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Program will be scaled back, reserve fund established Laura Mueller

laura.mueller@metroland.com

News - The city will enshrine an ad-hoc program to offer rebates on donations to municipal election campaigns. Ottawa is one of only three municipalities in Ontario to offer such as rebate (Toronto and Ajax are the others). The refund was created as a way to “level the playing field” between corporate and individual donations to municipal election candidates and encourage public participation in elections – and it worked. In 2002, before the rebate was offered, 65 per cent of donations were corporate. See REBATE, page 18

Steph Willems/Metroland

Pink on the Parkway There is no shortage of colour on the John A. Macdonald Parkway on the morning of Oct. 6 as nearly 6,000 people take part in the CIBC Run for the Cure. The growing annual event saw $1.2 million raised for the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation.

Residents weigh in on Byron Linear Park improvements Steph Willems

steph.willems@metroland.com

Can-Am League team picked for vacant baseball stadium. – Page 33

Community - After being spared the possibility being used to accommodate a new light rail line, the question being considered at a recent public meeting was “what to do with Byron Linear Park?” The long, narrow park, itself a former electric tramline, runs from Golden Av-

enue to Richardson Avenue in its western segment, and Churchill Avenue to Holland Avenue in its eastern segment. While walking paths and trees have existed in the park since the streetcar tracks were ripped up in the late 1950s, Kitchissippi Coun. Katherine Hobbs feels it’s time to make the park more attractive for those who use it. An Oct. 7 community

meeting elicited resident feedback for the prominent western portion – Golden to Sherbourne Road – which now sees more foot traffic due to the seasonal farmer’s market set up near the eastern edge. The project has no firm budget or timeline, though any park improvements would likely be funded mainly through cash-in-lieu-of

parkland money. Hobbs said that individual improvements could implemented piecemeal over a period of time, unlike the major makeover of the more conventional Fisher Park earlier this year. “If we start the consultation process now, I can get a project manager assigned to it,” said Hobbs, stressing that after the comment sheets from this meeting were com-

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Connected to your community

Hintonburg food co-op to fill a neighbourhood need Steph Willems

steph.willems@metroland.com

News - If a group of socially-minded entrepreneurs have their way, Hintonburg will see a new food option

coffeehouse and community space for cultural programming and workshops. The co-op, incorporated earlier this year, would follow the model made popular in largely agricultural areas

added to their neighbourhood early next year. The West End Well Co-op, slated for a storefront at 969 Wellington St. West, is being designed to offer locally-sourced organic food, a café,

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of the country by asking members to sign on to the business, which is managed by a board of directors. Bill Shields, one of the originators and a board member, said the group aims to boost food security in the area and increase Hintonburg’s grocery options. “We plan to open in March, so we’re entering a major startup phase,” said Shields, adding they intend to work with other stores in the area to identify gaps in available produce and goods. “There’s something of a food desert in Hintonburg. We want to work with the neighbourhood to build confidence (in us) having what they need between the four or five stores who sell food.” The Wellington West building, located at Somerset Square, has already been purchased thanks to the financial contributions of private investors. Calling it a “multiple stakeholder co-op,” even the farmers who supply the goods would have a voice on the member-elected board. While the co-op aims to make a profit in order to pay its staff and bills and sustain the operation as a whole, Shields said that “no individual gets rich doing this.” Because members are part owners of the co-op, a legislated portion of profits at year’s end can be returned to investors, while the rest can be reinvested in the co-op’s future and upkeep. In addition to 140 square metres of retail space, the building would house a 30-seat café and second-floor space that can be booked by the community. Take-home prepared meals would be offered via the building’s kitchen, which will be manned by chef Jacqueline Jolliffe of Stone Soup Foodworks, who operates a food truck in Ottawa (and will prepare food for the truck from this site).

Food co-ops have become more organized in recent years, while making inroads into urban centres. The Ontario Natural Food Co-operative was founded in 1976, while a subsidiary - Local Organic Food Co-operatives was created in Ontario in 2009 to create collaborative networks between local co-ops. Shields said the West-End Well already has chosen farms from which to source from and would seek out others to meet demands for particular produce or products. “All of the things we want to offer may not be available locally,” said Shields. “If so, we will try to find them as close to the community as possible, and continue to look as local as possible.” Besides diversifying the local food base in Hintonburg, Shields said the co-op aims to promote local artistic and cultural talent through its community space. A program is being developed to facilitate this. With food security being a big issue with the co-op’s organizers, they plan to reach out to community groups and agencies to figure out the best way to get fresh, nutritious produce into the hands of those who can least afford it. Lots of work lies ahead in the next several months, said Shields, but the group is prepared for a long haul. “It’s going to be challenging. It’s going to take time to figure out and will take time to evolve,” said Shields, adding that the co-op network serves as an inspiration, as “they’ve been at this longer than us.” Anyone interested in learning more information and having the opportunity to interact with the co-op’s organizers can come to information meetings scheduled for Oct. 17 and 19. Interested persons can RSVP to info@westendwell.ca.

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The creators of the West End Well Co-op hope to have a location at 969 Wellington St. West open for business in March of 2014.


news

Connected to your community

Kiwanis Club laugh-in to support affordable housing Steph Willems

steph.willems@metroland.com

Steph Willems/Metroland

Man killed in Bank Street collision Ottawa police and SIU investigators probe the scene of a fatal vehicle collision at Bank and Laurier streets on the morning of Oct. 2. Police have charged the driver of a Honda Civic with impaired operation of a motor vehicle causing death, criminal negligence causing death and failing to provide a breath sample following the early-morning collision. The crash occurred when the Honda, travelling westbound at a high rate of speed on Laurier, collided with a Kia Rondo travelling south on Bank Street. The occupant of the Kia, identified as 54-year-old Alain Seguin, died in hospital following ther crash.

News - Homelessness is no laughing matter, but the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa is hoping humour can be put to good use eradicating it. The service organization’s sixth annual Yuk Yuk’s Comedy Night, planned for Oct. 25, will see all proceeds going towards the Multifaith Housing Initiative. The organization provides affordable housing or supports to Ottawa residents who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. Currently, the initiative is in the midst of a $500,000 capital campaign dubbed A Place to Call Home, which aims to add 25 new units to its inventory and take 40 to 60 more people

off the streets. “There really is a crisis out there,” said Kathy Jones, president of the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa West. “There are 1,200 individuals who sleep on the streets every night in Ottawa and 200 of them are family members. Imagine a child who wants to go to school, but doesn’t have an address.” The issue of homelessness has seen heightened awareness recently, but the available public funds are not enough to put a stop to the problem. That leaves individuals, non-profit agencies and service clubs to attempt to fill in the gaps. While the annual comedy night usually brings in $4,000 to $5,000 after expenses, Jones said she wished more could be raised to stem the tide of

homelessness. The laughterfilled fundraiser sees three professional comedians – all regulars at Yuk Yuk’s Comedy Club – entertain crowds at the Ron Kolbus-Lakeside Centre in Britannia Park. A cash bar and gourmet pizza from the Newport Restaurant will provide fuel for attendees. Unlike the jokes tossed about on HBO specials, Jones said the humour at Yuk Yuk’s Comedy Night is familyfriendly. ‘It’s good – it’s still really funny,” said Jones, adding, “You have to be really talented to pull that off.” Tickets for the Oct. 25 show are $35, and are available by calling 613-787-9977, or by emailing p.mccumber@rogers.com. Tickets will also be available at the door.

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news

Connected to your community

Police want residents to trade pistols for pixels

s and Chills all Steph Willems

steph.willems@metroland.com

News - If you have an old, unwanted firearm collecting

dust in your residence, the police are offering you a trade. On Oct. 4, the Ottawa Police Service, in partnership with Henry’s, Olympus Cam-

era and the provincial government, launched a gun amnesty program in the capital that will see a camera and camera course offered in exchange for

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unwanted firearms. The program runs from Oct. 7 to 20. Pixels for Pistols was created in 2008 and has since been implemented in several Canadian cities. The program offers limited immunity to possession offences – such as an unlicensed person having a relative’s hand-me-down rifle or shotgun in the home – but does not include offences attached to a particular person or firearm (such as the commission of a crime). By calling a special number, an individual can have an officer pick up the unwanted firearm for disposal, then receive a voucher for an Olympus VG160 digital camera and a Henry’s School of Imaging course. The value of the compensation is listed at $175. “This program is providing a way for people to hand over unwanted guns that exist in our community … that are at risk of being used in crimes,” said police services board chairman Coun. Eli- El-Chantiry. “In Ontario, there were 36 more firearms reported stolen in 2012 than in 2011. Also in Ontario, 918 firearms were reported stolen in 2012, 94 per cent of which were long guns. Potentially, these firearms can end up in the hands of criminals.” Old 12-gauge shotguns and .22 rifles might seem unsuitable for the purposes of crime, but many models can be cut down to create a more concealable weapon. Compensation under the program only applies to operational firearms, but the police will also accept ammunition, pellet guns and replica firearms

Steph Willems/Metroland

Ottawa Police Chief Charles Bordeleau announced the Pixels for Pistols gun amnesty campaign on the morning of Oct. 4. for disposal. The vouchers for the camera and course will be sent via registered mail within four to six weeks. “The Pixels for Pistols program have been successfully implemented in Toronto, Halifax and Winnipeg,” said police Chief Charles Bordeleau. “These guns can be an inheritance from a relative, an old hunting rifle or a souvenir that has been around an elderly person’s home.” Residents won’t need to worry about facing possession charges, said Bordeleau, stressing that the public should not enter police stations – or Henry’s locations – with a firearm, but instead call or email to arrange a pickup. “We don’t think that criminals will be using this program to hand guns in,” added Bordeleau. Ian Landy, president and CEO of Henry’s, said the program was created in the wake

of an armed robbery of one of their Toronto locations. That first amnesty program, held in Toronto, resulted in the recovery of 1,897 firearms and 58,000 rounds of ammunition. Landy said the program doesn’t infringe upon legal firearm owners’ rights, nor that of the firearm industry and is free of ideology. During a press conference announcing the program, Staff Sgt. Mark Patterson from the police department’s guns and gangs unit, wasn’t able to provide statistics for how many stolen long guns in Ontario have been used in the commission of crimes. “In our jurisdiction here in Ottawa, we recovered six last year, which had been stolen in Ontario,” said Patterson. The number to call if you wish to partake in the program is 613-236-1222, ext. 7300, or one can email pixelsforpistols@ottawapolice.ca.

