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SNOW COLLEGE FALL

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TURNS

Standing on the shoulders of the past, looking forward to the future.

• The History of Snow | pg. 4 • Future and Innovation | pg. 12 • From a Student’s Perspective | pg. 18


4 SNOW COLLEGE MAGAZINE FALL 2013

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Contents President’s Message

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Glen Larson: 1949-2013

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In Memoriam

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Snow College: A Junior College Is Born

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Performing Arts Schedule

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Our Future Is Bright at 125

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Vibrant and Alive: 125th Anniversary Events

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My Experience as a Student at Snow College

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2013 Athletics Update

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Sports Schedules

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Distinguished Alumni

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Alumni Update

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Donor Report

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Publisher

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Cover: Snow College student Kassie Nielson works on chemistry experiments.

Snow College Office of Advancement 150 College Ave Ephraim, UT 84627

Art Direction / Design /Photography Snow College Office of Communications Snow College Magazine is published annually in the Fall by Snow College.

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AND

VISION LEADERSHIP COMMITMENT

A

s we celebrate our 125th anniversary, we find ourselves in the most exciting time in the College’s history. This coming May we will award our first bachelor’s degrees, to a group of music students. Our music program is unique in the state and, as we suspected, is causing at least two Utah universities to develop similar degree opportunities at their schools. Our first four-year degree has created so much interest that several professional musicians came back to Snow College to enroll in our program. And this year, a number of music students transferred to Snow College from large urban universities. While the music program itself is extremely exciting and innovative, it also serves as the most public expression of the excitement and innovation going on in all our departments across both campuses.

Our focused work over the past several years to fine-tune our career and technical education programs, located primarily on our Richfield campus, led the Six County Association of Governments and local economic development officers to recognize us this year for our “vision, leadership, and commitment in developing educational programs that assist in retention and expansion of business and industry within the Six County region.” This local recognition means a great deal to us because we have been working hard to serve local needs. But we are continuing to garner increased national attention as well. There are approximately 1,200 colleges in America that can be described as community, junior, associate, or technical colleges. From this crowd of schools, spread across 50 states, Snow College was ranked ninth in the nation by Washington Monthly magazine and eighth by The Best Schools, an Internet-based college and university ranking service. These are new recognitions that validate last year’s identification by CNN Money of Snow College as the sixth best in the nation, as well as the prestigious Washington, D.C.-based Aspen Institute ranking that placed Snow College in the top 10 percent tier. They all use slightly different criteria, but they all find us at the top. Despite the recgnition and anniversary celebration this year, there will be no resting on our laurels. As the saying goes, “success leads to further success,” and we are just getting going! We are presently engaged in a huge strategic planning effort that will examine every one of our programs. The commitment among our faculty and staff to step up our game is very exciting indeed. And we don’t want to leave you out of the action; please join with us in building opportunities for our students. We welcome your suggestions and, to the extent you are able, donations for scholarships. You should be proud of your school—I sure am!

Scott L Wyatt President

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Glen Larson 1949-201 3

“Glen always amazed me with how caring he was. His heart was always in the right place to help others. He worked hard to get where he was, and he didn’t mind sharing what he had with others. Glen helped so many people that we will never know about because he was never one to talk about it.” -Linda Helsten, Glen’s Sister

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len Sheldon Larson, 63, formerly of Ephraim, passed away at his home in Mexico on July 9, 2013. Glen was born September 3, 1949, in Ephraim, Utah, to Sheldon R. and Gladys P. Larson. Glen served an LDS mission to Finland. He returned to Ephraim and attended Snow College where he received his associate’s degree. While at Snow, he served as student body president and was named Man of the Year in 1969. He went on to attend BYU and the University of Utah, where he graduated with a degree in physical therapy. Glen also proudly served his country as a member of the Army National Guard for six years. Glen was very successful during his lifetime. He opened a physical therapy clinic in San Diego for a short time. He then became an owner/administrator of Country Hills Residential Care and Country Hills Intermediate Care Center in Lemon Grove, California. The latter-named facility was later relocated to El Cajon as Country Hills Health Care Center. Glen loved people. He was very social and enjoyed entertaining and having fun with family and friends. Glen was also a generous and caring person. Throughout his life, he was an animal lover, opening his home to many stray animals, including a sea lion named Monico that was found stranded on a nearby beach. He was president of the Glen Sheldon Larson Legacy Foundation (Give Some Life). Glen was also a generous supporter of Snow College. For many years, he hosted the student body officers for retreats at his home in Mexico. He also established an endowment fund to assist student body officers with scholarships. Glen was named a Snow College Distinguished Alumnus in recognition of his success and kindness to the college. He is preceded in death by his parents, five of his six siblings, four nephews, and one niece. Glen will be greatly missed by all who knew and associated with him. Snow College pays special tribute to our long-time friend and alum, Glen Larson. Glen’s generosity will now continue beyond his lifetime through a generous provision in his estate plan. His thoughtful remembrance will place Glen among the most substantial donors in the history of the College. Snow College is fortunate indeed to have a caring friend such as Glen. 20 1 3 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A ZI N E


In Memoriam Through June 30, 2013

What Kind of a Legacy

Will You Leave? Alumni Venna (Sorenson) Anderson ’40, May 30, UT Lewis Rawlin Bagnall, Jr. ’68, April 21, UT Jodi Bailey ’97, June 2, UT Guy Taft Baker ’50, May 16, UT Olive (Olsen) Blackham ’38, February 22, UT Patricia (Schofield) Brough ’50, February 5, UT James Paul Childs ’99, March 1, UT Gary Ellis Christensen ’60, June 5, UT Virginia Covington ’74, May 31, UT Alex Blaine Furness ‘06, March 2, UT Maureen Gassman ’52, May 10, UT Michael John Goodwin ’06, March 11, UT Joyce (Sorenson) Graham ’53, May 25, UT Ivan Eugene “Gene” Hansen ’48, May 17, UT Albert Lynn Kuipers ’56, June 19, UT Doris Elaine (Nielson) Larsen ’42, May 16, UT Miles Stewart Maxwell ’02, April 28, UT John Phillip Monsen ’58, April 14, UT Colleen (Jensen) Nielson ’47, April 16, UT Daniel Kent Olsen ‘71, April 1, UT Lois (Lorensen) Olsen ’40, May 29, UT Zola (Anderson) Ruesch ‘36, March 12, UT Becky Smart ‘13, June 21, UT Joe Reece Taylor ’63, June 10, UT Gretchen Louise (Miller) Thomas ’74, June 17, UT Charles Richard Thompsen ’42, June 24, UT Vard White ’66, June 6, UT

We all have a desire for significance. For many of us, significance comes through creating a legacy during our lives–something for which we will be remembered in the future. A bequest is perhaps the easiest and most tangible way to leave a lasting legacy to the people and charitable organizations that mean the most to us.

A bequest is a gift made through your will or trust. There are several ways to make a bequest: • Specific dollar amount • Specific asset • Percentage of your estate • Residue of your estate

For more information on how to create a lasting legacy through a bequest, please contact us at 435-283-7061 or log on to our website at snowgifts.org.

Attendees

Glen Charles Johanson, April 15, UT Walli Luise (Poepel) Sanger, June 22, UT Marissa Watkins, April 1, NV

Friends Laurie (Bowen) Fyans, April 19, NV Please contact the Advancement Office to notify staff of alumni who have passed away: Phone: 435-283-7062 Email: alumni@snow.edu Mail: Snow College Advancement Office 150 College Ave, Box 1033 Ephraim, UT 84627

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Early construction on the Snow Academy Building, now the Noyes Building.

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By Travis Schiffman Strength, love of learning, deep commitment to education and students, tenacity, perseverance, and an unconquerable spirit are just a few words one might use to describe Snow College, its faculty, staff, students, and alumni who proudly called themselves “Badgers.” There is no coincidence that this caliber of individual is so prevalent at Snow College when you reflect on the College’s past 125 years of excellence and consider the type of people who forged it in its humble beginnings.

Snow College’s Scandinavian Start Although the first white settlers of the Sanpete County area were British and American born, recent converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from Scandinavia left the greatest imprint on the area, and this imprint continues to this day. Upon arriving in Salt Lake City, many were directed to various settlements throughout Utah, but most eventually ended up in Sanpete. By 1870, nearly 95 percent of Ephraim’s population was of Scandinavian descent. The early Scandinavian settlers arrived in the Sanpete Valley amidst trouble with the native inhabitants of the area, the Ute Indians. What began as a peaceful relationship soon turned adversarial. To protect themselves, the settlers were forced to build forts, such as the one erected in Ephraim and occupied by Scandinavians during their first few years in the valley. The settlers would face other challenges as well. Even though they were used to a difficult life in the “Old Country,” their lives were already established. Now, as new inhabitants of the Sanpete Valley, they would have to start over, clearing land, digging irrigation canals, building roads and bridges, and erecting homes. While they brought with them few material goods from the old country, they did bring their acquired skills and a propensity for hard work. Within a relatively short period of time, they began working the land and planting crops. Eventually, with the development of an irrigation system, farms flourished throughout the valley.

