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EMILY BUCKBERG Architecture Portfolio | University of Oregon


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Emily Buckberg esbuckberg@gmail.com 301-789-8093


ABLE OF CONTENTS ELEVATE MUSEUM OF INDUSTRY

LEARN LIBRARY FOR THE VISUAL ARTS

PLAY MUSICIAN REHEARSAL STUDIOS

CONTEMPLATE REIMAGINING THE SENTO BATH

SURVEY ANCIENT VILLA DOCUMENTATION

CHARETTE URBAN DESIGN EXPLORATION

RESEARCH URBANISM NEXT RESEARCH

CAPTURE PERSONAL PHOTOGRAPHS

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08


01 | Museum of Industry ARCH403 | 6 weeks Spring 2017 Professor James Tilghman Chestertown, MD SketchUp, Adobe Creative Suite Nestled on the Eastern Shore, Chestertown, Maryland is a town born out of the water. However, the former port town’s relationship with the Chester River has become tumultuous as the threat of sea level rise increases. The Chestertown Museum of Industry and Culture lifts the exhibition and studio spaces off of the ground so that they may be preseved after most of the adjacent Wilmer Park, and the lower level of the building, is sacrificed. The articulation of the building features represents a mercantile vernacular that relates to the inustrial past of Chestertown, so that while the artwork pushes society forward, it is encased in a memory of the town’s history. The large cantilever of the exhibition space also represents the changing relationship with the water and the town’s unavoidable duality, allowing the building to act as both protection from the water, as well as a vessel onward.


CHESTERTOWN

PUBLIC SPACE

TOWN APPROACH


Studio

Studio

Exhibition Space Studio Bath Bath Mech.

Studio

Reference Library

Classroom Classroom

CR

CR

Off.

Bath

Off.

Bath

Off.

Off.

Off.

Off.

Ticket Sales Lecture Constructed Wetland for Graywater Filtration

Atrium Lecture

Cafe/Bookstore


Approach

Atrium


Ceiling Plate

Wooden Beams

Trusses made from Recycled Wood

4’ Concrete Slab

Reinforced Wood Columns

EXHIBIT/MAKE

COLLABORATE

LIBRARY/CAFE

Exhibition Space

LEARN MAKER SPACE/EXHIBITION SPACE LECTURE HALLS/LOBBY

GATHER CLASSROOMS/OFFICES/ OUTDOOR PLAZA SPACE


02 | Frederick Arts Library ARCH401 | 6 weeks Spring 2016 Professor Georgeanne Matthews Frederick, MD Hand Crafted Media | Digital Media The ascension of humanity towards our highest understanding governs the ethereal movement upward in library spaces, where pursuit of knowledge is the primary aspiration. As we move toward understanding life through consumption of knowledge, we also move toward understanding through the tactile activity of making and creating. In the small, historical oasis of downtown Frederick, Maryland, a library with publicly usable makerspaces and a small gallery provides a community space for creative aspirations to thrive. The undulating glass forms draw people from both an active street as well as the anking creek walk. A corten steel screen provides increasing levels of enclosure as you ascend through the building, while still maintaining views to the creek and park to the west, to always remind us of the world we seek to understand.


Contemplate Ideate Create

Thematic Program

Public vs Private Spaces

Circulation Core Reading g Room

Cafe Maker Space

Stacks

Offffi fice Space Ga allery

Program


03 | Soundroom ARCH401 | 6 Weeks Spring 2016 Professor Georgeanne Matthews H Street, Washington D.C. Hand Crafted Media | Digital Media Music is often seen as a universal language which binds people across space and time. On a busy commercial street in Washington, D.C., a music rehearsal space brings a sense of community and a place for collaboration to a thriving, multicultural neighborhood. Folding fractal walls and oors bring a unique reverberation to each rehearsal space, as well as to the communal jam space in the building. The facade, constructed from sustainably sourced, recycled wood and glass panels, reminds us of the complexity and beauty of the world around us.


