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Snow College FALL 2016

BADGER ATHLETICS: EXCELLENCE FOR LIFE

THE ROBERT STODDARD ERA, P. 14 SOCCER: A NEW TRADITION, P. 19 THE BADGER LEGACY LIVES, P. 22

M AGAZINE


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Construction is underway on the Robert M. and Joyce S. Graham Science Center. This artist’s rendering shows how II S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E the finished structure will look. For more information and a construction update, see Page 3 of the magazine.

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Snow College Snow College MAGAZINEFALL2016

CONTENTS

President’s Message

MAGAZINEFALL2016

2

CampusNews

badger news

3

homecoming schedule

6

Colombia Student Exchange

8

performing arts schedule

10

sports schedules

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SNOWFeatures

Entrepreneuring Badgers

12

The Robert Stoddard Era

14

Soccer: A New Tradition

19

The Badger Legacy Lives

22

A New Face for Badger Stadium

24

Badger Profile: Drew Manning

26

Alumni&Giving

Alumni Association President’s Message

29

Distinguished Alumnus: Justin Osmond

30

Distinguished Alumnus: Charles Pugh

32

Alumni Spotlights

34

40 Under 40

38

New Foundation Board Members

41

President’s Club Luncheon

42

President’s Club/Heritage Club Members

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Legacy Giving: Marsha Anne Hunter Irwin

44

In Memoriam

45

Annual Donor Report

46

Employee Giving Club

49

Cover Photo: Former Badger Wide Receiver Jonah Trinnaman now attends Brigham Young University and plays for the Cougars (photo by David Leach).

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Publisher

Contributors

Snow College Office of Advancement 150 College Ave Ephraim, UT 84627

Rosie Connor Mitch Jenkins Terra Matthews Emily Peterson Lurlynn Potter

Art Direction / Design / Photography Snow College Office of Marketing & Communications

Snow College Magazine is published annually in the fall by Snow1College.


President'smessage

Success and growth at Snow College Dr. Gary L. Carlston, President

As an alumnus, I have always known the importance of a Snow College education. For more than 125 years, Snow College graduates have entered the workforce, and the world, with the skills they need to improve their lives and the lives of others. These skills are becoming more and more necessary each year. The value of a post-secondary education and a college degree, to the individual, the community, and the economy, is ever increasing. “Envision Utah, a Utah-based public-private partnership focused on long-term growth statewide, concluded from its 2015 statewide survey of 50,000 respondents: ‘Utahns believe education allows them and their children to have more opportunities, earn a better living and achieve a higher quality of life. They also view education as a key to developing a better, safer community Janet and Gary Carlston with better citizens.’ Beyond economic benefits, a college education is the primary factor that leads to a high quality of life, vibrant communities and a stable family life for Utah’s population” (Utah System of Higher Education). Since its beginning in 1888, Snow College has provided students with opportunities that will enrich their lives and the lives of others. Access, affordability, and quality education are essential factors for

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students when considering an opportunity to go to college. Snow College provides open enrollment and invites students of all abilities. The College is dedicated to helping students successfully complete their programs of study. Over the last five years, 73 percent of our students have completed their programs or successfully transferred to four-year institutions. This success rate is among the highest in the nation and a great tribute to our students and to an outstanding faculty and staff. Snow College is affordable; tuition and fees are the lowest in Utah for a public higher-education institution, and the College is committed to keeping costs affordable to help more students access the excellent programs and opportunities here. Students matter, and their success is our number one priority. In the fall of 2015, for the first time in College history, the combined student headcount on the Ephraim and Richfield campuses exceeded 5,000 students. Enrollment projections indicate that the College will continue to grow, and that means more opportunity for additional students. Growing enrollments bring both opportunity and the challenge to make sure that all students know that they matter, they count, they are important, and they can succeed. We share a common bond with all who have attended Snow College in the past, those who now attend, and those who will become Badgers. This bond, through our experiences and opportunities at Snow, has enabled so many of us to receive a degree and contribute to our families and communities. Please know that this wonderful, nationally recognized institution continues to honor heritage and tradition while also providing a modern and high-quality learning environment. This magazine highlights our strong athletics history as we prepare to launch a fundraising initiative for facilities improvements. Athletics is one of many areas where the Snow College experience has improved the lives of many. We welcome you to come and see the successes we are having in all aspects of college life � all are welcome here.

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BADGERnews

New Graham Science center update

In May, Snow College broke ground on a new era in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education with the start of construction on the Robert M. and Joyce S. Graham Science Center. Funding for this new building was provided by generous contributions from many donors and significant state funds, including an appropriation of almost $20 million in 2015 and an additional $4.7 million during the 2016 legislative session. The George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation provided the lead charitable gift and chose to name the building after the Grahams, who are alumni of Snow College. The $29 million, 56,700-squarefoot building will provide opportunities and pathways for learning and

innovation with expanded space for teaching and labs for students majoring in the earth sciences, life sciences, physical sciences, chemistry, math, engineering, computer sciences, and natural resources. The new structure will address all of the deficiencies found in the current building, such as outdated equipment and lack of space for teaching and laboratory activities. Future classrooms and laboratories will boast the latest in science teaching tools and safety features. The building will also feature a variety of innovative science exhibits, making it a truly inspiring building for Snow College students, faculty, staff, and the community. Students will experience the Robert M. and Joyce S. Graham Science Center beginning in fall 2017.

Construction of the Robert M. and Joyce S. Graham Science Center

Aspen Institute Names Snow College among Top 150 U.S. Community Colleges The Aspen Institute College Excellence Program named Snow College as one of the nation’s top 150 community colleges eligible to compete for the 2017 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence and $1 million in prize funds. This marks the third consecutive time that Snow College has received this recognition. “We are honored to be recognized by the Aspen Institute, along with so many other impressive colleges,” said Snow College President Gary Carlston. “This is a distinguished list of schools, and it is exciting to see Snow College singled out for our good work.” This recognition includes colleges across the nation located in 35 states in urban, rural, and suburban areas, serving as few as 300 students and as many as 60,000 students. The Aspen Prize, awarded every two years, is the nation’s signature recognition of high achievement and performance among America’s community colleges. This recognition encapsulates exceptional student outcomes in four areas: student learning, certificate and degree completion, employment and earnings, and access and success for minority and low-income students. The Aspen Institute, originated in 1949, has been awarding this recognition since 2011. For a complete list of the top 150 colleges, visit aspeninstitute.org.

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BADGERnews

Making Strides toward Better Health SNOWFIT Program Encourages EmpLoyee Fitness “Did you know that it is 1,280 steps from the Noyes building to the AC?” “How many steps do you have so far?” Questions like these have been buzzing around both campuses since last fall, with the launch of SnowFit: An Innovative Approach to Employee Health and Wellness. Hundreds of employees participate in SnowFit, and

"SnowFit has been a great program for the College." - Markay Gold other two-year colleges are looking to SnowFit as a model for their own fitness programs. SnowFit was developed by staff members MarKay Gold and Lurlynn Potter, in cooperation with the Snow College Wellness Committee. Gold and Potter oversee the program’s development and track weekly progress for SnowFit participants.

“SnowFit has been a great program for the College,” said Gold. “It has brought people from many different areas together to work towards common goals.” SnowFit participants receive a FitBit step-tracking device to help monitor their daily activity. Many have joined teams and participated in walking challenges. The combination of step tracking, social support, accountability, friendly competition, and departmental collaboration helps those around campus become more active. The SnowFit experience is helping employees make healthier lifestyle choices, resulting in real change and an improvement in overall health. “I was overweight, tired all of the time, and couldn’t seem to find any motivation, then SnowFit happened,” said Lynette Olson Graham, who

Armando Frutos, who works for Snow College Facilities, recorded more than 1 million steps each month for nine months.

works in Snow College’s purchasing department. “I decided to accept the challenge, and I am so thankful that I did. I am now exercising on a regular basis, documenting everything that I eat, and drinking lots of water.” President Gary Carlston and his wife, Janet, are among SnowFit’s most active participants. “We are excited about the SnowFit program and thank MarKay and Lurlynn for their vision and leadership,” said President Carlston. “The program has created a positive energy and enthusiasm for wellness on both campuses. We have seen the personal benefits of participating in the program, and we have enjoyed working together to reach our daily FitBit goals.” Employees and their participating spouses recorded walking almost 64 million steps from October 2015 to March 2016. As of March 2016, 41 percent of all part-time and full-time employees on both campuses were participating in the program. Gold and Potter were invited to present on SnowFit at the 18th Annual League for Innovation in the Community College Conference in Chicago, where representatives of several community colleges expressed plans to develop similar programs at their institutions. There are plans to improve upon SnowFit for years to come, including incorporating new themes and inviting students to participate. “I’m delighted that so many people are supportive of the program and are seeing significant improvement in their health,” said Potter.

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BADGERnews

Telling her story

Lorenzo Snow Honoree shares love of learning with family, fellow students, and others At age 32, Megan Batterman enrolled as a freshman at Snow College's Richfield campus. It had been 16 years since she dropped out of high school. Although Megan said she had been labeled as “stupid” throughout her schooling, she wanted to educate herself and inspire her children to do the same. Just three years before returning to school, Megan gave birth to a stillborn daughter, and the sadness took over her life. She took solace in writing. “I found myself in words,” Megan said. “I vowed to no longer live this oppressing silence. I vowed that I would live my life for my daughter who could not. I promised her and myself that I would speak of her story, our story, and never stop speaking of it.” With a love of writing and learning and a desire to show her children the value of education, Megan has not only survived the college experience, she has thrived. Megan is a student body director, an academic tutor, and a literacy tutor on the Richfield campus. She has published a collection of poetry (Mermaid in the Valley, under her pen name, Meg Bee), is working on a non-fiction book, and reports for the Sanpete Messenger, all while attending college full-time and raising four children. Scholarships and financial aid have allowed Megan to immerse herself as a full-time student. “There’s no way I could attend college and pay for myself; [scholarships] are life-altering for me,” she said. Megan was the recipient of the 2016 Lorenzo Snow Award, which is 2 0 16 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E

Megan Batterman — 2016 Recipient of the Lorenzo Snow Award

awarded to a Snow College student who, according to the printed award program, “exemplifies the very best that Snow College has to offer in citizenship, character, and personal accomplishment.” Sara Phelps, student life program coordinator on the Richfield campus, nominated Megan for the award. Sara recalled attending a dinner for student body advocates, where Megan said the students at Snow College helped save her. “The reality

is that it is Megan who is saving the other students. She befriends the students who need it the most. She doesn’t like anyone feeling left out or that they don’t belong,” Sara said. After graduation, Megan plans to attend Utah State University and become an English professor. She also wants to keep sharing her story in hopes of inspiring others. “To know that I am making a difference every single day,” she said, “is really important to me.” 5


BADGERnews

Homecoming

A Great Time to Come Home Mark your calendars and plan to visit Ephraim for Snow College’s Homecoming events, October 14-15. 1976 Football Team Reunion and Golden Badger Reunion activities span both days. For registration or more details, please contact the Alumni Office at 435-283-7062 or email alumni@snow.edu.

Friday, October 14 5:30 p.m. – Golden Badger Reunion Dinner If you attended Snow College in 1966 or earlier, you are a Golden Badger! Join fellow alumni for an evening to remember.

7:00 p.m. – 1976 Football Team 40-Year Reunion Dinner Football alumni are invited to join Snow’s 1976 football team to celebrate the team's 40-year reunion.

Special discount alumni ticket packages are available through the Snow College Advancement Office. Please call 435-283-7062 or visit snow.edu/alumni for more information. 6

Saturday, October 15 10:00 a.m. – Parade Watch from Main Street, or join the alumni float! Lineup for floats begins at 9:30 a.m. along 300 South.

11:00 a.m. – Tailgate Party Get your game gear and food, and have some fun on the practice field before the game. Come to the Snow College Alumni booth to pick up your alumni packet and to buy unique merchandise or extra tickets to the barbecue party that is right after the game.

1:00 p.m. – Football Game Cheer on the Badgers as they battle on Stoddard Field!

4:30 p.m. – Alumni Barbecue Meet up with fellow alums and enjoy a delicious barbecue on the Greenwood Student Center patio right after the game!