Sanpete Stake Academy – Snow College in Embryo In 1867, a Norwegian by the name of Canute Peterson moved, along with his family, from Lehi to Ephraim on assignment from the LDS Church as a bishop. Prominent leaders of the church were frequent visitors to the Peterson home, which led to many extensive discussions of the need for a nonpublic school in Ephraim. Canute seized the opportunity to pitch the idea of a higher institution of learning to his captive guests. Just months before the Manti Temple was dedicated (May 17, 1888), local LDS Church members were being urged to prepare themselves to help build an academy. The Ephraim Town Square was proposed as the future site for the academy, land was purchased, and a letter was received from President Wilford Wood20 1 3 | S N OW CO L L EG E M AG A ZI N E

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ruff of the LDS Church, asking that Church academies be built. Needed funds would come from local stake donations. These donations were minimal, so the Academy Board, including Canute Peterson, Henry Beal, and John B. Maiben, selected the social hall on the second floor of the co-op store on the corner of 100 North and Main Street in Ephraim as a temporary classroom site. It was the fifth day of November in 1888, when Principal Alma Greenwood and Mrs. Kerri Henry Payne, along with the first Sanpete Stake Academy class of 120 students, climbed the outside, walled-in stairway to reach a single classroom and begin what would eventually become what Snow College is today. This classroom was divided into two rooms by a heavy curtain. Mrs. Fannie Green Thompson, a student of the first class, recalls that “there was no light [in the stairway] except what came through the open door at the bottom of the steps by day and a coal-oil lamp hung at the top of the steps by night… There were two stoves—one on the stage and one in the main room. Classes were held in both rooms. The curtain, which was used to separate them during classes, was a heavy, painted canvas attached to a pole the length of the stage and was raised and lowered by means of a rope.” After a few years, the classes grew out of the upstairs room and had to meet in the North Ward meetinghouse, as well as in various businesses all over town.

Sacrifice Secures and Saves Snow Academy

Top: Canute Peterson, Founder of Sanpete Stake Academy Bottom: Ephraim Co-Op

Launching this type of institution was difficult for the local church units, but maintaining them required endless endurance. In 1898, only 10 years into the Sanpete Stake Academy’s existence, disheartening communications came from Salt Lake City that the LDS Church would not be in a position to fund the Academy and that the new building for which they had broken ground would have to be put on hold indefinitely. Principal Newton Noyes was determined to keep it going. On September 9, 1898, he announced, “The Academy will not close!” Dedicated faculty members chose to take a cut in pay, working as part-time missionaries as well as part-time instructors. Recent graduates were hired to fill in vacancies, knowing their pay was uncertain. The Academy’s only piano was sold, and Principal Noyes took no salary for several months to ensure that those remaining could be paid. During these dark days, the people of the college and the community wondered if Snow College would survive, but their faith, loyalty, and willingness to sacrifice carried them through. On March 30, 1900, the school was renamed Snow Academy after LDS Church President Lorenzo Snow and Apostle Erastus Snow. Of the 22 church academies that began in the sunny days of Snow College’s inception, only six remain today. The founders and supporters of Snow College simply would not let it fail. The members of the local community agreed to help cover the costs of the college, and they survived and flourished. The time arrived when the Sanpete Stake was authorized to resume its plans to build the Academy Building with the expectation that construction would cost $25,000. They soon discovered, however, that even with $15,000 of donated labor, the final cost would be $56,000. Local members raised the majority of these funds from many sources. Perhaps one of most inspiring stories

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Above: Indian War Veterans Reunion, August 3, 1906. Photo taken next to the Noyes Building.

to surface from this period was the account that many of the residents collected their Sunday eggs and contributed them to the building committee to assist in the construction costs. Based on the value of eggs at the time, at six cents a dozen, the financial impact of the Sunday eggs was negligible, but the fact remains that the construction of the Academy had widespread support. The generous community investment demonstrated their commitment to ensure that the Academy would survive, and the Academy–now a college–grew. The Snow Academy Building was partially occupied but finally finished and dedicated on November 5, 1909. In 1945, in honor of the 29 years of service that Newton Noyes gave to Snow College, the building was renamed the Noyes Building. In December of 1903, the three Grecian muses (religion, science, and art) were placed on the building’s front gable, showing the values and expectations of the founders and Snow College’s goals of excellence today.

The Spanish Flu Comes to Sanpete; Snow College Gets a Mascot World War I brought changes to the local community and to Snow College. As the war ended, an international epidemic of Spanish Influenza swept across the United States, killing thousands of Americans. The first flu cases in Sanpete County were reported in October 1918. Citizens were

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urged to wear gauze masks as a precautionary measure. When four cases of influenza were diagnosed in Manti on October 12, 1918, town officials declared a quarantine that closed churches, Sunday schools, public schools, theatres, ward meetings, picture shows, fraternal meetings, dances, and all public gatherings. This, of course, included classes at Snow College. Classes would not resume until January of the coming year due to statewide Department of Health closures being enforced for all schools. As the struggles of the First World War gave way to the Roaring Twenties, Snow College began to take the shape that we recognize today. The large white “S” that proudly sits on the hillside at the entrance of Ephraim Canyon was created by the class of 1926. Ralph Booth from the Snow College Music Department directed the orchestra and band and offered a jazz program featuring a dance orchestra—a first among Utah colleges. In 1924, one of the football coaches, Ike Young, asked his players what they wanted to call themselves. Eddie Issacson made a motion that “we call ourselves the ‘Badgers’—a ferocious animal known to almost everyone in Sanpete.” Ray Noyes seconded the motion, the football club voted in favor of it, and a Snow College mascot was born. President Milton H. Knudsen was a Badger fan from Wisconsin, which assured that the Snow College Badger had a good start, and that it remains even to this day.

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The Great Depression – A Delayed but Real Challenge For many years after the stock market collapsed, local newspapers spoke of the Depression as something external, a far-removed quirk in an already degenerate Eastern, urban life that would soon resolve itself. Sanpete County began to feel the effects of the Depression in the latter part of the 1930s, a bit later than most, but the economic realities of the Depression hit home. In the surrounding communities, hundreds lost their jobs, and those who were still able to keep their jobs were asked to take a pay cut. This was also true of the staff and faculty of Snow College, who saw as much as a 10 percent decrease in pay.

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In 1931, the LDS Church gave the College to the State of Utah and it has, from that day forward, operated as a state-supported institution of higher education. Even though this transformation took place, it was not initially an easy one, since house bills introduced during the early thirties would require that local counties support Snow College, providing one half of its maintenance. Eventually, Conrad Frischknecht, a Sanpete County representative, introduced a bill that allowed for all two-year public colleges to be funded completely by the State of Utah. During this time of transition, the original colors of the college, gold and white, were changed to add an additional color: dark red. This change caused some concern among local residents, but it wouldn’t be the last time the colors would change, nor the last time locals would weigh in on the college’s colors.

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Opposite: Students in the old gym Top Right: Snow Normal College Marching Band Center Right: Snow College Band marching down Main Street in Ephraim Bottom Right: Snow College Football Team

Despite the hardships of the Great Depression, Snow College continued to grow under the direction of President James A. Nuttall. Improvements included the creation of the Vocational Arts Building, the construction of Greenwood Hall (as a boys’ dormitory), the purchase of a field for athletics, the creation of an agriculture program, and the building of a new gym. During this period of the 1930s and 1940s, huts were set up as housing for men until a permanent dormitory replaced them. A new auditorium was built and bleachers were installed on the athletic field, along with fencing that was provided by a donation from the student body.

World War II, Snow College, and Civilian Pilot Training America’s entry into World War II brought Snow College, along with the rest of the nation, out of the Depression. During the summer of 1940, President Nuttall saw the need for Snow College to train future servicemen for the Air Force and appointed Dr. Hans Reed Christensen to be the director of Civilian Pilot Training (CPT) at Snow College. By October 7, 1940, the first unit of Snow College student pilots had passed the required physical examinations and had entered ground training. This group of 11 future pilots learned about aviation, meteorology, plane flight theory, and instrument flying in classes taught by Dr. Christensen. Their actual flying took place at the airport in Mt. Pleasant, where licensed pilots supervised the 10 to 12 hours of flight training. The final phase of the CPT program required 35 to 45 hours of solo flying for completion. While the men were away at war, women gathered to do what they could to support the troops, often filling roles that were traditionally filled by men. One local woman remembered, “The girls at home got together once a week to show off diamonds, sew on trousseaus, tell about sweethearts, have a social life, and keep up our spirits, as well as finding new ideas to keep up the spirits of our servicemen. Music kept our spirits high and enthusiasm going. There were many types of music that had a beat, a rhythm and a message to keep up our spirits, whether we were feeling patriotic or sad, or if we just felt like having fun, dancing, or marching around.”

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Postwar and a New Millennium During WWII, the enrollment at Snow College had dropped to 51—8 men and 43 women. As with most of postwar America, Snow College grew quickly once the war ended. New buildings were added and others were remodeled. Intramural and intercollegiate sports, which had been largely eliminated during the war years, became immensely popular again, and they remain an important part of the Snow College experience today. Among the new buildings completed during this period was the Lucy Phillips Library. When the new building was completed in 1969 and ready for occupancy, students formed a human chain from the Noyes Building to the library and passed the books in Dewey Decimal order to their new home. In 2011, the new Karen H. Huntsman Library came online, allowing for a remodeling of the Lucy Phillips Library into a state-of-the-art classroom space. Students, faculty, and staff once again formed a human chain to move books from the old library to the new one. Other recent additions to the Snow College Ephraim Campus include the Eccles Center for the Performing Arts, dedicated in 2004, which serves as a centerpiece for community, cultural, and artistic events; and the Suites at Academy Square, a new residential complex for students. Following the war, Snow College went through many administrative changes, as well, becoming a branch of Utah State University from 1951-1969. It continued to grow and flourish after this period as it approached the new millennium. In 1999, the former Sevier Valley Tech, located in Richfield, merged with Snow College, bringing two great programs together to better serve the students of both campuses. Now known as Snow College Richfield, it is home to many career and technical education programs and is an essential addition to the campus community.

