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Alumni news ALUMNI ASSOCIATION NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2016

Robert M. and Joyce S. Graham Science Building Groundbreaking State and college officials, donors, and other dignitaries symbolically break ground for construction on the new science building.

Alumni Couple Honored with Building Naming

In this Issue

Every November, Snow College holds a Founders Day celebration to remember those who established the College back in 1888. This year’s event, held on November 5, paid tribute to the past while looking forward to the future with the groundbreaking of the Robert M. and Joyce S. Graham Science Building.

Groundbreaking 1 Athletic Hall of Fame 4 Softball Schedule 5 Homecoming 6 Snow Endowments 8 CRD Benefactor Award 11 Visual Arts Donation 12 In Memoriam 14 Performing Arts 16

“I believe our founders would be proud,” said Snow College President Gary Carlston during the groundbreaking ceremony. “As they turned the dirt with their horse-drawn plows, could they possibly imagine that 127 years later, their little school which had a rocky start would be turning dirt for a state-of-the-art science


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center that is still promoting the education cause in which they felt so strongly about?” Other speakers included Spencer F. Eccles, chairman and CEO from the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation, along with speakers representing Snow College. The Snow College Wind Symphony performed during the ceremony, and the science department provided “special effects,” including smoke and rockets, to add to the science focus of the day. The Eccles Foundation supported the project with a lead naming gift and chose to name the building after two individuals with close ties to both the Eccles Foundation and Snow

ALUMNI NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2014

College. Robert “Bob” Graham (’50), and his late wife, Joyce Sorensen Graham (’53), were both born in Sanpete County and met at Snow College. During their 60 years of marriage, the Grahams were active community servants, volunteering with numerous church and civic

Left: Robert Graham (left) and President Gary Carlston shared remarks during the groundbreaking ceremony. Below: The southwest view of the Robert M. and Joyce S. Graham Science Building.

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ALUMNI NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2016

You are honoring them where they met and their love for each other had its beginning. Their lives are exemplary, and you have chosen to help others know the Bob and Joyce you know and love. groups. Bob has been affiliated with the Eccles Foundation for almost 30 years, first as treasurer and now as a member of the board of directors. During the ceremony, President Carlston thanked Spencer and Lisa Eccles of the Eccles Foundation for honoring the Grahams. He said, “You are honoring them where they met and their love for each other had its beginning. Their lives are exem-

plary, and you have chosen to help others know the Bob and Joyce you know and love. Your generosity and thoughtfulness have made it possible for their legacy to continue and for our students to learn from them and the great lives they have led.”

each discipline represented will be located in the new building. Because Snow College plans to make this building a science center for all of Central Utah, local fifth graders visited these stations and participated in the various activities.

Bob Graham also spoke during the event. He said he was overcome with emotion when he learned that the building would be named in his and his late wife’s honor. “My two years at Snow were two good years,” he said. “Many years have passed since I was a student here, but I still maintain a great deal of pride in the degree I got at Snow.”

Construction on the $23 million, 56,700-square-foot building is slated to begin this March and will be completed in time to welcome students in the fall of 2017. The funding for the project is a combination of public and private funds, with the Utah Legislature providing more than $19 million, and approximately $3.5 million coming from private donors. The building will be located at the corner of 100 East and Center Street, west of the Karen H. Huntsman Library.

Following the groundbreaking, Snow College’s science department set up different exploration stations, roughly located on the spot where

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ALUMNI NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2014

Hall of Fame Inducts Five

Pictured (from left to right): Trenton Whiting, Coach Dave Arslanian (for Dave Archer), Robert Trythall, Charla Cooke (for her daughter, Casey), and Brett Vroman (for his son, Jackson). On October 24, 2015, the Snow College Athletic Hall of Fame inducted five outstanding individuals into its ranks. Each has contributed tremendously to Snow College athletics, and many have gone on to perform at the university, professional, and international levels.

Robert Trythall

Administrator & Teacher, 1977-2015 Bob Trythall was an integral part of Snow College Athletics for over 38 years. He was athletic director (three times) and director of the Activity Center, developed the Varsity Experience program, helped establish the Greenwood Student Center, initiated the broadcasting of Snow College football games, and served as softball coach and assistant baseball coach.

