mechatronic systems to Research interests: range from modeling, simulation and control of mechatronic to robotics, hybridmodeling, field systems of mechatronics, (130 SCOPUS papers). simulation Supervised and 19 Doctoral transmission and mobile machinery. He has published about 240 scientific journal and conference papers in the He has published about 240 scientific journal and confere transmission and mobile machinery. transmission and mobile machinery. He has published about 240 scientific journal conference papers Hasand been responsible leaderinofthe academic and industrial R&D projects (tot. > 15M€). Co-founder of field of mechatronics, (130 SCOPUS papers). Supervised 19 Doctoral Dissertations field of mechatronics, (130 SCOPUS papers). Supervised 19 National DoctoralDefense Dissertations field of mechatronics, (130 SCOPUS papers). Supervised 19 Doctoral Dissertations Haptronics Oy. Visiting Professor in University of Minnesota, Academy (Japan) an Has been responsible leader of academic and industrial R&D projects (tot. > 15M€). Co-founder of MeVEA Oy and Has been leader ofand academic and industrial R&D projects (tot. > 15M€). Co-founder Peter the responsible Great of Polytechnic Univ. Has been responsible leader of academic and industrial R&D projects (tot. > 15M€). Co-founder MeVEA Oy Haptronics Oy. Visiting Professor in University of Minnesota, National Defense Haptronics Academy (Japan) and StinProfessor Petersburg Several (Japan) Duties Trust ASME, IEEE and GFPSof Minnesota, National Defense Academy (Japan) Oy. of Visiting in University Haptronics Oy. Visiting Professor in University of Minnesota, National Defense Academy and St Petersburg Peter the Great Polytechnic Univ. Peter the Great Polytechnic Univ. Peter the Great Polytechnic Univ. Several Duties of Trust in ASME, IEEE and GFPS Several Duties of Trust in ASME, IEEE and GFPS Several Duties of Trust in ASME, IEEE and GFPS

Prof. Agneta Egenvall - Presenter

ta Egenvall- -Presenter Presenter a Egenvall

Prof. Egenvallprofessor - Presenter AgnetaAgneta Egenvall; veterinarian, in veterinary epidemiology. Worked with large databases on dogs, horses, cats and cows on various diseases, and epidemiological and clinical studies in dogs and

veterinarian,professor professorininveterinary veterinaryepidemiology. epidemiology.Worked Worked largedatabases databases horseswith for example tick borne disease. Since over 10epidemiology. years the interest is clearly on equine Agneta Egenvall; veterinarian, in veterinary Worked withfocused large databases on ;ll;veterinarian, with large ononprofessor biomechanics, withinthe ultimate aim to integrate biomechanics and veterinary epidemiology. The ats andcows cowson onvarious variousdiseases, diseases,and andepidemiological epidemiologicaland and clinical studies dogs and dogs, horses, cats and cows on various diseases, and epidemiological and clinical studies in dogs and s and clinical studies in dogs and special interest is horse-rider with focus on biomechanical effects of sidedness/laterality, mple tickborne bornedisease. disease.Since Sinceover over10 10years yearsthe theinterest interest clearly focused onequine equineinteraction horses for example tick borne disease. Since over 10 years the interest is clearly focused on equine ple tick isisclearly focused on rein tensionepidemiology. and the rider’sThe seat in relation to horse-rider communication, equestrian surfaces and with the ultimate aim to integrate biomechanics and veterinary biomechanics, with the ultimate aim to integrate biomechanics and veterinary epidemiology. The ith the ultimate aim to integrate biomechanics and veterinary epidemiology. The trainingof strategies in relation to horse health and performance. horse-riderinteraction interactionwith withfocus focuson onbiomechanical biomechanicaleffects effects sidedness/laterality, special interest is horse-rider interaction with focus on biomechanical effects of sidedness/laterality, sishorse-rider of sidedness/laterality, dthe therider’s rider’sseat seatininrelation relationtotohorse-rider horse-ridercommunication, communication, equestrian surfaces and rein tension and surfaces the rider’s seat in relation to horse-rider communication, equestrian surfaces and equestrian and ies in relation to horse health and performance. training strategies in relation to horse health and performance. es in relation to horse health and performance. 15

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Saddle Research Trust

Saddlefitfitand andperformance performance Saddle Session Auditors //// Session Auditors abstracts abstracts Session ////

Saddle fit and performance Session Auditors abstracts Auditors Saddle fit and performance

Session Auditors abstracts

ProfRené RenéVan VanWeeren Weeren– –Workshop WorkshopChair Chairand andAuditor Auditor Prof René Van Weeren – Workshop Chair and Auditor Prof

became a1983 staff member of the Graduated in 1983 from Utrecht University (The Netherlands) René van Weeren from Utrecht (The Netherlands) René van Weeren became a sta Prof René Van Weeren – Workshop Chair and Auditor became a instaff member of the University Graduated in 1983 from Utrecht University (The Netherlands) René van WeerenGraduated Department of General and Large Animal Surgery in that year and obtained his PhD degree in 1989. From 1991-Animal Surgery in that year and obtained his PhD degree in Department of 1989. General and1991Large Department of General and Large Animal Surgery in that year and obtained his PhD degree in From 1993 he worked as a visiting professor at the Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria of the Universidad Nacional in Heredia, he worked as afrom visiting professor at the (The Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria of thebecame Universidad N 1993 he worked as a visiting professor at the Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria of the1993 Universidad in Heredia, Graduated inNacional 1983 Utrecht University Netherlands) René van Weeren a staff Costa Rica. After becoming a diplomate of the European College of Veterinary Surgeons in 1994 he gradually Costa Rica. After becoming a diplomate of the European College of Veterinary Costa Rica. After becoming a diplomate of the European College of VeterinaryDepartment Surgeons inof1994 he gradually General and Large Animal Surgery in that year and obtained his PhDSurgeons degree inin19 shifted towards research and was appointed as full professor to the Chair ofshifted Equinetowards Musculoskeletal Biology in research and was as full to the Chair of Equine Musculo shifted towards research and was appointed as full professor to the Chair of Equine Musculoskeletal Biology in appointed 1993 he worked as a visiting professor at the Escuela deprofessor Medicina Veterinaria of the Universidad Nac 2007. His main research areas are articular cartilage and biomechanics, including quantitative gait analysis. He articular cartilage and biomechanics, including quantitativ 2007. His main research areas are 2007. His main research areas are articular cartilage and biomechanics, including quantitative analysis. Costa Rica. Aftergait becoming aHe diplomate of the European College of Veterinary Surgeons in 19 became Head of the Department of Equine Sciences in January 2012 and interim-head ofHead the Department of Clinical became of research the Department Equine Sciences in Januaryto 2012 interim-head of the Dep became Head of the Department of Equine Sciences in January 2012 and interim-head of the Department of and Clinical shifted towards wasofappointed as full professor the and Chair of Equine Musculoske Care of Companion Animals in September 2018. Care Companion Animals in September 2007.of His main research areas are articular2018. cartilage and biomechanics, including quantitative g Care of Companion Animals in September 2018. René van Weeren has supervised 31 PhD students to date and is currently supervising 10. Heofisthe an associate editor René van Weeren has supervised 31Equine PhD students and2012 is currently supervising He is became Head Department Sciencesto in date January and interim-head of 10. the Depar René van Weeren has supervised 31 PhD students to date and is currently supervising 10. He is an associate editorof of Equine Veterinary Journal and has been external examiner for PhD students Care in Equine Belgium, the UK, Animals France, Austria, of Companion in September Veterinary Journal and has been2018. external examiner for PhD students in Belgium, the U of Equine Veterinary Journal and has been external examiner for PhD students in of Belgium, the UK, France, Austria, Sweden, Norway and Finland. He is author or co-author of more than 300 peer-reviewed scientific publications René van Weeren has supervised 31 PhD students to dateofand is currently 10. He is an Sweden, Norway and Finland. Heand is author or co-author more than 300supervising peer-reviewed scientif Sweden, Norway and Finland. He is author or co-author of more than 300 peer-reviewed scientific publications and has contributed various chapters to a variety of textbooks. of Equine Veterinary Journal and has external examiner for PhD students in Belgium, the UK, has contributed various chapters to abeen variety of textbooks. has contributed various chapters to a variety of textbooks. Sweden, Norway and Finland. He is author or co-author of more than 300 peer-reviewed scientific has contributed various chapters to a variety of textbooks.

ndi SaddleResearch ResearchTrust TrustDirector, Director,Presenter Presenter and Auditor Dr Anne Bondi – Saddle Research Trust Director, Presenter and Auditor di ––Saddle and Auditor Dr Anne Bondi – Saddle Research Trust Director, Presenter and Auditor

successful professional rider who competed at international advanced level both in eventing and Anne Bondi successful rider who competed at international advanced level both in eventing and uccessful professional rider who competed at international advanced levelwas botha in eventingprofessional and ner, she prepared pupils for both competition careers and professional exams and she wasprepared a Senior pupils for both competition careers and professional exams and was a Senior dressage. As a trainer, er, she prepared pupils for both competition careers and professional exams and was a Senior Anne Bondi was athat successful professional rider who competed at international advanced level both in eventing and British Horse Society. Anne currently rides a very nice young event horse is Horse competing Examiner of the British Society. Anne currently rides a very nice young event horse that is competing itish Horse Society. Anne currently rides a very nice young event horse that is competing dressage.atAs3* a trainer, she aprepared pupils for both competition careers and professional exams and was a Senior t amateur level and also owns an advanced horse that competes level with young consistently well at with amateur level and also owns an advanced horse that competes at 3* level with a young amateur level and also owns an advanced horse that competes at 3* level a young Examiner of the British Horse Society. Anne currently rides a very nice young event horse that is competing professional rider. consistently well at amateur level and also owns an advanced horse that competes at 3* level with a young TM nded Solution Saddles, which manufactures the SMART range of fully flexible sports saddles. Inprofessional 2006, founded ded Solution Saddles, which manufactures the SMARTTM range of fullyAnne flexible sportsSolution saddles.Saddles, which manufactures the SMARTTM range of fully flexible sports saddles. rider. gns, which have been awarded five patents, have established the company as a market leader inbeen awarded five patents, have established Anne’s unique designs, which have theofcompany as a sports marketsaddles. leader in gns, which have been awarded five patents, have established the as afounded market leader in Saddles, In company 2006, Anne Solution which manufactures the SMARTTM range fully flexible ote equine welfare and performance. saddles promote equine andawarded performance. te equine welfare and performance. Anne’s that unique designs, whichwelfare have been five patents, have established the company as a market leader in ded the Saddle Research Trust (SRT) to promote the welfare of2009, the ridden horse, to the educate and Anne founded Saddle Research Trust (SRT) to promote the welfare of the ridden horse, to educate and ded the Saddle Research Trust (SRT) to promote the welfare ofInthe ridden horse, to educate and saddles that promote equine welfare and performance. the widely underestimated issues surrounding saddles, welfare and performance and to support raise awareness of the widely underestimated issues surrounding saddles, welfare andridden performance to support he widely underestimated issues surrounding saddles, welfare In and performance and tothe support 2009, Anne founded Saddle Research Trust (SRT) to promote the welfare of the horse, toand educate and mportant field. The SRT is now internationally recognised forresearch its ground-breaking work. field. The SRT is now internationally recognised for its ground-breaking work. into thisof important mportant field. The SRT is now internationally recognised for its ground-breaking work. raise awareness the widely underestimated issues surrounding saddles, welfare and performance and to support research into this important field. The SRT is now internationally recognised for its ground-breaking work.