Snow College Today As one reflects back upon the determination and devotion of the founders, faculty, and friends of the school, demonstrating an uncommon commitment over the last 125 years, it is easy to see why that small academy is still here—serving students across Utah, the United States, and the world. Students come to Snow College from many countries including such places as Japan, China, Macao, Wales, Russia, Brazil, Madagascar, Liberia, Canada, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Latvia, Nepal, Senegal, and Zimbabwe. The physical footprint has grown beyond the original Academy Building, and the enrollment has increased significantly. Along with the tradition of offering an outstanding general education, the college continues to offer a number of new programs and degrees to meet the ever-changing needs of our students.

CELEBRATE

WITH US!

Purchase a Snow College 125 CELEBRATION CARD

and receive admission to Badger Sports home games, as well as Theatre, Music, and Dance productions through May 2014!*

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BUY YOURS TODAY! *Please see the website for all exceptions and rules of use. Card usage subject to change by Snow College.

www.snow.edu/125 435-283-7000

One aspect that has remained unchanged, however, is the commitment of faculty and staff. There is a spirit of service and sacrifice that permeates the work of Snow College, a spirit that has been on campus since its beginnings in 1888, and a spirit that will carry Snow College to serve its students and community for another 125 years and beyond.

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FALL 2013

SCHEDULE

DATE

EVENT

TIME

Sept 27

Homecoming Spectacular Concert–

7:00 p.m.

Founder’s Plaza Oct 2-5

Theatre–You Can’t Take It With You

7:30 p.m.

Oct 10

Due West Concert

7:30 p.m.

Oct 10

Snow You Can Think You Can Dance-

7:30 p.m.

H.A.C. Main Gym Oct 15

Choir Concert

5:30 p.m.

Oct 21

Vocal Area Recital

7:30 p.m.

Oct 24

Wind Ensemble/Symphonic Band Concert

7:30 p.m.

Oct 28

Vocal Area Recital

5:30 p.m.

Oct 31

Woodwind Area Recital

6:00 p.m.

Chamber Music Concerts

7:30 p.m.

Founders Day Concert

7:30 p.m.

Jazz II Concert

7:30 p.m.

Theatre–The Railway Children

7:30 p.m.

Nov 15

Orchestra Concert

7:30 p.m.

Nov 18

Faculty Recital

7:30 p.m.

Jazz Combo Concerts

7:30 p.m.

Wind Ensemble/Symphonic Band Concert

7:30 p.m.

Dance Ensemble Winter Concert–

7:30 p.m.

Nov 5-7 Nov 8 Nov 12

Snow College Theatre Presents

KENNY by MIKE tage he s for t pted l ada e v o EDITH NESBIT ’s N

Nov 13-16

Nov 19-20 Nov 21 Nov 21-22

Physical Graffiti Nov 25

Directed by

Milinda Weeks

NOVEMBER 13-16

Opera Workshop

7:30 p.m.

Dec 2

Choir Concert

7:30 p.m.

Dec 2

Woodwind Area Recital

6:00 p.m.

Dec 3

Jazz I Concert

7:30 p.m.

Yule Feast–Greenwood Student Center

6:00 p.m. &

Forgotten Carols–Theatre

7:30 p.m.

Messiah Concert

7:30 p.m.

Dec 5-7

Curtain at 7:30 Eccles Performing Arts Center Adults: $8.00 Seniors/High School & Younger: $7.00 Snow College Students: $2.00 w/Activity Card

Dec 8-9

Unless indicated, events are held at the Eccles Center for the Performing Arts on the Snow College Ephraim campus. 11 201 3 | S N OW CO L L EG E M AG A ZI N E

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By Travis Schiffman

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Standing on the Shoulders of the Past, Looking Forward

S

now College did not reach its current milestone of 125 years of excellence simply by sitting on its laurels and waiting for the grass to grow under its feet. Building on the traditions established in the past by innovative men and women who were bound and determined to see Snow College succeed no matter what challenges might present themselves, Snow is always looking forward to the future. According to Dr. Beckie Hermansen, Director of Institutional Planning and Research, Snow College now belongs to the League for Innovation in Community Colleges, an international organization dedicated to catalyzing the community college movement. The League hosts conferences and institutes, develops Web resources, conducts research, produces publications, provides services, and leads projects and initiatives with its member colleges, corporate partners, and other agencies in their continuing efforts to make a positive difference for students and communities. According to its website (www.league.org), the League is specifically committed to improving community colleges through innovation, experimentation, and institutional transformation. Snow College faculty members have attended and presented at recent conferences hosted by the League in Pennsylvania and Texas, and they plan to continue their participation in the future.

The Snow College White Papers Attendance at these conferences has inspired the ongoing creation of “white papers,” or authoritative reports that initiate discussion to understand an issue or solve a problem and generate a proposal for changes that help to reach a specific goal. Faculty members now have a more formal method of presenting ideas for innovation and productive 201 3 | S N OW CO L L EG E M AG A ZI N E

change to their colleagues and the college as a whole, to continue to support Snow College’s growth and development. Once proposals are reviewed and accepted, funding is generally available to help “kick-start” a project. One such proposal was presented by Rachel Keller, a member of the English department faculty, who saw the need for better recycling and composting at the College. A proposal was made to establish a plastic recycling and composting center where Snow College employees and community members could bring their plastic to be recycled. The project has flourished thanks to the vision of Professor Keller and an enthusiastic outpouring of community support. Snow College music students were able to make use of available project funds in their efforts to create a physical score of sheet music for performance pieces that had no physical score. They were then able to travel to conferences to present their work.

An Innovation Academy Plans are underway for an Innovation Academy during the week following graduation in 2014. This four-day workshop will allow faculty members to work together, collaborating on ways to hone their already great teaching skills in the areas of pedagogy, technology, and assessment. In addition to polishing their syllabi, faculty can choose to work on webinar development, create their own “app,” or focus on some other technological innovation as part of their teaching. A piloting program for cross-disciplinary courses that surface from this collaboration is forthcoming in the near future as well.

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“An Even Better Version of Snow College”

Dual Admission Degree Agreements Snow College is actively pursuing agreements with other schools to provide 2+2 Dual Admission Degree Programs, which are guaranteed transfer programs where students will, upon completion of a prescribed sequence of courses leading to an associate’s degree, be assured transfer to the university of their choice with full junior-year status. Students would be able to complete one application and pay only one application fee. If they meet and satisfy specific requirements, they can be concurrently admitted to Snow College and the 2+2 college or university of their choice. Snow is also reaching out to business owners to arrange for 14

collaborative partnerships that will “fast-track” students into applicable internships or employment after graduation.

Go to Snow and Study in China! The Snow College Center for Global Engagement has partnered with faculty to research and establish relationships with foreign universities that will provide students with an immersive study abroad experience. One such opportunity will enable Snow College education students to spend half of a semester in China. Students will observe teaching methods in China and return to Snow College to share what they observed as part of their “Global Badger” experience.

Strategically Set for the Future While current and former students, faculty, staff, and area residents have always known about Snow College’s success, the College has recently received national recognition, as well. The Aspen Institute has named Snow College among the top 10 percent of U.S. community colleges in its last two ranking cycles (2011 and 2013). In addition, CNN Money ranked Snow College sixth in the nation for two-year colleges that help students succeed with graduation or transfer. Snow College was recently ranked ninth in the nation by Washington Monthly magazine and eighth by The Best Schools, an Internet-based college and university ranking service. 20 1 3 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A ZI N E


Snow College recently received re-accreditation through the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU). In their accreditation letter, the NWCCU “commend[ed] Snow College for an outstanding group of faculty, staff, and administrators who have a spirit of optimism and who are dedicated to maintaining the rich heritage and strong traditions of the past along with a commitment to educational excellence in the six-county service area.” As a part of the accreditation process, Snow College has established a comprehensive future plan. This written blueprint focuses on specific changes that will take place over the next 10 years to improve campus life, both for students and for faculty. To surmount this great task, a committee of 21 members, made up of both faculty and staff, met together to decide on four to six goals that will serve as Snow College’s strategic plan for the future. This “Strategic Planning Task Force” has been hard at work. According to Marvin Dodge, vice president of finance and administrative services, “We are pleased to report that our [Strategic Planning Task Force] website has been launched and is available for all to review.” Everyone is encouraged to visit the site: http://www.snow.edu/vision. Ongoing faculty and staff focus groups facilitate open discussion and gather input about the direction the College needs to go to achieve these improvements. One of the many proposed ideas involves adding more four-year programs to current degree offerings. Snow College now offers a new four-year music program, and there is hope of adding more in the future. The changes and decisions made by this committee will help to make Snow College even more successful in the future. Committee Co-chair Melanie Jenkins said, “I think students will see changes that will benefit them directly in terms of transferring abilities and four-year degrees. I think there is nothing but excitement about what future students will see. It will be an even better version of Snow College.” With 125 years under its belt, Snow College’s future has never looked brighter!