Folding Form Iterations


Precession


04 | Elemental Explorations ARCH683 | 9 weeks Fall 2017 Professor Christopher Brown Oldtown/Chinatown, Portland, OR Hand Crafted Media | Digital Media Portland’s Oldtown/Chinatown neighborhood has seen many reinventions. The addition of this Japanese Sento Bathhouse into the neighborhood will create a new atmosphere for the area. Explored primarily through model-making, this conceptual studio focused on the movements and materiality that create spatial quality and interaction. The models produced for this project included elemental materials such as wood, concrete, and plaster. The primary spatial organization of the building diverts users into two separate paths, either a path running back through the building on the ground oor, through the elements of the traditional bathing program, and then up into the primary soaking space. The other moves directly upward through the building, through the same program along the top of the building, and then descends into the soaking space. The movement of these paths orbiting around the same space creates a dynamic, contrasting experience, a new take on the traditional Sento Bath

problem: disconnection materials: wood, string, magnets

m


problem: degradation materials: copper, ďŹ ngerprints

concept: elemental, interlocking spaces materials: concrete

ďŹ gure ground materials: concrete


photo of physical model representing upper path representing ethereal desire for exploration, focused on natural light and creating a sense of curiosity and tranquility materials: basswood, trace paper

photo of physical mode representing contemplation, aspiration


l representing central, main soaking space n; a new experience with hints of familiarity materials: plaster, water, basswood

photo of physical model representing lower path representing grounded movement through network of urban caves; inward focused spaces materials: concrete, powder pigment


05 | Stabia In the Shadow of Vesuvius Summer 2016 Professor Robert Lindley Vann Castellamare di Stabia, Italy Graphite | Ink EDM and Point Cloud Survey Tech Adobe Illustrator Nestled in the Bay of Naples, the town of Castellemare di Stabia is the home of the most complete collection of Roman Villas covered by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. This past summer, I was able to take part in the efforts of surveying and documenting the recently unearthed Villa San Marco, focusing primarily on the northwest wall in the Atrium of the Villa. Through a combination of sketching, theodolite surveying, cloud point surveying, photostitching, and tracing in Adobe Illustrator, I was able to record and analyze this wall, contributing my recordings to the larger goal of completely documenting the villa, while simultaneously immersing myself in the history of a fallen empire.

Hand Sketches


Photostitch

EDM and LiDar

D IO

N

B

RU

CT

A

DETAIL A

OB

ST

C

DETAIL B

DETAIL C

DETAIL D

NW Atrium Wall Elevation and Details


street boun

06 | Urban Design Charette ARCH584 | 1 weeks Spring 2018 Professor Nico Larco Gateway, Portland, OR Hand Drawn Diagrams Gateway is a neighborhood located toward the eastern limits of Portland. While the area’s proximity to the highway, and light-rail connected transit center seem like assets that would help the area thrive, its current status is far from that of its full potential. This rapid design charette exercise explores various opportunities for redevelopment and reimagining of one of the main superblocks of the area. The process involved rapid analysis and production of exploratory diagramming, followed by generation of a variety of programming and formal schemes for the area. While the brevity of the exercise leaves the ďŹ nal results fairly open and broad, the intention of these intense charette developments is evident in the breadth of design ideas produced in a brief period of time. Additionally, the exercise was used as an introduction to the Urban Design Studio, of which I am currently a part for the duration of the Spring 2018 term at the University of Oregon.

street hier

ba


ndary

block structure

people

rarchy

street enclosure

car focused space + portland city block overlay

arriers

grain of development

greenery + amenity access


experience + design goals

increase pedestrian connectivity

provide access to open green space

foster existing community by creating spaces for play + gathering

connect to a variety of ammenities

deďŹ ne street edge

disperse uses among a variety of scales


schematic explorations


parti

street boundary

section explorations

recreational focus


parti

section explorations

interspersed density


INPUTS

AUTONOMOUS VE

Independent Research Ongoing Supervised by Professor Nico Larco Portland, OR During my time at the University of Oregon, I have been heavily involved in research with the Urbanism Next program, first during Independent Research, and continuing with an official Graduate Employee Position. My research focuses on the impacts of emerging technology (such as autonomous vehicles, the sharing economy, and e-commerce) on various aspects of the built environment. In March of 2018, I assisted with the organization and facilitation of the first ever Urbanism Next Conference, which drew a wide breadth of professionals to discuss these topics. While my particular research has primarily focued on microtransit and other emerging forms of mobility, the overall implications of the topics within the Urbanism Next Program will likely change many of our current perceptions surrounding the built environment on a larger scale. The program is currently developing planning strategies for several cities around Oregon and working on several funded grant studies.

variables

07 | Urbanism Next

transporation

TRANSIT aided by avs emerging mobility options like AVs a

like the first/last leg issue and connecting under-served area

cannibalized by avs tncs also have the po

existing transit networks

autonomous there is also the potential for transit infrastructure

The relationship between transit, consum tumultuous since the rise of ridesharing co studies have shown that transit ridership h the country, and that while new transporta with transit shortcomings (i.e. first/last mile Lyft typically usually cannibalize transit rider Additionally, the nature of transit as a pu emerging technologies. The nature of inter rapidly shifting in ways that will both proact environments.