9:00 p.m. – Homecoming Dance Relive your Snow College days and attend the Homecoming Dance in the Snow College Horne Activity Center with your special date. To buy tickets for the dance, contact Student Life at 435-283-7121. S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E | 2 0 16


BADGERnews

tractors and technology

new agricultural mechanics program serves central utah's farming industry When one envisions a rural Utah farm, images of drones hovering overhead and farmers managing irrigation systems on their cell phones are probably not part of the picture. Although traditional equipment is still essential, high-tech devices are becoming more common and more important. A recent grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) will help Snow College create a program that teaches students how to maintain and repair traditional farm equipment while also gaining a knowledge of innovative machinery. In Snow College’s Agricultural Mechanics (Ag Mechanics) program, students will develop skills they can use on family or commercial farms, or as equipment service technicians. Program development will begin in fall of 2016, and instruction will start the following year. An additional grant from the Utah Department of Workforce Services will also support the program, including the development of a high-school-to-college pathway. The program will include both new and existing courses. Existing courses in engine repair, hydraulics, and diesel drivetrains will be modified to include agricultural units; new courses will feature instruction in small engines, chemical applications, and irrigation. 2 0 16 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E

The program will also instruct students in the growing trend of using drone and GPS technology in agriculture. Farmers can use drones (unmanned aerial vehicles) to f ly over their cropland and assess irrigation, fertilizer, and chemical needs. Farmers can also utilize GPS technology to map areas that need specific treatment. “This program has immediate benefits for our students and the region,” said Dr. Steve Hood, vice president for academic affairs. “Businesses that repair implements and engines used in agriculture are in desperate need of qualified mechanics. Farmers and ranchers who run their own operations benefit from programs like Ag Mechanics, because it enables them to do repair work themselves, thus saving precious capital for other projects.” The NSF’s Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program focuses on educating technicians at two-year colleges in preparation for careers in high-technology fields. “We are so honored to be a National Science Foundation grant recipient,” said Hood. “Receiving this grant affirms the confidence the NSF has in us and our Ag Mechanics program.” 7


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BADGERnews

a magical journey

snow students participate in u.s./colombia exchange By Mitch Jenkins, Snow College Service Learning Coordinator Colombia is the land of magical realism; a full explanation of that topic will be saved for another article, perhaps from the English department, but Colombia certainly is a magical place. On a recent trip to that beautiful country, Snow College students and faculty learned firsthand the magic and splendor of the country. The trip was initiated by a 100,000 Strong in the Americas grant, supported by a partnership among the U.S. Department of State, Partners of the Americas, and NAFSA: Association of International Educators.

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The great people of Servicio Nacional de Aprendizaje (SENA) hosted the trip. SENA is Colombia’s publicly funded community college system, providing free post-high-school educational opportunities to its citizens. We were greeted at the Medellin International Airport by our wonderful hosts and, for the next week and a half, toured SENA facilities in Medellin, Itagui, and Santa Fe de Antioquia. Snow College students participated in once-in-a-lifetime opportunities to learn, share, and serve in ways only found in global engagement and service learning. Snow students

participated in cane sugar production at a small facility perched high on an Andean hillside. They worked on an eco-farm in the semi-arid Cordillera, a branch of the Andes. Time was spent picking limes, mangos, and other tropical fruit and, of course, enjoying the freshest juices on earth! After leaving the rural Colombian countryside, students helped with English translation of tools and processes at SENA’s exclusive Luthier School located in Itagui, a suburb of Medellin. Snow students enjoyed association with Colombian students and SENA instructors, seeing furniture design come to life and learning the incredible diversity found in Colombia with the hundreds of tropical tree species used in construction and furniture making. Bright and forward-thinking people put this trip together. Special thanks to instructors Alex Peterson and English Brooks, the great students of their Community Engagement and Service Learning class, and also our SENA hosts for showing us the magical city of Medellin, the beautiful Parque Regional Arvi, and the incredible educational facilities of SENA. This was the perfect educational experience!

1. Christian Fales picking fresh limes. 2. Watching sunset over Rio Cauca River. 3. Walking to cacao fields. 4. Kyla Swain, Damon Swain and Liliana Lopez (SENA professor) overlooking Medellín. 5. Eco-tourism farm near Santa Fe de Antioquia. 6. Abigail Lyons refining brown sugar or panela. 7. Downtown Medellín. 8. Snow College students participate in furniture design class. 9. Bougainvillea blooms.

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ARTSSCHEDULE Date

Event

Time

Sep. 9

Darryl Worley (SVC)

7:00 p.m.

Oct. 1

Locash (SVC)

7:00 p.m.

Oct. 4

Jazz Orchestra concert

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 5-8

Theatre: Much Ado About Nothing

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 8

Richard Marx and Jenn Bostic (SVC)

7:00 p.m.

Oct. 11

Chamber Music Ensemble concert

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 13

Choir concert

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 14

Orchestra pops concert

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 18

Wind Symphony

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 27

Faculty recital

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 28

Piano recital

7:30 p.m.

Nov. 4

Founders Day concert

7:30 p.m.

Nov. 8

Guitar Area recital

5:30 p.m.

Nov. 9-10

Chamber music concert

7:30 p.m.

Nov. 12

Bellamy Brothers (SVC)

7:00 p.m.

Nov. 14

Guitar Area recital

5:30 p.m.

Nov. 15

Chamber music concert

7:30 p.m.

Nov. 16-19

Theatre: The Cripple of Inishmaan

7:30 p.m.

Nov. 18

Choir/Orchestra concert

7:30 p.m.

Nov. 21

Woodwind Area recital

6:30 p.m.

Nov. 28

Piano Area recital

7:30 p.m.

Nov. 29

Jazz Combo concert

7:30 p.m.

Nov. 30

Jazz Combo concert

7:30 p.m.

Dec. 1-3

Theatre: A Christmas Carol

7:30 p.m.

Dec. 1

Music Department Christmas concert (SVC)

7:30 p.m.

Dec. 2

Music Department Christmas concert (Salt Lake City)

7:30 p.m.

Dec. 3

Music Department Christmas concert

7:30 p.m.

Dec. 6

Composition concert

7:30 p.m.

Dec. 7

Jazz Orchestra concert

7:30 p.m.

Dec. 7

Jim Brickman (SVC)

7:00 p.m.

Dec. 8-9

Opera Workshop: The Gondoliers

7:30 p.m.

Events are held at the Eccles Center for the Performing Arts on the Snow College Ephraim Campus, unless otherwise noted. Tickets for Sevier Valley Center (SVC) events are available for purchase online at svc.snow.edu.

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SPORTSSCHEDULES FOOTBALL

MEN'SBasketball

Complete Schedule (home games in bold)

Home Game Schedule

Date

Time

Against

Date

Time

Against

Aug. 27

TBA

Utah Shock

Nov. 10

7 p.m.

Central Arizona

R

Sep. 3

TBA

Tucson Tech

Nov. 11

7 p.m.

Eastern Florida State

R

Sep. 10

7 p.m.

Glendale Community

Nov. 12

3 p.m.

Eastern Wyoming

R

Sep. 17

TBA

Mesa Community

Dec. 9

7 p.m.

Central Wyoming

E

Sep. 24

7 p.m.

Air Force Academy

Dec. 10

5 p.m.

TBD

E

Oct. 8

TBA

Arizona Western

Jan. 7

5 p.m.

Salt Lake Community

E

Oct. 15

1 p.m.

Pima Community*

Jan. 14

5 p.m.

USU Eastern

E

Oct. 29

7 p.m.

Eastern Arizona

Jan. 19

7:30 p.m. Southern Idaho

E

Nov. 05

TBA

Phoenix College

Jan. 28

5 p.m.

Colorado NW

E

Nov. 12

TBA

Scottsdale Community

Jan. 31

7 p.m.

Southern Idaho

E

Feb. 4

5 p.m.

Salt Lake Community

E

Feb. 11

5 p.m.

Colorado NW

E

Feb. 23

7:30 p.m. USU Eastern

BOWL GAME Dec. 3

TBA

*Homecoming Game

Campus*

E

R: Richfield, E: Ephraim

Volleyball Home Game Schedule, Ephraim Campus

Date

Time

Against

Sep. 1

7 p.m.

Western Wyoming

Sep. 22

7 p.m.

Salt Lake Community

Sep. 24

1 p.m.

Southern Idaho

Oct. 20

7 p.m.

USU Eastern

Oct. 22

1 p.m.

Colorado NW

Oct. 29

1 p.m.

Southern NV

TOURNAMENT November

REGION 18 - TBA

November

NJCAA NATIONAL - TBA

Rodeo

Women'sBasketball Home Game Schedule, Ephraim Campus

Date

Time

Against

Nov. 7

5 p.m.

Southern VA University

Nov. 11

7:30 p.m

Fort Carson (CO)

Nov. 12

3 p.m

Gillette (WY)

Dec. 17

3 p.m

Western Wyoming

Jan. 7

3 p.m

Salt Lake Community

Jan. 14

3 p.m

USU Eastern

Jan. 19

5:30 p.m

Southern Idaho

Jan. 28

3 p.m

Colorado NW

Jan. 31

5:30 p.m

Southern Idaho

Feb. 4

3 p.m

Salt Lake Community

Date

Against

Feb. 11

3 p.m

Colorado NW

Sep. 9-10

Southern Utah University

Feb. 23

5:30 p.m

USU Eastern

Sep. 16-17

Idaho State University

POST SEASON

Sep. 23-24

Utah State University

Mar. 2-4

TBA

Region 18 Tourney SLC

Sep. 30-Oct. 1

Utah State University-Eastern

Mar. 20-25

TBA

NJCAA Nationals, TX

The Snow College Horne Activity Center is open to all students and the public. The center has a variety of activities for the entire family: indoor swimming, racquetball, volleyball, wallyball, basketball, indoor track, indoor soccer, and a fitness center. See snow.edu/athletics/ac/index.html for hours, classes, and membership information.

For a complete schedule of athletic events, visit snowbadgers.com.

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Bringing a Fresh Face to the Event Game Entrepreneuring BAdger football players launch their own business By Terra Matthews

Darius Myers and Cody Scott, two young athletes, arrived at Snow College’s football summer training camp excited for a new adventure and new opportunities. Little did they realize that this day would be the beginning of a new and successful partnership. Growing up in Boston, Darius’ first love was football, but creating something that would positively impact others drove his ambition. He began his entrepreneurial pursuit in high school by building his first mobile application, or “app”: a computer program designed to run on mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet computers. His love for football led him to Snow College on a football scholarship, where his talent could thrive both on and off the field. Cody made a hobby of designing and creating apps in his hometown of Pleasant Grove. His skill as an athlete led him to join the Snow College Football Team, where a 12

combination of personal drive, his idea for a new app, and a chance meeting pushed his hobby to the next level, opening doors for success and providing him the opportunity to use his natural talent for business. During summer football camp, Darius and Cody were partnered for a team-building activity. Cody’s ambition intrigued Darius, and a new partnership was formed. The two set out to create the HYPE app, a specialized social media platform that allows users to find events through geolocation, or digital mapping. The app offers an innovative approach to event promotion, targeted at both promoters and potential attendees. Event organizers are now able to showcase their event and let a user in on new experiences they may not have known of otherwise. Individuals can use the app on their smartphones to coordinate private events, send invitations, and eventually purchase tickets to events. S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E | 2 0 16


STUDENTSPOTLIGHT

Cody Scott (L) and Darius Myers (R)

In December 2015, the partners entered Opportunity Quest, a Shark-Tank-like competition sponsored by the Snow College Business Department. The competition is designed to foster students’ entrepreneurial mindset and connect them with other entrepreneurs. Their HYPE app prototype and business model took first place at the competition and launched them into the business world. Darius and Cody then competed with students from colleges and universities throughout the state in the Utah Entrepreneur Challenge and finished second place in the People’s Choice competition. The duo also received a funding award from the Conrad Frischknecht Investment Training Series endowment fund to help them prepare for the competition. The fund was established by Conrad Frischknecht, a Sanpete County businessman who was quite successful with investments in the stock market. Conrad’s daughter, Maude

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Conrad, is now the contact person for the endowment. She said she hopes the interest funds generated from the original contribution can help other local business people achieve success similar to her father’s. While the app is still in the prelaunch phase, several local entities, including Snow College, have begun utilizing the creators’ event promotion services, and several events along the Wasatch Front have asked them to co-sponsor upcoming shows and concerts. Cody describes HYPE as “the shiny new toy that isn’t out yet but everyone is talking about it, and you can’t wait to have it.” Cody and Darius are as optimistic as ever about the success of their app. Even with all of the demands that life throws their way, they each look forward to waking each day ready to create success. As Darius spells out: “It’s all or nothing, now or never.” 13


Bob Stoddard loved coaching. He is pictured here among former Snow College coaches (from left to right) Cleve Morgan, Bob Stoddard, Ray Englestead, and Rick Church.