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Connected to your community

Campaign draws attention to Canada’s vast boreal forest Unique agreement made industry, environmentalists unlikely bedfellows Steph Willems

steph.willems@metroland.com

Steph Willems/Metroland

Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement executive director Aran O’Carroll speaks at the launch of the On the Move campaign, held at the Canadian Museum of Nature on Oct. 2. In partnership with The Royal Canadian Geographic Society, the CBFA is taking a giant map of Canada crosscountry to educate youth on the complex makeup of the Canada’s boreal forest.

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News - For many living in Canada’s major cities, the boreal forest represents a faraway land only seen on nature documentaries. The reality is that Canada’s boreal forest is the country’s largest ecosystem, stretching between both coasts and boasting a strong presence in all provinces and territories except Nunavut. The partners who make up the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement now want the public to know of the ecological and economic benefits of the area, launching their On the Move campaign at the Canadian Museum of Nature on Oct. 2. The agreement, signed in 2010 by 21 Canadian forest product companies and seven environmental organizations, was created to satisfy the needs of the forest industry and its contribution

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of the Pikwakanagan First Nation (located near Golden Lake, Ont.) offered official greetings. “I think that the agreement that is proposed here can only come to something good in the end,” Bernard said. “Any agreement between industry and those of us who want to conserve the resources we have…can only come to a good end in my mind.” Partnering with the CBFA on the campaign is the Royal Canadian Geographic Society, which brought a room-sized map of Canada to illustrate the extent of the Boreal Forest and the resources and geographic features it contains. Children’s programming has been created to go along with the map. “Absolutely delighted to partner with CBFA on this campaign … our goal is to inform adults and educate youth,” said John Geiger, chief executive officer of the society. “This giant map, accom-

“That was way to easy!”

panied by a truckfull of props and classroom activities will travel the country in the coming weeks and months. The giant map encourages students to take a walk in the woods, if you will, and consider questions from wildlife, to conservation and biofuels. In the process of exploring and discovering the boreal forest, students will strengthen their critical thinking skills and become more spatially and geographically literate.” While the CBFA is still in its infancy, it has already achieved some successes. In June, 2012, signatories to the CBFA agreed to secure a three-million hectare parcel of land in northeast Ontario to conserve boreal woodland caribou while maintaining forestry jobs in the region. Of the land, 835,000 hectares will remain free of forestry practices, with sustainable forestry practices allowed in the remaining 2.2 million hectares.

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Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013


NEWS

Connected to your community

Towers get strong reaction at Hintonburg meeting Proposal will add to Parkdale woes: residents Steph Willems steph.willemns@metroland.com

News - A development proposed for a jumble of lots on the southwest corner of Scott Street and Parkdale Avenue would put too many people and cars onto a notorious roadway, say nearby residents. An Oct. 2 meeting between Hintonburg and West Wellington residents and the staff and consultants of Richcraft Homes was civil, but opposition toward the proposed 32- and 28- storey, mixed-use towers was clear. The zoning bylaw amendment covers properties on Scott Street, Parkdale Avenue and Bullman Street. Despite Richcraft’s assertion that the company remains involved in the Scott Street community design plan process that’s currently underway, the site’s location - on Parkdale Avenue, where traffic is frequently ground to a halt – intensified questions regarding the limits of density. The Scott Street CDP overview calls for higher density near Tunney’s Pasture transit station and the site is one of the few that could accommodate the added density, said Ted Fobert of Fotenn Consultants. “We appreciate that this site is surrounded by lower-profile buildings, which is part of the challenge,” said Fobert, adding that Richcraft is not trying to “get ahead” of the CDP process, nor would the results of the CDP be meaningless. “I’m not holding my breath that we’re going to see a lot of redevelopment at Tunney’s Pasture, as there have been five previous plans for that,” he said. “Our concern is that the en-

tire Mechanicsville community (to the northeast of the site) is all low-profile in nature, and their plans want to preserve that as much as possible. There are very limited development opportunities to intensify around that station … to ensure that the transit system is financially viable.” Fobert said the feedback collected would be flowing back to the developer following the meeting. While the two towers would rise from a four-storey podium, would be located just 280 metres from the Transitway station and would contain a large amount of retail (including the possibility of a much-desired grocery store), the project’s 470 vehicle spaces and 499 residential units seemed in excess of what the CDP group was likely to allow, said Hintonburg Community Association president Jeff Leiper. “(This) seems out of synch with resident’s expectations of what the CDP is likely to support,” said Leiper. The fact Richcraft is proposing the buildings shows that this is their desired outcome, he said. “I’m cynical that if the CDP supports something in the area of 10 to 20 storeys, they won’t revamp their plans to reflect those CDP recommendations. If the city was to reject any proposal that doesn’t work with the CDP, we think the builders have every intention of going to the (Ontario Municipal Board).” A possible grocery store was something many residents in that area want and if built, would serve those living in Mechanicsville as well. However, accessing the store – proposed for the base of the

IF IT’S A

IT’S A

32-storey tower -- left some people queasy. “Creating an extra 288 vehicle trips in the morning and afternoon rush hour is really dangerous,” stated Chris Burke. “How will the city make the (Parkdale/Scott) intersection safe for pedestrians? It’s great having a grocery store … but when cars see a break in traffic (at that intersection), they go.” Earlier, a resident stated that drivers waiting to turn onto Scott or Wellington from Parkdale “could write their memoirs out longhand” while they idled motionless. Gord Scobie of Delcan Consultants had earlier said the development would produce 120 to 150 new vehicle trips during morning and evening peak times. “The number of parking spots doesn’t necessarily mean the number of cars,” he added, stating that a number were reserved for visitors and retail use. The number of residential spots would amount to 0.5 spaces for every unit. Ron Jack, also of Delcan, admitted that the traffic that exists on Parkdale now “is the best it’s ever going to be,” adding that if residents living in the development found they could save time and hassle by biking or taking transit at certain times of day, human nature would compel them to change their ways. Jack said that a northbound left-turn lane could be added to a widened Parkdale as part of the development. While a planning committee date for the Richcraft project is not known at this time, the Scott Street CDP process is expected to wrap up in December of this year, with the zoning amendments needed to implement the plan to be approved by the city at a later date.

CRISIS

SUBMITTED

This rendering shows the 32-storey development proposed for the southwest corner of Parkdale Avenue and Scott Street.

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Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

7


OPINION

Connected to your community

EDITORIAL

Let’s talk about death

J

udging by the sad state of our province’s palliative care system, it’s time to have a conversation about death. The statistics are frightening. According to the Canadian Palliative Care Association, most Canadians would prefer to die in a home-based setting, yet nearly 75 per cent of all deaths occur in a hospital. Only 16 to 36 per cent of Canadians have access to hospice palliative care depending on where they live. The situation will only become worse over time, with the seniors’ population expected to double by 2036. Meanwhile, people are living longer, giving them time to develop more chronic diseases. Unfortunately, Ontario’s residential hospices are struggling to stay afloat, with a funding model that relies primarily on charitable donations. The Ontario government only started providing financial support for hospices during the past decade, leaving the responsibility of keeping them running to volunteers and community groups. After sustained lobbying from palliative care agencies, the federal government finally took action, providing $3 million in one-time funding for the Canadian Palliative Care Association to develop a plan to deliver quality end-of-life care across the country. The 2012-15 initiative advises provincial govern-

ments to have a clear policy on palliative care that promotes access and integrated delivery of services together with the necessary funding. But based on a recent interview with Ontario Health Minister Deb Matthews, we’re not confident that approach is even on her radar. The minister was recently in town for the opening of the Ottawa Birth and Wellness Centre, promoting it as a way to provide less-costly and sometimes more appropriate options for expectant mothers. But when asked if she saw a parallel with using a similar cost-efficient model to offer non-medical care at a hospice, Matthews said she’d “have to think about that a little bit,� adding hospices will always be partially funded by communities, because it’s the communities who want them there. But the minister is not the only one guilty of avoiding a serious conversation about death. We all need to start talking about the state of our province’s palliative care system and the options available for quality palliative care. Individually, everyone should prepare an advance care plan, directing their care in the event of a lifethreatening illness. Collectively, we must force this on the legislative agenda at Queen’s Park. As it stands, today is not a good day to die.