Dave Archer

Football, 1981-1982 Quarterback Dave Archer led Snow College to a Wool Bowl victory, earned JUCO All-American honors, 4

and ranked fourth in the nation in passing in 1981. He played at Iowa State University and was inducted into their Hall of Fame. He then played eight years in the NFL as quarterback for the Atlanta Falcons, Washington Redskins, San Diego Chargers, and the Philadelphia Eagles. He also played five seasons in the Canadian Football League and one in the World League of American Football, where his team won a World Bowl championship and he was the game MVP. Dave is currently the color commentator for the ACC Network football broadcasts and Raycom Sports and radio analyst for the Atlanta Falcons.

Trenton Whiting

Men’s Basketball, 1995-1996 and 1998-1999 Trent Whiting was a National Junior College Athletic Association All-American, leading the Badgers to a regional championship. As a sophomore, he was one of four finalists for National Player-of-the-Year honors, and he led the Badgers to the best team record in school history.


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ALUMNI NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2016

Robert Trythall

Dave Archer

Trenton Whiting

He continued to thrill crowds around the world, winning personal awards and international championships by playing for BYU and in the Italian Basketball League.

Casey Cooke Sundquist

Women’s Basketball, 1999-2001 Casey Cooke Sundquist led her team to two straight Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) championships. The team ranked 12th in the nation. Casey continued her career at Southern Utah University (SUU), where she broke several school records, then went on to coach SUU’s women’s basketball team.

Casey Cooke Sundquist

Jackson Vroman

Phoenix Suns and the New Orleans Hornets. He also played for the Lebanese National Team in the FIBA World Basketball Championships—winning many titles and honors. Jackson completed the ninth year of his professional career as a basketball player at the time of his death on June 29, 2015. His father, Brett Vroman, accepted this award in honor of his son.

Men’s Basketball, 2001-2002

Probably the most moving moment of the event was when the current basketball team, wearing Badger Orange, lined the wall near the Hall of Fame display to pay tribute to the inductees. Brett Vroman broke down in tears as he saw them, knowing that not long ago, his son was where these young men were—and that they may yet have dreams of becoming the player his son Jackson had been.

Jackson Vroman led Snow College to the SWAC title game and was an All-Big-12 selection at Iowa State. Jackson was selected as the 31st pick in the 2004 NBA draft and played for two years in the NBA with the

For a more complete tribute to these inductees, or to nominate someone for the Snow College Athletic Hall of Fame, please visit our website: www.snow.edu/alumni.

Jackson Vroman

2016 Snow College Jan. 29 Jan. 29 Jan. 29 Jan. 30 Jan. 30 Jan. 30 Mar. 4 Mar. 5 Mar. 11

8 a.m. 3:30 p.m. 10:30 p.m. 8 a.m. 1 p.m. 6 p.m. 1 p.m./3 p.m. 12 p.m./2 p.m. 1 p.m./3 p.m.

Eastern Arizona Central Arizona Scottsdale Comm. Arizona Western Yavapai Pima Comm. SLCC SLCC Southern Nevada

Softball Schedule

Mar. 12 Mar. 18 Mar. 19 Mar. 25 Mar. 26 Apr. 1 Apr. 1 Apr. 8

12 p.m./2 p.m. 1 p.m./3 p.m. 12 p.m./2 p.m. 1 p.m./3 p.m. 12 p.m./2 p.m. 1 p.m./3 p.m. 12 p.m./2 p.m. 1 p.m./3 p.m.

Southern Nevada Southern Idaho Southern Idaho Western Nevada Western Nevada Colorado NW Colorado NW SLCC

Apr. 9 Apr. 15 Apr. 16 Apr. 22 Apr. 23 Apr. 29 Apr. 30 May 6 May 7

12 p.m./2 p.m. 1 p.m./3 p.m. 12 p.m./2 p.m. 1 p.m./3 p.m. 12 p.m./2 p.m. 1 p.m./3 p.m. 12 p.m./2 p.m. 1 p.m./3 p.m. 12 p.m./2 p.m.