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T•H•E

ROBERT

STODDARD E•R•A

Bob Stoddard (center) and his four children (from left to right): Julie, Kathy, Mark, and Kristine

as a coach, teacher, administrator, and supporter, robert stoddard spent more than 30 yeaRs serving snow college. the legacy of his service and commitment lives on today. 2 0 16 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E

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By Terra Matthews and Rosie Connor

Snow College family members from different eras can typically recall iconic individuals from their times who evoke fond memories and truly embody the Spirit of Snow. Robert “Bob” Stoddard, who was employed by Snow College from 1954 to 1992, is one of these legendary individuals. He began his career at Snow as a football coach, and before his retirement, he had served in at least nine different coaching, teaching, and administrative positions, including track and wrestling coach, agriculture teacher, athletic director, dean of instruction, interim president (twice), and vice president of development. It would be fair to say that Bob was one of those rare people who always went above and beyond expectations. He was a football coaching legacy and an irreplaceable member of the Snow College campus and the Sanpete community. Bob was raised in the small agricultural community of Bancroft, Idaho, on the family ranch with his four sisters and one brother, and he spent most of his childhood sleeping in the bunkhouse with the ranch hands. His youth was filled with hard work and the typical mischief that follows young boys.

Bob Stoddard served in the U.S. Navy during World War II.

As a child, he rode his horse to town every day to attend school. One day while coming into the schoolyard, he was riding quickly and fell, hitting his head on a pole. His siblings carried him into class and propped him up in his chair, ready for class. He always said he could never remember anything from that day. Bob also spent his youth active in school and athletics; he attended North Gem High School, where he played football and basketball.

In 1943, Bob graduated from high school and, soon after, signed up with the Navy at only 17 years old. He became a pilot for landing crafts and found himself in the middle of intense action in the Philippines. Near the end of 1944, he was piloting a craft of troops from a large Navy ship to the shore when another craft broke down near him. Bob drew his craft up to the broken-down one, and the two crafts were lashed together to keep the damaged one from drifting near enemy artillery. The Navy ship had to leave and was unable to return for a few days. The two crafts drifted for days, and when the Navy ship was finally able to return, the crafts slowly made their way toward it, with the enemy firing on them from the shore. The large Navy vessel then aimed its guns at the shore and laid down protective fire 16

for Bob and the other seamen. Bob told his children that in that moment, with his fellow seamen on that ship doing everything they could to save the few men who drifted there in the ocean, he had never been more proud to be an American citizen. After his time in the military, Bob returned home to attend Ricks College and eventually transferred to Utah State University. He was a talented athlete, gaining notoriety in several sports. He was a heavyweight wrestler, competed in shotput and discus, and played defensive tackle on the football team. During this time, Bob met his future wife, Dorothy Jensen (‘45), who would become his biggest fan and supporter. Dorothy, an Ephraim native, met Bob on a blind date. The story goes that he was highly interested, but she was less so. Bob was not discouraged and eventually won her over; the two were married in June of 1948. After college, Bob was recruited by the legendary Chicago Bears Head Coach George Halas. Even though Bob had a signed contract, which his family still has today, he decided that football didn’t provide a reliable future, and he turned the offer down. Bob was known to say he would never move to Sanpete County, where Dorothy was raised, but just a few years later his heart was changed. After Dorothy’s father died in an accident on the family farm, Bob and Dorothy moved to Gunnison to help Dorothy’s mother and assist with the farm. Bob found a position teaching agriculture at Gunnison Valley High School. Soon after, he was hired by Snow College as an assistant coach for men’s sports under Snow College Athletics Hall of Fame member Jim Williams. When Williams left, Bob found himself as the head coach for men’s sports. In the Snowdrift student newspaper it stated, “According to the Badger team, he has helped a great deal in boosting morale.” Bob cared a great deal about his players, more so than he cared about the games they played. He encouraged the players and was concerned for their academic and athletic success. It weighed heavily on him when he was in a position to have to discipline one of his athletes. Kristine (Stoddard) Tatton (’71), Bob’s daughter, said that her father always gave people a chance. “Even if they weren’t the best players, he gave the opportunity to play to anyone willing to put forth the effort and commitment,” she said. His coaching and concern made his teams successful, with the football team becoming the 1963 Intermountain Collegiate Athletic Conference champions, defeating Boise State. S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E | 2 0 16


Athletics was a family affair for Bob, Dorothy, and their four children: Julie (Warren, ‘78), Mark (’75), Kathy (Nelson, ‘72), and Kristine. During games, Dorothy would pace up and down the sideline in support of the team. She would also have the entire team over for dinner at the beginning of the school year. These gatherings became popular in part thanks to Dorothy’s famous German chocolate cake. Bob’s mother-in-law spent many hours mending uniforms. His family also became a second family to many of the athletes he coached. “Snow College was our family’s life,” said Kathy. “We all had a love for Snow College — it really was a family thing.” Kathy said her dad always paid attention to the individual and his/her needs. She recounted stories of interactions with student athletes at Snow on and off the field. She Dorothy and Bob Stoddard were married in 1948 and were “the best of sweethearts,” according to their children.

remembers that her dad would always find projects for the football players living in their basement to do to help teach them how to work. “My dad had high expectations, and he expected you to tow the line,” she said. Julie, Bob and Dorothy’s youngest daughter, echoed her sister’s word’s regarding Bob’s individual attention and high expectations. She recalled a story of when she was young and out working with her dad breaking horses. While training one particular horse, Julie was thrown off and landed pretty hard. Bob insisted that Julie get up and back on the horse. “Dad always expected us to do and be our best,” she said. “He wanted his kids to be honorable people, and he modeled that for us.” Regarding her parents’ relationship, all the kids agreed that Bob and Dorothy were “the best of sweethearts.” They said that Bob and Dorothy held the utmost respect for each other. Independently, their daughters all mentioned Bob’s respect and support for women. Kathy said that “he always treated women well.” Julie and Kristine added that Bob’s support and encouragement of women was not always found during those days. Each of Bob’s daughters went on to have professional careers, and they attribute Bob’s love, encouragement, and respect to their individual successes. Susan Larsen (‘71), former director of the Student Success Center, took a badminton class from Bob in 1970, and found herself as his badminton partner. She recalled: “Once I was swinging for the birdie and missed. The racket slipped from my hand and hit Professor Stoddard in the side of the head! I was mortified!” Everyone was laughing, but nervously, as no one knew what the reaction was going to be. Bob simply rubbed his head, smiled, and patted her on the back. “He said he was watching the birdie and not me and it wasn’t my fault. What an awesome guy! And more importantly, I passed the class.” Not long after the badminton incident, Bob agreed to work part-time in the development office and was to assist in the search for a permanent development director. The search council, without his knowledge, recommended him as director. He became the first vice president for development and later executive director of the Snow College Foundation, a position he enjoyed immensely. During his tenure, he successfully positioned the Snow College Foundation for the success it experiences today. Bob went on to become a founding member of the Council for Resource Development (CRD), a national organization focused on fundraising and

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Basketball Coach Gary Bliss with Bob Stoddard

alumni development at two-year colleges. Within five years, he became CRD’s president and was honored with the Distinguished Service Lifetime Membership Award and an endowment fund established in his honor. Bob is also prominently honored at Snow College. Through the Stoddards’ generosity, Badger Stadium is home to the Robert Stoddard Field, a recognition of Bob’s many dedicated years as a football coach at Snow College. He is in both the Ricks College and Snow College halls of fame and is recognized as a key player in creating a football program at Manti High School. Additionally, Snow College students benefit from scholarships funded by the Robert L. & Dorothy J. Stoddard Endowment Fund each year.

Like coaching, Bob’s work in development also became a family affair. His son, Mark (’75), President and CEO of Central Valley Medical Center in Nephi, has served as the Snow College Alumni Association president, the Snow College Foundation Board chair, and chair of the Snow College Board of Trustees. LeAnn (’93), Mark’s wife, currently serves on the Foundation Board and is the incoming chair. In 2015, CRD honored Mark and LeAnn with the Benefactor Award, which recognizes those who have made outstanding contributions to community colleges. Dr. Jim Tatton, (’70), Bob’s son-inlaw (married to Kristine), is also a former Foundation Board chair. In addition to the 38 years he devoted to Snow College, Bob also dedicated a great deal of time serving his church. He often stated that his service in the Manti LDS Temple and as a teacher in the LDS Primary organization were among his greatest joys. Bob passed away in 1994 after creating his long legacy of commitment and loyalty. Today, when his children happen to meet former players of Coach Stoddard, their accolades are always unanimous in attesting to the fact that playing football under Bob changed their lives and made them better people. Mark probably best summarizes the life of Robert Stoddard, saying, "I couldn't have asked for a better father!”

Bob Stoddard (right) with a hard-working Badger team

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SNOW COLLEGE

A new chapter in athletic excellence begins this fall 2 0 16 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E

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A New Goal

Snow College’s Soccer Coach and Teams Begin Another Tradition By Terra Matthews

Nuno Gourgel (pronounced NEW-no GOR-jel) may have a lot on his mind with building the new Snow College soccer program, moving to a new home, and learning who has the right-of-way when livestock are involved, but he still has plenty of energy to set high goals for his teams. “My plan,” he said, “is to have a solid base for this first year, start our recruiting early next year, get a great sophomore team put together, and take that team to compete for the region title. Why not?”

Coach Nuno Gourgel

As the head coach for both the men’s and women’s soccer teams, Coach Gourgel has found his way from England to Florida to Arizona, and now right here to Ephraim. He has years of experience both playing and coaching soccer in a variety of leagues, both in England and the United States, and is looking forward to the opportunity to share that experience with Snow College’s athletes as they take on this new challenge. “I’ve only been here for a little while, but Ephraim seems like a great place,” he said. “I think we will like it here; we just need to get ready for winter. My wife is from Florida, so it’s definitely going to be a change, but I think it will be a good change!”

Though Snow’s soccer program is brand new, Gourgel doesn’t see this as a hindrance. “We are in about the same situation as most of the teams; the ones that have been operating for a few years have a small advantage, but all of the programs are fairly new, so we are definitely not at a huge disadvantage,” he said. “There are

“Success is no accident. It is hard work, perseverance, learning, studying, sacrifice and most of all, love of what you are doing or learning to do.” -Pele

positives and negatives to being a new team. On the good side, we can set the standard from the get-go, we can determine the abilities and build the team from scratch. On the bad side, students may be more inclined to go to one of the programs that has been going for a few years just because it’s more established, but I’m not worried about that. Every time I introduce myself and say I am from Snow College people get really excited. Everyone is so positive about the school and wants to play here because of that. The reputation of the school makes recruiting really exciting for me.” The Badgers will not be the only new team in their region; most of the schools in Region 18 of the National Junior College Athletic Association are home to new soccer programs. In addition to Snow College, the region includes Salt Lake Community College, College of Southern Nevada, Colorado Northwestern Community College, and Utah State University Eastern. Both the men’s and women’s teams will practice and play at the Snow College Sports Complex, just north of campus at 300 North and 200 East. They would love to have alumni, friends, and the community attend a game and cheer them on!

SOCCER Home Game Schedule: Men's (M) and Women's (W)

Date

Time

Against

Sep. 23

4 p.m. (M)

Salt Lake Community

Sep. 23

2 p.m. (W)

Salt Lake Community

Sep. 24

1 p.m. (M)

Salt Lake Community

Sep. 24

11 a.m. (W)

Salt Lake Community

Sep. 27

4 p.m. (M)

Western Wyoming

Sep. 27

2 p.m. (W)

Western Wyoming

Oct. 13

4 p.m. (M)

Colorado NW

Oct. 13

2 p.m. (W)

Colorado NW

Oct. 20

4 p.m. (M)

USU Eastern

Oct. 20

2 p.m. (W)

USU Eastern

Oct. 22

1 p.m. (M)

Southern Nevada

Oct. 22

11 a.m. (W)

Southern Nevada

Snow College soccer players pictured: Juan Frutos and Makenna Clark

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BADGER LEGACY The

LIVES

By Terra Matthews

T

hroughout the history of Snow College Athletics, student-athletes have arrived on campus, eager to participate in the sport of their choice. When it was time to move on, these athletes found that Snow College gave them much more than the opportunity to play a game. Countless numbers of Badger athletes have experienced great success in their professions and lives. The following are just a handful of those whose time at Snow College served as a stepping stone to greater achievements.