COLUMN

Things that go beep in the night

S

omething went beep beep beep at 5:30 in the morning. Just loud enough to wake me up, not loud enough to wake up the whole neighbourhood. It kept going beep beep beep for it seemed like 10 minutes. Could have been a truck backing up, but what truck backs up continuously for 10 minutes? The first thought was that it was the sound of an electronic device wanting something. Electronic devices are very needy. If their batteries sink below a certain level, they start going beep, no matter what time it is. Then you have to remember whether the phone or the camera or whatever is in somebody’s purse or somebody’s jacket pocket or under a seat cushion somewhere. But it was none of those things. It was something outside. Or maybe in the garage. There was equipment left in the back yard for some work going on. Maybe a piece of that equipment needed something. But there was no beeping in the garage and nothing in the backyard. It was somewhere in the neighbourhood, but no idea where. By the time I got back to bed, it had stopped. I’ll never know what it was. Don’t think it was a car alarm. Remember when

Oawa West News !URIGA$RIVE 3UITE /TTAWA /. +%"

613-723-5970 Published weekly by:

CHARLES GORDON Funny Town those used to go off all the time? Now you never hear them. Maybe they’re made better. Maybe no one turns them on any more. Maybe they just make little beeps like the ones I was hearing. Trying then to get back to sleep, I pondered not only the neediness but the stupidity, and perhaps even perversity of our electronic devices. Long before the first cellphone was invented, Woody Allen had a stand-up routine about his war with the machines he owned. The toaster burned the toast. The clock ran counter-clockwise. The sun lamp rained on him. So he gathered all the appliances together and spoke to them reasonably, asked them to co-operate. A few days later, the TV set began to act

Vice President & Regional Publisher Mike Mount mmount@perfprint.ca 613-283-3182, ext. 104 Regional General Manager Peter O’Leary poleary@perfprint.ca 613-283-3182, ext. 112 Group Publisher Duncan Weir dweir@perfprint.ca 613-283-3182, ext. 164 Regional Managing Editor Ryland Coyne rcoyne@perfprint.ca Publisher: Mike Tracy mtracy@perfprint.ca

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Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

up and he attacked it in a rage. Two days later, he was in an elevator, which asked him for his floor. He said 16. The elevator said: “Are you the guy that hit the television set?� Then the elevator took him up and down fast between floors and let him off in the basement. Most of our machines are not that mean. Although I have a printer that demands to be realigned when it doesn’t need it. If I were Woody Allen I would have a little talk with it and tell it that it’s printing just fine the way it is. But I know there’s no reasoning with it, so I go through the whole realigning drill, which is time-consuming and inconvenient. The thing is, the printer is too stupid to know it doesn’t need realigning. The manufacturers probably thought the printer is really smart, because it can send me messages. But if the messages are wrong, what’s so smart about that? The same with those things that go beep beep beep. Children make noises when they need something but, except for the very young ones, they know it’s more effective to make noise when their parents are awake. Not so for cellphones, cameras and whatever that other beeping thing was. If machines

were really so smart, they’d know when people are sleeping. The fault is ours, of course. We, the technology-obsessed people of the world, taught machines to make noises, to send error messages, to demand upgrades. And if we don’t obey, they make our lives miserable. Which forces us to buy newer machines. The only possible solution is to turn them off whenever possible. You know they don’t like that because they’re always asking us to confirm that we want to do it. And there may well be a punishment down the road. But at least it stops the beeping for awhile.

Editorial Policy The Ottawa West News welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at ottawacommunitynews.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to patricia.lonergan@metroland.com, fax to 613-2242265 or mail to the Ottawa West News, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa, ON, K2E 7L2.

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OPINION

Connected to your community

LETTER

Aiming to change 76,000 lives To the editor, United Way Ottawa set an objective this year to change the lives of more than 76,000 people in our community by raising the $21 million needed to achieve this. Yes, it is true that $21 million is less than $30 million. However, comparing these two fundraising goals is like comparing apples and oranges. In the past, United Way set a fundraising goal based on how much we thought we could raise. This goal included the donations we hoped to attract to the work of United Way and the donations we collect on behalf of other registered charities. This year’s goal is much different. Last year, donors contributed $16.8 million to United Way to advance our community’s priority goals. This year, we aim to raise $21 million, a goal for which we can be transparent, accountable and demonstrate results. Three years ago, through research and consultations, United Way defined the needs in our community and established priority goals for our work with others. These goals included helping more children and youth to succeed in school, ensuring more seniors can continue to live in their own homes and helping more of our neighbours facing a crisis in their lives to access the support they need. Since then, United Way has

invested donor dollars in programs and initiatives that are linked to these goals. Today, based on the reports of our partners and our own ongoing research, we can show our donors that their donations produce results. We are proud of these results. Here’s one result. Research shows that one in five children in Ottawa live in poverty and many don’t have access to after-school homework support, recreation and social programs. Last year, we invested almost $1.8 million in 23 front-line programs that directly helped more than 9,100 children and their families. Reports about the children and youth in one homework club supported through donations to United Way show that two-thirds are doing better in school. We want our donors to know that their gifts to United Way are making our community measurably better. We also want them to know that with more donations, we can help more people to the benefit of everyone in our community. That’s why we introduced a different kind of goal this year. It’s often challenging and complex to explain change and our intention this year is to tell a much simpler story. Join us. Michael Allen President and CEO of United Way Ottawa

What’s diminishing your productivity?

M

onday morning, I sat down at the desk in my home office. As I lowered myself into the chair, my elbow bumped something sticking out of the bookshelf. A dictionary fell on my head – and a condom fell out of it. It was pretty clear what the universe was trying to tell me – my office had become out-of-control untidy. Everywhere we turn these days we find tips on increasing our productivity – both personally and professionally. But one thing that diminishes our productivity subtly is our physical environment. As organizations move toward open-concept offices, employees have to figure out how to filter out not just their own mess, but that of other colleagues as well. Organizations – like the federal government’s Workplace 2.0 – see open-concept as a boon financially. This is based on the idea that cubicles are cheaper than walls and that, theoretically, people can do their jobs anywhere – but these modern companies may actually be losing money on the productivity side. Journalist Annie Paul Murphy, who publishes a monthly electronic newsletter on psychology and human behaviour, points to a number of studies that tell us open-concept workspaces actually make us work

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BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse poorly, for multiple reasons. First, they inhibit our problem-solving capabilities. “Research shows that the ceaseless hubbub can actually undermine our motivation,” writes Paul. She points to a study recently published in the Journal of Applied Psychology. In the study, a group of 40 clerical workers were divided into two groups. The first group was exposed to three hours of low-intensity noise, while the others were given a quiet work environment. At the end of the period, all the women were asked to figure out a series of puzzles – puzzles that, actually, had no solution. The women who had worked in the noisy environment gave up early. The ones that had worked in quiet persisted with the problem-solving. Open-concept can also inhibit productive communication. Paul notes that, while open-concept workspaces are designed to increase communication between employees, a lot of it is just unproductive gossip that was once confined to the water cooler. Studies show that people

are less likely to make important calls under the watchful eyes of colleagues, preferring instead to take a walk with their cell phones when it’s convenient or foregoing the call entirely. And for managers, openconcept can be a nightmare. “I have no private space to coach or discipline my employees,” said one manager in social services. “If I need to have a meeting with a staff member, I have to book a conference room,” said another government manager. “These are designed with open-concept in mind, too, so everyone walking by can see us conversing in the fish bowl.” As a writer, I’ve never been one of these hip coffee-shop groupies. In order to get anything done, I need a quiet space. The ideal writing time for me is in the early morning. If I’ve had a good night sleep, I have many ideas stewing in my brain in the early hours and I’m unlikely to be interrupted by anyone at 5 a.m. Meanwhile, however, I’ve got to clean my office. Boxes stacked in the corner, paper covering every surface and my bulletin board with five-year-old data on it? These “things” are like people chattering at me all day long. I’ll let you know how I get on with the clean-up. In the meantime, you may want to find yourself a clean, quiet place to get that project done.

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Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

9


Dying for dignity

Connected to your community

The way forward Ontario is on the cusp of a revolution in the way the province offers palliative care, but the plan hinges on government support Metroland East Special Report

O

ntario’s palliative care agencies offer a chilling prognosis for the decades to come. With a seniors’ population predicted to double in size by 2036, and a funding model for residential hospice care that relies primarily on charitable donations, the system just isn’t sustainable, say palliative care experts. Canadians are living longer, giving them more time to develop chronic illnesses. The health-care system can also expect to encounter a growing number of patients with unpredictable life spans as a result of an increase in cases of dementias such as Alzheimer’s and other diseases. “Unless something is done in the next few years, we’re going to be in a crisis situation on a number of fronts including palliative care and Alzheimer’s and other dementias and just physical space for treatment of the Baby Boom generation,” said Christine Elliott, Ontario Progressive Conservative health critic. “We need to start planning seriously now, because this is happening in the next three to five years,” she added. “We’re going to have to start to deal with it as boomers hit 65 and start having more complicated health problems.” Meanwhile, only 16 to 36 per cent of Canadians have access to hospice palliative care and end-of-life services, according to the Canadian Palliative Care Association, depending on where they live. Three-quarters of all deaths occur in hospital, even though most Canadians would prefer to die at home.

The provincial government has failed to properly fund residential hospices, said France Gélinas, the Ontario NDP health critic. Many are forced to come up with more than half of their operating costs through charitable donations and fundraising drives. “Except for hands-on care, the Ministry of Health has not paid for hospices, so the hospices are on the hook for everything,” she said. “Fundamentally something is wrong – we don’t ask any other part of the healthcare system to fundraise their operations. Why do we ask hospices to do that?” Hospice palliative care is a priority for the Ontario government, said provincial Health Minister Deb Matthews. But she was vague concerning the ministry’s current and future plans, adding that it wasn’t long ago that hospices received no funding at all. “When George Smitherman was minister he announced some funding. I recently announced we would cover the nursing care in hospices,” she said. “So we have come from zero to 50 per cent, or whatever the number is, in a very short period of time.” The provincial government started providing funding for hospices in 2006. TIGHT BUDGET

The Ontario government’s action plan on palliative care must recognize both the growing seniors’ demographic and the province’s tight fiscal situation, Matthews said. “We know we’re not going to have a whole lot more money,” she said. “Our government is committed to keep increasing the health-care budget, but at

emma Jackson/Metroland

Experts in palliative and end-of-life care are looking ahead to a time when all Canadians can access quality care in their final days, and have the opportunity to choose where they die.