New construction in recent years is an important part of Snow College’s commitment to innovation and improvement. From top to bottom: Suites at Academy Square Karen H. Huntsman Library George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Center for the Performing Arts

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Vibrant&Alive S N O W

C O L L E G E

A T

1 2 5

A number of activities and events will mark Snow College’s 125th Anniversary.

I

t’s finally here! Snow College is 125 years old and proud of every wrinkle! When Principal Alma Greenwood and Mrs. Kerri Henry Payne first organized what is now known as Snow College back in 1888, they likely had no idea just how much their small academy would blossom into what Snow College is now. To grow from a starting class of 120 students to the nearly 4,500 who attend today, to be the oldest two-year college west of the Mississippi River, and to be recognized by multiple organizations as one of the nation’s top two-year colleges is truly remarkable. With a rich and diverse group of active alumni dating back several decades, Snow College is poised and ready to celebrate the 125th anniversary, and all of the planning for this year’s special events is finally coming to fruition. The kickoff began the night before the 2013 commencement, and the celebration continued in August with seminars and events commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. In the upcoming months, Snow College will gather everyone’s great “Snow Experiences” for StoryCorps, host a special Homecoming that you won’t forget, and let you take Buster Badger on your road trips with you as part of this year’s events.

Snow College Baccalaureate 125th Anniversary Kickoff a Success On May 3, 2013, hundreds of students and alumni surrounded Lorenzo and Erastus Snow, both immortalized in bronze statue, joined by confetti cannons, beautiful music, and plenty of cupcakes, to kick off the full year of celebrations commemorating Snow College’s 125th birthday. The Snow College Baccalaureate 125th Anniversary Celebration was a magnificent display of history and culture, with incredible performances by various groups from Snow College’s own Julliard-infused music program. Attendees enjoyed an auditory feast of music and storytelling, where they learned of Snow College’s Scandinavian roots and humble beginnings, as well as the many changes the College faced through the uncertainty of iconic times like the early 20th century, the Great Depression, and two

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world wars. All who were present left with a renewed sense of pride for Snow College and a feeling of gratitude for the many sacrifices that were made to keep it vibrant and alive.

New Banners Display Badger Pride The baccalaureate kickoff is only the beginning of many great events that will commemorate Snow’s “Big 125” this year. All over both campuses and all along Ephraim’s and Richfield’s main streets, beautiful, bold banners, with Snow College’s own blue and orange, proudly display the milestone achievement of 125 years of excellence. Local businesses already display their Badger Pride and support with similar banners mounted in storefront windows and elsewhere, in an effort to maintain community awareness, interest, and involvement with the college. If you ever have felt the need to “drag main” in Ephraim or Richfield, now is the perfect time to do so and feel your Badger Pride renewed once again.

Snow College Joins with Gettysburg to Commemorate 150 Years This August, Snow College held its first annual American History War Era Seminar. This year’s seminar focused on the Civil War, in conjunction with the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg and the Emancipation Proclamation. Three published, highly regarded scholars gave presentations about Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War over four days of celebration. Music students performed in a concert, and the highlight of the week was a special dinner, where Dr. Allen Guelzo from Gettysburg College spoke about Abraham Lincoln’s religion.

Take Buster Badger on Your Next Road Trip Buster Badger, at least in miniature form, is spreading the joy of being 125 throughout the world, with the help of many alumni friends. If you’re going to make a trip, take Buster with you! Snow College has several small “Buster Badgers” that can be taken anywhere by those who are interested, 20 1 3 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A ZI N E


The first of Snow College’s planned United States Historical War Era Seminars, focusing on the Civil War, took place during Snow College’s 125th anniversary year.

as long as they’ll take a picture with him and send it back to Snow College to be proudly displayed on the College’s website. Buster has already traveled to some pretty exotic places like Thailand, Congo, Hawaii, and Nepal, and will likely surface in many other countries around the world. Snow College boasts alumni from around the world, and Buster would like to visit them wherever they may be. Please contact Marci Larsen by calling (435) 283-7013 or marci.larsen@snow.edu for more information on how to borrow Buster for your next trip!

Join the StoryCorps! Faculty, staff, and other volunteers are ready and willing to help you record your Snow College memories as a part of the 125th Anniversary StoryCorps. David Allred, English faculty member and Honors Program director; Rosie Connor, director of philanthropic initiatives and partnerships; and other faculty and staff volunteers continue to reach out to Snow College alumni, faculty, emeriti, donors, and friends of all backgrounds and ages, to record, share, and preserve brief stories of their Snow College experiences. Portable recorders are available to capture these “Badger Bytes.” Short excerpts from the interviews will be made available for public and electronic presentation, including an anniversary book and accompanying CD. Doug Barton, Snow College alumnus and owner/operator of Mid-Utah Radio, has agreed to feature some of these stories on the radio. Don’t be shy, and come be a part of the StoryCorps! For more information, please call (435) 283-7060 or visit the 125th Anniversary website at www.snow.edu/125.

Homecoming at 125 If you’ve ever felt that need to return for Homecoming at Snow College, this year will definitely be an exciting one, so make that road trip! Events begin Friday, September 27, with a special concert: “Spies in the Night: The Music of James Bond,” at 7:00 p.m. on the Heritage Plaza. In addition to the 5k at 7 a.m. and the parade at 10 a.m., a big tailgating party is in the works for Saturday, September 28, at 11:30 a.m. After the football game, which starts at 1 p.m., there will be a reunion barbecue at 4 p.m. The Suites at Academy Square will be available for lodging to interested alumni who wish to come down for the celebration and stay. This beautiful, new housing unit is like nothing Snow College has had before. With its exercise and gaming areas, large windows, and balcony, the Suites is the place to be if you like to exercise, play games, or just sit and relax while overlooking Ephraim and the Snow College campus. For more information, visit the Homecoming website at http://snow.edu/alumni/homecoming.html.

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My

Experience as a

Student

at

By Cassidy Rice

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ooking back on my Snow College career, I have learned so much and created many memories I will cherish for the rest of my life. I grew up a city girl: shopping in all the malls, eating out at restaurants, and going to the movies were things I was very used to prior to moving to Ephraim. When I chose Snow College after graduating from high school, I had no idea what culture shock awaited me. I was now living in a small rural turkey town, with not a whole lot to do, and definitely no malls to shop in. But it was because of this quaint town that I learned a lot about myself and new things I was interested in. In turn, I also fell in love with Ephraim. Snow College gave me the opportunity to experience the college life away from home, learn the importance of self-reliance, gain an education, and make new friendships. I have been involved in many fun activities such as dances, and pep rallies, participated in the business club, and attended many Badger sporting events. If there was one piece of advice I could give to all graduating high school students, it would be to become a Snow College Badger. It has definitely been one of the best decisions I have ever made. Snow College gave me the ability to complete my general education without the major price tag and work with amazing professors who have really helped me along the way. Since my enrollment in 2010, I

have seen the College grow each and every year. During my freshman year, the Karen H. Huntsman library was a brand new addition to the campus. The Lucy Phillips Building then became a much-needed spacious testing center as well as a place to hold classes. Since then, there has been a historic color change to blue and orange, the cafeteria was renovated, and brand new dorms and offices have been built all around the campus. It has been a great experience to be a part of all the historic changes taking place here. The future of Snow College looks extremely optimistic, and for the incoming student population, there is much to look forward to. Snow College is currently rated in the top 10 among two-year colleges for academic success. With the College celebrating its 125th anniversary this year, this is a great time to be receiving such national recognition. But no matter the graduation year, everyone who has ever attended this school has his or her own unique story to tell, and that is what connects us as alumni. The memories I have created here are now not only a part of me, but a part of the history of Snow College. My education and experiences here have helped greatly in preparing me for the next chapter in my life. Snow will always hold a special place in my heart, and the exciting future of this great college looks brighter than ever.

Cassidy Rice is a 2013 Snow College Graduate from Riverton. She will be attending Utah State University this fall, majoring in public relations/communications. After graduation, Cassidy plans to work as a corporate event specialist.