ProfPat PatHarris Harris-SRT -SRTHonorary HonoraryScientific ScientificAdvisor, Advisor,Facilitator Facilitator and Auditor Prof Pat Harris -SRT Honorary Scientific Advisor, Facilitator and A Prof and Auditor Prof Pat Harris -SRT Honorary Scientific Advisor, Facilitator and Au

After qualifying from the University of Cambridge Veterinary School Dr. Pat Harris completed her PhD at the Animalof Cambridge Veterinary School Dr. Pat Harris completed her qualifying from After qualifying from the University of Cambridge Veterinary School Dr. Pat Harris After completed her PhD atthe theUniversity Animal Health Trust in Newmarket into the Equine Rhabdomyolysis Syndrome. She joined the WALTHAM Centre for the Pet Cambridge After from the University Veterinary School Dr. PatShe Harris completed her P Health Trust in Newmarket Rhabdomyolysis Syndrome. joined the WALTH Health Trust in Newmarket into the Equine Rhabdomyolysis Syndrome. She joined thequalifying WALTHAM Centre forinto Pet ofEquine Health Trust in SPILLERS, Newmarket into the Equine Shescience joined the WALTHAM Nutrition in 1995 and is responsible for the research which provides the science behind BUCKEYE inthe 1995 and isBUCKEYE responsible for theRhabdomyolysis research whichSyndrome. provides the behind the SP Nutrition in 1995 and is responsible for the research which provides the scienceNutrition behind the SPILLERS, Nutrition in 1995 and is responsible NUTRITION and WINERGY brands. This is carried out by the WALTHAM EquineNUTRITION Studies group inWINERGY collaboration with for the research which provides the science behind the SPIL brands. NUTRITION and WINERGY brands. This is carried out by the WALTHAM Equine Studies group and in collaboration with This is carried out by the WALTHAM Equine Studies group in NUTRITION and WINERGY experts at institutes and universities around the world. She is also an Adjunct Professor of institutes Equine Studies atbrands. VirginiaThis is carried out by the WALTHAM Equine Studies group in co experts at andatuniversities experts at institutes and universities around the world. She is also an Adjunct Professor of Equine Studies Virginia around the world. She is also an Adjunct Professor of Equine experts at institutes and universities around the world. She is also an Adjunct Professor of Equine St Polytechnic Institute and State University, an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Liverpool, a Visiting Polytechnic and State University, an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of L Polytechnic Institute and State University, an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Institute Liverpool, a Visiting Polytechnic Institute and and an State University, an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Live Professor in the School of Animal Rural and Environmental Sciences Nottingham Trent University Adjunct in the School Animal Rural and Environmental Sciences Nottingham Trent Univers Professor in the School of Animal Rural and Environmental Sciences NottinghamProfessor Trent University and anof Adjunct Professor inClinical the School of Animal Rural and Environmental Sciences Nottingham Trent University Professor at University of Queensland Australia. Pat is an European Specialist in Professor Veterinaryat and of Comparative University Queensland Australia. Pat is an European Specialist in Veterinary Clinica Professor at University of Queensland Australia. Pat is an European Specialist in Veterinary Clinical and Comparative Professor at University of Queensland Australia. Pat is an European Specialist in Veterinary Clinical a Nutrition, in addition to being a Past President of the British Equine Veterinary Nutrition, Association. Pat lectures all over the President in addition to being a Past of the British Equine Veterinary Association. Pat l Nutrition, in addition to being a Past President of the British Equine Veterinary Association. Pat lecturesto allbeing over the Nutrition, in addition aorPast President of the British Equine Veterinary Association. Pat lec world on nutrition as it affects the health, welfare, behaviour and performance of the horse. She is the author coworld on nutrition as it affects the health, welfare, behaviourand andperformance performance the horse. She world on nutrition as it affects the health, welfare, behaviour and performance of the horse. She is the author or coworld on nutrition as it affects the health, welfare, behaviour ofof the horse. She is t author of numerous lay as well as over 500 scientific papers, abstracts as well as book of chapters . lay as well as over 500 scientific papers, abstracts as well as book chapters . author author of numerous lay as well as over 500 scientific papers, abstracts as well as book chapters . author of numerous numerous lay as well as over 500 scientific papers, abstracts as well as book chapters .

on––SRT SRTHonorary HonoraryVeterinary VeterinaryAdvisor Advisorand and Auditor Dr. Sue Advisor and andAuditor Auditor Dr. SueDyson Dyson –– SRT SRT Honorary Honorary Veterinary Veterinary Advisor on Auditor

ed from the University of Cambridge and completed an InternshipSue in Large Animal Medicine and Surgery Sue Dyson graduated from the University of of Cambridge Cambridge and completed Surgery Dyson graduated from University completedan anInternship InternshipininLarge LargeAnimal AnimalMedicine Medicineand and Surgery d from the University of Cambridge and completed an Internship in Large Animal Medicine andthe Surgery Pennsylvania. She then spent a year in private equine practice in Pennsylvania, beforePennsylvania. returning to Great theUniversity University Pennsylvania. She then then spent spent a year in private Great atatthe She private equine equinepractice practiceininPennsylvania, Pennsylvania,before beforereturning returningtoto Great Pennsylvania. She then spent a year in private equine practice in Pennsylvania, beforeofof returning to Great osition at the Animal Health Trust, Newmarket. Sue is currently Head oftoto Equine Orthopaedics, Britain take position at the the Animal Animal Health Health Trust, Newmarket. Britain take aaClinical position at Newmarket. Sue Sue isis currently currentlyHead HeadofofEquine EquineClinical ClinicalOrthopaedics, Orthopaedics, sition at the Animal Health Trust, Newmarket. Sue is currently Head of Equine Clinical Orthopaedics, eferral service for lameness and poor performance, attracting clients from all over the United Kingdom, running clinical referral service for lameness lameness and and poor poor performance, clinical for performance, attracting attractingclients clientsfrom fromallallover overthe theUnited UnitedKingdom, Kingdom, erral service for lameness and poor performance, attracting clientsrunning from alla aover thereferral Unitedservice Kingdom, ntal Europe. Irelandand andcontinental continentalEurope. Europe. Ireland ntal Europe. ege of Veterinary Surgeons Specialist in Equine Orthopaedics and a isEuropean Specialist in VeterinarySurgeons isa aRoyal Royal Collegein ofVeterinary Veterinary Surgeons Specialist Specialist in College of Veterinary in Equine Equine Orthopaedics Orthopaedicsand andaaEuropean EuropeanSpecialist SpecialistininVeterinary Veterinary ge of Veterinary Surgeons Specialist in Equine Orthopaedics andSue aSue European Specialist nd Rehabilitation. Although Sue has a full-time clinical post, she is passionate improving theAlthough Sue has a full-time clinical post, she is passionate about improving the Sports Medicineabout and Rehabilitation. Rehabilitation. Medicine and d Rehabilitation. Although Sue has a full-time clinical post, she Sports is passionate about improving the Although Sue has a full-time clinical post, she is passionate about improving the understanding and management of lameness and poor performance and is actively involved in clinically related research, management of lameness and poor performance and is activelyunderstanding involved in clinically related research, and management of lameness and poor performance and is actively involved in clinically related research, management of lameness and poor performance and is actively involved in clinically related research, with thereviewed aim of improving equine welfare. She has published more than 270 papers in peer reviewed journals concerning proving equine welfare. She has published more than 270 paperswith in peer journalsequine concerning the aim of improving welfare. She has published more than 270 papers in peer reviewed journals concerning roving equine welfare. She has published more than 270 papers in peer reviewed journals concerning lameness andRoss, diagnostic imagingand and has lectured worldwide. She is co-editor, with Mike Ross, of Diagnosis and gnostic imaging and has lectured worldwide. She is co-editor, with Mike of Diagnosis diagnostic imaging nostic imaging and has lectured worldwide. She is co-editor, lameness with Mikeand Ross, of Diagnosis and and has lectured worldwide. She is co-editor, with Mike Ross, of Diagnosis and Management of Lameness in the Horse and co-author of Clinical Radiology of the Horse and Equine Scintigraphy. meness in the Horse and co-author of Clinical Radiology of the Horse and Equine Management of Scintigraphy. Lameness in the Horse and co-author of Clinical Radiology of the Horse and Equine Scintigraphy. meness in the Horse and co-author of Clinical Radiology of the Horse and Equine Scintigraphy. Sue isand a former Presidenthorses of theto British Equine Veterinary Association. She is also a rider, and has produced horses to top sident of the British Equine Veterinary Association. She is also a Sue rider, has produced top Equine is a has former President of the British Veterinary Association. She is also a rider, and has produced horses to top ident of the British Equine Veterinary Association. She is also a rider, and produced horses toand top national level in both eventing show jumping. th eventing and show jumping. national level in both eventing and show jumping. h eventing and show jumping.