DYING FOR DIGNITY A three-part series about hospice palliative care in Ottawa Part 3: Palliative-care experts press governments to support a move to integrated end-of-life care. nothing like the past years.” In 2011, the ministry asked the local health networks to agree to a partnership to increase access to hospice and palliative care by: • Improving the co-ordination of services • Monitoring care to ensure effective use of resources • Providing fair access to hospices across the province • Improving palliative care at longterm care homes and hospitals • Providing care using an inter-disciplinary team and setting standards for end-of-life care The partnership agreement also recommends the provincial government draft a policy statement support-

28%

of Canadians aged 15 years and older provide care to a family member or friend Source: Statistics Canada 2012 General Social Survey on Caregiving and Care Receiving

10

Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

ing consistent palliative care planning across every region. “So, within basically the same envelope, we have to transform how we deliver care,” said Matthews. “One of those things ... is improving options for palliative care.” One option is reallocating money from hospitals to residential hospice care. Liberal Senator Sharon Carstairs, who founded and chairs the Canadian Virtual Hospice, said receiving palliative care at a hospital or long-term care facility is the most expensive form of delivery. “You want to avoid sending someone to a hospital setting if you possibly can. But at the same time you

46%

54%

of caregivers are women

of caregivers are men

need a hospital setting,” she said. “It’s turf war. It’s about moving the dollars out of the hospital system and into the community.” By funding more hospice beds, the province can reduce the burden on hospitals’ emergency rooms and acute care beds, according to a report published in 2009 by the Hospice Association of Ontario’s Residential Hospice Working Group. An acute care bed in an Ontario city costs an average of $850 per day, nearly twice the amount charged by a hospice for a residential bed: $439 per day. Using a 10-bed hospice model, this would free up $1.5 million annually in health care spending, according to the hospice working group. But this money does not represent dollar-for-dollar savings, said Rick Firth, director of Hospice Palliative Care Ontario. “We’re decreasing the cost of care for the individual and we’re freeing up beds in the hospital for them to use for other priorities,” he said, adding it’s about providing appropriate care for the patient. Continued on page 13

Age of caregivers 24%

25

20%

20 15 10 5 0

15%

14%

14% 8% 4%

15 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 54 55 to 64 65 to 74 75+ years


Dying for dignity Continued from page 10

Moving forward, the province needs to set a funding target of 80 per cent for residential hospices, he said, as well as improve access to hospice in rural communities. Célestin Abedi, executive director of the Champlain Hospice Palliative Care Program, an advisory group for the Champlain Local Health Integration Network, is hoping to convince the LHIN to change the funding formula for hospices. “If we would like hospice to play a bigger role in the health-care system, it is not correct to ask them to fundraise for 60 per cent of the budget to do that,” he said. “In the rural regions, where you almost don’t have any capacity for fundraising, you cannot give them a bed and say, ‘fundraise for 50 or 60 per cent of that money,’ knowing that they don’t have that capacity.” Hospices already supplement their operations with an army of volunteers. More than 600 people donate their time to Hospice Care Ottawa to keep its services afloat.

See video of one volunteer’s story: ottawacommunitynews.com /ottawaregion-video/

The Champlain LHIN is now looking at how much money goes into palliative care in hospices and in the region. Its strategic plan identifies palliative care as one of the health network’s priorities for 2013-16. MOVING FORWARD

A big part of the solution to Ontario’s palliative puzzle lies in the integration of services, say palliative care experts. “Integration is key,” said Firth. “It’s a trend in most of the western world in order to contain health-care costs.” After years of advocating for improved access to hospice by the Quality End of Life Care Coalition of Canada, the message finally resonated with the federal government. In 2012, the Canadian Palliative

T

here’s a lesson for palliative care professionals in the way Roger’s House helps dying children. “Truly, the model we have for pediatrics would be the gold standard for adults,” said nurse Marion Rattray, manager of Roger’s House. One of only four hospices of its kind in Canada, Roger’s House provides eight beds and a home-like environment for families whose children are terminally ill. Respite care, pain-management consultations and other types of ongoing interventions are more necessary for young patients at the end of life, Rattray said. Caring for palliative children is

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program aims to help patients and caregivers create a palliative care plan that starts long before the patient is in the final days of life. “The one thing about the Ottawa program is that the community has come together and (is) talking together about integration of services,” said Kitchen Clarke. Other examples of cities offering innovative and integrated programs include Edmonton, which has a regional palliative care program that offers 57 hospice beds located in three different areas in the city, as well as an intensive palliative care hospital unit. Staff at Victoria Hospice, located in Laura Mueller/Metroland the capital of British Columbia, conLeanne Kitchen Clarke, project manager on The Way Forward, says sult with hospitals and health facilities throughout the region, and help access to palliative care is a key part of solving the puzzle. family doctors and home care teams provide care for patients dying in their • Monitor the palliative care system homes. Care Association received $3 million “There are pockets across the counto conduct a three-year national study to make sure it’s working The Way Forward also recom- try,” said Kitchen Clarke. “But that’s looking to develop a plan to deliver quality end-of-life care across the mends creating strong links between just it. It’s happening in pockets.” hospitals, long-term care homes, famThe Way Forward aims to connect country. The 2012-15 initiative, titled The ily doctors, hospices and other pallia- all the dots. “That’s where Ottawa can help Way Forward National Framework: tive care providers. It also offers guidelines for fam- show others the good steps in the right A Roadmap for the Integrated Palliative Approach to Care, is looking ily doctors, long-term care homes, as direction,” she said. Meanwhile, individuals can take to provide a best practices guide for well as acute and home care. For more information read the full steps towards dying with dignity government, care providers and palthrough advance care planning. liative care agencies for the decades report online at hpcintegration.ca. The report recommends regional “These are not conversations peoto come. Halfway through preparing The program planners develop special- ple want to have, but they are also Way Forward report, project manager ized inter-professional palliative-care conversations people should have all Leanne Kitchen Clarke said the group teams – groups composed of, for ex- along the way,” said Kitchen Clarke, has found access to palliative care is a ample, a community nurse, a special- adding that they don’t have to wait ized nurse, a program co-ordinator until someone is nearing the end of key part of the solution. A draft version of the study, re- and a psycho-social support worker. It their life. “It’s a tough conversation to have, leased in the spring, calls on federal also suggests the creation of a central phone number to allow virtual access but it needs to happen.” and provincial governments to: Kitchen Clarke said The Way For• Establish palliative care policies to palliative care services. “Right now we have small little ward project is trying to change how for all care settings and providers • Create laws and regulations to en- hospitals that will say, ‘We have a health care agencies treat life-limiting sure all palliative and end-of-life care palliative care consult team,’ and it’s illnesses and encourage Canadians to a nurse that’s done one hour of train- think more about hospice palliative agencies follow those policies • Create guidelines and standards ing,” said Lynn Kachuik, a nurse care and advance care planning. “More people need to know about of care that reflect the needs of spe- specializing in palliative care at the cific populations, for example, rural Ottawa Hospital. “Well, that’s not a it, more people need to be thinking consult team.” about it, more people need to be talkversus urban patients ing about good quality hospice pal• Compensate doctors for the time liative care,” she said. “We can only required to provide integrated care AHEAD OF THE GAME move forward together if we under• Create seamless care transitions for people when they move to a differThe push for the integration of pal- stand what’s happening.” ent health care setting, for example by liative care services is already being providing electronic medical records felt in communities across Canada, Special report by Michelle Nash, Jessica Cunha, Laura Mueller, Blair • Teach the integrated approach to including the nation’s capital. all health care providers The Champlain LHIN’s regional Edwards and Emma Jackson

Advance care checklist Think about what is right for you. What’s most important to you about your end-of-life care?

Learn about the different medical procedures that can be offered at the end-of-life. Some may improve your quality of life, others may only prolong it.

Choose your substitute decision-maker. Pick a loved one who is willing and able to speak for you, if you can’t speak for yourself.

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Record your end-of-life wishes – write them down, create an audio record or make a video. Courtesy of advancecareplanning.ca

Lessons from Roger’s House usually a more complex challenge than providing the same care for dying adults. Children receiving palliative-care are more often stricken by multiple, complex genetic conditions that leave the child with very high care needs. “We need to be connected to a tertiary care hospital,” said Lloyd Cowin, executive director of Roger’s House. “That’s critical.” That need reinforces the link between the hospital’s palliative care team and the hospice – something that differentiates it from hospices that serve adults. Those lessons could be translated into adult care settings by having medical teams extend palliative care

outside hospitals, she said. “You’d have a palliative care team in hospital, but that team would also outreach into the community, into the hospices,” Rattray said. Many hospices are affiliated with hospitals and palliative-care experts who work in a medical setting, said Cowin, but that interdependency is more vital in pediatric palliative care. One of the big secrets of its success is co-location – the house sits on what was a small sliver of spare land at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario. Being located on the same site means doctors and nurses from the hospital’s palliative care team help oversee care at Roger’s House.

“It’s very unique,” said Cowin. “It’s a big reason for our success.” The labour-intensive youth hospice model works simply because it serves a smaller proportion of palliative patients, Rattray said, making it possible for Roger’s House and CHEO to invest the resources needed to provide that high level of care. Creating a connection with families and the children themselves helps ensure the patient receives the type of care that’s best for them during the entire course of their illness, Rattray said. “The beauty of it is if we are consulted early in the illness trajectory we are able to help them all the way through,” she said.

That’s the type of foresight – referred to in the medical community as “advanced care planning” – that palliative-care professionals say would help ensure patients get the care they need – and not treatment they don’t want. It would also reduce the burden of dying adults on hospitals. The key is to let the patient and his or her symptoms dictate what time of treatment or care is needed, Rattray said. “In medical schools and in nursing school, basically you’re taught to fix. And we are such a death-denying society that we have to fix. We just have to fix this. And some things we can’t.”

Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

11


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Royal hosts honest talk about mental health ‘In my 27 year career, by far the toughest thing I have ever done is to do this today’ Michelle Nash

michelle.nash@metroland.com

News - When Denis Trottier started to feel sick, he said there were days when he couldn’t find the energy to get out of his car and go into the office. “I would sit in my car and literally cry for hours, telling myself that today I was going to make it,” Trottier said. The partner at KPMG, a tax audit and advisory company, said he felt if he told his fellow business partners, he would lose his job -- but that was not the case. “They wouldn’t let me go, they supported me,” he said. Trottier sought help, and with the support of his family and staff, doctors and councillors at the Royal, he said he got better, but life remains a battle. And because of this battle, Trottier said he hopes that one day people will feel free to talk about mental health illnesses as easily as they

can talk about having cancer. He added that ultimately, he would like every workplace to have a designated mental health care worker, much like a designated first aid certified employee. “Think about it: when is the last time we just handed out a Band-Aid?” Trottier asked. On Oct. 1, hundreds gathered at the Ottawa Conference and Event Centre to hear Trottier’s story and to discuss mental health illnesses in the workplace at the Royal Ottawa Foundation for Mental Health’s sixth annual Leaders for Mental Health Breakfast. “In my 27 year career, by far the toughest thing I have ever done is to do this today,” Trottier said. Over the course of the last five years, the Royal’s foundation has raised $2 million for the cause, helping increase research and support for mental ill individuals. The breakfast featured other emotional stories from people living with a mental

Michelle Nash/Metroland

Denis Trottier recounts his battle with mental illness at the Royal’s sixth annual Leaders for Mental Health Breakfast. health illness, including CTV anchor Graham Richardson’s recount of living with a family member battling the illness. “What if there was no fear, no fear of stigma, no fear of institution, what if there were no voices in her head,” Richardson said. “It’s been nearly 40 years, my brother and I don’t think its possible, but what if?” Trottier and Richardson asked those in attendance to

help support the Royal’s initiative to raise money for research and patient care. The breakfast aimed to raise thousands of dollars, asking people to make multiyear donations. According to the foundation, donations have already helped: • Established a professional development endowment fund for nurses; • Supported world-class re-

searchers in finding causes and treatment for some of the most prevalent mental illnesses today including Alzheimer’s disease, depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia; • Purchased special beds for patients in the geriatric psychiatry program that help to reduce the number of patients who fall out of bed and ensure a higher level of comfort for our frailest patients; • Funded an occupational

therapy program that teaches patients how to develop a website. This provides not only an opportunity for self expression, but also the development of technology skills that are transferrable to the working world; • Funded a family resource centre in Brockville to provide families and patients with learning tools to help them manage life with mental illness.

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Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

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New co-op looks to ease funeral financial burden Michelle Nash

michelle.nash@metroland.com

News - People living in the Ottawa now have an affordable funeral option thanks to the region’s first funeral co-operative. The doors officially opened for the Funeral Co-operative of Ottawa on Oct. 2. The co-op, located across from Beechwood Cemetery, on St. Lau-

Université d’Ottawa

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rent Boulevard is offering its members and the public the opportunity to hold a funeral at low cost. “It’s not geared to make a profit, but to pass savings along to members,” said the co-op’s president, Mark Goldblatt. He said the idea has been in the making for the past four years and he is happy that this day has finally come. “We hope the community

will respond, members are ultimately in charge,” Goldblatt said. The co-op already has 550 members -- people who signed on before there was a viable business plan, which the president said, was not an easy task. “They signed on basically because they felt, like us, it was a good idea,” Goldblatt said. “They believed in what

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we were doing.” Membership costs a onetime fee of $20 and offers a 10 per cent discount on any of the services. The co-operative is also open to the public, offering funeral services at cost, meaning people looking for an affordable funeral could get something like a casket for as little as $50. That’s a far cry from the $6,000 board member Beverlee McIntosh said she paid when her husband died last year. “I wish there was this service for me. I felt alienated by the whole process when my husband passed,” she said. “I felt more like if they could sell more to me, the better.” McIntosh said she is happy to know that other grieving families now have another option. “It’s a time when you are just saying to yourself, ‘let’s

get through this,’” McIntosh said. “At other funeral homes, they are trying to make a profit. Here you have a compassionate funeral director and you know it’s not based on profit. The family has control.” McIntosh said she feels this co-operative is bringing the funeral service back to a community level. Making it about a celebration of the family, not about feeling guilty for what the price of an urn is. “For my husband, I picked what I thought was the most beautiful urn and I was told it was the cheapest one,” she said. “It made me feel guilty, like I wasn’t doing what’s best for my husband. I am happy here that is not the case.” The funeral director, Stéphane Monpetit, McIntosh explained, will be paid by salary, not commission and the co-operative will offer a full range of services, from reduced costs of cremation, memorial gather-

ings at the Unitarian church, obituaries and online tributes as well as tools for estate settlement. Services will be available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, in both English and French. Funding to start up this cooperative cost the organization $455,000 and was acquired through various funding arenas, including other Canadian co-operatives and private donations and grants. According to the co-operative, such organizations have been in operation in Canada since the 1950s, with the first one being founded in Sudbury, Ont., in 1952. In Quebec and Prince Edward Island, the concept of a funeral cooperative is well established, with La Cooperative funeraire de l’Outaouais having 12,500 members and handles about 70 per cent of all funerals in the Outaouais region.

Size of park means new fixtures could spring up over time Continued from page 1

Better lighting, benches, more trees, improved access points and a wider pathway featured prominently in the comments, while some felt the area close to Golden – which hosts the farmer’s market – should have a water feature as well as improved curbs and sidewalks. It was also suggested that a signalized crosswalk

should be placed to provide access to senior’s residences on the north side of Richmond Road. Hobbs admitted the current state of the Byron/Golden intersection “is terrible.” Brian Seymour, who lives nearby and walks the pathway all the time, said better lighting would be a plus and that traffic calming should be implemented on Byron Avenue. “I’d like to see traffic on

Byron slowed down,” said Seymour. “Increasingly, it’s being used as a thoroughfare at rush hour.” The meeting swerved to get the conversation started about the next phase of the park’s life. Hobbs said she plans to “run a survey through the whole area stating (existing) ideas and soliciting others,” once the current round of feedback is completed.

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Community

Connected to your community

Popcorn fundraiser helps youth learn life skills Community - Kids heading back to school, leaves changing colours and cooler evenings all mark the change in season. But for Scouts Canada, the arrival of fall means it is time for children and youth to learn important life skills and strive

Canadian Citizenship Not For Sale Canadians know that it is an honour and a privilege to be a citizen of this country. That is why our government continues to take action against those who lie, cheat and scam the system by fraudulently obtaining citizenship or permanent residence status in Canada. In December 2011, under the leadership of former Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Jason Kenney, our government launched an aggressive initiative to target these fraudsters and send a message that Canadians citizenship is not for sale. At the time, it was revealed that nearly 6,500 people from over 100 countries were being investigated for lying about their presence in Canada in order to maintain status as a permanent resident, or in order to become a citizen. In September 2012, the number of investigations rose to nearly 11,000. In the past year, there has been an increase of approximately another 1800 investigations and our government has revoked citizenship from 27 people who obtained it illegally. This is a huge increase when you look at history. From 1976 until 2011, only 60 citizenships were revoked. In May of this year, former CIC Minister Kenney announced that a former citizenship judge, an immigration consultant and an employee of the accused consultant had all been arrested by the RCMP and charged as part of a citizenship fraud investigation. More recently, the new CIC Minister, Chris Alexander, congratulated the RCMP on charging Basem Farid Awaad of Nova Scotia. Awaad was charged with two counts of Counseling Misrepresentation and two counts of False Representation. Awaad will appear in court on December 5, 2013. These fraudsters hurt everyone. By illegally obtaining permanent residence or citizenship, these people have access to taxpayer-funded social benefits including health care and education. This means that honest Canadians have to pay more out of their own pockets to subsidize these scammers. Our government is committed to maintaining a system of immigration which attracts the world’s best and brightest. By also cracking down on those who try to abuse our generosity, we can ensure the long-term prosperity of our great nation. Pierre Poilievre MP for Nepean-Carleton

to earn scholarship money. Over the next few months, tens of thousands of Scouts across the country will participate in Scout Popcorn, Scouts Canada’s national fundraiser, along the way they will learn important life skills, gain scholarship

money and raise funds for local Scouting programs. Through the Scouts Popcorn program, youth cultivate valuable business skills such as financial responsibility, marketing strategy development, time management skills, and in the

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seniors

Connected to your community

Making sauerkraut was a family tradition

T

he big wood barrel had been scrubbed with hot soapy water and a brush and put outside on the back stoop to dry in the sun. It would take days for it to be as dry as a bone and if the sky looked like a drop of rain might come down, the barrel was rolled into the summer kitchen until the threat was over. Dozens of big fat cabbages were already in the summer kitchen on a table Father had put together by putting three wide planks on two saw-horses. A new bag of coarse salt had been bought at Briscoe’s General Store. We were ready. This would be a Saturday night when there would be no going off to a house party or having neighbours in for a game of cards. This night would be reserved for making sauerkraut and the whole family would be doing the job. I had mixed feelings about the night we made the sauerkraut. Certainly the whole family was working together brought me special joy, but being the youngest of the five children my job was menial at best. All I was allowed to do

MARY COOK Mary Cook’s Memories was bring in more cabbages from the summer kitchen as they were needed. The old pine table had been stripped of its well-worn red and white oilcloth and the wood scrubbed clean by my sister Audrey. All the chairs and benches had been moved back to the wall – there would be no sitting that night. Hands had been scrubbed with a brush and hot soapy water and both Father and Mother wore long white aprons for the job. When the work-night started, on the table close to one end was the cabbage slicer. Father said it had been made by his great-great grandfather when he settled in Northcote generations ago. It looked like a long narrow wood box with no lid. In the bottom of the box was a sharp blade that Father said could be

deadly if you accidentally ran your hand over it. The well-scrubbed barrel had been rolled into the kitchen right after supper and it sat close to the table at one end. Straddling the barrel was the wood box with the deadly blade which also, of course, had been scrubbed within an inch of its life. Now it was time to bring in the cabbages from the summer kitchen. Not all at once – they were kept out as long as possible, so that when they were finally shredded they would still be well chilled from being outside of the steaming hot kitchen. That’s when I figured into the picture. It was my job to bring in the cabbages when Father said he was ready for another one. This meant I was constantly running back and forth – inside, outside. But back in those days, a young

daughter did exactly what she was told. There was no negotiating with a brother or sister to change jobs. It was Emerson and Everett’s job to peel off the very top leaves of each head of cabbage. Beside the table were two huge baskets into which went the outer leafs. They wouldn’t be tossed out in the back yard, where garbage was kept. No, these baskets of leaves would go to feed the pigs. This is where my youngest brother Earl came into the picture. It was his job to tear down the discarded cabbage into smaller pieces. That way, Father said, it was easier to make the feed go farther when it was finally tossed out to the pigs, mixed with other slop. Audrey sliced off the very end of the cabbage with a sharp butcher knife, and that too was tossed into the baskets by the table. Then that head was passed on to Father. Father fed the head of cabbage into the wood box straddling the barrel, running it back and forth over the sharp blade, letting the finely shredded cabbage fall into the barrel. Mother used a block

of wood attached to a short pole and every so often Father stopped shedding as she gently packed down the cabbage. Everything would come to a halt and with a measuring cup dipped into the bag of coarse salt, Mother would spread in a good amount. For some reason I was never able to fathom, the number of shredded cabbages was always enough to exactly fill the barrel. The very top of the shredded cabbage got the final toss of coarse salt, then a well-scrubbed stone – the same one we used every year – was the last addition to the barrel. The stone would make sure the cabbage was well packed-down.