SLCC Southern Nevada Southern Nevada Southern Idaho Southern Idaho Western Nevada Western Nevada Colorado NW Colorado NW

HOME GAMES AWAY GAMES

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ALUMNI NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2014

The Spirit of Snow was strong at the Homecoming football game.

HOMECOMING 2015 For many Snow College alumni, graduation day is when their campus memories end. After students pack up and head home, their lives, careers, and families take them away from Central Utah. Those seeking a reason to return to Snow College need look no further than Homecoming weekend. This year’s event, held September 25-26, included annual activities and ongoing traditions, along with the introduction of a new tradition—the Badger Football 40-year reunion. The football reunion began with a Friday night dinner, which drew more than 45 members from the 1975 team, along with their families, coaching staff, and former Snow College President J. Marvin Higbee. 6

Many of the players, who had not seen each other for decades, stayed late into the evening, watching team videos and reminiscing. They also joined in Saturday’s parade and were recognized during half-time of the football game. Plans are in the works to hold a 40-year football reunion each year during Homecoming.

Other events included the parade and tailgate party, the annual Golden Badger reunion (for alumni who attended Snow at least 50 years ago), and the Distinguished Alumni breakfast, where Theressa Alder and Dr. Daniel Witt were honored. The Badgers were victorious at the Homecoming game, defeating Glendale Community College, 24-0. We hope you will join us October 14-15 for Homecoming 2016.

The Homecoming Parade is a popular tradition for students, alumni, and the community. Whether it’s been 40 years or 40 days since your last visit to Snow College, start making your plans today. Look for more details and dates later this spring.


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ALUMNI NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2016

1: The 1975 Badger Football Team takes time out for a photo during their 40-year reunion.

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2: 1975 football team members reconnect before the Homecoming game. 3: Badger spirit was high! 4: VP for Academic Affairs Steve Hood and his wife, Mary, chat with the Golden Badgers during their annual reunion. 5: The Badgers defeated Glendale Community College, 24-0.

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Visit https://www. facebook.com/ SnowAlumni to see more pictures and to tag your friends.

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Endowments

ALUMNI NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2014

Many Snow College students, both past and present, have received financial support from a private scholarship endowment. Some of these endowments have been established by businesses with ties to the area, while others are named in honor of loved ones to help preserve their memory.

The following are among the 140 endowments that help Snow College students receive an invaluable college education.

Alta Wintch Christensen Endowment

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lten Christensen was born to Heber C. and Annie Peterson Christensen on August 13, 1906. His life was full of challenges and fulfillment. With his mother’s passing when he was only eight years old and his father’s death just two years later, Alten learned early in life about the importance of a strong maternal influence in his development. His loving maternal grandmother, Annie Peterson, kept the young family together and worked diligently to meet the young boy’s needs. Several years later, Alten would begin a legacy of his own with the help of another strong influence, when he married his sweetheart, Alta Wintch, on August 28, 1939. He was known to have said that the wisest and most important thing he ever did was to convince Alta to marry him. Even

strengthening families. Alten created the Alta Wintch Christensen Endowment in 1993 to honor his wife’s important contributions, her love of education, and her love of her alma mater, Snow College. The endowment seeks to assist students from the Manti and Richfield areas who wish to attend Snow College.

Alten Christensen though it took four years, had it taken 40, for him it would have still been worth it! Alta Wintch Christensen attended Snow College from 1934-1935. She worked as a teacher in Richfield and recognized the importance of an education in developing individuals and

Alten and Alta’s son David Christensen continues their legacy today with his support for the endowment, and he encourages others to start their own legacy by donating. When asked what others could do to help students, David commented: “Tell them that they can start one [an endowment] too! It really doesn’t matter how big or how small, they all help.” The Christensen family is thrilled to provide opportunities for students to attend Snow College and honor their mother’s legacy.