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Saddle fit and performance Group Leaders abstracts/// Group Saddle fit and performance Group Leaders abstracts

Saddle fit and performance

Leaders Group Leaders abstracts

Prof. Hilary Clayton -Presenter and Group Leader

Prof. Hilary Clayton -Presenter and Group Leader Professor and McPhail Dressage Chair Emerita, Michigan State University. Visiting Professor, Nottingham Trent University Dr. Hilary M. Clayton is a veterinarian, researcher and horsewoman. For over 40 years she and hasMcPhail performed innovative Professor Dressage Chair Emerita, Michigan State University. Visiting Professor, Nottingham Trent Univer Prof. Hilary Clayton -Presenter and Group Leader Dr. Hilary M. programs Clayton is afor veterinarian, research in the areas of locomotor biomechanics, lameness, rehabilitation, conditioning equine researcher and horsewoman. For over 40 years she has perfor Professor and McPhail Dressage Chair Emerita, Michigan State University. Visiting Professor, Nottingham Trent University the areas200 of locomotor athletes, and the interaction between rider, tack and horse. She has publishedresearch 7 booksinand over scientific biomechanics, lameness, rehabilitation, conditioning progra Dr. Hilary M. Clayton is a veterinarian, researcher and horsewoman. For over 40 years she has performed innovative athletes, and the interaction between rider, tack and horse. She has published 7 books and ove articles on these topics. Dr. Clayton served as the Mary Anne McPhail Dressage Chair in Equine Sports Medicine at research in the areas of locomotor biomechanics, lameness, rehabilitation, conditioning programs for equine articlesfrom on these topics. Dr. Clayton served as the Mary Anne McPhail Dressage Chair in Equine Spo Michigan State University's College of Veterinary Medicine from 1997 until she retired academia in 2014. She athletes, and the interaction between rider, tack and horse. She has published 7 books and over 200 scientific State University's of Veterinary Medicine from 1997 until she retired from academ continues collaborative research with colleagues in universities aroundMichigan the world. Dr. Clayton is a College charter articlesto onperform these topics. Dr. Clayton served as the Mary Anne McPhail Dressage Chair in Equine Sports Medicine at continues to perform collaborative diplomate and pastUniversity's president College of the American College of Veterinary Sports Rehabilitation. She isShe anresearch with colleagues in universities around the world. Dr. Cla Michigan State of Veterinary Medicine from 1997 until Medicine she retiredand from academia in 2014. diplomate and past president of the American College of Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilit Honorary Fellow of the collaborative International research Society for and has beenthe inducted intoClayton the International continues to perform withEquitation colleaguesScience in universities around world. Dr. is a charter Honorary Fellow of the International Society for Equitation Science and has been inducted into th Equine Veterinarians Hall of Fame, Hall of Medicine Fame andand theRehabilitation. Saskatoon Sports Hall diplomate and past president of the Midwest AmericanDressage College ofAssociation Veterinary Sports She is an Equine Veterinarians Hall of Fame, the Midwest Dressage Association Hall of Fame and the Saskat of Fame. She Fellow is a lifelong and has competed many equestrian most recently focusing onInternational dressage in Honorary of therider International Society forinEquitation Sciencesports, and has been inducted into the of Fame. She is a lifelong rider and has competed in many equestrian sports, most recently focusing Equine Hall Fame, Prix the Midwest Association Hall of Federation Fame and the Saskatoon Hall which she Veterinarians trains through theofGrand level andDressage has earned US Dressage bronze, silverSports and gold which she trains through the Grand Prix level and has earned US Dressage Federation bronze, of Fame. She is a lifelong rider and has competed in many equestrian sports, most recently focusing on dressage in medals. medals. which she trains through the Grand Prix level and has earned US Dressage Federation bronze, silver and gold medals.

pstorff – Group Leader

Prof Lars Roepstorff – Group Leader oepstorff – Group Leader duated as a veterinary surgeon in 1985. He has practised as an equine clinician both in private

Lars Roepstorff graduated as a veterinary surgeon in 1985. He has practised as an equine clinician both in private clinics and at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU). practice at different clinics and at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU). graduated as a veterinary surgeon in 1985. He has practised as an equine clinician both in private ly with equestrian sports with, for example, appointment as National Vet and as Lecturer He has Team worked closely with equestrian sports with, for example, appointment as National Team Vet and as Lecturer ent clinics and at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU). ation of Professional Trainers. He has headed the Department of Equine Studies at SLU. His in Continuing Education Professional Trainers. He has headed the Department of Equine Studies at SLU. His losely with equestrian sports with, for example, appointment as National Team Vet and asofLecturer een focused on biomechanical studies of equine locomotion scientific with the work overall aim to focused improveon biomechanical studies of equine locomotion with the overall aim to improve been ducation of Professional Trainers. He has headed the Department of Equine has Studies at SLU. His ss it comprises than 80 scientific Lars has been or isand involved supervisor in health soundness and it comprises more than 80 scientific papers. Lars has been or is involved as supervisor in asand been focused onmore biomechanical studies papers. of equine locomotion with the overallasaim to improve 11husbandry, PhD-projects, more than 50and bachelor/master theses within the veterinary, animal husbandry, equine studies and re than 50itbachelor/master the papers. veterinary, equine dness and comprises more theses than 80within scientific Larsanimal has been or is involved as studies supervisor in engineering programs examined ms and than examined an equal number of student theses. , more 50 bachelor/master theses within the veterinary, animal husbandry, equineand studies and an equal number of student theses. He was chairman of the committee for ICEL 2012 (International Conference on Canine and Equine the international committee for ICELof2012 (International Conference on Canine andinternational Equine grams and examined an equal number student theses. Locomotion) hasconferences been presenter and invited speaker on numerous scientific as well as sports conferences as been andcommittee invited speaker numerous scientific as well asonand sports n of the presenter international for ICELon2012 (International Conference Canine and Equine around the working world. In with 2011 he became Professor of Equine Functional Anatomy and is today working with applied nd2011 he became Professor of Equine Functional Anatomy and is as today applied has been presenter and invited speaker on numerous scientific well as sports conferences biomechanics in three horse-rider different areas; development of tools for objective equine lameness diagnostics, horse-rider ee areas; development of Equine tools forFunctional objectiveAnatomy equine lameness diagnostics, d. different In 2011 he became Professor of and is today working with applied and equine footings. three different areas; development of tools for objective equineinteraction lameness diagnostics, horse-rider ne footings.

equine footings.

Dr Thilo Pfau – Presenter and Group Leader

Dr Thilo Pfau – Presenter and Group Leader

Dr Thilo Pfau – Presenter and Group Leader

Thilo is a computer scientist by training, having studied information technology at the Technische Universitä Thilo is a computer scientist by training, having studied information technology at the Technische Universität München (TUM) in Germany. This was followed by a PhD in signal processing and pattern recognition at TUM before taking o Thilo is a computer scientist by training, having studied information technology at the Technische Universität (TUM) in Germany. This was followed by a PhD in signal processing and pattern recognition at TUM before taking onMünchen a postdoctoral position at the in Germany. This was followed by a PhD in signal processing and pattern recognition atresearch TUM before taking on aInternational postdoctoralComputer Science Institute (ICSI) in Berkeley, California. From there, research position at the International Computer Science Institute (ICSI) in Berkeley, California. From there, Thilo moved to a Veterinary College’s Structure and Motion Lab in the area of further postdoctoral role moved at the Royal research position at the International Computer Science Institute (ICSI) in Berkeley, California. From there, Thilo to a further postdoctoral role at the Royal Veterinary College’s Structure and Motion Lab in the area of biomechanics movement associatedof with a project funded by the BBSRC, DEFRA and the HBLB. During further postdoctoral role at the Royal Veterinary College’s Structure and Motion quadrupedal Lab in the area of biomechanics of quadrupedal movement associated with a project funded by the BBSRC, DEFRA andparticular the HBLB. During this time (and in through quadrupedal movement associated with a project funded by the BBSRC, DEFRA and the HBLB. Duringthe thisexposure time (andtoinclinical lameness assessments performed at the RVC Equine Refe particular through the exposure to clinical lameness assessments performed at thedeveloped RVC Equine Referral Hospital) he a keen interestHospital) in the quantitative assessment of lameness in horses with techniques that can particular through the exposure to clinical lameness assessments performed at the RVC Equine Referral he developed a keen interest in the quantitative assessment of lameness in horses with techniques that can be ‘in field’, i.e. outside theemployed confines of developed a keen interest in the quantitative assessment of lameness in horses with the techniques that can be employed ‘indedicated gait laboratories. the the field’, i.e. i.e. outside thethe confines of dedicated gait laboratories. Since having moved to the Department of Clinical Science and Services at the RVC, Thilo has intensified h field’, outside confines of dedicated gait laboratories. Since having moved to the Department of of Clinical Science and Services atatthe intensified this areahas resulting in a his considerable of peer reviewed publications, many conducted with the help Since having moved to the Department Clinical Science and Services theRVC, RVC,Thilo Thilo has intensified hisresearch research in innumber this areaarea resulting in ainconsiderable number of of peer reviewed publications, with help inertial sensor technology assessing upper body movement asymmetry and more recently back ranges of motion. Thilo e resulting a considerable number peer reviewed publications,many manyconducted conducted withthe the help of of inertial sensor technology assessing upper body movement asymmetry and more recently ofofmotion. supervising undergraduate andenjoys postgraduate students for the research components of their respective degrees, a technology assessing upper body movement asymmetry and more recentlyback backranges ranges motion.Thilo Thilo enjoys supervising undergraduate andand postgraduate students forfor thethe research degrees, always to produce results of publishable quality. undergraduate postgraduate students researchcomponents componentsofoftheir theirrespective respective degrees, always striving striving to produce results of publishable quality. produce results of publishable quality.

DD Dr Jan Birch – SRT Honorary Education and Knowledge Transfer Advisor and Group Leader Dr. Jan Birch completed her PhD in Veterinary Physiology at the University of Cambridge, based at The BBSRC Babraham Institute as an Animal Health Trust scholar. Over the past 30 years, she has had a career as an academic: lecturing, managing degree programmes, and developing and validating industry-aligned degrees in the animal and equine sciences. She has also undertaken industry-linked applied research (engaging and supervising undergraduate, postgraduate and PhD students), initially based at The University of Liverpool Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Leahurst and latterly as Research, Scholarship and Knowledge Transfer Manager for University Centre Reaseheath. This project development includes partnership building, grant writing and knowledge transfer for numerous collaborations between industry, the voluntary sector and researchers.

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Saddle Research Trust

Workshop Sponsors Sherry Belton Sherry Belton, Managing Director of Albion, has an impeccable equestrian history having trained with dressage specialist Franz Rochowansky of the Spanish Riding School and competed successfully in both dressage and eventing. Referred to in the industry as “Saddle Fitter to the Stars”, Sherry has fitted saddles for Olympians and professional riders worldwide for over 30 years including Ernst Bachinger, the Balkenhol family, the Bechtolsheimer family, Emile Faurie, William Fox-Pitt, Alain François, Sylvia Loch, Hans Peter Minderhoud, Margit Otto-Crépin, Herbert Rehbein, Guenter Seidel, Laura Tomlinson, Thomas Voss and George Williams. These riders trust Sherry’s exceptional saddle fitting experience and Albion’s ability to correctly fit and find saddle fitting solutions for their horses.