It took Father and three brothers to roll the barrel out to the summer kitchen. Of course the sauerkraut would not be ready to eat until it had been well fermented and was always best when the blasts of winter froze it solid. By then, which is something else I had trouble figuring out, the cabbage turned to sauerkraut and had settled down into the barrel. The amount was considerably less, I thought, than what had been put in that night in our kitchen. For days afterwards, I would sneak a peek into the barrel and would be met with the sharp tang of the fermenting cabbage. I would have a feeling of contentment come over me, because now I knew, deep in that awful Depression, it didn’t matter how bad things got, we would at least have sauerkraut to put on the table. R0012234198

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Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

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food

Connected to your community

Easy Korean kimchi salad a unique, tasty side dish Lifestyle - This quick-pickled vegetable salad and fruit slaw skips prolonged fermentation traditional to pickled Korean kimchi. Serve with grilled meats and rice for a refreshing side dish that can be made up to one day ahead. Preparation time: 20 minutes. Serves four to six. Ingredients

• 750 ml (3 cups) thinly sliced green cabbage • 250 ml (1 cup) thinly sliced carrot • 250 ml (1 cup) thinly sliced cucumber • 125 ml (1/2 cup) thinly sliced red or Daikon radishes • 1 firm pear, cored and slivered • 1 tart apple (such as Cortland), cored and diced • 1/2 red onion, slivered • 2 green onions, thinly sliced • 2 cloves garlic, minced • 50 ml (1/4 cup) rice vinegar • 45 ml (3 tbsp) liquid honey • 15 ml (1 tbsp) sesame oil • 15 ml (1 tbsp) vegetable oil • 10 ml (2 tsp) finely minced fresh

ginger root • 5 ml (1 tsp) anchovy paste • 1 ml (1/4 tsp) cayenne pepper • Salt and black pepper Preparation

In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, carrot, cucumber, radishes, pear, apple, red onions and green onions.

In small bowl, whisk together the garlic, vinegar, honey, sesame oil, vegetable oil, ginger, anchovy paste and cayenne. Season the dressing with salt and black pepper to taste. Add the dressing to the vegetable mixture and toss to combine.

Rebate controls reasonable: Watson Continued from page 1

That dropped to 33 per cent at the next election in 2003 with the introduction of the rebates and continued to fall to 21 per cent at the 2006 election. The percentage of corporate contributions rose slightly to 24 per cent during the 2010 election. But city council never identified a source for the funds used to pay out the rebates, so city staff dipped into the election reserve fund to pay out more than $667,000 in rebates since the city began offering the program. Mayor Jim Watson put forward a motion to continue offering the rebates and direct staff to identify a funding course for council to approve as a budget pressure in the 2014 budget. On Oct. 1, the finance and economic development committee also approved staffrecommended changes to

the formula used to dole out rebates: • Rebates will not be offered for donations of less than $25 (pervious limit was $50) • Donors of $25.01 to $100 will receive a 50 per cent rebate (previous rebate offered 75 per cent back from donations between $50 and $150) • Donors of $100.01 to $200 will get a $50 rebate plus 25 per cent of the amount by which the contribution exceeds $100 (previously, people who donated $150.01 to $300 received a rebate amounting to 75 per cent of the first $150 and 50 per cent of the remaining amount) • Donors of more than $200 will receive a flat $75 rebate (the program used to provide a rebate of $187.50 for donations of more than $300) The average contribution amount is $200, according to the city staff report. Corporate donors will not be eligible for rebates.

The changes are expected to reduce the cost of the rebate program from $500,000 to $285,000 – a reduction of $215,000. Adding an annual contribution of $71,250 to a new election rebate reserve fund should cover that cost, according to a staff report. Watson said reasonable controls for rebates on larger donations and identifying a sustainable funding source made the changes a good idea. The finance and economic development committee supported the changes on Oct., with dissent from Kanata South. Coun. Allan Hubley. Council was set to get the final say on Oct. 9. The city began offering municipal election rebates in 2002 after the federal and provincial governments rejected its request for income tax credits for donations. Alta Vista Coun. Peter Hume put forward the motion that originally created the program.

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news

Connected to your community

Dedicated volunteers keep Sandy Hill homework club growing Michelle Nash

michelle.nash@metroland.com

Community - A small community room is bursting with noise. Tables, chairs, and children from four years old to 18 fill the area. Some are working on conjugating French verbs, others a math problem but all are making their educational future stronger. From 3 to 9 p.m., Monday to Friday, the Strathcona Community House operates as a homework club. Over the course of any one of those evenings, the room will see at least 125 kids - from all communities in the city. All seeking help with their school work. “My goal is to have the kids graduate high school to make a difference, and to make less crime,” said Ruweida Shire, the creator and director of the program. The children call Shire auntie and parents praise her dedication to the club -- she volunteers her time. For the past six years she has been tutoring, mentoring and caring for each and every child that walks through the door.

“I feel proud,” Shire said. “When I go home I am tired, but I tell myself, “No, I am not tired I am making a difference.’” Shire has a few regular volunteers, as well as students from the University of Ottawa that help the children with their homework. The program takes place throughout the school year and Shire also runs a summer camp. Run out of the Ottawa Community Housing Strathcona Heights neighbourhood, the space is offered for free and other costs involved with running the club come from many sources. The Ottawa Food Bank supplies the snacks and juice, the local community association and the area city councillor help out along with the occasional parent sends money with their child to help cover costs -- but even then the club has needs and Shire said its biggest need is for printer ink. Recently set up with an Internet connection by community housing, the computer and printer used by the homework club are in use constantly. Because of that, Shire said

Michelle Nash/Metroland

Tahmid Karim, Fares Dweiri and Abdigani Hussein join Ruweida Shire, second from left, each day at the Strathcona Heights Homework Club. the printer goes through ink cartridges every month. “We used to get the ink from a donation, but that donation has stopped,” she said. According to Shire, it doesn’t matter if the club receives money for the ink or ink itself the club would welcome

any help offered. The director will be hitting the pavement to reach out to community partners, in hopes to find the money for the printer ink. Every year, Shire said, she thinks she has enough money to run the club, but then more

children show up. “The numbers grow every year,” she said. “On the first day this year we opened the door and there was a lineup.” Abdigani Hussein started coming to the club when he was only in Grade 6. A new immigrant, Hussein didn’t know

how to speak English, but was already in an English-speaking school. He said the homework club not only helped him survive the year, but made him enjoy school. “This was the only place I got help,” Hussein said. “At school there are too many kids; teachers don’t have the same amount of time to help you.” Hussein said that his favourite part of the club is having the chance to understand what he is learning in class. “Here they push you, they help you and make sure you know what you are learning,” he said. Now in Grade 11, Hussein is looking forward to applying to university to study engineering. Shire said Hussein’s story is like many others and she loves knowing this club is helping these children get there. “When I started this club, I had just five kids and three were mine. Within a month, there were 75 kids coming,” Shire said. “At first I was really surprised, but you know, if you offer good service, and you offer love and respect these kids can learn respect and the importance of what your community can do.”

Why Rent: Owning Your Home Sooner and On Your Terms home buyers are thinking they’ll be stuck in the rental trap for years. Scott Temple of Why Rent Canada believes that honest hard-working people looking to make the commitment to own and maintain property not only deserve the opportunity, but also the right to obtain protection to keep their future secure. A proper rent-toown program moves people towards their dream of owning their own home while protecting their rights.

When Scott first started out to create Why Rent Canada he spent a great deal of time in research with real estate and legal professionals to ensure that every step of the process kept protection of the clients’ interests in the forefront. He reviewed countless consumer-affairs publications and found a recurring theme of what tenant-buyers should look for before signing on the bottom line.

First, is rent to own right for you? Why Rent Canada puts credit counseling and mortgage planning at the front end of the process to ensure their clients will be able to qualify for their own mortgage in the near future. Licensed mortgage brokers 22

are involved from the beginning, not at the end, to avoid unpleasant surprises and disappointment. Key to the program is an affordable plan that will cover all the costs of executing a home purchase agreement. In reality, most people with sufficient income will qualify for a mortgage and buy a home after three years of planning and saving. With Why Rent Canada they can live in the home of their dreams right from the beginning as rent-to-owners while that time quickly passes.

There’s no such thing as a free lunch or in the case of rent-to-own, zero down. Scott warns of operators enticing applicants with a no-money down program. A zerodown scheme simply means paying higher monthly fees and taking longer to reach the goal of home ownership. This is where many rent-to-owns fail. The upfront option fee combined with the monthly rental credits are used to build and save the down payment and closing costs. Why Rent Canada spells out all the financials upfront and in detail and in writing so their clients know that within two to four years they will be able to quality for and obtain their own mortgage.

It’s your home so it should be your choice. Some rent-to-own operations have

Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

a limited number of properties to offer, and many only involve a single development or neighbourhood. With Why Rent Canada, the choice is yours. They aren’t tied to any one builder or real estate company, so you can have the home you want in the neighbourhood of your choice. A licensed real estate agent will be at your disposal and will be able to provide professional advice so your choice is the right one for you and your family.