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“If there was one piece of advice I could give to all graduating high school students, it would be to become a Snow College Badger. It has definitely been one of the best decisions I have ever made.�

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Adapting to change is a necessity in the collegiate athletic environment. During the 2012-13 season, Snow College Athletics proved just how adaptable they can be. By Doug Johnson and Codi Ramsey

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Football The 2012 Snow College Football Team finished with a record of 11-1 and was ranked third nationally following a 47-21 win over previously undefeated ASA College of Brooklyn, New York, in the inaugural Carrier Dome Bowl played in Syracuse, New York. The Badgers were undefeated in conference play in the Western States Football League (WSFL) for the first time since 2008. Running back Breon Allen became the first Badger to ever lead the nation in rushing with 1,632 yards, and he also led the nation with 20 rushing touchdowns. Allen was named as the WSFL’s Most Valuable Offensive Player and FirstTeam National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) All-American. He 20 1 3 | S N OW CO L L EG E M AG A ZI N E

has committed to play next year at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina. Defensive end Ofa Hautau joins Allen on the NJCAA All-American First Team and was a unanimous pick as the WSFL’s Most Valuable Defensive Player of the Year. Ofa will be playing next year for Oklahoma State University, while his brother, Siale Hautau, another standout on the Badger defensive line, will play for Oregon State University in the PAC-12. Defensive end Jake Miller (third nationally with 13 sacks) was Honorable Mention All-American, and along with the Hautau brothers, was part of the Badger defense that led the nation in sacks (67) and safeties (8). Offensive lineman Justin Manu was named NJCAA First Team All-Ameri-

can and will be heading to North Texas State in the fall. Punter Chris Van Orden finished second in the nation in punting average (40.8 yards per punt) and was named NJCAA Second Team All-American. Wide receiver Damond Powell was fourth nationally with 1,231 yards on 41 receptions (leading the nation with an average of 30.0 yards per catch) and was third nationally with 14 receiving touchdowns. Powell was named Honorable Mention All-American and has committed to play next year at the University of Iowa in the Big 10. A school record 11 Badgers were named to the WSFL All-Conference First Team, including Allen, Powell, Manu, Miller, Van Orden, Ofa Hautau, E.J. Pauni, Thomas Bryson, Nik Wolford, Kapena Clark, and Spencer Groner. Quarterback Chris-

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tian Stewart (second nationally with 37 touchdown passes) was named to the WSFL Second Team and will be heading to play next season at BYU. Head coach Tyler Hughes announced in January that he will also be moving on, heading to the Ohio State University to pursue a graduate degree. Replacing Hughes at the helm for the Badgers this fall will be defensive coordinator Britt Maughan. The 2013 season is already off to a great start, with the Badgers ranking second in the NJCAA preseason poll.

Men’s Basketball With the resignation of Michael Ostlund in late July, the men’s basketball team was looking for a smooth transition on short notice. Athletic Director Rob Nielson stepped in to lead the men’s team through the season. They finished with a 22-10 overall record and an 8-7 conference record, finishing third in the Scenic West Athletic Conference (SWAC) regular season. The Badgers started the

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season 12-1, earning a selection as high as 20th in the NJCAA national poll.

will give Coach Nielson a solid core to build around this coming year.

During the Region 18 tournament, Snow College made its way to the championship game against conference rival Salt Lake Community College, but fell short, 86-75, ending their competitive season. Three sophomores are continuing on, signing to play at four-year institutions. “I am proud of the sophomores and the way they worked to improve this season,” Nielson said. Cheikh Sane has signed on to play at Division I school Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia. Point guard Nick Gruninger committed to the University of California-Riverside, and Connor Van Brocklin will be staying in-state and playing for the University of Utah. Nielson concludes that he is “going to miss all three of them … they’re good kids and they worked very hard to earn these opportunities.” Casey Taylor, Brock Smith, Roberts Baltruns, London Simonsen, and Haudrick Hilaire all got significant playing time as freshmen and

Women’s Basketball Head Coach Natalie Visger and the women’s basketball program accentuated the “student” side of the student-athlete last season, as the Lady Badgers were ranked with the highest team GPA (3.58) in the nation by the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA). On the court, the program had a pendulum swing of change in 2013 after ending the 2011-12 season on a record high, at the national tournament. With only one returning starter, Jordi Willden, the Lady Badgers had a tough rebuilding season. Despite their overall record of 10-21, the ladies held their ground at the Region 18 tournament, defeating USU Eastern in the first round by a 13-point margin (62-49). After being swept by the Golden Eagles during regular conference play, it was definitely a high-note finish. The ladies

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ended their season in the second round with a loss to eventual Region 18 champions, College of Southern Idaho. The Lady Badgers will refresh their team with returning point guard, Amber Daly, forwards Kobe Farrer and Sydney Webb, and the inside presence of 6’3 Emily Howey and 6’4 Lyssa Hanks. Joining the team for the 2013-14 season are Bingham High School (South Jordan) standouts Jillian Powell, Ashton Henderson, Mackenzie Bruggerman, and Madison Aulai-Roe. Also suiting up in orange will be Sloane Robinson from Richfield High School, Whitney Saunders from Riverton High School, Aleksa Gappmayer of Maple Mountain High School (Spanish Fork), and Hailey Greenwood of Star Valley High School out of Grover, Wyoming. “I’m very pleased with our 2013 recruiting class,” said Visger. “They are competitive young ladies who are used to winning. They possess a high skill set and solid basketball knowledge. These girls come from excellent programs and understand ‘team.’”

led by All-American outside hitter, Amy Sorensen, to a 16-9 overall record and 5-5 in the SWAC. Snow College defeated four top-20 opponents, including fifthranked Salt Lake Community College, and was ranked nationally for the majority of their season. Sorenson finished the season ranked fourth in the conference for kills (278) and ninth for digs (222). During the Region 18 tournament, Sorensen was named to the All-Conference First Team and was later selected as an All-American by the NJCAA. “I feel so blessed to have been able to receive this honor,” states Sorensen. PAC-12, Division I program Oregon State has signed Sorensen for next season to help the Beavers recover from a rebuilding year of their own. Also continuing on to four-year institutions are Sorensen’s

fellow Badgers, Katie Vincent (middle hitter), Annie Smoot (outside hitter), and Nicole Koehler (outside hitter). Vincent will play for the High Point University Panthers (North Carolina), in the Big South Conference. The Panthers finished last season ranked third in the conference. Smoot will be playing for the Ore Diggers of the University of Montana Tech. The Ore Diggers are part of the Frontier Conference and finished last season with an 18-11 overall record. Koehler is headed to St. George to play for the Dixie State Red Storm. Robyn Felder, Dixie head coach, says “Nicole [Koehler] will add so much depth to our team … [she’s] a constant threat anywhere on the court.”

Volleyball The women’s volleyball team also entered the academic rankings with a team GPA of 3.5, tying them for fifth in the nation. “We really do emphasize the academic part of the program,” said Snow College Volleyball Coach Keven John. “It’s not just a cliché here.” On the athletics side of the spectrum, the team soared after coming off a tough rebuilding season in 2011. The team was

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Softball The Lady Badgers softball team finished in the middle of the pack with a record of 21-24, good enough for fourth place in the SWAC. A brutal schedule made it hard for the Badgers to get any kind of consistency. Snow College spent the last week of February and the month of March playing at home with numerous weather cancellations, and games not played in mud were played in freezing temperatures. You would think that Snow College would have an advantage playing in the snow, but it doesn’t always work that way. When spring finally came, the Badgers found themselves on the road for the entire month of April. “We faced a lot of tough situations,” said Chad Larsen, fourth-year head coach. “But this was a great bunch of girls and they really stuck together.” Sophomore hurler Katie Greenberg (15-10, 2.35 ERA) will be moving on to play at Southern Utah University. Sara Park moved from second base to shortstop as a sophomore and had a stellar season hitting .416 and leading the team in batting and runs scored. She will be teaming up with Greenberg again next year, having also signed to play at SUU. Sophomore catcher Sylvana Kelley will not be laying down her gear just yet either, as she has signed to play next year for the Rangers of Northwestern Oklahoma State University. Returning infielder Sydney Butler (.366 and team-leading 38 RBI and 5 HR) and outfielder Ally McAfee (.348 BA) will give Larsen a good base to build around next year. Incoming freshman pitcher Belle Stoddard (21-4 W-L record and .583 BA this year at Bountiful

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High School) is expected to fill the hole left by Greenberg’s graduation.

Rodeo Joining the realm of collegiate sports, Nielson announced the addition of rodeo to the athletic department. Kendra Sagers has been named as head coach and has assembled a great team, who competed in their first event on September 6 and 7. “We are so excited to have this team up and running,” said Sagers, who has 20 years of experience in training and coaching rodeo athletes. Snow College will compete in the Rocky Mountain Region of the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association (NIRA), which includes Utah schools UVU, USU, SUU, and Weber State, along with Idaho State and Colorado Mesa, as well as regular Snow College opponents Southern Idaho and Colorado Northwestern. The Rocky Mountain region is one of 11 regions nationally, and is highly respected, with Southern Idaho currently leading the national men’s team standings and Idaho State leading the women’s team standings. Individual events include saddle bronc; bareback and bull riding; tie down, breakaway, and team roping; and steer wrestling, barrel racing and goat tying.

Rodeo Sept 6-7 Sept 12-13 Sept 13-14 Sept 27-28

at Cedar City, UT at Pocatello, ID at Pocatello, ID at Logan UT

Events begin on Friday, September 27, with a reunion dinner at 5 p.m. for Golden Badgers (those who attended Snow College at least 50 years ago). That evening, a special concert, “Spies in the Night: The Music of James Bond,” will take place at 7:00 p.m. on the Heritage Plaza. Everyone is invited to attend. Events begin bright and early on Saturday morning with a 5K run at 7 a.m., followed by the annual parade down Main Street at 10 a.m. The tailgate party begins at 11:30 a.m. and concludes at the beginning of the Homecoming game at 1 p.m. A reunion barbecue will take place after the game, at 4 p.m.