sharing economy

nd microtransit have the potential to solve many of the problems of big transit networks, as to larger networks.

otential to decimate transit ridership if they become cheaper and more convenient than

networks themselves to become autonomous and connect to a larger connected

mers, and cities has become increasingly ompanies and on-demand transportation. Recent has already decreased as much as 10% around ation technology may have the potential to assist issue), Transit Network Companies like Uber and rship rather than bolstering it. ublic amenity may be changing as a result of raction with large scale transit infrastructure is tively and reactively impact the built and social

e-commerce

draft Implications

EHICLES

Equity

If transit services decrease as a result of cannibalized ridership from TNCs, the groups that will be adversely affected are likely those of lower incomes. Mass transit is still the most affordable mobility solution for most people, and if services decrease, it will limit the access that these peripheral groups have to services.

health

If transit agencies reduce service as a result of decreased ridership, more people may rely on personal vehicles, eventually reducing the amount that people are walking to and from transit stops, decreasing overall public health.

Environment

Transit alternatives like ridesharing have been shown to increase vehicle miles traveled (vmt) overall, making transit the most environmentally friendly form of mobility. The more people replace transit with ridesharing, the more we can expect negative environmental impacts to increase as a result of heightened vmt.

Economy

With transit ridership already down, municipal budgets are seeing adverse effects. While ticket sales are decreasing, most transit options are still maintaining the same schedule, resulting in a continuing and consistent loss of income for municipalities.

Governance

Methodology surrounding transit legislation may have to become increasingly proactive, despite its often reactive history. Adaptation will become increasingly important for transit legislation structure.


LAND USE

related impacts

Housing

Desire for housing development and proximity to transit stops may matter less as AVs allow people to live further from urban centers.

Parks & open space

URBAN DESIGN metropolitan footprint If people are not reliant on transit for their access to downtown urban areas and services, they may be willing to live further away from these areas, increasing the metropolitan footprint.

Street Design

TRANSPORT walking

Buildup around areas typically e people to walk a accessible cent increasing pede activity.

biking

Areas with stron access allow fo use and safety non-vehicular m including bike u begin to rely mo the technology responsive to b more consisten automated leve

Strong transit allows for healthy and abundant green space access, and encourages creation of parks and open space near transit hubs. If transit use decreases, the use of these spaces may as well.

Reduction in transit reliance may result in a reduction of ‘transit corridors’, and may encourage streets to be shared across mobility types.

Retail/Commercial/ Office/Industrial (employment uses)

If transit use decreases, T.O.D. will likely decrease soon after. As transit becomes increasingly atomized, development around hubs may be less necessary.

A combination o transit networks shared vehicles mean a reductio need for parking popular urban, areas.

resiliency

vehicles

If people begin relying on AVs rather than transit for access to work places, employers may begin to move to cheaper, more remote locations outside of typical downtown areas.

Transit-Oriented Development

In the wake of natural disasters, mass transit networks tend to be stronger and more likely to rebuild quickly, as opposed to vehicle infrastructure which is more scattered.

place/identity

original template ďŹ le by Alison Bowers

parking

While transit typ succeeds in red personal vehicle negative cycle c increased ridesh decreased trans and decreased services, may le to rely more hea vehicular travel.


transit encourages around ters, estrian

ng transit r increased of mobility, se. If people ore on AVs, will still be iking on a t and l.

of robust s and s could on in the g in downtown

pically ducing e trips, the created by haring, sit ridership, transit ead people avily on

real estate land value

If mass transit use continues to decrease, land previously valued highly for its proximity to transit hubs may see a valuation decrease.

project feasibility

Development of areas will no longer rely on proximity to transit stops, allowing for projects that may have been halted in the past to be built, provided they will significantly attract users for non-mobility reasons.

buzz/vitality If transit ridership decreases, areas that relied on transit proximity for support may see a decline in overall activity.

quality If proximity to transit access is no longer a primary factor in the development of neighborhoods, internal design quality may become increasingly important. Also, it could result in the atomization of quality.

guiding policy

TATION

Continue government subsidy for transit networks so they are not surpassed in cost efficiency by TNCs.

Expand transit services to traditionally under-served neighborhoods and areas in cities to reduce reliance on AVs. Tax AVs to decrease their cost competitiveness with transit.


THANK YOU

Emily Buckberg Architecture Portfolio  

A collection of work from my Undergraduate and Graduate Education in Architecture

Emily Buckberg Architecture Portfolio  

A collection of work from my Undergraduate and Graduate Education in Architecture

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