Paul Belton Paul Belton, Chairman of Albion Saddlemakers was classically trained in dressage riding and schooling by Ernst Bachinger, the former Director of Training at Spanish Riding School in Vienna. He also competed in show jumping at Hickstead and showing at Wembley. Paul is a qualified design engineer and studied the construction of saddles and bridles and carries forward a real passion for technical research and development. He formed Albion in 1985 after returning from Vienna and recognising how so much equipment was restricting horse and rider performance. He was past President of Society of Master Saddlers and co-founder of S.M.S training course for saddle fitters. Paul studied Human anatomy to identify precise skeletal differences in male and female rider’s anatomy and has researched the influence of horse cross breeding to identify skeletal and muscular changes which is now worldwide practise and constantly changing. All changes influence performance, conveying the need for revised design and construction requirements to benefit these changing structures.

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Saddle Research Trust

Delegates Paul Belton Sherry Belton

Workshop title sponsor - Albion Workshop title sponsor - Albion

Charlotte Berridge Lauren Birbeck Dr. Jan Birch

Solution Saddles Nottingham Trent Uni, Brackenhurst SRT Honorary Education and Knowledge Transfer Advisor

Tracy Bye Sue Carson Prof. Hilary Clayton Tad Coffin

Bishop Burton College Workshop Gold sponsor SC Saddles Michigan, USA Tad Coffin Saddles, USA

Dr. Anne Bondi Dr. David Bondi

SRT Director SRT Strategy Advisor

Richard Davison David Doherty Dr. Sue Dyson Prof. Agneta Egenvall Liz Gandy

BEF / BD Horsetech Conferences SRT Honorary Veterinary Advisor Veterinary Epidemiology, SLU, Sweden UoS

Prof. Heikki Handroos Prof. Pat Harris

Lapeenranta University, Finland SRT Honorary Scientific Advisor

Dr. Sue Horseman Millie Horsfall David Kempsall Dr. David Marlin

Duchy College Solution Saddles Conference title sponsor - Wow

Dr. Rachel Murray Dr. Kathryn Nankervis

AHT Hartpury College

Russell Guire Jenny Hall

Centaur Biomechanics BEF Veterinary Advisor

Kay Hastilow Dr. Jo Hockenhull

Saddlers' Company Bristol Uni

Dr. Pauline Martin Richard Mott Emma Murphy

CWD, France Warwick College

Brig. Philip Napier Vicki Newton

Saddlers' Company International, World Horse Welfare

Laurence Pearman Dr. Thilo Pfau

Cirencester Saddles RVC

Emily Sparkes Tony Tyler

RVC Conference title sponsor - WHW

Claire Williams

British Equestrian Trade Association

Jane Nixon Sue Norton

SMS Vet rep SMS

Annie Pollock Laura Quiney Frances Roche Prof. Lars Roepstorff Linda Roost

SRT Administrator AHT Saddlers' Company Sweden Netherlands

Dr. Annelies Van den Eede Prof. René van Weeren Dr. Anna Walker Maggie White

Belgian vet Utrecht University Duchy College Conference title sponsor - Wow

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Saddle Research Trust

Abstracts Sue Norton

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Challenges faced by the saddlery fitting profession

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9:30 – 9:40

One of biggest challenges we face is recognition by the horse owning public that a qualified professional fitter is part of their horse care team, and that regular checks are essential for a happy and comfortable partnership able to do the job being asked of them. The SMS do take complaints seriously, and we constantly ask ourselves how we can ensure good service across the board. Education is key –sharing best practice and encouraging people to tell us if they experience poor service. Initial costs to set up as a fitter can be high, combining training and sufficient demo stock. This presents two challenges: supporting promising fitters as they grow their business, sometimes from smaller initial investment; and helping fitters to balance cash flow and stock to reduce pressure on them to sell. Like some other professionals, we undercharge for our time and expertise. The expectation that fitters are only interested in the money can be demotivating. This may be true for a small number of people, but for most fitters their priority is assessing and fitting for horse and rider wherever possible and not selling at any cost. Fitters must be confident, professional, and often diplomatic in dealing with clients. The recommendation that another equine professional should assess the horse before ridden work recommences is not always popular coming from a saddle fitter! However, if treatment and remedial work is advised the fitter can assist. The challenge is a holistic outlook from everybody! It can be difficult when a para-professional condemns or contradicts fitting practice or advice without consulting the fitter. We work hard, but conditions can change rapidly. We also, like any human, can make mistakes. Let’s work together for the horse and rider - let’s talk. Many times we are faced with financial restrictions of owners and the subsequent result of them purchasing saddles online. This is a crazy saving for such an important tool. Marketing and high-profile brands can also be a challenge. Sponsorship of our medal-winning riders is influential but a saddle suitable for a fit and talented horse and rider is not necessarily the saddle for an office worker to compete at 90 cm one weekend and have fun round a sponsored ride the next. In recent years the challenge of obesity and lack of fitness in horses and riders has grown. The pilot study on rider weight has resulted in some interesting findings but also the need for further work. Best fitting practice is based on experience and supported by research. Open and up to date research, informed by qualified saddle fitters active in that role, would benefit the industry. Breeding programs now give some cause for concern as the horses back seem to be getting shorter. This again is a concern to be shared and considered amongst experts in this field. Let’s work together for maximum performance.

David Kempsell -

The saddlery manufacturing industry -

9:40 – 9:50

Almost every industry and sport in the world thrives – indeed depends on – innovation in order to improve and succeed. What can be done better, whether by incremental or radical change, is essential for improvement, even survival. Consider for example tendon therapy. If there was no innovation and evaluation of new techniques over the last 50 years, we would still be firing legs, not considering treatments such as electromagnetic therapies or stem cell use. The saddle industry is the outlier that swims against this tide. There is resistance to real innovation and progress in design. This comes from partly from the end purchaser and user, the rider, but mainly from the ‘experts’ they rely on such as retailers and trainers. Many of these influencers appear to have the perception is that change is bad and that tradition trumps innovation. “We have always done it that way”. Also the so-called innovation that does exist is not the big jumps forward that we see in other industries with radical change but rather little steps so we don’t cause too much upset and backlash. The negative perceptions from the “industry influencers” may partly be due to a lack of understanding of the rationale behind improvements made, but often is an unwillingness to undertake new training, or to invest in new equipment or stock, or take the time to educate their end-customers, who realistically ‘don’t know what they don’t know’. It is my contention that the audience here today, an inner elite within the industry, has a duty to work from first principles, to evaluate what the horse needs from us and then design it. Our role is not just to ask how we can tweak the current status quo to make it a little better for the horse. Or, dare I say it, a little more profitable. We equally have a duty to educate: educate every retailer, every trainer, every equine professional, not just to talk amongst ourselves. My challenge is: how do we effect change in both aspects? How do we galvanise true innovation based on hard facts and rigorous R & D processes which utilise state of the art materials and techniques? And how do we rapidly and effectively take on responsibility for communication and education to the full gamut of the equestrian world?

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Saddle Research Trust

Abstracts Dr. Pauline Martin -Saddle fit and performance: the challenges facing saddle designers-

9:50 – 10:00

The saddle is the most important interface between horse and rider. The designer faces the challenge of trying to match two different biomechanical systems, horse and rider, in order to produce the perfect saddle. Modern saddlers need thorough and precise data in order to introduce innovation to saddle design, thus optimising the welfare and comfort of both horse and rider. We developed the Saddle In Motion project in order to improve our knowledge of the biomechanics of the horse whilst being ridden. For the first time the movement of the horse’s spine was measured under the saddle thanks to an innovative measurement protocol. The collected data allows the designer to optimize each part of the saddle (e.g dual-density and integrated panels) to best suit the horse. Similarly, the rider's reaction with the horse can be tracked and analysed. A fitted saddle is perfect for the horse only when the rider can move naturally with it. Any restriction of the rider will have a direct impact on the horse's performance and comfort. For this reason we have also launched research studies concerning the biomechanics of the rider and his interaction with the horse. Our innovations have allowed us a better insight into the relationship between horse and rider and this has led to improvements which have been implemented in our saddle 2Gs Mademoiselle. The analysis of the relationship between horse, saddle and rider was made possible by the development and utilisation of new tracking devices. The iJump saddle and the iPulse girth allow the collection of data as they track the horse and rider pair during movement. When data is analysed over time this allows analysis of the effects of training. The saddle trade is changing and is increasingly inspired by scientific studies which is leading to improvements in the welfare and comfort of both horse and rider as well as optimizing sporting performance.

Laurence Pearman

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Challenges facing saddle fitting trainers

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10:00 – 10:10

The first challenge will always be delivering inclusive training to a varied group of people from different backgrounds, whilst ensuring that all key elements are properly covered. Some come to saddle-fit training from a long-time owning or working with horses. Some come with a retailing background, and some come from saddle manufacturers or workshops. Each will have different levels of knowledge and experience in all aspects of saddle fitting. Some will have greater knowledge of anatomy, some greater experience of handling horses, some understand riders, some have skills in handling clients, and some will have saddle making or leatherworking skills. A good saddle fitter needs a sound foundation in all these areas. They also need experience. We advise that 3 years supported working as a saddle fitter is essential to reach the standard required to gain qualification. We arrange mentorships for Trainees and launched our online learning this year. This gives intermediate training and support in preparation for our City & Guilds course and assessment. Our experience and the growing body of research shows that saddle fitting is a complex process. We have extended our course to a full 5 days, and we design each section to be short and sharp to hold interest and concentration. English saddles are used all over the world which attracts trainees from far afield. We are expanding the locations of SMS course. Our online learning can be accessed anywhere. The SMS Introductory stage attracts Equestrian professionals wanting to enhance their knowledge and use that greater understanding of saddle fit in their present role. It is encouraging that demand for CPD in this area remains high. However, those practitioners who seek a path to fit and sell saddles themselves could find a conflict of interest. Saddle fitting is a profession in its own right. A working Saddle Fitter must be able to assess and adjust many makes of saddle. Product knowledge is key. It takes time to develop, and some fitters can find it hard to access a wide selection. Manufacturer engagement is important to support this learning, It is just as important to recognise design features, restrictions and faults. There is no room legally for missing a safety issue or asymmetry and so we must give Trainees the tools to thoroughly assess each saddle. We require that they hold our Flocking qualification and have trained in flocking to fit the moving horse and rider. They should also understand bridle fitting as this complements the comfort of the horse. Trainees should develop skills in assessing rider influence. Alongside our training we encourage them to shadow coaches and trainers, and to study current research – in this and all other aspects of tack fitting. Time restrictions and a lack of familiarity with academic language means that access to research can be challenging. One of the biggest challenges, and one we must meet, is client management. The end user has multiple sources of information which are easily accessed. To explain what is achievable for them and their equine takes time, patience, confidence and expertise.