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THE ATHLETES

J. Boyd Grant is the first to say that without the encouragement from professors like the infamous Lucy Phillips and coaches like Snow College Athletic Hall of Fame member Jim Williams, he would have never had the skills and courage to start his own Hall-of-Fame-worthy career, coaching basketball at Fresno State, Colorado State, and the College of Southern Idaho. No offer came from Bronco Mendenhall’s dream school, Brigham Young University, but Snow College was more than happy to pick him up at cornerback. As a member of the 1985 football team, he was invaluable in their legendary 1985 National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) National Championship and is now at the height of his coaching career. He was head coach at BYU for 10 years, finding huge success, and is currently the head football coach at the University of Virginia. Star Lotulelei wasn’t sure of his future and took a year off after high school. During that time, he discovered that the football field was where he belonged. However, with the gap in his education and play, most colleges were wary. When all he needed was an open

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Left: Bronco Mendenhall, Right: Star Lotulelei 23

AP Photo/Bob Leverone


door and a chance, Snow College stepped in to provide that opportunity. He is now a powerhouse defensive tackle for the Carolina Panthers and was a standout player in the 2016 NFL Super Bowl. One of the top football recruits in the nation this year, Garrett Bowles arrived at Snow College after facing overwhelming challenges in his life. He found support and guidance that resulted in his progress on the football field and improvement in the classroom, becoming the kind of athlete that Division I universities seek to add to their rosters. He is playing for the University of Utah after being ranked the No.1 junior college recruit in the nation by Scout.com.

Garrett Bowles

Many Snow College athletes find professional success outside of sports. Carley Garner, a member of the Badger Softball Team from 1997 to 1998, is now a highly successful

A NEw Face for BADGER STADIUM Snow College has long prided itself on a strong athletics program. Football is an important part of Snow College Athletics and the Badger tradition of excellence. This fall, Snow College’s football team will enter the 2016 season as the nation’s top-ranked junior college program, according to Sporting News. In the magazine’s 2016 College Football Preview edition, Snow is ranked No. 1, followed by City College of San Francisco, Northwest Mississippi, East Mississippi, and Iowa Western, to round out the top five. This exciting news comes amid the announcement of a new campaign to improve Badger Stadium. Through the Badger Football Improvements and Facilities Enhancement Campaign, the College plans to sustain its commitment to football and to recruit and support the very best student-athletes and coaches. Snow College is in the early phases of a major renovation project that will bring key football facilities, including Badger Stadium and Robert Stoddard Field, up to the modern standards of an elite athletics program to support Badger Athletics’ history and tradition of excellence. Snow College Football supports the College’s mission by providing student-athletes with exceptional educational and athletic opportunities. Badger Football is also self-supporting and receives very limited state funding. The program relies on revenues and private support to help fund 24

all team activities. The campaign will be implemented in three phases. The total cost to implement the campaign is estimated at more than $4 million, generated over a threeyear period. The first phase will begin this fall. The State of Utah has provided funding for improving the stadium’s electrical capacity and seating refurbishment, while private funding will support the installation of new lighting. The long-anticipated lights will expand the use of the field to include evening football games as well as enhanced recreational campus and community access. The new lighting will be followed by new turf for Robert Stoddard Field for the 2017 season. Phases two and three will include the establishment of an athletics endowment fund as well as improvements and upgrades for the following: • • • •

Locker room and football coaching offices Athletic training room, weight room, and laundry area Press/announcers’ space Stadium concessions and restrooms

Snow College is deeply appreciative to the supporters who have stepped up thus far to assist with this project. More gifts from generous supporters will help us continue to provide a top-quality experience for our athletes on the field and in the classroom. Philanthropy is crucial in helping student-athletes graduate while competing in our championship-caliber programs. The College would also like to thank our volunteer campaign steering committee members who are leading the fundraising initiative. S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E | 2 0 16


commodity market strategist and broker and the author of Currency Trading in the FOREX and Futures Markets, A Trader’s First Book on Commodities, and Commodity Options. She is a featured columnist in Technical Analysis of Stocks & Commodities magazine.

THE FUTURE “Athletes find themselves at Snow College for a variety of reasons, but once they arrive on campus, they all find the same things: support, encouragement, and success,” said Athletic Director Rob Nielson. “The Snow College approach to education includes faculty and staff who push you to be your best, the close-knit student body, scholarships to provide opportunity, and students who rise to the occasion. This formula for success has been proven to work time and time again.”

Who will be the next Star Lotulelei, Boyd Grant, Bronco Mendenhall, Garrett Bowles, or Carley Garner — the next young athlete to walk onto campus looking for an opportunity, and walk away from it improved, with drive and direction, ready to take on all that the world outside of campus has to offer? There are students right now discovering their passion and their potential, and every year there will be more. Snow College will be there to feed their minds and inspire them to become their best, both on and off the field.

Carley Garner

Artist’s rendering of the future Badger Stadium

Campaign Steering Committee Volunteers: Mark Stoddard, Co-Chair Eric Bergeson, Co-Chair Dave and Pat Arslanian Cade Cooper Ken Denos 2 0 16 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E

Mark Geiselmayr Mark Howard Roger Monson Frank Stewart Brad Taggart

Badger Football will open the season on August 27 in Ephraim against the Zion Lions, a semi-pro team from St. George. The 2016 Homecoming game will be played on October 15. For more information on the Badger Football Improvements and Facilities Enhancement Campaign, please visit us at snow.edu/giving. You can also call the Foundation at 435-283-7060. 25


BADGERPROFILE

former badger goes from "fit 2 fat 2 fit" drew manning's experience helps motivate others By Terra Matthews

In a podcast interview in 2015, Drew Manning shared the quote “People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” As a personal trainer, it was Drew’s job to care. When he realized that he could do a better job of caring, he undertook an extreme experiment that gave him a unique perspective on his clients’ health and fitness challenges. Drew, who attended Snow College in 2003 and was a linebacker on the football team, had always been healthy and physically active. As a result, he saw physical fitness in terms of black and white. Either health was important, or it wasn’t; someone was either fit or lazy � it just came down to making a choice. Since he had never struggled with making healthy choices, he didn’t understand why others did. Clients were approaching Drew with frustration, saying he didn’t know what it was like to go through the challenges they were facing. Drew took the feedback to heart. Instead of moving on to new clients or giving up on his dream of personal training, he chose to listen, truly listen, and put himself in the shoes of his clients. He wanted to understand how to support and train the very people who had expressed frustration with him in the past. “I felt disconnected from my overweight clients because I couldn’t understand where they were coming from, and they couldn’t relate to me. I felt like I needed to learn something to become a better trainer. And for whatever reason, the idea of gaining weight on purpose made sense, and I felt like I had to do it to finally understand.” Drew’s new journey began. He started calling it Fit2Fat2Fit; he allowed himself to gain weight and live a sedentary lifestyle, and then he documented his 26

life and the struggles he experienced in the process of regaining his health. Through the process, Drew gained 72 pounds, but even more than the weight and the change in his clothing size was the change in his lifestyle. “I was in denial at first, but I did become lazier,” he said. “I wasn’t helpful with the kids, or around the house. It was a tough six months going through this mental and emotional struggle.” He had lost confidence and was uncomfortable and insecure for the first time in his life. “The biggest thing is that it’s not just about the physical,” Drew said. “It’s not just about the meals and the workouts. The critical point is the mental and emotional struggle. I realized those issues are real.” When the time came to take the journey back to fit, the changes didn’t come as easily as Drew had anticipated. At the height of his weight he had developed high blood pressure, a fatty liver, and symptoms of sleep apnea, and he realized he had a long journey ahead of him. For the first 30 days he changed what he was eating, lost 19 pounds, and got his blood pressure under control. “I wanted to show people how powerful nutrition is,” he said. Drew experienced headaches and food cravings after cutting out sugars and soda. He also started going back to the gym, which was harder than he thought. “This is the first time going to the gym that I was nervous. I was humbled, I struggled, I felt judged like so many of my clients had said before. I always told them no one was judging you, but you feel judged when you are struggling at the gym. It was very humbling and an experience I needed to have.” Drew freely admits his experience is not the same as someone who doesn’t have his expertise and has never exercised, but he does have more understanding. “I compare it to being on top of a mountain my entire S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E | 2 0 16


One of Drew's many fitness endeavors is the Dollar Workout Club, which he founded with his wife, Lynn (center), and fitness writer Natalie Hodson (right).

life, and I’m trying to help my clients climb up that mountain one step at a time, yelling at them from the top to keep coming and don’t give up, don’t fall down by cheating and messing up. But for the first time in my life I was at the bottom of the mountain looking up and it’s a totally different perspective, and it’s something I needed to go through.” After taking the journey with his clients, and joining them on the mountain they are facing, he has become a different person and a better trainer to the people he wants to help. After completing his Fit2Fat2Fit journey, Drew used his experience to motivate as many people as he could reach. He has become a best-selling author with his book Fit2Fat2Fit: The Unexpected Lessons from Gaining and Losing 75 Pounds on Purpose, and he is the creator, producer, and narrator of, and a trainer coach on, the Fit2Fat2Fit TV program, which airs on the A&E cable network. Drew is also a motivational speaker, a National Academy of Sports Medicine certified trainer, a blogger, and a fitness enthusiast. Drew co-founded Dollar Workout Club with his wife, Lynn, and fitness writer Natalie Hodson, and he has been featured on numerous television programs. 2 0 16 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E

In the fall of 2014, Drew came back to Snow College to share his knowledge and encourage the faculty, staff, and students to challenge themselves and set goals. He arrived on campus and invited anyone interested in working out to join him that day. He also talked about making healthy choices and encouraged faculty and students to set goals for that year. In the spring of 2015, he returned to campus to follow up on those goals and motivate the campus to continue with a healthy lifestyle. After spending a year enjoying the unparalleled beauty of Hawaii, Drew and his family have recently returned to Utah, and he is working on another book. “I have more journeys planned for the future that I will document and use to continue to educate the world on living and maintaining a healthy lifestyle,” he said. Drew’s message to anyone who is struggling to change their lifestyle is different than it once was. “First and foremost, you are worth it; you can live a healthy life. Start slowly; take baby steps. Instead of changing everything all at once, which seems impossible, start small. It’s a journey, not a destination.” 27


ALUMNI&GIVING

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It's our chance to give back! By Emilee Blackham Kuchenmeister ('08) Alumni Association President

You’re probably reading this because you have a profound love and appreciation for Snow College and its mission to continue its tradition of excellence. As president of the Alumni Association Board, I have the opportunity to see the influence this school is making on individual students and the life-changing impact that will affect generations. When I read applications and thank you letters from scholarship recipients, I am moved by the stories of actual people with real needs who are truly helped. They see a bright future ahead. Therein is the value of supporting this institution.

Did you know? • Student enrollment in fall of 2015 reached a record high of 5,111 � a 7 percent increase from the previous fall. • The Aspen Institute’s College Excellence Program listed Snow College among its top 150 community colleges. • Snow College continues to have high student success rates, affordable cost for value, and exceptional teaching. Excellence at Snow College is regularly recognized by local and national organizations in many fields, such as teaching quality, academics, employee services, athletics, innovation, inclusion, marketing, and health and science, to name a few. As alumni of Snow College, we can each look back and recognize the excellent foundation we received. We remember with fondness the struggles and the successes we experienced. Now, it is our chance to give back! We can make a difference in the lives of students who might not otherwise have the opportunity to experience the same start in their lives and careers that we enjoyed.

The Alumni Scholarship Endowment Fund was established to provide scholarships for deserving Snow College students. These students have financial need and demonstrate academic excellence, character, and commitment. Last year we awarded our first scholarship, and with your help, we should be able to award at least one full-tuition scholarship each year! There are many ways you can give life-changing financial assistance to students at Snow College. You can give to the Alumni Scholarship fund, or you can provide a scholarship to a student now. Many of you may be like me, still Emilee Kuchenmeister (photo by Katie Gleave) working on building your foundation for a financially secure life. You may have limited resources and feel like your ability to make a difference is small. This is a very valid concern, but please know that small contributions add up to make a big difference. You can set up an automatic annual or monthly donation of just a few dollars. You can have the joy of knowing that you are helping to build the futures of Snow College students. If you cannot give monetary contributions, donating your time is also a valuable way to help Snow College students succeed. Contact the Advancement/Alumni Office for more information about how you can contribute to the success of Snow College and its students. After all, it’s all about the students. And, since they are “our” future, we are also helping ourselves. Call or visit snow.edu/ giving to find out how you can give today! Please sign up for email updates from the Advancement/Alumni Office by sending an email to alumni@ snow.edu. It’s that easy! We’ll send you monthly updates to help you keep in touch with what is happening with the Alumni as well as with the College. I am looking forward to seeing you around campus!

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DISTINGUISHEDALUMNus

JUSTIN OSMOND

“I may have a hearing loss, but that hearing loss does not have me.”