Interested in creating an endowment? Contact the Snow College Foundation office at: (435) 283-7060

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ALUMNI NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2016

Endowments

Johnson Sisters

Scholarship Fund Established

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now College is honored to announce the establishment of the Johnson Sisters Endowed Scholarship Fund. This fund is established as a tribute to the Johnson sisters, Almina, Erma, and Alice, and to their parents, Lars and Johanna. The Johnson family initiated the endowment fund to provide encouragement and support for Snow College female students who either have responsibility for minor children while attending school or are returning to school after fulfilling other lifestyle obligations, such as raising children or assisting in family duties. Consideration in awarding the scholarship is given to applicants who possess high character, commitment to timely completion of an enrolled program or degree, and scholastic excellence, and who manifest an intent to use the sought-after certificate or degree in a future career or vocation. The Johnson sisters, Almina, Erma, and Alice, were the daughters and only children of Lars Rasmussen Johnson and Johanna Henrietta Julia Jensen. Born and raised in Sanpete County, the sisters encountered many challenges while growing up. Their childhood was marked by historically traumatic events, including World War I, the flu epidemic of 1918, and the Great Depression. In these challenging circumstances, the three sisters learned to work hard, to be frugal, and to pull together. The girls loved their parents, who taught them by

The Johnson Sisters example to be honest and respect others. The three sisters supported, loved, and nurtured one another as they endured many difficulties. They remained close while raising and educating their own children. Erma worked outside the home for many years to provide for her children, while Almina and Alice worked side-by-side in agricultural tasks with their husbands for much of their lives. The Johnson sisters mirrored the virtues they learned from their parents and from their own life experiences. Their children were taught to work, to be fair, to be honest, and to be respectful and considerate of others. The Johnson sisters’ posterity includes many remarkable individuals who exemplify the values these women cherished. Almina and her husband, Lynn Kay, raised their six children (Marilyn, Lu

Dean, Joanne, Steven, Grant, and Clark) in Mona. Erma and her first husband, Henry Bluhm, had two sons (Paul and Duane) before Henry was killed in an industrial accident while working on the construction of the Hoover Dam. Erma later married David R. Carlston. Together, they raised Paul and Duane as well as their six children (Judy, Lee, Miriam, Michael, Gary, and Alan) in Fairview. Alice and her husband, Herman Young, raised six sons (Glade, John, Morris, Bruce, Tom, and Gordon) in Mona. Following the untimely death of Glade, Alice and Herman also raised their grandson Raymond. Since the sisters also valued education, their family members, many of whom are Snow College alumni, have established this endowment fund to extend the caring legacy of the Johnson sisters to generations of students for many years to come. 9


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Endowments

Serine Knudsen Staalesen Jorgensen Endowment

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or Serine Knudsen Staalesen Jorgensen, hard work and an undetermined future were constant companions throughout her life. Whether she was diligently caring for her children as a young widow in Norway, walking mile after mile across the United States to finally reach Utah as an LDS pioneer, or braving the frontier as a dairywoman in what is now part of Fishlake National Forest, she likely never imagined that her legacy would include a concert hall that bears her name and an endowment that would help students to attend Snow College in her beloved Ephraim. Serine’s legacy as an energetic, industrious, and cheerful woman, with a steadfast loyalty to her friends, family, and convictions, along with her husband Johan Gustav Jorgensen’s gift for music, surely instilled a reverence for integrity, a desire for helping others, and a love of music in her descendants. The Serine Knudsen Staalesen Jorgensen Endowment, established

Endowments are gifts that permanently fund scholarships, programs, infrastructure, and other expenses as designated by a donor. The donated funds are invested and only a portion of the interest income is used each year to support the donor’s intended purpose. The

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in 2002, certainly embraces these values as it seeks to assist two different types of students. First, the endowment provides educational opportunities for rural students with financial need who exhibit academic promise and a high level of integrity. It also seeks to support and develop Snow College’s excellent music program by attracting highly talented musicians who exhibit great integrity and who can make significant contributions to the music program. Serine’s legacy will continue to help others succeed through a great Snow College education made possible with generous support from the Jorgensen family. Recipients of the scholarship are encouraged to support the fund with donations of their own when they reach a point in their lives that allows them to give back. The Jorgensen family encourages others to donate so that they may experience the joy that comes from helping students succeed.

larger the College’s endowment base, the better prepared it is to provide for the needs of future students. If you are interested in establishing an endowment at Snow College, please call Rosie Connor at the Snow College Foundation at 435-283-7061.