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Saddle Research Trust

Abstracts

Anne Bondi

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What are the challenges faced by researchers in the field?

9:00 – 9:15

Better collaboration and communication between the scientific community and the equine industry is required to achieve meaningful progress in equine research. The two sides need to develop an improved understanding of the issues that each other face in order to achieve relevant outputs from research. This presentation will discuss some of the challenges posed by the investigation of horse, saddle and rider interactions. The real-world problems that are faced by researchers in the field are considered. Some popular measurement systems, their usefulness and their limitations are described. Potential solutions to some of the areas where progress is most needed are proposed.

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Saddle Research Trust

Abstracts David Doherty - How HorseTech is impacting on how Horses and Riders interact? -

4:00 – 4:10

David is just back from attending the world's biggest Equine Veterinary Conference in San Francisco (the 64th annual Conference of the American Association of Equine Practitioners) and will share some of the latest ways that he's seeing technology being used around the world to transform how horses and riders interact.

Anna Walker

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Equine Simulators: Applications, Perceptions and Limitations -

4:10-4:20

Riding is a sport enjoyed by 2.7 million people with 1.3 million regular riders (BETA NES 2015). Riding in any discipline requires complex interaction between horse and rider with high levels of balance, fitness, flexibility and proprioceptive coordination. There are high levels of rider injury with reports of up to 81% of the rider falls requiring medical attention (Mayberry et al., 2007). Injury risk is particularly high in racing with risk factors for falls including rider fitness and experience (Hitchens et al., 2012). Horse simulators were developed in 1980 with the first interactive simulators in 2007 (Racewood). Anecdotally there are widely accepted differences between horse and simulator movement with evidence quantifying the differences in terms of rider stress (Ille, et al., 2015) and simulator plus rider kinematics and kinetics (Walker et al., 2016a,b). Despite proven differences exhibited during simulator riding there are unquestionable advantages to their application in terms of reduced risk of rider injury, ease of physical manipulation and repetitive, repeatable movement. Simulators are increasingly used in place of real horses as they provide a safe, cost effective environment for novice riders to develop muscle memory for specific disciplines in a consistent, repeatable and predictive manner. Whilst many coaches use ear pieces to communicate with riders, feedback is inherently indirect, and riders often fail to make the immediate corrections. On the simulator, the coach can give more detailed feedback, making use of mirrors, video playback and physical manipulation to advance rider learning. Despite their advantages there are limitations to the current generation of simulators and several reasons that they will never replace real horses. Simulators can be of benefit when used as a fitness tool but only if the rider is experienced and committed to working hard. The movement of a simulator is, by nature of its cyclical movement, more repetitive and consistent than a real horse, limiting the benefits to the riders. Simulator riding, fundamentally has no consequences to the rider due to poor riding technique, however there are extensive opportunities for rapid development through real-time feedback. Simulators are currently available for racing, dressage and jumping with their use being most popular in racing. The reasons for this are currently unknown but arguably the most important element of simulator riding is that the ‘feel’ needs to be correct. The racing simulator requires just one basic and cyclical movement to represent gallop, whilst this movement increases in speed, the trajectory and range of movement do not, the movement simply gets faster. Simulators aimed at other disciplines require more complex movements which are neither cyclical nor consistent unlike the movement of a galloping racehorse. While this disparity exists, simulators will never help riders develop feel or the skills required to adapt to the horse movement (e.g. stumble). It is unclear what the future holds for simulator use and development but the addition of greater degrees of freedom to represent differences associated with canter lead and trunk roll or a blend of the elements from the fall simulator may be of further benefit to all simulators. Incorporating elements such as bucking, bolting, rearing and stumbling would aid the development and adaptability of novice riders. Alternatively developing simulators which only respond to really strong rein contact or are ‘spooky’ and shoot sideways rapidly could be used to train novice riders how to react appropriately to such movements. References BETA NES 2015 http://www.beta-uk.org/pages/industry-information/market-information.php Hitchens, P.L., Blizzard,C.L., Jones,G., Day,L.M., Fell,J. (2012).The association between jockey experience and race-day falls in flat racing in Australia. Inj.Prev.18(6),385–391. Ille, N.,VonLewinski,M.,Aurich,C.,Erber,R.,Wulf,M.,Palme,R.,Greenwood,B., Aurich,J. (2015) Riding simulator training induces lower sympathetic response in riders than training with horses. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science. 35, 668–672. Kruger, L., Hohberg, M., Lehmann, W., Dresing, K. (2018) Assessing the risk for major injuries in equestrian sports. BMJ Open Sport Exercise Medicine 16:4(1) Mayberry, J., Pearson, T., Wiger, K., Diggs, B., & Mullins, R. (2007) Equestrian injury prevention efforts need more attention to novice riders. The Journal of Trauma, Injury, Infection and Critical Care, 62 (3), 735–739. Parkin,T.D.H., Clegg,P.D., French,N.P., Proudman,C.J., Riggs,C.M., Singer,E.R., Webbon,P.M., Morgan,K.L. (2004) Race and course level risk factors for fatal distal limb fracture in racing thoroughbreds. Equine Veterinary Journal 36(6),521–526. Racewood Equestrian Simulators. (http://racewood.com/about.php), (accessed 23.09.15) a Walker, A.M., Martin, A., Pfau, T., Sparkes, E.L., Wilson, A.M., Witte, T.H. (2016) How realistic is a racehorse simulator? Journal of Biomechanics. 49, 3570-3575. b Walker, A.M., Applegate, C., Pfau, T., Sparkes, E.L., Wilson, A.M., Witte, T.H. (2016) The kinematics and kinetics of riding a racehorse: A quantitative comparison of a training simulator and real horses. Journal of Biomechanics. 49, 3368-3374.

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Saddle Research Trust

Abstracts Heikki Handroos

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The technical challenges in development of novel horseback riding simulator beyond the state- of the art

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4:20 – 4:30

The commercially available state-of-the-art horseback riding simulator technology has boundaries that limit its applicability. These boundaries range from motion capabilities to available maximum power and programmability of individual motions. The commercially available simulators use patented crank-mechanisms that limit both the motion amplitudes and individual programmability of the motion axes (such as US 6,616 456 B1, 2003, US 7,749,088 B2 ,2010). Also they use 1,5 kW AC-motors as a power sources (www.racewood.com) that limit the peak power of the simulator. The peak power of a real horse can be as high as 11kW (Stevenson RD, Wassersug RJ.,1993). During past decades, a number of horseback riding simulators have been developed in research projects (Koenig, 1993, Peham, 2011, Chen 2002, Yamaguchi, 1992, Amirat, 1996). In those reports there is no clear evidence about the validity of the measurement method nor the capability of the motion platform to complete the gait motion patterns. One of the most successful of such projects is the Robbie project (Eskola, 2009, 2013). As concluded in those reports the hydraulic Steward platform of the simulator was unable to complete the required motion amplitudes during trot and canter. Mimicking the walk was successful. Also fast switching between gaits was fluently achieved, which was a clear advantage in comparison to commercially available simulator. The control interface of Robbie enabled a natural interaction between the simulator platform and the rider. The aids provided by the interface included calf pressure, reins tension and stirrup angle. To provide a highly realistic riding sensation to the rider in simulator environment at least the following capabilities should be provided: 1) ability to measure the gaits of any individual horse while rider is sitting in the saddle 2) a fully programmable motion base that can provide sufficient motion amplitudes at least in 5-degree of freedom and 10kW peak power 3) an appropriate rider-simulator interface to make realistic interaction possible 4) intelligent algorithm to make the simulator respond the rider’s aids in proper way 4) a multiscreen visualization with rider’s head tracking to provide a dynamic camera view to the rider. In near future, because of fast development of equipment, their increasing cost efficiency and availability of modern AI algorithms, it would be possible to develop a fully programmable high-end riding simulator providing all required capabilities required to achieve highly realistic riding sensation both in dressage and jumping. The presentation gives proposals how to achieve this. The key technical solutions such as motion measurements, motion platform kinematics, actuation, instrumentation, visualization and algorithms etc. are discussed. References Stevenson RD, Wassersug RJ. (1993), Horsepower from a horse. Nature. 1993 Jul 15; 364(6434):195. Koenig, P.M., Bekey, G.A. (1993): Generation and Control of Gait Patterns in a Simulated Horse. ICRA (3)(1993)359-366 C. Peham, T. Licka, M. Kapaun and M. Scheidl (2001), A new method to quantify harmony of the horse-rider system in dressage, Sports Engineering (2001) 4, 95-101 Eskola, R., Handroos, H., Sallinen, J. (2009). Advanced Horseback Riding Simulator with Hydraulic Motion Base, The 11th Scandinavian International Conference on Fluid Power, SICFP’09, June 2-4, 2009, Linköping, Sweden www.racewood.com Eskola, R., Handroos, H., (2013) Novel Horseback Riding Simulator Based on 6-DOF Motion Measurement, Motion Base and Interactive Control of Gaits, Advanced Robotics, Volume 27, Issue 16, 2013 G-L. Chen et al., (2002) Biofeedback Control of Horseback Riding Simulator, Proceedings of the First international Conference on Machine Learning and Cybernetics, Beijing, 2002. M. Yamaguchi and N. Iguchi (1992), Development of a horseback riding simulator, Advanced Robotics, vol.6, no.4,pp.517-528,1992. Y. Amirat, C. Francois, G. Fried, J. Pontnau and M. Dafaoui, (1996), Design and Control of a New Six DOF Parallel Robot: Application to Equiestrial Gait Simulation, Mechatronics Vol. 6, No. 2, pp. 227-239, 1996 US 6,616 456 B1 (2003) Apparatus for performing hippotherapy: sep 9, 2003, 3-dimensional motion mimicking horse walk, specially designed mechanism using pulleys, cranks and pivots US 7,749,088 B2 (2010), Horse Simulator, Body and mechanism providing horizontal and vertical motion to a longitudinal axis plus kit of other equipment