Sharing Determination and Inspiration for All to Hear By Lurlynn Potter

Throughout his life, Justin A. Osmond (’99) has learned that persistence pays off, family support makes a difference, and nothing is impossible. Despite living with a 90 percent hearing loss that put him a couple of years behind his peers academically, Justin pressed forward. It is his tenacity and cheerful demeanor that makes him extraordinary. Because he has overcome difficult challenges, he can speak to those who struggle in a way that is truly inspirational. Justin’s hearing challenges have been turned into a strength of character that is evidenced by every aspect of his life. One example is music. Imagine being born into a very musical family (Justin is the second son of Merrill Osmond, lead singer of the world-renowned Osmond Family) and being told by teachers and professionals that you would never play a musical instrument. Justin proved the experts wrong by learning to play the violin, viola, piano, and drums, and by receiving the prestigious Sterling Scholar award, an award given to outstanding Utah high school seniors, in music.

Justin and Kristi Osmond

After high school, Justin enrolled at Snow College. He shared a poignant moment he experienced at Snow College that had a profound impact on his life: “I had a musical and academic scholarship while I attended [Snow College]. I played the viola in the Snow College orchestra. … I went into one of the practice rooms of the old musical building where each room was separated by heavy curtains. In the room next door, there were lots of brass instruments playing and it was so loud that I couldn’t hear myself practice. So a thought came to mind. I took my 30

hearing aids out! That got rid of the loud brass sounds and it was nice and quiet. “Then, I experienced and discovered something that forever changed my life. I put my viola up next to my chin bone and started to play. Through the vibrations, I could hear every note that I played as long as I stayed in the low frequencies. From that day on, I realized that I could play the violin and viola by feeling the musical notes. … It was so neat to be able to shut out all the outside noise and be able to focus and laser in on my own musical talent and abilities.” After graduating from Snow College, Justin earned a bachelor’s degree from Utah State University, and an MBA in marketing and public relations from Western Governors University. He has dedicated his time and talents to speaking for those who cannot hear. At the age of 39, Justin is CEO/founder of Olive Osmond Hearing Fund; president of O2 Events & Productions; author of the inspirational book, Hearing with my Heart; a motivational speaker; founder of The Hearing Fund UK; and a former board member and spokesperson for Starkey Hearing Foundation outreach program, which is the largest outreach program S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E | 2 0 16


in providing hearing help to children worldwide. Justin has hosted many fundraisers in the form of talent shows, live musical productions, gala events, school fundraisers, firework celebrations, marathons, and other running events – raising enough money to help thousands of children around the world have better hearing.

Above: Justin helps a boy in Guatemala who is receiving hearing aids for the first time. Below: Each year, Justin's foundation serves thousands of people from around the world.

Justin is also a family man who resides with his wife, Kristi, in the mountains of Ephraim. He loves four-wheeling with his family and friends, camping, hunting, and spending time in the outdoors. Justin lives every day by his personal motto, “I may have a hearing loss, but that hearing loss does not have me.” He tells people: “You may have a particular challenge that you are trying to overcome, and that is perfectly okay, but don’t let those challenges have you. We are in control of our own dreams and aspirations in life. Our challenges don’t define us; it is just the other way around. We define our challenges and who we really are and what we become.” In recognition of his determination and service to others, the Snow College Alumni Association has selected Justin to be a recipient of the 2016 Distinguished Alumnus Award. He will be honored during Homecoming, October 14-15. 2 0 16 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E

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DISTINGUISHEDALUMNUS

Charles Pugh Paying it forward By Lurlynn Potter

Small towns continually turn out people of high caliber and character, like Charles Edward Pugh (’85). Born in Cedar City, he spent his youth on the islands of Tonga and in Blanding, Utah, where his father was an educator. He earned awards such as Sterling Scholar, senior class president, and National Honor Society president. He served an LDS mission in Pennsylvania, where he served as assistant to the president. In 1984, Cless Young, who later worked in Snow College’s counseling office and as an associate professor, arranged for Charles to receive an academic/ leadership scholarship to Snow College, where had the opportunity to serve as an Inter-Club Council member. Charles also earned the Outstanding Chemistry Student award and was listed in Who’s Who Among Students in American Junior Colleges while attending Snow. Snow College is where Charles met the love of his life, Jolene Beazer (’86). They met in the L.D. Singers group. He learned that she was taking a chemistry class, so he joined the class halfway through the year, and the rest is history. “When you get an Ephraim girl, you are pretty lucky!” Charles mused as he remembered dancing at the old Institute building. When asked what he wanted to be when he grew up, Charles replied: “My father was an educator, so I considered that. I also studied finance and accounting. But, 32

when I attended Snow College, Professor Boyd Beck gave me a taste of chemistry. He is a great educator. He’s brilliant! At that point, I went from business and accounting to earning a pre-med degree in biology … and ended up going into chemical safety.” While reminiscing about his time at Snow, Charles recollected, “Everyone at Snow College, and in Ephraim in general, made you feel like you were home, not just there to get an education.” Of all the many mathematics and chemistry classes he has taken, Charles points to the classes he took at Snow College as the best, and added that he definitely patterned his teaching style at Brigham Young University after Paul Fore and Boyd Beck. They had the gift of making complicated topics understandable; they were funny and to-the-point. Having learned the value of education from his father, Charles did not stop at earning an associate degree in of chemistry and business from Snow College. He earned bachelor’s degrees in both biology and industrial hygiene/public health from Utah State University, and a Master of Science in Public Health from the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of Utah. After BYU recruited Charles to help decommission their nuclear test reactor, he became their chemical hygiene officer and oversaw chemical safety for the entire university. As BYU's first chemical hygiene officer, Charles implemented many safety protocols that are still in place. In addition to teaching as an adjunct professor while at the “Y,” he also taught at the National Safety Council and was a guest lecturer at the University of Utah’s Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health. Charles was also privileged to serve as a risk manager and safety officer at the 2002 Winter Olympics. Twenty years ago, Charles was recruited from BYU to the safety and health department at Worker’s Compensation Fund Insurance (WCF) in Sandy, where he had the opportunity to consult with significant companies in best practices and lab management. Among them are O.C. Tanner, the State of Utah, NuSkin, and even Snow College. Charles is currently senior vice president of S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E | 2 0 16


Left: Charles and Jolene with their five children. Below: Charles loves the outdoors: he and his family enjoy hiking, camping, fishing, and riding ATVs.

claims at WCF. Charles points to his chemical safety background, which began at Snow, as being very helpful in understanding underlying issues, analytics, and other highly data-driven reports. Charles and Jolene live in Spanish Fork and have one daughter, four sons, and seven grandsons. They love being together as a family, and they enjoy outdoor activities, such as sporting events, camping, fishing, riding ATVs, and hiking. Charles also enjoys woodworking, building, and working in his yard.

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Charles loves to serve and be involved in the community. He has worked for many years with youth groups and served in leadership positions in his church. He has served as president of the American Industrial Chapter for the State of Utah and on institutional and curriculum review committees for the University of Utah and BYU. He also serves on the board for Junior Achievement of Utah and volunteers with Neuroworx � a foundation that provides rehabilitation for those with spinal and brain injuries. He is full of positivity and feels very blessed. This is easy to see in his life’s motto: “If it is to be, it is up to me!” The Snow College Alumni Association recognizes Charles’ ability to rise to the top of every situation he has found himself in. He has been selected as a recipient of the 2016 Distinguished Alumnus Award and will be honored during Homecoming, October 14-15.

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ALUMNiSPOTLIGHT J. Boyd Grant 1951-1953 A native of American Falls, Idaho, J. Boyd Grant (’53) played football, basketball, and baseball at Snow College. “A lot of my success started with Snow College and my opportunities there,” he said. “Coach [Jim] Williams gave me a chance to be successful; I wouldn’t have had the career I did without him.” Boyd continued playing basketball at Colorado State University (CSU). He earned All-Skyline Conference honors in 1956 and 1957. After receiving a degree in physical education, Boyd coached at Mountain View High School in Wyoming. In 1961, he returned to CSU as an assistant coach under Coach Williams and completed his master’s degree. After 11 years, he relocated to the University of Kentucky and then to the College of Southern Idaho (CSI), where he eventually became head coach. Under Boyd’s guidance, CSI won the 1976 National Junior College Championship. Boyd’s success caught the attention of California State University, Fresno. In his first season as head coach, the team achieved an impressive 21-6. They also won three Western Athletic Conference (WAC) championships, made three NCAA Tournament appearances, and won the 1983 National Invitation Tournament Championship. Boyd then returned to CSU, winning two WAC titles and making two appearances at the NCAA Tournament. He retired from coaching in 1991 and held administrative positions at CSI before officially retiring in 1996. He currently lives with his wife, Mary Jean, in Pocatello, Idaho, where he golfs, enjoys traveling, and keeps tabs on the teams he coached during his monumental career.

Kirk Dahlke 1962-1964 Kirk Dahlke ('64) was a powerhouse athlete at Snow College. He arrived with a football scholarship, but he found the most success on the wrestling mat. Kirk went undefeated his freshman year, finishing the year as the conference champion. He finished his sophomore year as conference runner-up. Kirk was a member of the S-Club, a campus club for athletes. “In the S-Club we used to play what we called ‘Idaho basketball,’ where you had to wear a boxing glove on your right hand and try to play basketball,” he said. “You sure didn’t want to keep that ball long; you would get clobbered!” At Utah State University, Kirk continued wrestling and received his degree in education. He coached and taught at various Idaho schools, eventually settling at American Falls High School, where he remained until he retired in 2005. Kirk was inducted into the Idaho High School Activities Association Hall of Fame in 2006. He was described as “demonstrating a deep concern for the welfare of his students and athletes, and was a positive influence in the lives of countless young men and women.” After retirement, Kirk taught at an alternative high school until he chose to stay home and take care of his wife Berdean. They have six children, and Kirk is a proud grandfather. Berdean passed away in 2013, and Kirk recently remarried. He and his wife Jo had been friends for years. Kirk enjoys hunting and fishing. He recently took a fishing trip to Alaska with his sons, which he described as “wonderful, one of those bucket list kind of experiences.”

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Kevin White 1984-1986 “We are a little grayer and a little wider, but the relationships and the stories remain strong,” Kevin White (‘86) said about his 1985 National Junior College Athletic Association National Champion football teammates. “There was such trust and respect amongst everyone on the team that we knew each person was going to do their job. And while many of us went on to four-year schools, many of us still consider Snow College as our alma mater.” Kevin played quarterback for Snow College from 1984 to 1986. As a student, he also had the opportunity to write an article for one of the local newspapers each week called “In the Pocket,” a sports article from the perspective of the athlete.

Debra Willardson 1971-1973 Although there weren’t official leagues for women’s athletics during Debra Willardson’s ('73) time at Snow College, she played volleyball, basketball, and softball for the Women’s Intercollegiate Athletic Association (WIA). Deb recalled: “I saw a notice for volleyball tryouts in the cafeteria. … I remember telling the coach, Ann Bricker, ('68) that I didn’t think I would have time for sports [and academics]. … She assured me I could do both, and she was right.” At the 1973 National Junior College Tournament, the basketball team placed eighth in the nation. Deb was recognized as the top rebounder in the league and was also named as one of the nation’s outstanding college athletes. Deb continued playing volleyball and basketball at Utah State University and, due to injuries, met with the men’s athletic trainer. She was only allowed to meet with him after hours because women weren’t allowed in the training room. She took what she was learning from her treatments and began taking care of teammates’ injuries, and the trainer encouraged her to join a new athletic training program for women.

Kevin describes his time on the team as “one of the great thrills of my life.” Following his time at Snow, he completed his education at Utah State University. Kevin spent 17 years in sales, marketing, and business development with a variety of high-tech “There was such trust and respect companies before amongst everyone on the team.” returning to Snow College as athletic director in 2008, a post he held for two years. He is currently working as vice president at InsideSales.com, a startup, cloud-based tech firm. Kevin and his wife, Tessa, who works for Vivint Solar, currently make their home in Alpine. They have six children, three of whom also attended Snow College, continuing the family legacy.

Deb was the first woman accepted into the program and the first female athletic trainer hired by the University of Utah. Over the years she acted as trainer for all university sports, eventually being specifically assigned to women’s volleyball and basketball. She was also the graduate supervisor and associate director of sports medicine. In 2013, she received the Linda K. Amos Award for Distinguished Service to Women. Deb retired from the University of Utah after 36 years and is an avid fly fisher; she also enjoys reading and mountain biking.