ALUMNI NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2014

IPA Endowment Each year, the Intermountain Power Project (IPP) in Delta generates an average of more than 12 million megawatt hours of energy. At Snow College, the Intermountain Power Agency (IPA), the organization that operates IPP, generates another kind of energy, kindling the spark of learning through student scholarships. Since 2008, 94 deserving Snow College engineering students have received scholarship funds from the IPA endowment. “It was determined by the IPA Board that scholarships in engineering would be a good investment for the Project, and Utah,” said Ted Olson, Snow College professor and chair of the IPA Board of Directors. In 2015, IPA provided more than $1.7 million in scholarships to Utah colleges and universities. Since 2008, IPA has awarded scholarship funds to 94 deserving Snow College engineering students. These funds provide support needed to pursue studies in a demanding and competitive field. The endowment “has provided good will toward IPA and [IPP]. It has helped the Engineering Department attract good students, and it, of course, has helped dozens of students to be able to go to school without accumulating additional debt,” said Olson. According to its website, the IPA is an organization of 23 Utah municipalities formed to finance, construct, operate, and maintain the IPP, which generates enough electricity to supply the needs of more than 1.5 million homes.


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ALUMNI NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2016

Stoddards Receive Benefactor Award Mark and LeAnn Stoddard were honored at the Council for Resource Development’s annual conference on October 30, 2015. From left to right: LeAnn Stoddard, Mark Stoddard, CRD President Leah Goss, and Snow College President Gary Carlston. Alumni Mark (’75) and LeAnn (’93) Stoddard of Nephi were honored for their support of Snow College by receiving the Benefactor Award at the Council for Resource Development (CRD) Annual Conference in Washington, D.C. on October 30, 2015. The CRD Benefactor Award recognizes individuals, foundations, or corporations for outstanding contributions to community colleges. The award embodies the ideals of philanthropy, leadership, and volunteerism in the service of community colleges.

the vice chair of the Snow College Foundation Board. Their direct and indirect charitable commitments have supported scholarships, the football program, and other programs and projects around campus. The Stoddards also played a significant role in the effort at Snow College to construct a new science building. For many years they Their charitable support through Central Valley Medical Center, have been quiet Rural Health Group, and Rural contributors to their Health Foundation was one of the college. And, while first campaign commitments and they do not seek the influenced other support to reach spotlight, this honor is the $3 million fundraising goal. well deserved. Equally important is their support of sending all four of their children to Snow College as students.

Mark and LeAnn have been active donors and volunteers for the college for many years. Mark is currently the president and CEO of Central Valley Medical Center in Nephi, chairman of the Rural Health Group and Rural Health Foundation, and the president of Rural Health Management Corporations. He also serves on the State Board of Regents. LeAnn is heavily involved with volunteering for various civic, church, educational and political organizations, including the Rural Health Care Foundation. The Stoddards have given generously of their time and resources to support their alma mater. Mark has served as the Snow College Alumni Association president, chair of the Board of Trustees, and as the Snow College Foundation Board chair. LeAnn currently serves as

“We are pleased with the CRD’s decision to recognize Mark and LeAnn. For many years they have been quiet contributors to their college. And, while they do not seek the spotlight, this honor is well deserved,” said Snow College President Gary L. Carlston. “They have been generous with their time and resources, and we appreciate their friendship, support and advocacy. Mark’s father, Bob, was an influential administrator and former coach at Snow College, and Mark and LeAnn’s son is currently attending classes on campus. Their love of Snow College spans generations, and they indeed represent the ‘Spirit of Snow’ we often reference.” 11


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ALUMNI NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2014

Visual Arts Receives Unique Collection Butami Port Workers, by Soviet artist Shota Ambakovich Zamtaradze, is one of 13 paintings donated to Snow College.