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2013-2014 BADGER SPORTS

Football Aug 24 Aug 31 Sept 7 Sept 14 Sept 21 Sept 28 Oct 5 Oct 12 Oct 19 Oct 26 Nov 2 Nov 9

at Glendale CC Georgia Military College at Scottsdale CC at Pima CC Mesa CC New Mexico Military Institute at Eastern Arizona College Phoenix College Arizona Western College Playoffs: Round 1 Playoffs: Round 2 Playoffs: Championship

Men’s Basketball TBA Oct 19 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 9 Nov 22 Nov 28 Nov 29 Nov 30 Dec 2 Dec 6 Dec 7 Dec 14 Dec 27 Dec 28 Jan 2 Jan 4 Jan 9 Jan 11 Jan 18 Jan 23 Jan 25 Jan 30 Feb 1 Feb 8 Feb 13 Feb 15 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 27Mar 1 Mar 8 Mar 17-22

at Westminster at Salt Lake Jamboree at Western Wyoming at Sheridan College at Arizona Western at Tohono O’odham at Mesa CC Colorado Kings at Lamar CC at Northwest Tech at Casper College at Central Wyoming Planet Athlete Academy Impact Academy Salt Lake CC ABCD Prep ABCD Prep at North Idaho College at College of Southern Idaho USU Eastern Colorado Northwestern CC at Salt Lake CC College of Southern Idaho North Idaho College at Colorado Northwestern CC at USU Eastern Salt Lake CC at College of Southern Idaho at North Idaho College USU Eastern Colorado Northwestern CC Region 18 Tournament District Playoff NJCAA Nationals

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Women’s Volleyball Aug 23-24 Aug 30-31 Sept 6-7 Sept 13-14 Sept 27 Oct 3 Oct 5 Oct 11 Oct 12 Oct 19 Oct 25 Oct 26 Nov 1 Nov 2

CSI Wild Wings Tournament Salt Lake Tournament Starr Corporation Tournament Badger Bash Salt Lake CC at North Idaho College at College of Southern Idaho Colorado Northwestern CC USU Eastern at Salt Lake CC College of Southern Idaho North Idaho College at USU Eastern at Colorado Northwestern CC

Women’s Basketball Oct 18 Oct 26 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 9 Nov 15 Nov 16 Nov 29 Nov 30 Dec 6 Dec 7 Dec 14 Dec 27 Dec 27 Dec 28 Dec 28 Jan 2 Jan 4 Jan 9 Jan 11 Jan 18 Jan 23 Jan 25 Jan 30 Feb 1 Feb 8 Feb 13 Feb 15 Feb 20 Feb 22 Feb 27 Mar 17

at Salt Lake City Jamboree Alumni Scrimmage at Western Wyoming CC at Sheridan College at Tohono O’odham at Arizona Western College at Mesa CC at Otero Junior College at Western Nebraska CC Otero Junior College Gillette College Planet Athlete Academy Planet Athlete Academy at Salt Lake CC Glendale CC SLCC Vs ABCD Prep ABCD Prep SLCC Vs Glendale CC at North Idaho College at College of Southern Idaho Utah State University Eastern Colorado Northwestern CC at Salt Lake CC College of Southern Idaho North Idaho College at Colorado Northwestern CC at Utah State University Eastern Salt Lake CC at College of Southern Idaho at North Idaho College Utah State University Eastern Colorado Northwestern CC Region 18 Tournament NJCAA Nationals

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Distinguished Alumni Y

ou would be hard-pressed to find anyone who has attended Snow College in the past four decades who doesn’t know Bart Nelson—a celebrated math teacher, a beloved mentor, and a great friend. Bart Nelson and Snow College are practically synonymous with each other, like peanut butter and jelly, or better yet, differential equations and calculus! The fact remains that many students have had the privilege of taking math from Bart Nelson, and his contributions to Snow College are truly legendary.

serve his community and its youth inspired Bart to serve as a councilman on the Ephraim City Council for eight years, where he was instrumental in the planning and development of the Ephraim City Baseball/Softball Complex. Prior to serving on the council, he had volunteered as director of the Ephraim City Recreation Board for six years, continuing to serve on the board for many years thereafter. Bart truly understood the value the baseball/softball complex would have for the youth of the Ephraim community. Service has always been paramount for Bart Nelson. He has been a member of the Ephraim Lions Club for the past 35 years, serving as president of the club for three terms. He is still active in the club and is one of its top recruiters. Because of the club affiliation and Bart’s love of youth sports, he has been the director of the Ephraim Lions Club Annual Baseball/Softball Scholarship Tournament since joining the club. The Lions Tournament is a highlight for hundreds of kids each summer who receive an opportunity to participate in sports, serve others in the tournament, and raise funds for local high school graduates to attend Snow College.

Bart Nelson

James Bart Nelson was born in Price, Utah, to James Rodney and Alice Tucker Nelson. Bart attended Fairview elementary and junior high schools, and he graduated from North Sanpete High School in 1959. Bart became a Snow College Badger in the fall of 1959, and he completed his degree in the spring of 1961. After graduating from Utah State University, Bart was offered a teaching position at Uintah High School in Vernal and taught there for three years. In the fall of 1965, he was hired to teach mathematics at Snow College. Bart has taught thousands of students during his 42 years as a faculty member. He still receives cards and letters from former students who write or call to thank him for being such a great teacher and influence for good in their lives. Known to his close friends as “the Renaissance Man,” Bart has always welcomed change and a chance to learn and help others. In August 2006, Bart was awarded the Jesse Madsen Brady Teaching Award. Since his retirement in May 2007, Bart has continued to teach one to two classes per semester. He has always had a great love for Snow College and its mission in serving the students who have attended throughout the years. Bart has always had a great love of tennis and baseball. He served as a tennis coach at Snow College for over 20 years. For 26 years, he served as the tournament director for the state 2A and 3A high school tennis tournaments for the Utah High School Activities Association. His desire to 26

Bart remains active in the Boy Scouts of America and the LDS Church. He served for three years as a Cubmaster and now serves as a merit badge counselor for the Citizenship in the Community merit badge. He has served in many callings, such as a bishop, a high councilor, and a Primary teacher, to name just a few, for the LDS Church in the Snow College and Ephraim stakes. Bart and his wife, Barbara, now enjoy working as service missionaries at the Manti Bishops’ Storehouse, helping families in need. Bart has always been a good friend and neighbor, helping and giving generously to many in need. He and Barbara enjoy spending time with their six children, 14 grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. In addition to being very active in their family’s lives, they continue to support Snow College in as many cultural and sporting events as they are able to attend. Bart has solved more than math problems for many and is an endearing part of what makes Snow College great. He may work with very complex equations, but he has never forgotten a simple solution—serving others is the best “proof” of true humanity. This year, Bart will receive the Snow College Distinguished Alumnus Award, to honor his many years of service. He will be honored during 2013 Homecoming, on September 28. 20 1 3 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A ZI N E


I

t is no surprise that Eddie Cox attended Snow College. From a young age, he was already made of the “stuff” that makes great Badgers—a great work ethic, a love of learning, and a strong desire to always give more than he receives. You won’t find anyone else who champions the “Spirit of Snow” more than Eddie L. Cox. Eddie was raised in a family of six boys on a small dairy farm in Fairview, Utah, about 25 minutes north of Snow College on US Highway 89. He graduated from North Sanpete High School in 1969 and went on to serve a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in the Southern United States. After completing his mission, Eddie assumed the responsibilities of his family’s farm, due to his father’s illness. He also went to work for his uncle, Iven R. Cox, at Central Utah Telephone (now known as CentraCom). His workdays were very long between milking cows, taking classes at Snow College, and working at his regular job with the phone company. Eddie persisted with his education at Snow, however, and finished an A.S. degree in 1974. Eddie and his brother Ron started Fairview Rupp (now Cox Automotive and Sports), selling Rupp snowmobiles and recreational vehicles. In addition to helping people have fun in the snow, Eddie and his cousin Branch Cox started Skyline Construction (now MKJ Construction) doing excavation work. Even though Eddie is not currently involved in these two businesses today, he is still proud to have been part of their inception and values the experience. He never did leave the family farm, and he continues to manage it today. Eddie is the president and general manager of CentraCom Interactive, and his cousin Branch serves as the CEO. The two have worked together in the telecommunications business for over 38 years, taking a small, nearly bankrupt business with 700 subscribers and five employees in 1984, to a full-service communications company. CentraCom now serves more than 20,000 highspeed Internet, telephone, long-distance, and cable TV customers across rural Utah with more than 80 wonderfully talented employees who keep the phones ringing, the Internet “surfable,” and many televisions tuned in to a variety of programming, including Snow College sports and activities. Eddie has always believed in giving more than he has received and tries to “pay it forward” with every opportunity to serve Snow College, his community, and others that may come 201 3 | S N OW CO L L EG E M AG A ZI N E

his way. He currently serves on the Snow College Foundation Board of Directors. He recently completed two terms as a member of the Snow College Board of Trustees, serving as chair for four years. Eddie’s interests in Snow College and Sanpete County as a whole directed him to serve as the first chairman of the Sanpete County Economic Development Committee and as a Sanpete County commissioner from 1992 to 2002. Improving life in his local community is very important to Eddie, where he has served as Fairview City mayor for four years and for eight years on the Fairview City Council. His business ventures provide him with additional opportunities to serve, with past appointments that include president of the Utah Rural Telecom Association, president of the Rocky Mountain Telecommunications Association, and president of the Western Telecommunications Alliance. He presently serves on the boards of several communication corporations in Utah, California, and New Mexico, and he also serves as a commissioner-at-large on the Utah Transportation Commission. Aside from serving on the Snow College Foundation Board of Directors, Eddie is a generous donor, having established an endowment fund to provide scholarship support for students. Because of his close ties with North Sanpete High School, he has also created a scholarship fund through his company for North Sanpete graduates who wish to attend Snow College.