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ALUMNiSPOTLIGHT Casey Cooke Sundquist 1999-2001 In the last seconds of the Scenic West Athletic Conference (SWAC) championship game, Casey Cooke Sundquist (’01) hit an outstanding three-pointer, ensuring a win for the Badgers. “The most special things about my time at Snow would have to be creating those friendships with my teammates and going through everything we went through together,” Casey said, “the good times and the hard times. The amazing coaches we had pushed us to our limits and further. It seriously was the best two years of my life, and I wouldn’t trade it for anything.”

Olin Hannum 1998-2000 1998-99 Badger Quarterback Olin Hannum ('00) said of his first impression of Snow College: “Head Coach Mike Empey sat all of us down and said, ‘Play your best and you are going to play. If you are good, I’ll get you a scholarship.’ I had never seen that; there wasn’t any pre-judgment, just do your best and you’ll get what you deserve. And we did, they got the best out of all of us. That was so impressive to me.” With this encouragement from Coach Empey, Olin became a star on the field, throwing for 3,378 yards and 25 touchdowns. He led the nation in passing at the junior college level and was named an All-American during the 1999 season. Raised in a rodeo family in Plain City, Utah, he followed up his time at Snow College playing football for North Carolina State University. He now finds himself excelling in a different field, the rodeo arena.

Originally from Parowan, Casey was a member of the Snow College Women’s Basketball Team in 1999 and 2000, which won the SWAC Championship both years. In her sophomore year, Casey was co-captain, an All-Conference player, player of the year, and MVP of the SWAC Tournament. After graduating from Snow, she played at Southern Utah University and was named an All-Conference player. After graduating from SUU, Casey coached at Canyon View High School in Cedar City and Grantsville High School in Grantsville. She was also an assistant coach at SUU and Snow College. Casey then took the position of head coach at Timpview High School in Provo, where her team made it to the state championships. In 2015, Casey was inducted into the Snow College Athletic Hall of Fame. Casey and her husband, Troy, are now keeping busy with two young boys at their home in Cedar City.

Competing in steer wrestling and tie-down roping, Olin has had a remarkable career. He has qualified for the Wilderness Circuit finals every year since 2004 and has won three times. He has also won at the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas, the Pendleton Round-Up, the Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo, and the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, which includes the top 15 rodeo athletes in the world. Olin lives in Idaho with his wife, (Natalie Whipple, '01) and their two young daughters. When he isn’t competing, he builds custom cabinets and is a cattle rancher.

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Tell us

your story

Badgers!

Casey Cooke Sundquist 1999-2001

Breon Allen 2011-2013 Breon Allen (‘13) was a National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) First Team All-American running back during his sophomore year at Snow College. He led the nation in running yards and touchdowns with 1,632 yards and 20 touchdowns; he was named Western States Football League Offensive Player of the Year, and was a finalist for the NJCAA Player of the Year. Breon helped lead the Badgers to an 11-1 record and a third-place national ranking. He is Snow College’s all-time leading rusher, with 2,404 yards. Originally from Daytona Beach, Florida, Breon adjusted well to the Utah winters and beautiful mountains. “Snow taught me so much and gave me so much. I cried, laughed, loved, hated, failed, and ultimately succeeded,” he said. “Most importantly to me, I made some lifelong friends during my time at Snow. It will always hold a special place in my heart and Ephraim will forever be a part of me.” Breon fondly remembers the things he learned both in and out of the classroom. “I also am proud to say that I learned how to do the Haka [a traditional Maori war dance]!”

We want to hear about you, your family,

you career, and your adventures! Send us a brief update, including the years you attended Snow College and any certificates or degrees you earned. Did you continue your education after Snow? Have you received a recognition or had a life–changing experience? Share your story at alumni@snow.edu We want to know about you! Please include an updated photo.

Breon transferred to East Carolina University, where he led the team in rushing yards and achieved honor-roll status. A torn knee ligament during Breon’s senior year put his playing career in jeopardy. “The recovery process was very trying and testing for me, but at the same time, it showed me a lot about myself. It wasn’t easy that’s for sure, but it was worth it,” said Breon. As soon as he was able, he returned to football. He served as a graduate assistant coach for running backs at Minot State University in North Dakota and currently plays running back for the Colorado Crush, a professional indoor football team. 2 0 16 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E

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40UNDER40

These 40 Distinguished Young Alumni honorees were selected by the Snow College Alumni Association as representing alumni under 40 years old who have accomplished a noteworthy level of personal and professional achievement following attendance at Snow College.

Hannah Allred '11

Caleb Anderson ‘08

Dan Arnoldson ‘07

Christy Austin ‘05

Matt Averett ‘07

Registered Nurse University of Utah Kolff Dialysis Center

Principal Owner Anderson Investment Properties, LLC

Region Safety Mgr. Staker & Parson Companies

Teacher Jordan School District

Senior Account Development Mgr. Domo Inc.

Jeremy Beal ‘99

Blake Bench ‘03

Sarah Branca ‘09

Holden Brown ‘10

Brian Dalley ‘04

Operations Manager Keen Impressions

Loan Officer First Colony Mortgage

Program Manager University of Utah School of Business

MBA, MD Candidate University Of Utah School of Medicine

Director of Engineering Casino Game Maker, Inc.

Christopher Dodge ‘13

David Durrant, Ph.D. ‘99

Scott Ericson ‘02

Joshua Findlay ‘14

Preston Hadley ‘11

Coach, Sales Associate Skyridge High School Football, Under Armour

Postdoctoral Fellow National Cancer Institute

Deputy Commissioner Utah Department of Agriculture and Food

Assistant Manager Big 5 Sporting Goods

Assistant Football Coach-Cornerbacks Santa Ana College

Spencer Harman ‘04

Luke Harrison ‘04

Brady Jones ‘09

Steve Kjar ‘01

Jake Knighton ‘02

Product Manager Sling TV

District Manager Vivint Solar

Branch Manager Nexeo HR

Design Engineer Thermo Fisher Scientific

Gym Owner/USA Weightlifting Coach/ Radiologic Technologist

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Tim Larsen ‘97

Trace Larsen ‘00

Joey Mack ‘05

Zack Miller ‘04

Mark Olson ‘07

Attorney at Law Diaz & Larsen

Director of Operations Utah Disaster Kleenup

Senior Talent Acquisitions Manager Microsoft

Chief Nursing Officer Banner Health

Business Applications Manager Intermountain Healthcare

Shane Osmond ‘01

Joshua Papenfuss ‘98

Aaron Peterson ‘00

Kiley Sanders ‘10

Josh Schiffman ‘03

Director of Hearing Health Care My Hearing Centers

CEO Owner/Operator Wild Horse Xpress

Western Account Manager Barnet Products Corp.

Partner Sanders Logging LLP

Chief Sales Officer Sage Pest Control

Andy Stephens ‘05

Cameron Stewart ‘99

Carolyn Sutherland ‘15

Jacob Thomas ‘09

Jessi Vigil ‘14

Director of Admissions Stevens-Henager College

Executive Vice President, Sales eFileCabinet

Operations Manager HomeCare Answers

Ph.D. Graduate Fellow Idaho State University

Therapeutic Recreational Technician Richfield Care Center

Photo not INCLUDED Benjamin Curtis ‘04 EMT Paramedic

Michael Turner ‘03 Electrical Engineer Intermountain Power Service Corporation

Matthew Watts ‘09

Jacob Webb ‘13

Brandon Wright ‘03

Chief Operating Director Freedom Trade Group

GSC Engineer II-Palo Alto Networks Dimension Data

Executive Director of Admissions and Recruitment Southern Utah University

Previous honorees can be found in the SnowCollege Magazine archive. 2 0 16 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E

Visit our website:

snow.edu/advancement/alumni to see previous issues.

If you would like to nominate someone for this recognition, please contact the Snow College Alumni Office at 435-283-7062 or alumni@snow.edu.

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Leave YOUR Legacy Please consider a charitable bequest for Snow College students today. Many of our scholarship endowment funds have been established with estate gifts from our caring friends. You can leave a legacy at Snow College through a provision in your estate plan. You can structure the bequest to leave a specific amount of cash, securities, or property; make the gift contingent on certain events; or leave a percentage of your estate to benefit students. A charitable bequest is flexible and versatile and also offers these benefits:

Simplicity

Just a few sentences in your will or trust are all that are needed. The official legal bequest language for Snow College is: “I, [name], of [city, state, ZIP], give, devise and bequeath to the Snow College, a body politic and corporate of the State of Utah, [written amount or percentage of the estate or description of property] for its unrestricted use and purpose.”

OCTOBER 15

Tax Relief

If your estate is subject to estate tax, your gift is entitled to an estate tax charitable deduction for the gift’s full value. You can designate the program or area where you would like your gift to make a difference. Individuals who include the College in their estate plans are invited to become members of our Heritage Club. The Heritage Club is a special group that recognizes donors who have made known their thoughtful gift intentions through an estate provision, regardless of the amount. Heritage Club membership is offered to all individuals who notify us of provisions through any of the following estate planning methods: • A bequest in a will or living trust • A charitable gift annuity • A charitable remainder trust • A gift of a life insurance policy • Designation of Snow College as the beneficiary of a retirement plan • A remainder interest gift of a home or condominium For more information about joining the Heritage Club or making a planned gift to Snow College, please contact Rosie Connor at 435-283-7061 or via email at giving@snow.edu.

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GOLDEN BADGER REUNION

1976 FOOTBALL REUNION TAILGATE PARTY • PARADE

FOOTBALL GAME ALUMNI BBQ • 5K snow.edu/alumni/advancement/ alumni/homecoming.html

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FOUNDATIONNEWS

NEW FOUNDATION BOARD MEMBERS

additional leaders bring their expertise and influence to raise funds for students Founded in 1982, the Snow College Foundation is dedicated to the philanthropic support of Snow College. The Foundation provides support through the development of charitable giving, creating community awareness. The Snow College Foundation Board of Directors is a volunteer group of community leaders and alumni. Recently, the Snow College Foundation added the following new members to the board: Jared Eldridge has been serving as the elected Juab County attorney since 2003. Jared was raised in Topeka, Kansas, and attended Brigham Young University. He attended law school in Oregon. Jared worked as a public defender in Salt Lake County for two years and then served two years with the Utah County Public Defender Association. He now resides in Nephi with his wife and family. His wife, Melanie (Aagaard), is a 1989 graduate of Snow College. Mark Geiselmayr is a veteran of the technology industry and has served in executive leadership roles for small, medium, and large corporations for over 25 years. After graduating from Alta High School, where he met his wife, Jodee, he attended the University of Utah, where he played football and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in organizational communication. During his career, Mark has worked in Sanpete County; Salt Lake City; Scottsdale, Arizona; and Seattle, Washington. The Geiselmayrs relocated to Ephraim in 2009, and two of their three children graduated from Snow College. Even though Mark and Jodee are relative newcomers to Sanpete County, they feel a deep connection to the area as their ancestors were among the earliest settlers. Roger Thompson is currently a licensed broker in Utah, a commissioner of the Housing Authority of Salt Lake City, and president of the Utah Symphony Conductor’s Circle Advisory Council. Roger earned a bachelor’s

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degree in history from Yale University and a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Utah’s S.J. Quinney College of Law. Roger served an LDS church mission in Germany and has also served on the Salt Lake City Council and the Salt Lake City Board of Education. Roger loves to sing and was a member of the Yale Whiffenpoofs, the Yale Glee Club, and the Yale Alley Cats. He is also an avid tennis player and can be found on the court many mornings. He and his wife, Colleen, enjoy spending time with their family, which now includes 16 grandchildren. Brent M. Thorne ('63) retired in 2010 after serving in public education for 42 years, including 25 years as a school district superintendent. He is married and has six children and 10 grandchildren. As a young man, he served an LDS mission in the New England states. He later served a mission with his wife, Janis, in the Pacific island nation of Kiribati. Brent attended Snow College and Weber College on football scholarships, graduated from Utah State in 1968, and received a master’s degree in education leadership from BYU in 1978 and a Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut in 1984. He also served in the U.S. Army Reserves for six years. Currently, Brent and Janis are ordinance workers in the LDS Manti Temple.

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PRESIDENT'sCLUB

President's club luncheon MAY 11, 2016

The President’s Club is a special circle of friends and alumni who share a passion for, and pride in, Snow College. It is Snow College’s most prestigious donor club. Members are donors who make an annual contribution of $1,000 or more, and commit to do so every year. Among other benefits, President’s Club members enjoy an annual recognition event and social occasions with the President, membership in Snow College/Palisade Gold Club, and priority access in purchasing tickets for performing arts and sporting events. This annual event is President Carlston’s way of thanking those who truly help Snow College to move forward.

Top: (left to right): President’s Club member Keith Nielsen (’64), President’s Club and Foundation Board member Michael Carlston (’66), and Foundation Board member Roger Thompson. Bottom left: President Carlston warmly greeted every attendee. Bottom right: Students Summer Bell and Caydin Bell provided music while other students spoke about the value of scholarships.