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  he Snow College Visual Arts Department recently received a gift of 13 paintings by various Soviet artists. Roy and Anne Morgan Jespersen of Helper, Utah, provided this generous and unique collection to the College. Interestingly, Roy had never been on Snow College’s campus until the day he arrived to deliver the paintings. When asked why the couple chose to make this donation to the College, he replied that his decision was based on a suggestion from a friend. His friend is Vern Swanson, former director of the Springville Museum of Art for 32 years. Vern’s familiarity with the faculty and the success of 12

the visual arts program prompted him to recommend Snow. Grateful for the recommendation, Adam Larsen, chair of the visual arts department, said the Jespersens’ gift is very significant for visual arts students because the paintings represent a category of art that was little known until a few years ago. “Our department is absolutely delighted to receive this donation. We look forward to hosting a future exhibition of this work for members of the community as well as our students to enjoy,” he said. The Jespersens gave the donation because they believe that art is beneficial to all students. Roy said, “This is an undiscovered genre of

art that will help new visual arts students with their painting as well as help them appreciate the art and the artists.” Roy’s interest in Soviet art began somewhat accidentally. He has spent most of his life and career in financial management. He is a former principal of Wasatch Advisors and Wasatch Funds, Inc. He also served as a trustee of the Middlebury Institute of Internal Studies and, most recently, as the board president of the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art. Roy started collecting the work of Soviet artists in 1989 following a trip to the former Soviet Union. He visited the Republic of Georgia as part of


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ALUMNI NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2016

The Agitator, by Nikolai Nikolaivich Yakovenko, was donated to Snow College by Roy and Ann Morgan Jespersen. Pictured (from left to right): Visual Arts Faculty Member Adam Larsen, Roy Jespersen, and Visual Arts Faculty Member Scott Allred. a Utah delegation invited by the Soviet Academy of Science to speak on free market systems. While in Georgia, Roy made many new friends. He soon became involved in sponsoring Georgian students in the U.S., giving them the opportunity to attend high school here. As his connections in Georgia grew, so did interest in Soviet art. Roy said he actually began collecting the art as an investment. He and a colleague began bringing art from Russia to America. His friend Vern encouraged him to bring back more art and would coach him on what to look for. Aided by fine arts and interior design consultant, Ellie Sonntag, Roy was able to sell many of the paintings he brought to the U.S. His new business venture proved profitable. However, before long, Roy became well acquainted with some of the artists whose works he had been selling. He decided that he enjoyed the paintings so much that he would no longer buy and sell art as he had done previously. Instead, he decided to keep the pieces that were most meaningful to him. In addition to discovering a love for Russian art, Roy also found love

through his sideline interest. He met his wife, Anne Morgan, through his association with Ellie. Anne, an architect and designer, was living in San Francisco when both she and Ellie were selected as part of the team responsible for the restoration of the Utah Governor’s Mansion. Ellie set the two up on a blind date that obviously ended successfully.

The Snow College Foundation is grateful to donors like Roy and Anne Morgan Jespersen for their thoughtful non-cash donations. These donations support our students in a variety of ways. If you would like to make a donation such as real estate, art, or other tangible property, please call the Snow College Foundation at 435-283-7061.

Anne has exhibited her art extensively in Utah and has received many awards in both art and architecture, including the prestigious Henry Adams Award for Excellence in Architecture. In 2014, Anne received the prestigious Governor’s Mansion Artist Series Award from Utah Governor Gary Herbert, and her paintings belong to collections throughout the world. She is an integral part of the Helper Artist’s Movement. In the hardscrabble landscape of Carbon County, this unique group of dedicated artists is considered to be one of the two most significant art movements to come out of Utah in the last 50 years. Anne is currently working on a series of paintings entitled Contemporary Women of Utah. This series is a cross-section and a historical documentation of women’s lives in Utah from 2012-2024. The commitment to this long-term project provides an opportunity to view the changes in her work over time as well as an opportunity to share perspectives with other women and the community. The collection of paintings donated to Snow College comes from some of Roy’s personal favorites. He and Anne have also donated significant works to the Springville Museum of Art. The museum houses the largest public collection of 20th-century Russian and Soviet art in the western United States.