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Saddle Research Trust

Abstracts Agneta Egenvall

- Assessment of the horse, saddle and rider interactions - 8:45 – 9:00

This presentation will start by addressing some basic concepts in epidemiology. A glance at what has been published regarding horse-rider interaction applying epidemiological concepts will be made. Speculations on why there are so few state-of-the art epidemiological studies in equine locomotor health and performance will follow as well as discussion for the need of such studies? There is also a trade-off between data measured over time on many subjects versus data measured on few subjects on single occasions. How can we embrace both the individual variation and general principles for factors related to horse-rider interaction? Speculations will follow on whether we can read out more generally applicable evidence from our data without making large epidemiological studies. Also there is still, in spite of the fine measuring equipment we possess, a need come back to subjective evaluation of the correct execution of various dressage exercises, such as collection, in order to both understand what we are measuring and to communicate our results to a broader audience. Perhaps we must accompany all our studies with movies of all trials we made? Horse-rider interaction examples will be used throughout. Anne Bondi

- Assessment of the rider and their effects in the interaction. -

9:00 – 9:15

Riding horses exposes them to increased risk of injury and insults to well-being; it is therefore important, if public opinion is to continue to allow horses to be used for our pleasure at all, that we strive to develop our understanding of what may compromise the horse’s welfare. The effects of the rider are undoubtedly of great importance to the way in which the horse moves and performs but remain poorly understood. The three elements of the horse, saddle and rider interaction influence each other, but also move independently through their individual freedoms of movement. Since many orthopaedic symptoms become transparent exclusively in the ridden horse, a better understanding of the effects of the rider is therefore of critical importance. This presentation will discuss aspects of the effects of the rider: the known knowns and the known unknowns.

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Saddle Research Trust

Abstracts

Dr. Thilo Pfau

- Objective Performance Assessment -

9:15 – 9:30

A recent debate about the definition of lameness in the context of the increasing use of gait analysis in clinical practice has fuelled an animated debate amongst researcher and practising veterinarians [1–4]. This debate has highlighted the need for further discussions as well as for further research into the area of gait assessment for aiding clinical decision making. The principle should be clear: movement asymmetry (of head and pelvis) is intrinsically linked to the mechanics of movement (via Newtonian laws of motion) and hence the cardinal visual signs of lameness (head nod and hip hike) are directly associated with force asymmetries [5,6]. These cardinal signs of lameness can be measured accurately and precisely for example with optical motion capture or inertial measurement units. Making use of these techniques, changes in the degree of lameness can be quantified as a function of diagnostic analgesia [7–10] and hence remove some of the bias that is inherent to visual assessment of lameness [11] which may be related to limitations of the human eye in reliably detecting mild movement asymmetries [12]. Of course, lame horses do not only show head nod and hip hike. Other signs of lameness may be visible to experienced observers [3,13]. These often involve more detailed limb movements or very intricate changes to the forces and point of force application [14]. Improvements in inertial sensor technology have led to considerable progress in the quality of quantifications of limb movement in horses [15], which is encouraging for further research in this area. Accompanying expert veterinary assessments with fundamental (head nod and hip hike) or more advanced measurements such as withers movement [16], back movement [17] or indeed limb movements [15] is now possible. This presents a challenge and fantastic opportunity for the scientific veterinary community and now puts us in the position to critically evaluate the potential of additional parameters in helping to distinguish between different causes of lameness and between mechanical deficits – such as limb length differences – and pain related performance limitations. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Weeren, P.R. van, Pfau, T., Rhodin, M., Roepstorff, L., Serra Bragança, F. and Weishaupt, M.A. (2017) Do we have to redefine lameness in the era of quantitative gait analysis? Equine Vet. J. 49. 567-569 Adair, S., Baus, M., Belknap, J., Bell, R et al (2018) Response to Letter to the Editor : Do we have to redefine lameness in the era of quantitative gait analysis. Equine Vet. J. 50, 415–417. Bathe, A., Judy, C.E. and Dyson, S.J. (2018) Letter to the Editor : Do we have to redefine lameness in the era of quantitative gait analysis ? Equine Vet. J. 50, 273. Weeren, P.R. van, Pfau, T., Rhodin, M., Roepstorff, L., Serra Braganca, F. and Weishaupt, M. (2018) What is lameness and what ( or who ) is the gold standard to detect it ? Equine Vet. J. 549-551. Keegan, K.G., MacAllister, C.G., Wilson, D.A., Gedon, C.A., Kramer, J., Yonezawa, Y., Maki, H. and Pai, P.F. (2012) Comparison of an inertial sensor system with a stationary force plate for evaluation of horses with bilateral forelimb lameness. Am. J. Vet. Res. 73, 368–374. Bell, R.P., Reed, S.K., Schoonover, M.J., Whitfield, C.T., Yonezawa, Y., Maki, H., Pai, P.F. and Keegan, K.G. (2016) Associations of force plate and body-mounted inertial sensor measurements for identification of hind limb lameness in horses. Am. J. Vet. Res. 77, 337–345. Maliye, S., Voute, L., Lund, D. and Marshall, J.F. (2013) An inertial sensor-based system can objectively assess diagnostic anaesthesia of the equine foot. Equine Vet. J. 45, 26–30. Maliye, S., Voute, L.C. and Marshall, J.F. (2015) Naturally-occurring forelimb lameness in the horse results in significant compensatory load redistribution during trotting. Vet. J. 204, 208–213. Maliye, S. and Marshall, J.F. (2016) Objective assessment of the compensatory effect of clinical hind limb lameness in horses: 37 cases (2011-2014). Am. J. Vet. Res. 249, 940–944. Pfau, T., Spicer-Jenkins, C., Smith, R.K., Bolt, D.M., Fiske-Jackson, A. and Witte, T.H. (2014) Identifying optimal parameters for quantification of changes in pelvic movement symmetry as a response to diagnostic analgesia in the hindlimbs of horses. Equine Vet. J. 46, 759–763. Arkell, M., Archer, R.M., Guitian, F.J. and May, S.A. (2006) Evidence of bias affecting the interpretation of the results of local anaesthetic nerve blocks when assessing lameness in horses. Vet Rec. 159, 346–349. Parkes, R.S. V., Weller, R., Groth, a. M., May, S. and Pfau, T. (2009) Evidence of the development of “domain-restricted” expertise in the recognition of asymmetric motion characteristics of hindlimb lameness in the horse. Equine Vet. J. 41, 112–117. Dyson, S. (2014) Recognition of lameness: man versus machine. Vet. J. 201, 245–248. Williams, G.E., Silverman, B.W., Wilson, A.M. and Goodship, A.E. (1999) Pathology specific changes in equine reaction data demonstrated by principal component analysis. Am. J. Vet. Res. 60, 549–555. Bosch, S., Serra Bragança, F., Marin-Perianu, M., Marin-Perianu, R., Zwaag, J.B. Van Der, Voskamp, J., Back, W. and Weeren, R. Van (2018) EquiMoves : A Wireless Networked Inertial Measurement System for Objective Examination of Horse Gait. Sensors (Basel). 18. pii: E850. doi: 10.3390/s18030850 Rhodin, M., Persson-Sjodin, E., Egenvall, A., Serra Braganca, F., Pfau, T., Roepstorff, L., Weishaupt, M., Thomsen, M.H., Weeren, P.R. van, Hernlund, ElinEgenvall, A. and Braganca, F.M.S. (2018) Vertical movement symmetry of the withers in horses with induced forelimb and hindlimb lameness at trot. Equine Vet J, 50, 818-824 Greve, L., Dyson, S. and Pfau, T. (2017) Alterations in thoracolumbosacral movement when pain causing lameness has been improved by diagnostic analgesia. Vet. J. 224. 55-63

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Saddle Research Trust

Reflections Biography Abstracts Richard Davison – Reflections Richard Davison - PresenterPresenter Richard is a four-time OlympianOlympian (including the 2012 London Games) and Richard is a four-time (including the Olympic 2012 London OlymEuropean medalist and has been at the fore-front of the international dressage world for pic Games) and European medalist and has been at the fore-front four decades.

of the international dressage world for four decades. As well as

being among world’s most experienced international riders he As well as being among the the world’s most experienced international riders he is in demand ismany in demand for his attributes. HePerformance has beenManager the Britfor his other attributes. He many has beenother the British World Class and former British Class Dressage Olympic Team Captain. ish World Performance Manager and former British Dressage Olympic Team Captain. Among other awards he was awarded an

Among other awards he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Science by Nottingham Honorary Doctorate of Science by Nottingham Trent University and Trent University and the Fellowship of the British Horse Society. He is currently a trustee the Fellowship theserves British Horse Society. He isforcurrently a trustee for World Horse Welfareofand on advisory working groups the International for World Horse Welfare and body serves on advisory groups Equestrian Federation the world governing for equestrian sport.working He is a former for ofthe Equestrian the Dressage world governing member the International boards of the British EquestrianFederation Federation, British and the British Horsefor Society. body equestrian sport. He is a former member of the boards of

the British Equestrian Federation, British Dressage and the British Horse Society.

Training and management - the future and what changes will it bring?

Richard Davison – Company 9:45 – 10:00 The Worshipful of Saddlers (The Saddlers’ Company)

is one of the ancient Livery Companies of the City of London Could advances in technology and future research the way we ride, train established by Charterstudies of King influence Richard II in 1395. or manage our horses? Her Majesty Queenor Elizabeth II graciously granted a Supplemental What impact will changes to competition formats, rule amendments, have on our horses? Charter in 1995 which confirmed the Company’s Objects and Richard Davison looks into the future. Purposes by Act of Parliament. Chief among these is the furtherance of the craft of saddlery and activities related to both saddlery and equestrianism.