Eddie Cox Eddie and his wife, Lesa, have eight children and reside on the family farm near the mouth of Fairview Canyon. They are always grateful for what Snow College has given them, and they are willing to give back in the years to come. In recognition of his numerous accomplishments and dedication to Snow College and the community, Eddie will receive the 2013 Snow College Distinguished Alumnus award. He will be honored during the College’s Homecoming activities on September 28. - Travis Schiffman 27


AlumniUpdate

Joe Daniels CLASS OF

David Peterson

1957

During his time at Snow College, Joseph Jorgensen Daniels (1957) worked with the local farmers, stomping wool from sheep and cleaning irrigation ditches. Through these and other experiences, he learned about hard work, a lesson he has carried throughout his life. Joe received a full-ride football scholarship to Snow College. He played for Coach Robert Stoddard from 19541957. While attending Snow College, Joe married his high school sweetheart, Euarda. The couple resides in Malad, Idaho, and has six children, 29 grandchildren, and 14 great-grandchildren. After completing Snow College, Joe graduated from Utah State University in agricultural economics and business. Since graduating, he has worked and served in a variety of positions. He spent 23 years at Thiokol, and he has also served as Oneida County Commissioner in Idaho. He currently serves on the board of directors for the Idaho Cattle Association and the board of directors for the Idaho Irrigation Pumpers Association. He is also president of the Wrights’ Cattle Association. Joe is active in the LDS Church. He served 10 years as a tour guide at the conference center in Salt Lake City and is now a temple worker at the Brigham City Temple. Some of his most memorable experiences at Snow College include serving as the business manager of the student body and captain of the football team, and being in two stage productions. “My love for Snow College will live with me the rest of my life,” said Joe.

CLASS OF

1961

David Peterson graduated from Snow College in 1961. David was very active in a variety of sports while attending Snow. He lettered in football and track, and he won the conference in wrestling two years in a row. After leaving Snow College, Peterson attended Utah State University on a full-ride football scholarship as the team’s tackle. In 1966, he met his wife, Francine, and they have one son who also attended Snow College. They later moved to Eureka, California and have resided there ever since. In 1969, David graduated from Humboldt State University and later obtained elementary education, administrative, and driving instruction credentials. In 1973 he was hired by Mckinleyille Jr. High School as a teacher and coached football, basketball, and track at the neighboring high school. That same year, David and Francine opened the Humboldt Light Opera Company, which just celebrated its 40th anniversary. One of David’s fondest memories of Snow College was working over the summer with his uncle Hilmer Peterson, who at the time was the superintendent of the College, tearing down old houses and clearing space for the present-day Snow College football stadium. His time at Snow not only showed him the importance of education, but also gave him the work ethic that has guided him throughout his life. Through his athletic career, he learned the meaning of hard work and was able to retire in 2005.

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Jann Anderson CLASS OF

1973

Jann Jacobson Anderson considers her time at Snow College to be very positive—except for the one fight that she witnessed! It took place at a ball game between Snow College and Dixie State. “I wish I could remember the things that I learned in my biology class as clearly as I can remember that fight,” she said. After graduating from Snow College in 1973, Jann attended Utah State University and received a bachelor’s degree in business education. She worked for Social Service for one year and then taught junior high for four years. She married her best friend, Boyd Anderson, and stayed home for 17 years to raise five children. Jann and Boyd also helped raise three of their nephews for several years, which they consider an added blessing to them. For the past 16 years, Jann has worked as a part-time secretary at East Midvale Elementary. “I have worn out several automobiles taking kids to music lessons, ball games of all kinds, and lots of church activities,” Jann stated. In addition, she loves sewing, reading, quilting, and singing. Jann has passed her love for Snow College onto her family. Three of her five children have attended Snow College, and they share Jann’s enthusiasm for the quality of faculty, students, and experiences that the College offers.

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Lori Birch CLASS OF

Wendee Lamb

1987

Lori Ann McAllister Birch graduated from Snow College in 1987 and enjoyed one semester at Utah State University before she and her husband, Troy, also a Snow College graduate, finally decided to get married. They had been dating since they met each other at Snow College. They made their first home in East Millcreek in Salt Lake County. Lori was then accepted into the BYU nursing program. At BYU, she was a member of Phi Kappa Phi and graduated third in the 1990 class from the BYU School of Nursing with a Bachelor of Science degree. In 2005 Lori and Troy moved back to her hometown of Mt. Pleasant. In her time at Snow College, Lori made some lifetime friends and learned to really have fun. She took violin lessons from Dennis Hansen and enjoyed playing in the Snow College Orchestra. Serving as the Associated Women Students (AWS) president was also an honor for her. Lori and Troy have passed the Snow College tradition onto their children; their two oldest kids have attended Snow College, and their younger daughters plan to attend in the future. The family’s passion for Snow College was rekindled when Troy was transferred to teach at the Ephraim LDS Institute adjacent to the Snow College campus. He was recently appointed to be the Institute’s director. Lori and Troy both enjoy supporting Snow College’s current students in their plays, games, and performances.

CLASS OF

1992

After graduating from Snow College in 1992, Wendee Hansen Lamb returned home to Cache Valley to finish her schooling at Utah State University. She graduated in the spring of 1994 with an early childhood education degree and a math/science minor. She also got married that fall, on September 16, 1994, to her Snow College sweetheart, Troy Lamb. They have now been married for 18 years and have six children. Wendee taught for eight years in the Cache School District before deciding to stay at home with her children. She then started her own preschool business, Magical Beginnings. She is now in her 12th year of operating the preschool. Wendee explained what a great experience it was for her to attend college and live away from home. She enjoyed the smaller classes and getting to know her professors and classmates on a personal level. While academics were her reason for attending Snow College, the social life was a great balance to the hard work. Wendee has great memories of playing intramurals, attending the football and basketball games, and going to the school dances. In her time at Snow College, she learned organization and time management skills, which enabled her to be very successful academically. Wendee and Troy like to visit the campus on occasion with their children, telling them stories of their time at Snow College and taking a trip to Ephraim’s beloved Malt Shop.

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ALUMNI

SCHOLARSHIP

ENDOWMENT FUND

Jenny Rowley CLASS OF

2001

Jenny Vanover Rowley graduated from Snow College in 2001. While at Snow, she was a member and president of the Badgerettes dance team. She graduated from Southern Utah University in 2003. Jenny continued her love of dance by coaching high school drill teams and choreographing routines for high school and collegiate drill teams throughout Utah. She currently lives in Cedar City, where she owns a successful dance studio with 240 students. Besides dancing, she loves playing city league softball and spending time with her three kids and her husband Daniel, who is a firefighter and a Snow College graduate. Rowley said that Snow College enabled her to continue dancing after high school, which was her passion. “I feel like my time at Snow College has had the most prominent impact on my professional life than any other time in my life,” Jenny said. Some of her favorite memories from Snow College include performing at a football game while freezing rain came down on the dancers, Rollerblading around campus, and bowling with Bob. In 2004, Jenny’s first son, Parker, passed away at birth. This was a difficult time in Jenny’s life. “If there was anything I learned at Snow College (in Psychology class), it was above all things, to be positive,” she said. Today she volunteers in local support groups to help other bereaved parents who have suffered the loss of infants or children.

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Ashley Christensen CLASS OF

2012

As one of Snow College’s newest alumni, Ashley Christensen (2012) fondly recalls the two years she spent in Ephraim. A highlight of Ashley’s Snow College experience was taking midnight trips to Denny’s, 45 minutes away! “You haven’t lived the college experience until you’ve driven to Salina at midnight just to go to Denny’s,” she said. “There were many times when I went on these ‘runs’ with my roommates and other friends just to end up seeing the rest of the college campus there.” Ashley believes her involvement with Snow College groups such as Phi Theta Kappa, Phi Beta Lambda, and Student Government have helped her become a better leader. These opportunities, she said, have been very helpful to her as she pursues a degree in business marketing at Southern Utah University. In addition to attending school, Ashley loves outdoor activities, such as camping, fishing, hiking, and four-wheeling. She also enjoys photography, playing the violin, and spending time with family and friends. Although Ashley has moved on, she will never forget her time at Snow College. “Snow College is a one-of-akind school ... I was given an invaluable education, made lasting friendships, and had the college experience that no other school in the world offers,” she said. “Although I am no longer a student at Snow College, I will forever be a Badger at heart.” By Cassidy Rice and Emily Peterson

To commemorate the 125th anniversary of Snow College, the Alumni Board has set a $125,000 goal for the Alumni Scholarship Endowment Fund. Once this scholarship is fully funded, Snow College students will benefit every year for generations to come. The scholarship fund will be supported by donations from alumni and friends. Since Snow College has a rich heritage of generational alumni, we are making a special appeal to alumni families. Donations to the scholarship fund of $1,000 or more will be recognized on a special commemorative plaque that will be located on our recognition wall in the beautiful Karen H. Huntsman Library. This plaque will list the names of the first 125 families and individuals who make this legacy commitment. As an alumni association, we have established this scholarship program because we want as many students as possible to have the same great collegiate experience we had. The Alumni Scholarship Endowment Fund is a wonderful opportunity for us to give back to future Snow College alumni by easing the financial burden for a few deserving students each year. You can help students excel by making a contribution today. The Snow College Alumni Association Board invites you to join with us in supporting the Alumni Scholarship Fund. Please remember that no amount is too small and every gift makes a difference.