View from the Balcony, by Shota Ambakovich Zamtaradze. 13


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In Memoriam

ALUMNI NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2014

June 2 - December 31, 2015

Alumni LaRue (Thorpe) Bagley 1937 - September 27, UT Gwendolyn (Briggs) Rowley 1941 - October 26, UT Harold Clinton “Hal” Edwards 1947 - September 9, UT Larry John Gleave 1949 - November 28, UT Douglas Vearl Peterson 1952 - July 26, UT John LaRell Christensen 1952 - October 29, FL Milton Dick Sampson 1955 - November 10, UT Alta Elaine (Nicholls) Reid 1958 - November 26, UT Ada Maxine (Brothersen) Harward 1959 - October 30, UT Mary Bell (Mortenson) Norris 1960 - September 5, UT Mary Ann (Yardley) Bjerregaard 1962 - December 21, UT Kathryn Marie (Baker) Beacham 1967 - June 15, UT Billy Gayle Abraham 1969 - September 19, CA Gloria (Sudweeks) Hall 1987 - July 25, UT Jeffery Prentiss Gleave 1990 - October 19, UT Andrew Robert Anderson 1995 - July 12, UT Tamara Leigh (Cawley) Cruz 1998 - August 2, UT Scarlett Woodruff 2001 - September 10, NV Tazmarie Christensen 2001 - October 21, UT Heather Marie (Ewell) Hall 2002 - July 4, UT

Attendees Kimberlee (Turner) Bagley - September 25, UT Thomas Scott Biederman - September 19, UT Rollo Charles Brinkerhoff - November 7, UT Wendell Holden Chappell - August 5, UT Kenneth Grant Christensen - November 1, UT Kelvin Redd Curtis - December 16, UT

Memorial & Honor

Giving to Snow College

Honor a loved one by donating to Snow College today.

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Elda Ann (Blackburn) Ellett - November 6, UT Kenneth Roland Gurney - July 11, UT Bruce A. Hill - September 8, UT Nancy Ann (Crowe) Hopfenbeck - October 18, UT Jessica Francella (Kimball) Johnson - November 1, UT Phillip Ray McGee - October 31, UT Russell Kevin Nielsen - November 5, UT Frances Faye (Taylor) Nielson - September 6, UT James Ervin Ogden - September 30, UT Elma Gean (Jacobson) Peterson - October 29, UT Kenna (Aagard) Rasmussen - November 14, UT David Oscar Rioja - November 22, UT Bonnie Lee (Frandsen) Ross - November 5, UT Toni Talia’uli - December 17, UT Doreen (Jensen) Thompson - July 31, UT Kaden Whitney - September 16, UT

Friends Max C. Hawkins - December 8, UT Usher Junior Henrie - November 14, UT Mathew William Kesler - July 31, UT Reed Larsen - August 13, NM Alma Paul Morgan - September 17, UT Earl Ray Nielsen - December 9, UT Leonard Arthur Pritchard - November 3, UT Bette Valene (Jensen) Shuffler - July 21, UT Barbara Ann (Sorensen) Wood - November 15, UT Carolyn (Jensen) Wyatt - November 15, UT

To make a gift to Snow College in honor or in memory of a loved one, please contact the Snow College Advancement Office at (435)283-7060 or giving@snow.edu. You can also use the envelope included in the newsletter. Remember to include a note letting us know the name of the person you would like to honor.


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ALUMNI NEWSLETTER - SPRING 2016

Dennis Timmerman Hansen Dennis Timmerman Hansen was born May 25, 1944 in Salt Lake City to Ruth Timmerman and Allan LaMont Hansen. He passed away October 12, 2015 in Provo. Dennis was a gifted violinist and beloved faculty member at Snow College. He attended Olympus High School, Weber State University, and the University of Utah, and served an LDS mission to the west central states. He married Kathleen John, December 15, 1967, in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. Together they had three children. Dennis spent 20 years

Floyd Quinn

1944-2015

at Snow College, mentoring students and growing an orchestra program with the love and dedication of a true musician. He shared his passion for music as the conductor of the Ephraim and Manti community orchestras, as they welcomed the Christmas season with Handel’s Messiah for 20 years. Dennis spent his time teaching others the thing he loved most, leaving a legacy of music through the hundreds of private violin and viola students who benefited from his musical abilities. He also had a unique gift of appreci-

Dennis is survived by his wife, Kathleen John Hansen; children: Melody Hansen Brogdon and Dustin (Jodi) Hansen; grandchildren: Madisen (Colby) Ellison; Britton Whitaker; Tanner, Davis, Malorie, and Annie Hansen; and sister, Karen Anderson. He was preceded in death by his parents and daughter Cadence Hansen Hiatt. On behalf of the students, faculty, and staff at Snow College, we would like to honor Dennis for his generosity, dedication, and service to Snow College.