To learn about how you can become a member of the President's Club, visit snow.edu/give. 42

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E

PRE S

W C LLE O

G

SN O

B LU

ENT’S C ID

The President’s Club is a special circle of friends and alumni sharing a passion for and pride in Snow College. Membership in the club includes donors who make an annual contribution of $1,000 or more. For more information on the President’s Club, please contact the Snow College Foundation at 435-283-7060. Theressa Alder Anonymous (3)

Dr. Betty Mikkelsen & Mr. John Mikkelsen

Douglas Lee Barton

C. Meeks & Lawana T. Morrell Family Trust

Steven D. and Marjorie Bennion

Mrs. Myrtle Fitzgerald Munk

Eric and Chandra Bergeson

Dr. and Mrs. Richard and Lori Nay

Leonard M. and Laura Blackham

Keith C. and Beverly Nielsen

Mr. and Mrs. Greg M. Bosshardt

David and Judy Parrish

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Bushnell

Waldemar E. and Harriet Rasmussen

Flora and David Carlston

Mark and LeAnn Stoddard

President Gary L. and Janet Carlston

Roger H. and Colleen K. Thompson

Michael and Linda Carlston Family Rosie Connor and Larry Griffeth Mark Andrew and Karla Coombs Eddie L. and Lesa A. Cox Iven Branch and Dinah Cox Randy and Claudean Cox Mr. Kyle T. Day Lavon, Marianne, and Kevin Day Russell and Barbara Fjeldsted Mark and Jodee Geiselmayr Mr. Robert M. Graham Afton M. Hansen Dr. Matthew L. Hansen Hogan Family Trust Mark and Debbie Howard Mr. R. Kent Johnson Mr. Mark Jones Ms. Leslie C. Keisel Mr. and Mrs. Vance E. Larsen Nathan Leigh

The Heritage Club is a distinctive group of friends who carry on a tradition of philanthropy at Snow College through including the College in their estate plans. The College extends its warm appreciation to these individuals, who make known their thoughtful gift intentions through charitable bequests, life income plans, insurance gifts and charitable trusts. For more information on the Heritage Club, please contact the Snow College Foundation at 435-283-7060. Dee Anderson* Mr. and Mrs. Elliot J. Anderson Eva Beal Anderson* Anonymous Kari Arnoldsen Roger and Pamela Baker Mr. and Mrs. Morris O. Casperson Gerald G. Cazier* Randy and Claudean Cox Mr. and Mrs. Roy L. Crouch Gerald J. and LuAnn Day Debra Gardner Ms. Cynthia Henningson Loree T. Hickman* Mr and Mrs. David Higham Seth and Maurine Horne* Mark J. and Debbie Howard Marsha Anne Hunter Irwin* Dr. Claudia P. Jarrett Bruce and Larue Jennings* Glen Larson* Mr. and Mrs. Phillip M. Murray Melvin R. Olsen* Mr. and Mrs. Bruce and Kathy Peterson Mr. Jack F. Peterson Lucy A. Phillips* Jewell J. and Dorothea LaRue Jensen Rasmussen* Mrs. Marjorie Riley* Lynn F. and Karen Schiffman Mr. Lloyd Smith* Mark and LeAnn Stoddard Dr. James A. and Kristine Tatton Ethelyn Peterson Taylor* Leland and Phyllis Thompson Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Wheeler James Armount Willardsen* Leona E. Wilson* Fern Young* *Deceased

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LEGACYGIVING

Marsha Anne Hunter Irwin (1942 - 2015)

The Snow College Foundation honors the legacy of Marsha Anne Hunter Irwin ('62), who passed away last October. Prior to her passing, she made provisions for Snow College in her estate plan. The funds designated by Marsha have been used to establish a scholarship fund in her name to benefit Snow College athletes in the second or third year of their education who are working toward completion of their degree. Marsha was born in Lehi to Geraldine Thomson and Lynn O. Hunter. Marsha's mother, Geraldine, graduated from Snow College in 1937, and her aunt Elaine Thomson ('41) was the first female student body president at Snow College. Her grandparents Thomas Leonard and Ester Thomson lived in Ephraim. The family home was located right across the street from the Noyes Building where the LDS Institute currently stands. Marsha loved Ephraim and spent much time here during her youth. After she graduated from American Fork High School, Marsha attended Snow College. While attending Snow, Marsha stayed with her mother and grandparents in Ephraim. She wrote for the Snowdrift, participated in dance, theatre, and Gold Key, and was head cheerleader. Marsha’s only sister,

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Vicki Pedler, also attended Snow College for one year (1967-68) and met her husband during this time. After graduating, Marsha enrolled at the University of Utah, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in business and finance. Marsha enjoyed a long and successful banking career with Wells Fargo in the San Francisco Bay area. She moved to Salt Lake City in 1978, where she worked as an Investment Portfolio Manager for First Security Bank. Marsha married Scott Irwin in July of the following year. She later retired from Avaya Telecommunications. After retiring, she returned to work several more years as a systems engineer for Select Portfolio. Marsha and Scott loved to ski and spent much time with friends and family on the slopes of Alta. Marsha put the same amount of drive, enthusiasm, and passion in serving others as she did in her career. She was a member of the Utah Ski Archives Board for 15 years, serving as the logistics chair at the time of her death. Over the years, she contributed to 14 Ski Affair events and raised more than $500,000. She had recently been named recording secretary for the Assistance League of Salt Lake City. Marsha was also an accomplished violinist and was a member of the Wasatch Community Symphony Orchestra. An avid reader, she served on the Friends of the Marriott Library board for many years and had chaired the group since 2012 until the time of her death. Vicki said that although Marsha grew up during the ‘50s, she was an independent and accomplished career woman who owned her own home before she married. She loved to drive her Porsche and was known as a smart, powerful role model of grace, independence, and achievement, especially to her seven nieces and nephews. Marsha valued education. This new scholarship fund will honor Marsha Irwin’s legacy as well as her dedication to education and her love for Snow College.

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INMEMORIAM

Jan 1 – May 31, 2016 ALUMNI* Donald Carlyle Crawford 1943 – Feb. 15, WA Shirley Rae (Nielson) Kilgore 1944 – Mar. 4, CO Vera Jean (Anderson) Olsen 1944 – Jan. 23, UT DelMar Gardner 1948 – May 25, UT

David Wayne Roper – Mar. 20, UT Charlie Sefita – Apr. 30, UT Craig Marlow Young – Feb. 19, UT

FRIENDS

Carl G. Bown 1949 – May 1, UT

James Forsey – May 5, UT

Mary Dean (Stringham) Durrant 1949 – Apr. 5, UT

Bob G. Jensen – Feb. 6, UT

Frank Ray Tidwell 1950 – Mar. 23, UT

George Wilford Johansen – Feb. 26, UT

Lewis Farrell Monsen 1954 – May 10, UT

Bradley Thomas Johnson – May 13, UT

Kent Leon Anderson 1955 – Mar. 6, UT

Richard Wagner Jones – May 7, UT

Richard Calvin Goddard 1955 – Mar. 1, UT

Fred Stahmann Matley – Feb. 23, UT

Robert Lawrence “Larry” Royce 1961 – May 29, UT

Cherie Mae (Middaugh) Pauley – Apr. 26, GA

Rex Wright 1961 – Feb. 21, UT

Molly Elizabeth Peterson – May 27, UT

Robert Glen Rasmussen 1963 – May 29, UT

Norine (Call) Peterson – May 10, UT

William Robert “Bill” Anderson 1968 – Jan. 27, UT

Lloyd Victor Smith – Feb. 18, UT

Rawlin Reed Jacobson 1968 – Mar. 24, UT

Marilyn (Poulton) Smith – Feb. 29, UT

Carey Lee Naylor 1983 - Mar. 14, UT

Don J. Strong – May 6, UT

Marilyn Pederson 1987 – Jan. 6, UT

Merrill Larsen Wilson – Mar. 3, UT

Emily (Cook) Dyches 1997 – Feb. 29, UT

Marion Young – May 10, UT

ATTENDEES Daniel Dean Anderson – Mar. 1, UT Jarvis Lynn Anderson – Apr. 1, UT Doyle Barrett – Apr. 11, UT Paul Vincent Brennan – May 6, UT Kimberly Curtis – Mar. 16, UT David Johnson – Mar. 18, UT Michael Peterson – Apr. 6, UT Scott Samuel Richardson – Jan. 22, UT

2 0 16 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E

*Listed by graduation year Please contact the Advancement Office to notify us of alumni who have passed away. Phone: 435-283-7060 Email: alumni@snow.edu Mail: Snow College Advancement Office 150 College Ave, Box 1033 Ephraim, UT 84627 Please visit our “In Memoriam” web page for a list of previous acknowledgments: snow.edu/advancement/alumni/inmemoriam.html.

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ANNUALDONORREPORT

$50,000 AND UP $25,000$49,999 $10,000$24,999 $5,000-9,999

Brent L. Brown Jerry Burns Central Valley Medical Center Randy and Claudean Cox George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation Intermountain Power Agency Roy and Anne Morgan Jespersen

Mark and LeAnn Stoddard Verla A. Sorensen U.S. Department of Education U.S Department of Labor Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance James and Shannon Young

100,000 Strong in the Americas Innovation Fund Birrell Bottling Company CAF - Development Bank of Latin America Centracom Interactive Mark and Debbie Howard The Marsha Irwin Trust National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Waldemar E. and Harriet Rasmussen U.S Department of Agriculture U.S. Small Business Administration I.J. and JeannÉ Wagner Charitable Foundation SENA – Servicio Nacional de Aprendizaje Walmart Foundation Washington State University

Anonymous Barney Trucking Eric and Chandra Bergeson President Gary L. and Janet Carlston Michael and Linda Carlston Family Robert Lloyd Corkin Charitable Foundation Eddie L. and Lesa A. Cox Iven Branch and Dinah Cox Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund

Afton M. Hansen The Estate of Seth and Maurine Horne The Estate of Glen Larson North Sanpete School District South Sanpete School District The STEM Action Center U.S. Department of Homeland Security Wells Fargo Foundation

Belliston Family Foundation Cache Valley Bank Alison Kowalski Evelyn G. Langford Nathan Leigh Dr. Betty Mikkelsen & Mr. John Mikkelsen Keith C. and Beverly Nielsen Dennis and Joan Norton Family Foundation

46

The Snow College Donor Report is produced by the Snow College Foundation in conjunction with the Snow College Office of Advancement. Every effort has been made to present an accurate donor listing from July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2016. If your name has been omitted or erroneously listed, we sincerely apologize and ask that you advise us so we may correct our records. You can contact the Snow College Foundation at 435-283-7060.