Look behind the scenes. Scott Temple wants his tenant-buyers to know everything about Why Rent Canada. He and his team are open and willing to disclose the building blocks of their company. They use private investors who have come to realize that putting funds into residential properties occupied by their future owners makes good business sense. No wild unattainable rates of return are promised. Smart investors know that the key to success is slow steady growth of a portfolio based on solid planning. Tenant-buyers have a vested interest in not only keeping their homes in good repair, but work to improve the property’s livability and efficiency to the benefit of their families. And as the rental term is relatively short (less than four years), the exposure to risk is negligible.

Professional independent advice is a must when it comes to making the largest investment of your life. Why Rent Canada engages the services of licensed mortgage brokers who make it their business to know all the ins and outs of obtaining home financing and they insist that their clients obtain their own legal counsel for completely unbiased advice before anyone enters into an agreement.

Rent-to-own programs, when properly managed can help home buyers repair poor credit ratings and target their financial resources towards home ownership. At the end of the process, the worries about dealing with banks and getting turned down for a loan are gone and replaced with the peace of mind that comes from putting rental fees to work for families, instead of their landlords.

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With the local, regional, and national housing markets still strong and prices still high, it’s no wonder more potential


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Duquette’s FirewoodGuaranteed seasoned oak and maple. Free delivery. Butcher Supplies, Leather Kindling available. Member + Craft Supplies and Aniof BBB. 613-830-1488. mal Control Products. Get your Halfords 136 page Mixed hardwood- dried 1 FREE CATALOG . year. $100/face cord. Free 1-800-353-7864 or email: delivery to most area’s. order@halfordhide.com. 613-229-4004 Visit our Web Store w w w. h a l f o r d s m a i l o rder.com. FARM Dion box and wagon, $1,500; NH 782 harvester, $2,250; IH 454 loader, $4,500; JD 2350 4x4 loader, $11,750. 613-223-6026.

Disability Products. Buy and Sell stair lifts, scooters, bath lifts, patient lifts, hospital beds, etc. Call Silver Cross Ottawa (613)231-3549.

CLR449703

KANATA RENTAL

Eastern Ontario’s Largest Indoor Flea Market 150 booths Open Every Sunday All Year 8am-4pm Hwy. #31 – 2 kms north of 401

Mchaffies Flea Market HELP WANTED

TOWNHOMES 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Bathrooms, 5 appliances and more, located in established area, on site management office, from $1495 + up Urbandale Corporation 323 Steeplechase Dr. (just off Stonehaven Dr.) Kanata, K2M 2N6 Call 613-592-0548

KANATA Available Immediately

required

Moncion’s YIG 671 River Rd., Ottawa Joe 613-822-4749

HOT TUB (SPA) Covers Best Price, Best Quality. BUSY SERVICE company All shapes & Colours in Prince George, BC, is currently seeking a JourAvailable. C a l l neyman Plumber. with gas 1 - 8 6 6 - 6 5 2 - 6 8 3 7 . licence to work in a fast w w w . t h e c o v e r - paced, service company. Experience in service & inguy.com/sale stallation of heating and cooling systems, gas & wood fireplaces and all asSet of 4 Winter Tires: pects of plumbing as an BF Goodrich, winter asset. Good communicaSlalom 245/65R17 tion, troubleshooting used a season and a skills, valid drivers licence. half, selling as they will The company offers a very not fit new vehicle. competitive wage and exAsking $500.00 paid cellent benefit package. $1000.00 not on rims. Applicants should send re613-823-4205 sume to mainplum@telus.net STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS UP TO 60% Do you want a career but OFF!30x40, 40x60, 50x80, don’t have a degree? Are 60x100,80x100 sell for you self motivated and balance owed! Call: have the desire to make it 1 - 8 0 0 - 4 5 7 - 2 2 0 6 in life? You might be the www.crownsteelbuild- right person for our comings.ca pany. Call Jane 613-762-9519.

613-831-3445 613-257-8629 www.rankinterrace.com 3 bedroom townhouse. Kemptville. First/last required. Non-smokers, no pets. $1,300/mth. plus hydro. Fridge, stove, washer, dryer included. Available i m m e d i a t e l y . 613-258-4664. Kemptville. Brick, 3 bedroom home, fireplace, attached garage, built 1992. Available immediately. Located at 1106 Eager Rd. Excellent condition. 613-565-9330.

COMING EVENTS

info@karara.ca

COMING EVENTS

COMING EVENTS

COMING EVENTS

HORSE SALE SATURDAY Oct. 12. Tack 10 am. Equipment Noon. Horses Sell at 2 pm. 3340 Galetta Side Road, 1/2 hr West of Kanata. 10 min East of Arnprior. To consign call 613-622-1295

PERSONAL Gentlemen 75, young looking, excellent health, slim, 6ft. Wishes to meet outgoing Lady who enjoys: golf, senators, outdoors, country drives, family, Florida, friendship and fun. Please reply and include phone number to : Box NW c/o The News Emc 57Auriga Drive, Unit 103 Ottawa Ont. K2E 8B2

TRAILERS / RV’S

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

TRAVEL/VACAT/COTTG Exclusive, furnished South Florida Condo’s. Seasonal, 6 month rental, close to beach, shopping, golfing, pool (on site). Details call 613-267-5653.

Bachelor from $895 Inclusive 1 bedroom from $995 Inclusive 2 bedroom from $1095 Inclusive 2+ bedroom from $1395 Inclusive

TRUE PSYCHICS

24/7 Toll FREE Lyndhurst Gun & Militaria 1-877-342-3032 Mobile: Show at the Lyndhurst Le- #4486 www.truepsygion. Sunday, October chics.ca 20th, 2013, 9 am-3 pm. Halfway between Kingston PETS and Smiths Falls. Take Hwy 15 to 33, follow 33 to the Legion. Admission $5.00. Ladies and accom- Dog Sitting- Experienced panied children under 16 retired breeder providing free. Buy/sell/trade. Fire- lots of TLC. My home. dogs only. arms, ammunition, knives, Smaller available. military antiques, hunting References gear & fishing tackle. For $17-$20 daily Marg show info and table inquir- 613-721-1530 www. ies call John lovingcaredogsitting.com (613)928-2382, siderisjp@sympatico.ca. All firearm laws are to be obeyed, trigger locks are required.

FOR RENT

www.emcclassified.ca

WHITE CEDARS TOURIST PARK Large 40x50 full (3) serviced seasonal camping sites. 3 LARGE WATER VIEW SITES AVAILABLE FOR 2014 Private Seasonal Camp ground Quiet Family Orientated Boat Launch and Docks Clean Lake, Plenty of Fish Great Swimming. By appointment only www.whitecedars.ca 613-649-2255

HUNTING SUPPLIES For Answers, CALL NOW VACATION/COTTAGES Quiet Adult Campground. All services, near Merrickville, Ontario. Rideau River, Petangue, tennis, fishing, telephone. $1,200 per season. 613-269-4664.

WORK WANTED Send A Load to the dump, cheap. Clean up clutter, garage sale leftovers or leaf and yard waste. 613-256-4613.

MORTGAGES

$$MONEY$$ CONSOLIDATE Debts Mortgages to 90% No income, Bad credit OK! Better Option Mortgage #10969 1-800-282-1169 HELP WANTED-LOCAL w w w . m o r t g a g e o n t a PEOPLE NEEDED!!! Sim- rio.com ple & Flexible Online Work. 100% Genuine Opportunity. F/T & P/T. Internet MUSIC Needed. Very Easy...No Experience Required. In- Find your voice. Expericome is Guaranteed! enced Teacher. Singing, w w w . e z C o m p u t e r - speech, vocal technique, Work.com theory, piano, Gregorian chat, exam and competiRETIREMENT APART- tion preparation. All levels MENTS, ALL inclusive. welcome. 613-822-1957, Meals, transportation, ac- b.devine@studiobottawa.com tivities daily. Short leases. Monthly specials! Call World Class Drummer 877-210-4130 From Five Man Electrical Band, accepting new URGENTLY NEEDED students for private 2 INDIAN COOKS, $14/hour, lessons. Steve 40hrs/week. Karara INDIAN 613-831-5029. www. Take Out. 1600 Merivale Rd. stevehollingworth.ca email (Nepean) email: shollingworth@fivemanelec

CLR470344

3 bedroom townhouse, 1.5 baths, 2 appliances, unfinished basement, one parking spot. $1071 per month plus utilities.

HELP WANTED

Meat Cutter/Wrapper

HELP WANTED

FOR RENT

GARAGE SALE

PETS

PETS

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All Cleaned Dry Seasoned hardwood. (hard maple) cut and split. Free delivery, kindling available. Call today 613-229-7533

GARAGE SALE

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FOR SALE

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PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

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COMING EVENTS

LOOKING TO RE-HOME MY 11 YEAR OLD GREY COCKATIEL (MOZART)

Contact me at knesrallah@gmail.com or 613.853.9822

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I am looking for someone who has bird experience and has the time to give him the attention he needs. Ideally, I am looking for an existing bird owner or someone who has lots of time to spend with him. He sings, “talks”, loves to eat and go everywhere with you. Serious inquires only.

Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

23


HELP WANTED

CLASSIFIED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

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HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

EXPERIENCED AZ/DZ DRIVERS WINTER OPERATIONS

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Cruickshank is looking for ON-CALL combination snow plow/salter drivers with an AZ/DZ license for the following cities:

   

           

    

                

IS HOME FURNISHINGS YOUR PASSION TOO? CONTACT US ABOUT A CAREER OPPORTUNITY AS A HOME FASHION ADVISOR.

BRANDSOURCE. FEELS LIKE HOME.

Candidates must live within 30 minutes of one of the cities listed above.

OTTAWA BRANDSOURCE HOME FURNISHINGS

Previous experience Snow Plowing Highways is required.