1951-2015

Floyd Quinn was born on December 29, 1951 to Tim W. and Dorothy Florence Beech Quinn. Floyd married Toni Lyn Brand on January 24, 1973. Floyd worked at Snow College for 27 years. He loved hunting, fishing and camping with his family.

might have seemed tedious and dull to some, Floyd made the best of it. He always greeted everyone with a friendly “Hello!” and a smile, leaving brush strokes on many surfaces and “happy strokes” on many hearts. He will be greatly missed.

Having worked at Snow College since 1988, Floyd left his mark on almost every wall of the Snow College Ephraim campus. He painted every area at least once, if not multiple times. Even though the painting work

Floyd is survived by his wife, Toni, and children: Joy (Don) Bower, Diana Bryant Quinn, Lloyd (Kimberly) Quinn, Ernest (Tabatha) Thrailkill, Daisey Quinn, Hope Quinn, and Brent (Desiree) Quinn.

Please contact the Advancement Office to notify us of alumni who have passed away.

Phone: (435) 283-7060 Email: alumni@snow.edu Mail: Snow College Advancement Office

ating every musician’s contributions and offering a kind word of encouragement to many.

150 College Ave., Box 1033 Ephraim, UT 84627

For a list of previous acknowledgements, please visit our “In Memoriam” webpage: www.snow.edu/ advancement/alumni/inmemoriam.html.

Publisher Snow College Office of Advancement 150 College Ave Ephraim, UT 84627

Contributors Rosie Connor Emily Peterson Lurlynn Potter Travis Schiffman ’93

He is also survived by 14 grandchildren and by his siblings Jane Horsepool and Della Quinn. He is preceded in death by his parents; his brother, Ernest Ray Quinn; his brother-in-law, Dave Horsepool; and son-in-law, Gene Bryant. He passed away on November 1, 2015 at his home in Gunnison. Floyd’s hard work was appreciated by all, and he played a very important role as a part of the Snow College Maintenance family and the Snow College family as a whole.

Art Direction / Design / Photography Snow College Office of Marketing & Communications The Snow College Alumni News is published annually in the spring by Snow College.

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POSTMASTER: Send address changes to www.snow.edu/snowtv Snow College Alumni News 150 College Avenue Ephraim, UT 84627

Performing Arts Spring 2016 Schedule DATE

TIME

March 1

EVENT

DATE

TIME

EVENT

7:30 p.m. Wind Ensemble/Symphonic Band Concert

April 8

7:30 p.m. Orchestra Concert

March 3

4:30 p.m. String Area Recital

April 11

5:30 p.m. String Area Recital

March 3

7 p.m.*

Badgerettes Showcase

April 11

7:30 p.m. Jazz I Concert

March 4-5

**

Utah Clarinet Festival

April 12-13

7:30 p.m. Jazz Combo Concert

March 7

5:30 p.m. Vocal Area Recital

April 13-16

7:30 p.m. Theatre: Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead

March 7

7:30 p.m. Guitar Area Recital

April 14

4:30 p.m. String Area Recital

March 8

7:30 p.m. Jazz I Concert

April 14

7:30 p.m. Spring Choir Concert

March 9

6:30 p.m. Percussion Area Recital

April 18

6:30 p.m. Woodwind Area Recital

March 10-11

7:30 p.m. Rock-n-Roll Concert

April 18-19

7:30 p.m. Opera Workshop Concert

March 14

5:30 p.m. Vocal Area Recital

April 20

5:30 p.m. Piano Area Recital

March 16

7:30 p.m. Chamber Music Concert

April 20

7:30 p.m. Composition Recital

March 21

6:30 p.m. Woodwind Area Recital

April 21

March 22

7:30 p.m. Chamber Music Concert

7:30 p.m. Wind Ensemble/Symphonic Band Concert

March 24

7:30 p.m. Chamber Music Concert

Events are held at the Eccles Center for the Performing Arts on the Snow College Ephraim Campus, unless otherwise noted.

April 6

7:30 p.m. Guitar Area Recital

*Horne Activity Center. **Go to clarinetfestival.org for a complete schedule.

Scnewsletter2016web  

Snow College Alumni News 2016

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