Please make your gift today and help support the next generation at Snow College. To make a donation or receive more information, please call (435) 283-7062 or visit www.snow. edu/give. 20 1 3 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A ZI N E


Annual Donor Report

$100,000+

Huntsman International LLC The Huntsman Foundation David E. and Verla A. Sorensen U.S. Department of Labor Yvonne Whitmore

$50,000-99,9999

$25,000-49,999

Zion’s Bank University of Utah University of Missouri U.S. Small Business Administration Utah State Office of Education

Department of Workforce Services Rural Health Care Foundation Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration The Estate of Ethelyn P. Taylor Utah State Library Utah System of Higher Education I.J. and JeannĂŠ Wagner Charitable Foundation Washington State University

$10,000-24,999 Intermountain Power Agency Robert Lloyd Corkin Charitable Foundation The Estate of Seth and Maurine Horne Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance Randy and Claudean Cox Byron W. Gassman John R. and Merrilin Gassman Dr. Claudia P. Jarrett

$5,000-9,999 Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Eddie L. and Lesa A. Cox Afton M. Hansen Darlene Jerman Mountain Dell Ranch Mr. and Mrs. Halver Ross Richfield FM Group Marlon and Ann Snow Dr. James A. and Kristine Tatton State of Utah University of Minnesota Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Wells Fargo Foundation

$1,000-4,999 ACT AFAS Anonymous Barclay Mechanical

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Geaneen W. Blauer Brady Charitable Foundation Kim S. and Melinda C. Cameron CentraCom Interactive J. Gordon and Marcia Christensen Todd & Leanna Christensen Mark Andrew and Karla Coombs Iven Branch and Dinah Cox EMH Classical Music Ephraim City Ephraim City Lions Club Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Maureen Gassman* Robert M. and Joyce* Graham Carol and Jay Gunderson Doug and Renee Johnson Doris Elaine Larsen* Von P. and Merrill Madsen Gwen McGarry

MeWe Productions Morgan County School District Moroni Feed Company Virginia and Clark Mower National Trust for Historic Preservation Dennis & Joan Norton Family Foundation Berdean Oldroyd Questar Corporation Waldemar E. and Harriet Rasmussen Regions Trust Foundation-Arch Coal Sacco Dining Services, Inc. Snow College Emeriti Constitution Donald C. and April Stirling Strata Networks LaPrele O. and Richard Sumsion Stephen D. and Margaret Taylor Ruth O. and Richard Tempest Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems David R. and Patricia Willmore James and Jennifer Parnell Willmore Carolyn Wyatt Western AgCredit Western Clay Company

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$500-999 Theressa Alder Anonymous D. Scott and Joy Bushnell DeVere Lynn and Lynda Day Dr. Richard W. and Mary Elggren Russell F. and Barbara Fjeldsted Betty Mikkelsen, Ph.D Keith M. and Myrtle Fitzgerald Munk Larry Peck Randy and Jennifer Shirts Anderson Drug & Floral Murphy-Brown, LLC Red Mountain Wholesale Florist Union Pacific Corporation

$250-499 Aloha Hula Supply Anonymous ATK Douglas Lee Barton Devin Dale Blood Kay Christensen William Cook Dr. Lynn Cutler and Dianne Dean Richard S. Dixon Ephraim Family Dental Practice Mary Greathouse Jaron N. Jensen Riley Sventzer Jensen Steven K. Jensen Dan C. Jorgensen Joan and John McAllister Gary E. and Joleen G. Meredith Northrop Grumman Tyrel H. Oliver Principal Financial Group Saga of the Sanpitch Jim and Sallie Shank Softmink, Inc. Franklin C. and Nancy Stewart

$100-249 Osral B. and Linda Allred Heather D. Anderson Anonymous Mr. and Mrs. Jed D. Bartholomew Brady J. Belnap Vertis Benson Leonard M. and Laura Blackham Robert and Sandra Bliss

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Guy and Lynda Brown Carol A. Churchill Harlan Clark Ethan E. Colburn Maude F. Conrad Joyce H Cook Deseret Trust Company Matthew T. & Julianne Okeson De Witt John and Janelle Durrant Kyle R. Ellett Norma Erickson James V. Hansen Steve Harper Alvin B. Hatch Keith Holder John W. Irons , Jr. Rachel T. Jensen Kristin Keisel Allen Kiesel Clisbee H. Lyman Nolan F. and Marian Mangelson Lee and Mary Monroe Brandon M. Morrill Dia Vonne Mower Laura M. Mumford Brett L. Nelson Jason Rick Nielson Cheri Brown Oldham Roger K. Peterson Lynn and Julie Poulson Sharon Pritchett Scott and Bettye Tervort Frank E. and Kathryn Weaver John D. and Becky P. Whetten Richard and Rolayne White Donald G. and Mary Alice Williams H. James and Janet Williams

$1-99 Kyle Adams Anonymous Reg Dell Allred Rawlin D. Anderson Mr. Lewis Rawlin Bagnall* Shirlene Barrus Mr. and Mrs. Day L. Bassett Lowry F. and Marie Bishop Donald E. Bittner Carol M. Bullock Steven Calder Maxine Cameron

Suzanne D. Christofferson Jeanette Clark Carolyn J. Crabb Kirk Dahl Jason C. Davis Margie D. Denison General American Mutual Holding Co. Marie Gruver Donald Neil Hafen Mr. and Mrs. Boyd A. Hansen Laree and Robert Jackson Dallas O. and Beverly John Dorothy Jonas Dawn Kuchenmeister Claire D. and Dean Lund Rodney Brett Merchant Jeannie Millecam Sylvia B. Miller Mr. and Mrs. Kerry D. Montague Wesley C. Morger Marylene Naser Larry Ross Nordell Martha Olsen Alisha Dawn Pritchard Arlan and Clair Rasmussen Charles and Jean Rasmussen Brittany Reid Sharon and Mark Reimschiissel Judith A. and Ronald Rodriguez Kris A. Soper Mr. and Mrs. Dennis L. Sorensen Gordon and Beverly Staker Joann and Stan Stebbing Don B. Taylor Ronald C. Taylor William Joel White David and Loralee Wilkey *Deceased The Snow College Donor Report is produced by the Snow College Foundation in conjunction with the Snow College Office of Advancement. Every effort has been made to present an accurate donor listing from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013. If your name has been omitted or erroneously listed, we sincerely apologize and ask that you advise us so we may correct our records.

Snow College Foundation: Phone: (435) 283-7060 Email: giving@snow.edu 20 1 3 | S N O W CO L L EG E M AG A ZI N E


We value and appreciate our employee donors.

Mr. and Mrs. David C. Abbott Chris and Becky Adams Christie Allred Diane L. Adams Jannette Anderson Lynn and Pam Anderson Margie O. Anderson Monica Anderson Anonymous Hayden and Stacey Arnold Kari Arnoldsen Daniel K. Balls LaFaun Barnhurst David N. Beck Sheryl Ann James and Jonathan Bodrero Heather Boren Dean Brereton English Brooks Paul and Michelle Brown Jim Case Ronald W. and Elizabeth C. Cazier Keith Church Alan Christensen Rosie Marie Connor Stephen G. Crosland Stephen and Patsy Ann Daniels Mr. and Mrs. Jake Dettinger Marvin and Lesle Dodge 20 1 3 | S N OW CO L L EG E M AG A ZI N E

Tim Dolan Mr. and Mrs. Scott Drew Lawrence and Denise Durtschi David Dyches Bonnie S. Edwards Amber Epling Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Ericksen Renee Faatz Armando Frutos Diane J. Gardner Paul A. Gardner Sara L. Golding Bobby and Robin Gore Beckie Hermansen Heidi and Tracy Johnson Lisa Jones Jim and Penny Kittelsrud Laird-Rhodes Family Karl and Marci Larsen Susan Larsen Vance and Lorna Larsen Matthew Shawn Lindow Nick Marsing Russell and Teri Mason Steven and Patricia Meredith Terry L. Merrill Fernando Montano Vandy Moore Robert and Kathleen Nielson

Sherry Nielson Claudia W. Olsen Lynette Olson Ted and Vickie Olson Joseph Papenfuss Eric and Emily Peterson Chad and Cindy Price Carl Purcell Codi A. Ramsey Paul Rasmussen Bill and Carol Reeve Allen T. Riggs Lynette Robison John and Michelle Ruell K. Michael Seibt Brent and Marcie Smith Gary and Barb Smith Larry K. Smith Garth Sorensen Allan R. Stevens John and Shauna Stevens Jeanie Tidwell Bob and Debbie Trythall Natalie Visger Mr. and Mrs. Steve Weller Mr. and Mrs. Doug Wendel Mr. and Mrs. Richard White Scott L and Kathy Wyatt Cless T. Young 33


Find Us Online: Snow College Snow College Alumni @SnowCollege @Snow Alumni Snow College Snow College Alumni Snow_College Snow College Video www.snow.edu/snowtv

Non-profit Organization U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

Provo, Utah Permit No. 541

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Snow College Foundation 150 College Avenue Ephraim, UT 84627

Your children’s inheritance

just scored a big one If you graduated from Snow College, your children or grandchildren can attend Snow College at in-state tuition prices, no matter where you or they live in the world! To receive more information or to request a tuition voucher, please contact the Snow College Alumni Scholarship coordinator, Sara Golding, at (435) 283-7150.

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