The Worshipful Company of Saddlers (The Saddlers’ Company) is one of the ancient Livery Companies of the City The Company, mindful of established the powers invested in Richard it andII its of London by Charter of King in 1395. Majesty Queen Elizabeth II graciously grantedofa Supresponsibilities to theHer trade, is pleased to support the objectives plementalon Charter in Rider, 1995 which confirmed the Company’s the International Conference Horse, Saddlery Interactions: Objects and Purposes by Act of Parliament. Chief among Welfare and Performance. these is the furtherance of the craft of saddlery and activities related to both saddlery and equestrianism. The Company, of thecollaboration powers investedbetween in it and its reThe Saddlers’ Company seeks tomindful encourage to the trade, is pleased support objectives academic researchers,sponsibilities saddlery manufacturers, and to saddle &the bridle of the International Conference on Horse, Rider, Saddlery fitting practitioners. It is the Company’s view that horse welfare and performance is best served through Interactions: Welfare and Performance. positivist dialogue involving all three. This will encourage innovation and investment the tosaddlery trade and Company in seeks encourage collaboration The Saddlers’ between academic researchers, saddlery manufacturers, and assure its continued success. saddle & bridle fitting practitioners. It is the Company’s view horse welfare and performance is best served through The Company currently chairs The Saddle Fitting (Training & that Qualifications) Steering Group on behalf of a positivist dialogue involving all three. This will encourage wide range of stakeholders and is confident that the legacy of this Steering Group and the deliberations ofand thisassure innovation and investment in the saddlery trade Conference will together inform and motivate all those who work with, treat or simply enjoy horses. its continued success. The Company currently chairs The Saddle Fitting (Training & Qualifications) Steering Group on behalf of a wide range of stakeholders and is confident that the legacy of this Steer-

ing Group and the deliberations of this Conference will together inform and motivate all those who work with, treat or simply enjoy horses.

19


Saddle Research Trust

Delegate Biographies

Charlotte Berridge

Lauren Birkbeck

After graduating from the Royal Agricultural College in 2009 with a degree in International Equine and Agricultural Business Management, Charlotte started in her role as Business Manager for UK saddle manufacturers Solution Saddles. As well as working in the office, she is a Technical Advisor for the brand, fitting the SMART saddle range saddles to clients across the East Midlands. Charlotte became involved with the Saddle Research Trust in 2010, learning how to operate the Tekscan CONFORMat pressure mapping system as well as the Artec 3D scanner and subsequently assisting in several SRT studies. In addition, she has helped with the administration of the SRT, as well as the organisation of the International Conferences and Researchers’ Workshops, since their inception in 2012.

Lauren Birkbeck is a Senior Lecturer in Equine Science at Nottingham Trent University. With a background covering both equine and human sports science, she is interested in performance analysis in equestrian sports; particularly the influence of tack choices on the biomechanics of rider and horse; speed in the cross-country phase; and possible effects of these areas on performance and falls.

Dr David Bondi

Tracy Bye

David Bondi gained a PhD in Theoretical Chemistry at Manchester University for his thesis “The Quantum Theory of Chemical Reactions”. For the past 35 years he has worked in several different sectors of the food industry. For the past decade this has been as the Managing Director of fast growing, private equity backed, medium size businesses. Having ridden since school days, David remains a keen amateur rider and horse owner and has competed in horse trials up to CCI** level – and still has a go to this day. Building on years of trying to do better, an analytical approach and mixing with thoughtful horse people, he has become convinced that most performance issues are due to unrecognised problems that prevent the horse from cooperating. Education of riders, owners and professionals working in this area is the key to changing this.

Tracy is a Lecturer in Equine Science at Bishop Burton College in the UK. Tracy graduated with a BSc (Hons) Equine Science from the University of Central Lancashire in 2006 and worked practically within the equine industry as a coach and yard manager before starting at Bishop Burton in 2011. After studying and researching alongside her job role Tracy graduated with an MSc Equine Science from the University of the West of England in 2018. Tracy specialises in the studying biomechanics of the horse-rider interaction and is currently actively researching in two key areas; the origin and causes of asymmetrical posture in the rider, and the impact of bits and bridles on force distribution, behaviour and performance. Tracy works with a variety of academic and industry partners to develop applied research projects and has presented her work at a range of national and international conferences. Tracy is also a BHS Coach in Complete Horsemanship and has her own business ‘Rider Symmetry’ which offers research informed performance analysis and coaching for equestrian riders, including specialised training exercises using the riding simulator.

Sue Carson - Managing Director of Sue Carson Saddles

Tad Coffin By the age of 21, Tad Coffin had won team and individual gold medals in both the 1975 Pan American Games and the 1976 Montreal Olympic Games in 3Day Eventing. In 1977, he collaborated with Miller Harness Company on saddles for the American equestrian community. The saddles were built in Walsall under the Crosby brand. The Lexington TC and the following iteration, the Equilibrium, enjoyed long and successful runs. In 1992, Tad began his own saddle research and development looking for better performance. In 1997, Tad began his boutique manufacturing operation concurrent with his ongoing R&D efforts. The performance feedback from a group of carefully managed horses, which he rides, has guided all design and construction decisions. Tad makes his own saddle trees and panels with unique properties developed over 25 yrs and 4000+ experiments. He collaborated with a preeminent American engineer, Stan Yavoroski and holds 5 US patents. Many hundreds of Innovations in design, tooling, materials and processes have created new possibilities in saddle performance, understanding horse comfort and an alternative narrative for saddle fit. His SmartRide Rx saddle tree and panel technology and his newest innovation, a non-riding saddle like device called the Thera-tree, have therapeutic properties.

Sue is based in Derbyshire, she is a List 1 judge, international Grand Prix rider, and a Top trainer. Sue has competed in all disciplines and understands the issues riders experience from top level to grass roots. Sue has a wealth of experience and works hard to keep up with new ideas and technological advances in and around equestrian sports. Sue is methodical with her approach to saddle fit and has high exacting standards that will ensure your saddle fit is the best it can be, for both horse and rider.

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Saddle Research Trust

Delegate Biographies

Elizabeth Gandy MSc MBCS

Kay Hastilow

Elizabeth graduated from the University of Durham with a BSc (Hons.) in Mathematics in 1989 and an MSc in Computing in 1993. She worked as a software engineer in the pipeline inspection industry for seven years before taking up her current role as Senior Lecturer in the School of Computer Science at the University of Sunderland in 2000. Her teaching focuses primarily in the areas of programming, computer science and work-based projects. She is also programme leader for BSc Computer Science and BSc Cybersecurity and Digital Forensics.As a disabled rider, she has experienced first-hand the issues of asymmetry and this has led her to focus her research on the development of software tools to support the use of technology in the measurement and analysis of horse, rider and saddle interactions. Recent work, in collaboration with physiotherapists, coaches and equestrian practitioners, has included investigation of the potential of the Xsens MVN inertial motion capture system for the measurement of hip angle and pelvic orientation in the assessment of asymmetry in riders. She is currently enrolled on a part-time PhD programme, investigating requirements and interface design implications for the presentation of inertial motion sensor data to equestrian practitioners.

Kay has been a saddler since the late 1960s. Trained as a bench saddler, she became fascinated by the difference in performance in her own horses when altering or trying a different saddle on them. This led to her specialising in saddle fitting.As the Society of Master Saddlers looked to start providing courses in saddle fitting, Kay was an obvious choice to ask to be amongst the first lecturers as she already was well known for this speciality, and she has taught on these courses continuously since their inception in 1995. An enquiring mind has meant that new products bought to the market have had a full and fair appraisal, many being tried personally to decide the veracity of the claims made for them. However, as several new products nowadays are tested using pressure testing, gait analysis and film, it was an obvious progression to become interested in this work and in understanding how to interpret the data shown.Now semi- retired, Kay lectures and teaches saddle fitting to saddlers, vets and other interested parties as well as joining with some of the research work undertaken to improve the lot of horses and their riders.

Jo Hockenhull

Camilla Horsfall

Jo is an animal behaviour and welfare research scientist in the Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group at Bristol Veterinary School. She has participated in welfare research on a range of species from leisure horses and livestock to cetaceans, but her passion has always been horses. Jo’s PhD investigated the prevalence of behaviour problems in UK leisure horses and their associated risk factors. She has ridden since the age of 10 and has had Irish Cob Oscar on part loan for 7 years since he arrived on her yard as a 4-year-old

Camilla Horsfall has been Sales and Marketing Director for Solution Saddles since the company’s inception in 2006. She is a strident believer in the company ethos of putting horse welfare and performance first and, in relation to saddles and saddle fitting, has helped drive the company to the forefront of the equine industry with its unique, flexible SMART™ saddle system. Camilla grew up with horses and enjoyed competing through her school and university years. After graduating with a business degree, she went on to train at the renowned Yorkshire Riding Centre, home of Jane and Christopher Bartle, where she gained a deep understanding of horse and rider interaction, particularly when training for competition. As a mother with 2 keen riders under the age of 5, Camilla’s equine focus is on welfare, performance and safety in the horse, saddle and rider interaction.

Richard Mott

Emma Murphy

Richard has been involved with horses since the age of 8 and has evented at CCI* level. He spent 7 years running an event yard in Ireland before returning to academia and completing an MSc in Equine Science at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies. He has presented work on the kinematics of barefoot horses at the International Society for Equitation Science (ISES) conference in Denmark in 2014 and on markers of stress at the ISES conference in Rome this year. Richard lectures in various aspects of Equine Science on the Equine Degree programmes run at Moreton Morrell College, part of the Warwickshire College Group and is currently supervising a final year dissertation using video analysis software to quantify saddle slip.

Emma is an interested amateur horse-owner and rider, passionate about improving welfare in sports horses. She is an SRT supporter and has attended previous SRT conferences. Emma has previously used the SRT referral scheme and found it extremely valuable in getting informative and reliable expert advice for performance related issues. Currently working in London as tax adviser, Emma brings her strong administrational skills and keen eye for detail to the SRT workshop to help assist with capturing key conversations throughout the two days.

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Saddle Research Trust

Delegate Biographies

Dr. Rachel C. Murray MA, VetMB, MS, Ph.D, MRCVS Dip ACVS, Associate EVCDI, RCVS specialist in equine orthopaedics

Kathryn Nankervis Kathryn Nankervis manages the Equine Therapy Centre and the Margaret Giffen Centre for Rider Performance at Hartpury University. Both centres combine commercial, teaching and research activity. The Margaret Giffen Centre for Rider Performance encompasses riding simulators, including the Racewood Eventing simulator, a strength and conditioning gym and treatment rooms. The Centre aims to help riders of all levels improve their performance and recover from injury. Kathryn is a physiologist with an interest in equine exercise physiology and biomechanics, particularly equine back kinematics. She completed a DPhil entitled ‘Equine physiology and biomechanics relating to Equine Physical Therapy’. She lectures on the MSc Veterinary Physiotherapy programme for ACPAT physiotherapists at Hartpury and has guest lectured at the Royal Veterinary College, the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, and the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Surrey. She heads up the Equestrian Performance Research Group at Hartpury. Her own research focusses on the use of exercise within the rehabilitation of horses, in particular the use of water treadmills. She is currently supervising a PhD at Hartpury on the relationship between rider posture and horse-rider synchrony, using the Racewood Eventing simulator, 3D motion capture and inertial motion sensor technology.