Dave and Judy Parrish Principal Financial Group Snow College Emeriti Constitution Utah NASA Space Grant Consortium Zions Bank

$1,000-4,999 Theressa Alder Anonymous

Barclay Mechanical Boyd R. and Sandra Beck Beneficial Financial Group Steven D. and Marjorie Bennion Leonard M. and Laura Blackham Mrs. Geaneen W. Blauer Dr. Greg M. Bosshardt Burn's Saddlery Mr. and Mrs. Scott Bushnell Flora and David Carlston

S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E | 2 0 16


Mr. and Mrs. David A. Christensen Kay and Diane Christensen Eric J. Church Rosie Connor and Larry Griffeth Mr. Kyle T. Day Lavon, Marianne, and Kevin Day Ephraim City Ephraim City Lions Club Russell F. and Barbara Fjeldsted Mark and Jodee Geiselmayr Mr. Robert M. Graham Dr. Matthew L. Hansen Hey Gang Holdings, LLC Mr. R. Kent Johnson Ms. Lauren Matthews C. Meeks & Lawana T. Morrell Family Trust Dr. and Mrs. Richard and Lori Nay Kathleen Peterson Questar Corporation Mr. Robert Ratcliffe Rocky Mountain Power Foundation Mr. Jeff Savage Skyline Family Chiropractic, LLC Sons of Utah Pioneers, Sanpete Chapter Roger H. and Colleen K. Thompson TRB Rock Products, LLC Utah Community Credit Union Utah Department of Heritage and Arts U.S. Department of Justice Western Clay Company Richard and Rolayne White Mr. Monte J. Willardsen

$250-999

Mr. and Mrs. Chris and Becky Adams Mr. Steven G. Allred Linda Allred Anonymous (3) Ms. Lucinda Averett Bailey Farms Douglas Lee Barton Best Western Richfield Ms. Brooke Bown Mr. and Mrs. Paul and Michelle Brown Mr. and Mrs. Perry S. Bruno Mr. Craig W. Buchanan Mr. and Mrs. Stephen and Patsy Daniels Mr. and Mrs. Jake D. Dettinger Ms. Sinnali Dittli EconoLodge Salina Extreme Fitness Mr. and Mrs. Dennis and Renee Faatz Mr. and Mrs. Chris and Diane Gardner Mr. Wade M Gee Chris & MarKay Gold Mrs. Sara L. Golding Green Polka Dot Box Congressman James V. Hansen Dr. Steven Hood IFA Ephraim IFA Richfield Mr. and Mrs. Reed and Joy Jarvis Ms. Kay Jensen Mr. and Mrs. Doug Johnson Jorgensen Chevrolet Buick GMC Ms. Cynthia P. Jorgensen Ms. Leslie C. Keisel Jim and Penny Kittelsrud Laird-Rhodes Family

2 0 16 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E

Mr. and Mrs. Karl and Marci Larsen Mr. and Mrs. Vance E. Larsen Mr. Matthew Larson Mr. and Mrs. Matthew S. Lindow Mr. Terry Mackey Mr. and Mrs. Nick L. Marsing Ms. Erma Kaye May Roy and Carol Maynes Family Joan and John McAllister Mr. Michael McLean Mr. Forrest McNeill Merrill Lynch Ms. Elizabeth J Miller Mountainland Supply Co. Mr. and Mrs. A. Shane and Tera Nelson Robert and Kathleen Nielson Northrop Grumman Mr. Tyrel H. Oliver Lynn and Julie Poulson Redmond Trading Company, LC Scott Hay Security National Mortgage Company Franklin C. and Nancy Stewart Super 8 Salina The Community Foundation of Utah TRB Rock Products, LLC Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Wheeler Wheeler Machinery The Estate of Leona E. Wilson Mrs. Carolyn Wyatt Mr. Bret Yardley

$1-249

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas and Diane Adams Ms. Kristi Albright Mrs. Cindy Ann Alder Anonymous (10) All-Tech Electric, Inc. Mr. Phillip Allred Reg Dell Allred Anderson Drug & Floral Mr. and Mrs. Lynn R. Anderson Margie O. Anderson Mr. Mark Anderson Mr. L. Robert Anderson Mrs. April Dawn Anderton Kari Arnoldsen Mr. Wesley D. Arnoldson Mr. and Mrs. Paul Arslanian Mr. David S. Arslanian Mr. Seth C. Baker Barrett's Foodtown Mr. Corey Bastian Baum, LLC Mr. and Mrs. Boyd and Sandra Beck Mr. and Mrs. David N. Beck Ms. Celia Benson Michael T. Benson Mr. Sheryl Benson Donald E. Bittner Mr. David Black Mr. Sam Bodell Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan and Sheryl Bodrero Mr. John Borla Sarah Elizabeth Boucher Mr. Kurt Boyer Mr. and Mrs. Michael T. Brenchley Dean Merrill and Dottie Brereton Brown's Shoes and Boots

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Brown Carol M. Bullock Mrs. Udambor Bumandalai Mr. Trace Burningham Mr. Blake Burt Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. Cahoon Carl H. Carpenter Mrs. Carol Carver Mr. Jim Case Mr. and Mrs. Morris O. Casperson Ms. Elizabeth Cazier Mr. and Mrs. Joseph G. Christensen Mr. Keith V. Church Mr. Ken Ciancone Ms. Taska Marie Clark Keith Cline Coldwell Banker Best Choice Realty, LLC Maude F. Conrad Ms. Leslee Cook Mr. William Cook Mr. and Mrs. David and Sharlene Cornaby Mr. Daniel H. Crandall Ms. Cassandra Cranney Mr. Gary Crowshaw Mr. and Mrs. Alan L. Curtis Kirk Dahl Mr. Brent Davis Mr. Bryant Davis Mr. and Mrs. Mark & Lanila Nelson Day Dr. Lynn Cutler and Dianne Dean Mr. Ronald DeBry Mr. Ernest Denison Margie D. Denison Ms. Lisa Dickinson Ms. Sylvia Duke John and Janelle Durrant Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence A. Durtschi, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. David and Bonnie Edwards Mr. and Mrs. Karl Ehrlich Ephraim Family Dental Practice Eye Center of Ephraim, LLC Mr. Donald J. Findlay Mr. M. Garren Findlay Flying M Mr. and Mrs. Armando T. Frutos Mr. and Mrs. David Fullmer Mr. Drew C. Fulmer Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Gardner Mr. Steve Gardner Gem Theatre Mr. Darl S. Gleed Le Ann Goodwin Mr. Terry Goold Mr. and Mrs. Bobby and Robin Gore Mrs. Louise Gosar Mrs. Lynette Olson Graham Mr. Joseph J. Grant Ms. Carol A. Green Kay Buchanan Greene Greener World Sprinkler Marie Gruver Mr. Donald N. Hafen Mr. Kimber R. Hall Mrs. Mary Ann Hall Mr. and Mrs. Dennis E. Hansen Mr. and Mrs. Kerry and Jill Hansen Mrs. Gwenaley Hardy Michael D. Hare Mr. Lew B. Haslam

47


Healing Hearts Herbal Products Mr. and Mrs. Todd and Rebecca Hermansen Ms. Heather Hernandez Mr. and Mrs. John and Elaine Holman Ms. Karen Hopper Houston's Properties Mr. and Mrs. Keith L. and Priscilla B. Huff Ms. Denise Hurst IFA Salina Laree and Robert Jackson Mr. Franklin R. Jensen Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Jensen Edward C. and Lois Jessen Dallas O. and Beverly John Mr. and Mrs. Tracy and Heidi Johnson Mr. Bryant Jones Mr. and Mrs. Michael and Lisa Jones Mrs. Jan Jonson Mr. Douglas Keeler Ms. Rachel L. Keller Ms. Katy Kidd Mr. Richard A. Korth Mr. Karl Kovac Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. Kunz Mr. and Mrs. Randy and Susan Larsen Mr. Michael LeFevre Mr. Jeremy LeFevre Leland's Chevron Michael J. and Linda Lewellen Mr. Troy Lewis Mr. Robert Lopez Ms. Holly Luekenga Claire D. and Dean Lund Cortney Lunt Clisbee H. Lyman Mr. and Mrs. Von and Merrill Madsen Mr. Lance E. Maki Nolan F. and Marian Mangelson Mr. and Mrs. Teri Mason Mr. and Mrs. Russell and Brittany Maxfield Mr. E. Bruce McIff Ms. Stacee McIff McKay & Associates, Inc. McKell Christiansen Wise, PLLC Mr. and Mrs. Gary D. McKenzie Ms. Desiree McQueen Ken McQueen Rodney Brett Merchant Demsey Mills Mom's Cafe Mr. and Mrs. Stephen and Lois Monsen Fernando Montano Mr. Wesley C. Morger Linda Morris Mrs. Lesley D. Muir Mrs. Myrtle Fitzgerald Munk Mrs. Merian A. Murphy Mr. Ronald F. Myers Mr. Dean Nacario J. Bart and Barbara Nelson Ms. Debra H. Nielsen Mr. and Mrs. Blake J. Nielson Bonnie L. and Richard Nielson Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Nielson Mr. and Mrs. Roger and Nyra K. Nielson Mrs. Sherry Nielson Mrs. Shirley Nielson Nielson's Arc Service Mr. William B. Noblett

48

Larry Ross Nordell Ms. Diana Ogden Glen C. and Ida Oldroyd Mr. Parry Olson Ted and Vickie Olson Melanie Orullian Mr. Larry Osborne Mr. and Mrs. Clark Ostergaard Joseph M. Papenfuss Mr. Steven R. Pearson Mr. and Mrs. Elmer and Janet Peterson Mr. and Mrs. Eric and Emily Peterson Mr. and Mrs. Robert Peterson Mr. and Mrs. Wayne and Ardith Peterson Lurlynn Potter Robert L. and Barbara Poulson Mr. Kevin Powell Mr. Matt Ranck Arlan and Clair Rasmussen Mr. and Mrs. Jack J. Rasmussen Mr. Paul G. Rasmussen James Nelson and Suzanne Reeve Mr. Chris D. Reid Mr. Jose L. Renteria Drake Reynolds Mr. Allen T. Riggs Mr. Eric Roberts Mr. Rick Robinson Mr. and Mrs. Dell and Lynette Robison Judith A. and Ronald Rodriguez Abby Rowan Mr. Brent L. Rushton Mr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Rushton Mr. and Mrs. Donald A. Saltzman Sanpete Historical Writing Committee K. Michael Seibt Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Semadeni Benjamin D. and Amanda Semadeni Shamus Haws Horsemanship Mr. and Mrs. Tom Shore Nanette S. Simkins Mr. Stewart Simons Sinclair Gateway 66 Mr. and Mrs. Larry K. Smith Snow Dragon Snowy River Apartments Ms. Ashley Snyder Garth L. Sorenson Mr. and Mrs. Stan Southam Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Squire Stacy Rose Photography Mr. Allan R. Stevens John and Shauna Stevens Mr. Mont Stevenson Ms. Susan Stevenson Mr. Grant Stewart Mr. Micah Strait Mrs. La Nell Stringham Mr. and Mrs. William Stringham Mr. Kevin Sweat Mr. and Mrs. Garth E. Taylor E. Eugene and Leona Terry Mr. Kirk L. Terry Mr. Paul Tew Mrs. Louise B. Tew Thomas' Service and Repair Mr. Scott N. Thomas Mr. and Mrs. Don A. Thompson William Bruce and Afton Thompson

Dr. Brent Thorne Ms. Tiffany A. Tree Ms. Kellyanne Ure Utah Heritage Credit Union Mr. Jed Vandenakker Mr. Bill Vanderbur Ms. Shelley Vroman Mr. Shane Wade Blair N. and Mary Jane Warner Mrs. Becky Welch Stephen R. and Kristen Kim Weller Mr. and Mrs. Doug Wendel Mr. Clifford V. Whatcott John D. and Becky P. Whetten White's Sanitation White's Storage Mr. and Mrs. Max and Susan Whiting Sandy Whiting Mr. and Mrs. Trent J. Whiting Ms. Debra Wilkins Ms. Sequoyah Wilkins Ms. Genette Williams James and Jennifer Parnell Willmore Mr. Craig Willson Ms. Amanda Wood Mr. Myron Workman Mr. Nathan Wright Scott L and Kathy Wyatt YourCause

Snow College Foundation Phone: 435-283-7060 Email: giving@snow.edu

S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E | 2 0 16


We value and appreciate our employee donors. Thank you, employee donors, for making a difference in 2016! Chris & Becky Adams Diane L. Adams Cindy Alder Lynn & Pam Anderson Margie O. Anderson April Anderton Anonymous (24) Kari Arnoldsen Kim & Cindy Averett David N. Beck Ms. Celia Barnes Benson David Black Jonathan & Sheryl Bodrero Greg M. Bosshardt Mr. Dean Brereton Michelle Kavanagh Brown Udambor Bumandalai Gary L. & Janet Carlston Jim Case Keith Church Rosie Marie Connor Leslee Cook Stephen & Patsy Ann Daniels Jake Dettinger David & Lisa Dickinson Sannali Dittli

2 0 16 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A Z I N E

Lawrence & Denise Durtschi Bonnie Edwards Renee Mauche Faatz Armando & Adriana Frutos David Fullmer Diane J. Gardner Paul A. Gardner Chris & MarKay Gold Sara Golding Bobby & Robin Gore Lynette Olson Graham Beckie Hermansen Kevin Holdsworth Steven Hood Doug & Renee Johnson Heidi & Tracy Johnson Mr. Bryant Jones Jay & Danon Jones Lisa Jones Cyndi Jorgensen Jim & Penny Kittelsrud The Laird-Rhodes Family Marci Larsen Susan Larsen Vance & Lorna Larsen Matthew Shawn Lindow

Nick Marsing Stacee & Mark McIff Fernando Montano Robert & Kathleen Nielson Ted & Vickie Olson Joseph Papenfuss Alexander Peterson Eric & Emily Peterson Lurlynn L. Potter Matthew Ranck Allen T. Riggs Eric Roberts Lynette Robison Michael Seibt Mr. & Mrs. Aaron Semadeni Norma Shore Larry Smith Ashley Snyder Mr. & Mrs. Richard Squire John & Shauna Stevens Paul & Rhonda Tew Becky Welch Mr. & Mrs. Steve Weller Mr. & Mrs Doug Wendel Amanda Wood

49


Find Us Online:

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POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Snow College Foundation 150 College Avenue Ephraim, UT 84627

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