Rachel is a veterinary surgeon with a particular interest in sport horse injury and performance. She has led numerous studies investigating sport horse training, injury and performance and has published many articles on orthopaedic problems, horse/tack interaction and advanced imaging. Rachel graduated from University of Cambridge, before specialising in equine surgery. She spent 5 years working in the USA before returning to England as Equine surgeon at University of Cambridge, and subsequently completing a Ph.D. investigating exercise-associated joint adaptation and injury in horses. She has been based at the Animal Health Trust since 1997 where she runs the orthopaedic research group and provides a clinical service focussed on poor performance and rehabilitation in sports horses. Her research and clinical work is centred around sport horse training, performance and injury development. She also works for the British Equestrian Federation, providing scientific advice for the British Equestrian teams and as a veterinary surgeon and Assistant Team Vet with the World Class squads since 2009. Rachel has ridden in a variety of equestrian sports, including competing to Grand Prix level in dressage.

Vicki Newton

Dr. Jane V M Nixon, MA,Vet MB, BSc, MRCVS.

Vicki Newton is World Horse Welfare’s International Programme Officer, having joined the charity in 2013. Her academic background at postgraduate level is in equine science and education, achieving qualified teacher status in 2009 and then pursuing a teaching career in the UK for six years. In her current role as Programme Officer leading on education, training and capacity building within the charity’s international team, Vicki shapes the development and growth of the Southern Africa and Asia equine welfare programme which works to protect and promote working equid welfare. This involves project management, partner support, community-based interventions and the delivery of training workshops and programmes. The projects focus on changing behaviours towards health and welfare, primarily through healthcare and husbandry practices, and on strengthening systems and service provider networks, including saddlery, farriery and veterinary care.

Jane is a consultant equine veterinary surgeon based in Maids Moreton, Buckingham. Since graduating from the University of Cambridge in 1978 , Jane has worked in private equine practice with the well known equine veterinarian , her late husband Stewart Hastie, and is now a free lance consultant to the re branded Buckingham Equine Vets and a variety of elite studs and world class training establishments & other private clients. Jane has always been passionately interested in the best management of the young developing horse through to adulthood and beyond to ensure fitness for purpose. Having produced/ridden all her life , from achieving the Pony Club A test , to winning Working Hunter at HOYS, Master and Field Master of the Grafton Hunt for 10 years and now in her second term as British Equestrian Federation Director of Equine Development , including head vet to the Futurity having examined on average 500 foals to 4 year olds , annually , for over 10 years.Additionally Jane was Veterinary Surgeon to Towcester Racecourse since 1978, Senior Veterinary Surgeon since 2000 and Consultant Veterinary Surgeon to the SMS following Stewart Hastie. A Member of the Saddlers Company Steering Group & of AHT Industry Committee representing the BEF & SHBGB

Annie Pollock

Frances Roche M.V.O.

Administrator, Saddle Research Trust.

Based in Henley on Thames, working as a Saddler for almost 40 yrs. Master Saddler at the Royal Mews Buckingham Palace from 1996 to present, making and restoring Ceremonial State Harness, and fitting saddles. Course leader of SMS Bridle Fitting Course. Currently setting up SMS Bridle Fitting Qualification with City and Guilds. Joint owner of specialist bridle making company “Windsor and Henley Bridles”. Part time Lecturer at “the Saddlery Training Centre” Salisbury. Livery Secretary and senior Liveryman of “The Worshipful Company of Saddlers”. SMS Registered Master Saddler, Master Harness Maker, Qualified Saddle Fitter and Master Bridle Maker. President of the Society of Master Saddlers 2007. Lecturer in Saddlery Studies Cordwainers College 19921996.

As a lifelong horse owner, and following a career in Learning Disabilities/Mental Health, with a specific interest in Riding Therapy, I was delighted to take on the role of organising the 3rd International Saddle Research Trust Conference to promote the Trust’s aims of education and the advancement of welfare and performance in the ridden horse and rider.

22


Saddle Research Trust

Delegate Biographies

Linda Roost

Emily Sparkes

After graduating the MSc Animal Biology and Welfare studies at Essex University in UK in 2010, I started working as the project manager of the Field lab for Equestrian sports at the Dutch Equestrian College in Deurne. In October 2014 I started my own company in saddle pressure analyses 'De Zadel Consulent'. And started to develop a routine in analysing the influence of riders' seat and posture and saddle fit on the horses' motion and behaviour by use of the Novel Pliance® saddle system. In June 2018 the name of my company changed to PAERD (Professional in Applied Equestrian Research and Development). Currently I am working on several projects involving developments and innovative products for equine welfare and industries. To get the best results, I collaborate with several scientists and practitioners. In the future I am hoping to fulfil a PhD on saddle fit and horse rider interaction.

Emily Sparkes has been the Senior Technician in the Structure and Motion Laboratory at the Royal Veterinary College for the past seven years. Her expertise lies in biomechanics data collection techniques and movement analysis, including motion capture, high-speed video, force plates, EMG and pressure measurements. Her main research interests are investigating how to optimise performance, preventing injury and further understanding horse rider interaction. Prior to her appointment at the RVC, Emily worked for British Swimming as the Head Performance Analyst and Biomechanist to the GB Waterpolo squad and Senior Paralympic team through to the London 2012 Olympic Games. Emily is able to use the knowledge she gained from working in elite human sport, and through her varied role at the RVC, apply the same ideas and techniques to measure performance across all equine disciplines. Current projects including analysis of jockey technique, hoof surface interaction, and the use of technology in gait analysis and rider development.

Tony Tyler

Annelies Van den Eede Annelies Van den Eede started her career as an equine veterinarian at Ghent University (UGent, 2005-2012). She developed both her clinical and academic (PhD) veterinary skills, gaining experience in equine wound care, emergency medicine, patient hospitalisation and infection prevention. Meanwhile, she started a breeding-training-livery farm, with her husband. This provides a strong link with the equine sector and its need for innovation and education in the field. Being a riding instructor since childhood, Annelies acts as lecturer in the Flemish League for Equine Sports (VLP). Through experience, her conviction of the importance of injury prevention for horse and rider grew strong. Hence, she became a lecturer at the University College of Ghent (HoGent) in 2012, to help educate professional bachelors in equine training and ergo injury prevention. Driven by the significance of good tack and the difficulty of providing this in the field, Annelies became Master Saddle Fitting Consultant (2016) and established the HorseGent research group. Currently, this team of veterinarians, engineers, saddle fitters and riders is working on the HorseBack project. They focus on conformation analysis & digital (2D & 3D) applications to help solve the riddle of providing a suitable saddle for ‘the horse’ encountered in the field.

Tony Tyler BHSI, Deputy Chief Executive and Director of World Horse Welfare’s UK operations, has spent the last 35 years involved in the horse industry with extensive experience training horses and riders. Tony has worked in riding schools, as a freelance trainer, BHS Chief Examiner, senior college lecturer and he has worked for World Horse Welfare since 1999. Starting in the charity as the Norfolk Centre Manager and being promoted twice, he oversees the work of the charity in the UK including the work of the Rescue and Rehoming Centres and Field Officers, educational initiatives and liaising with other charities and organisations.

Maggie White - Wow Saddles

Claire Williams

Maggie was a typical horse-mad kid who progressed from Pony Club games through jumping to hunting. Her early career was in property selling and designing, and she represented the Timber Frame industry on the Timber and Brick Council. When her drag hunter became a problem to fit, requiring reflocks every 4 weeks, Maggie realised that adjustable but sealable air-bags in place of wool would obviate this need, and so the Flair concept was born. Together with her partner David Kempsell she undertook a long development process which led to the foundation of First Thought Equine Ltd, initially making and selling Flair. From there, her background in an industry which relies on the concept of modular construction led to the application of the same ideas to saddles. Maggie was hands-on with the production of the first Wows, which are now made by a team combining traditional craftsmanship with state of the art technology in their purpose-built facility in Kent. Maggie is responsible for the running of the company – everything from production management to the global network of Wow-trained retailers. She still prioritises meeting potential customers at shows and events, to help them with advice and information on saddling in general as well as Wow Saddles specifically.

Claire Williams is the Executive Director of the British Equestrian Trade Association, the leading representative body working on behalf of equestrian related businesses in the United Kingdom. With a wide ranging work portfolio, Claire is particularly proud of the two accreditation schemes launched over the last ten years as well as the successful growth of the BETA body protector scheme. She is also closely involved with the wide range of training courses developed by BETA and in particular the organisation of the first BETA/SMS introductory saddle fitting course run in New Zealand recently. She chairs the working group for the Worshipful Company of Saddler’s Saddlery Steering group responsible for writing the first National Occupational Standard for Saddle Fitters. Alongside her BETA work she also sits as a director on the Animal Medicines Training Regulatory Authority, the British Equestrian Federation and British Horse Council. In her free time she rides her two horses as often as time allows and is also keen on walking, home preserving and photography.

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Saddle Fitting Nationwide

International Trade Enquiries Welcome

0044 (0) 1278 734524

Your Saddle Fitting experience explained…. We know what a major investment a new saddle is, and we are dedicated to getting it right for both you and your horse. A comfortable horse is a happy horse.

A secure rider is an effective rider.

At Sue Carson Saddles we guide you through the whole process. It starts with a friendly, no obligation chat to discuss what your requirements are. We can then arrange an on-site visit with one of our experienced riders and saddle fitters. Your Sue Carson Saddle fitter will measure your horse and assess his way of going, all of which will have an impact on your choice of saddle. They will then move onto you! You will have the chance to see and ride on our range of saddles. Each saddle can be as individual as the rider on it! You can pick the seat that suits you and combine it with the flaps of your choice made in the leather you choose, in the colour(s) that you want. We also stock a standard range of Dressage, Jumping, Show and General Purpose saddles. We then go away and make YOUR saddle. When the saddle arrives, your fitter then re visits you to fit your saddle. The Sue Carson experience really is a complete service, second to none. Please give us a ring and see what we can do for you AND your horse! Your saddle is hand crafted to order by an SMS member using his expert knowledge and experience and only top quality materials.

We also offer Finance solutions to help make buying your new saddle even easier! To find out more about our Finance packages and 0% option, call the office on 01629 540343