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To apply please send your resume to chr11@cruickshankgroup.com no later than October 15, 2013. Cruickshank thanks all applicants.

www.cruickshankgroup.com

1000 BELFAST ROAD, OTTAWA Call Richard Laplante for an appointment at: 613-824-7004 OTTAWABRANDSOURCE.CA CLR470762

Winchester District Memorial Hospital (WDMH) is a rural community teaching hospital located 40 minutes south of Ottawa. Our clinical and academic mission is rooted in our philosophy of personalized service that brings care closer to home for the 90,000 residents we serve. WDMH is a full-service hospital that responds to the needs of our community, from childbirth to complex care and geriatrics. We are a hub site for cancer care, dialysis and cataract surgery and offer specialty clinics with visiting specialists from Ottawa hospitals. We are actively seeking candidates for the position of:

s0ERMANENT&ULLTIME/BSTETRICAL.URSES For further details on this position, please visit our website at www.wdmh.on.ca

CL438562_1010

Cruickshank Construction, a leading road builder and aggregate supplier located in Ontario and Alberta has immediate openings for:

Please forward your resume to the attention of Manager- Recruitment, Compensation and BeneďŹ ts, WDMH, 566 Louise Street, Winchester, Ontario K0C 2K0. You may also fax your resume to 613-774-7231 or email to kchambers@wdmh.on.ca We thank all participants, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

Network

ADVERTISE ACROSS ONTARIO OR ACROSS THE COUNTRY! For more information contact your local newspaper.

HEALTH

1 in 5 Canadians will experience a mental health issue in their lifetime Mental Health Helpline 1-866-531-2600 www.MentalHealthHelpline.ca    Mental Health Helpline on Facebook or @ConnexOntario on Twitter

FOR SALE

#1 HIGH SPEED INTERNET $32.95/Month Absolutely no ports are blocked Unlimited Downloading Up to 11Mbps Download & 800Kbps Upload  www.acanac.ca or  1-866-281-3538 SAWMILLS from only $4,897 - MAKE M O N E Y & S AV E M O N E Y w i t h your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready

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VACATION/TRAVEL DISCOVERY TOURS - CUBA, COSTA RICA or EL SALVADOR Unique 2 week escorted tours b a l a n c e h i s t o r y, n a t u r e a n d culture. Small groups, relaxed pace. www.thediscoverytours.ca. Brochure available. CALL Toll-Free 1-800-4170250 weekdays.

AUTOMOTIVE

ADVERTISING

PERSONALS

GUARANTEED APPROVAL DRIVE AWAY TODAY! We lend money to everyone. Fast approvals, best interest rates. Over 500 vehicles sale priced for immediate delivery OAC. 1-877-796-0514. www.yourapprovedonline.com.

LOOKING FOR NEW BUSINESS and added revenue? Promote your company in Community Newspapers across Ontario right here in these Network Classified Ads or in business card-sized ads in hundreds of well-read newspapers. Let us s h o w y o u h o w. A s k a b o u t o u r referral program. Ontario Community Newspapers Association. Contact Carol at 905-639-5718 or Toll-Free 1-800-387-7982 ext. 229. www.networkclassified.org

ARE YOU TIRED of investing in relationships that never seem to go anywhere? MISTY RIVER INTRODUCTIONS has people interested in finding partners for life. Ontario’s traditional matchmaker. CALL (613)2573531, www.mistyriverintros.com.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Want to talk to someone about gambling problems? Ontario Problem Gambling Helpline 1-888-230-3505 www.ProblemGamblingHelpline.ca    Ontario Problem Gambling Helpline on Facebook or @ConnexOntario on Twitter

EMPLOYMENT OPPS. JOURNEYMAN AUTOMOTIVE Service Technician(s) in Hanna Alberta. Hanna Chrysler Ltd. o ff e r s c o m p e t i t i v e w a g e s f r o m $30/hour, negotiable depending on experience. Bright, modern shop. Full-time permanent with benefits. Friendly town just 2 hours from major urban centres. More info    =>QX>=   ) *#["%* \"*%] ^   =>QX>_ X  X  net.

WANTED OLD DUCK DECOYS - Collector/ Researcher Looking for Wooden Duck Decoys. Interested in Buying, Photographing and Learning about their origin. FREE Appraisals, Confidential, No Hassle. CALL 613-376-6723 or X '!["""(%*# ` z          { |    {    EQUIPMENT. 40 years or older. Amplifiers, Stereo, Recording and Theatre Sound Equipment. Hammond organs. Any condition, no floor model consoles. Call Toll-Free 1-800-9470393 / 519-853-2157.

MORTGAGES

DATING SERVICE. Long-term/shortterm relationships, free to try! 1-877297-9883. Talk with single ladies. Call #7878 or 1-888-534-6984. Talk now! 1-866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet local single ladies. 1-877-804-5381. (18+) TRUE PSYCHICS! For Answers call now 24/7 Toll Free 1-877-342[#['] ‚X ƒ**"'] 

 „„……… > X psychics.ca.

SERVICES

Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

Westcan = X  > ˆ

`X X>   Recruiting Experienced TRUCK DRIVERS to drive on a Seasonal, Rotational or Full-Time Basis for our busy Fall and Winter seasons Travel to and from the location of employment provided APPLY ONLINE AT:

www.westcanbulk.ca Under the Join Our Team Link CALL 1.888.WBT.HIRE (1.888.928.4473)

AS SEEN ON TV... NEED A MORTGAGE Home Equity Loan, Better Rate? Bad Credit, Self-Employed, Bankrupt? Been Turned Down? Facing Foreclosure Power of Sale? CALL US NOW TOLL-FREE: 1-877-733-4424 (Live Operator 24/7) And Speak To A Licensed Mortgage Agent MMAmortgages.com specializes in: Residential, Commercial, Rural Agriculture, Farms, & Land Mortgages >>X>^   www.MMAmortgages.com (Lic#12126) $$$ 1st, 2nd, 3rd MORTGAGES Debt Consolidation, Refinancing, R e n o v a t i o n s , Ta x A r r e a r s , n o CMHC fees. $50K you pay $208.33/month (OAC). No income, bad credit, power of sale stopped!! BETTER OPTION MORTGAGES, CALL TODAY Toll-Free 1-800-282-1169, www.mortgageontario.com (LIC# 10969).

Have you become addicted to prescription medication? Drug & Alcohol Helpline 1-800-565-8603 www.DrugAndAlcoholHelpline.ca    Drug and Alcohol Helpline on Facebook or @ConnexOntario on Twitter

STEEL BUILDINGS STEEL BUILDING - THE GREAT SUPER SALE! 20X20 $4,070. 25X26 $4,879. 30X32 $6,695. 32X40 $8,374. 35X38 $9,540. 40X50 $12,900. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% OFF! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-457-2206 www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

ANNOUNCEMENTS Do you know a young star who is making a difference? Nominate them for the 2013 Junior Citizen Award. Nomination forms at www.ocna.org/juniorcitizen, from this newspaper, or call 905-639-8720 ext 221.

Connect with Ontarians – extend your business reach! www.networkclassified.org 24

DRIVERS WANTED

WESTCAN will be hosting a series of Open Houses in Ontario from October 17-19. CONFIRMED ARE: October 17, 2013: - London Husky, Hwy 401 Exit 195 & Hwy 74, 10am-2pm - Brantford Esso Truck Stop, 11 Sinclair Blvd, 6-9pm October 18, 2013: - Kitchener Petro-Pass, 120 Conestoga College BV, 10am-2pm. October 19, 2013: - Pickering Flying J, Hwy 401 Exit 399 (Brock Road), 10am-2pm More details to follow regarding additional locations LAIDLAW CARRIERS VAN DIVISION requires experienced AZ licensed drivers to run the U.S. Premium mileage rate. Home weekly. New equipment. Also hiring Owner Operators. 1-800-263-8267

COMING EVENTS G r o w M a r i j u a n a C o m m e r c i a l l y. Canadian Commercial Production Licensing Convention October 26th & 27th. Toronto Airport, Marriot Hotel. www.greenlineacademy.com. Tickets 1-855-860-8611 or 250-870-1882.


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UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iiĂ&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;,>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;-iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;

613-566-7077

DYNAMIC HOME RENOVATIONS BATHROOMS KITCHENS PAINTING DRYWALL INSTALLATIONS

R0011950143

A/C HEATING

1010.R0012349114

PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL BASEMENTS ALL TYPES OF FLOORING REPAIRS ADDITIONS

BILINGUAL SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES ~ ALL WORK FULLY GUARANTEED SENIORS DISCOUNT

613â&#x20AC;&#x201C;601â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9559 Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

25


Connected to your community

Business Directory Connecting People and Businesses! LANDSCAPING

R0011950273 1013.367796

HERITAGE LAWN CARE

Relevelling - Re-laying existing stones

0418.R0012028314

Toll Free 1-855-843-1592 www.insultech.ca

+

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LANDSCAPING

Estimates 613-219-3940

MASONRY

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;WEE LOADSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

613-880-1422 & 613-838-5344

R0012342895-1003

Tim Steele Ent.

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613-224-5104

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692-1478

UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160;,iÂŤ>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192; UĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;7Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D; UĂ&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â?Â&#x153;VÂ&#x17D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x192; UĂ&#x160;*>Ă&#x20AC;}Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;} Ă&#x17D;xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17E;i>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;iĂ?ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;Vi Ă&#x2022;Â?Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;i` -iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;

0418.R0012029344

PAINTING

New Era Masonry Specializing in Chimney Repairs Re-pointing Brick, Block and Stone Free Estimates New Home Construction

0307.R0011950223

Independently d l owned d and d operated

-iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;ÂŤĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192; FREE upgrade to Architectural Shingles We will Beat any Reasonable Estimate

613-227-2298

+&''3&:."35*/rĹŹĹŹr martinjeffrey@rogers.com

www.jsrooďŹ ng.ca

SPECIALIZING IN: r#BTFNFOUTr#BUISPPNTr,JUDIFOTr%FDLT r$SPXONPVMEJOHr1BJOUJOHr&UD 10% DISCOUNT FOR SENIORS.

BH ROOFING Residential Shingle Specialist Quality Workmanship Fully Insured â&#x20AC;˘ Free Estimates Written Guarantee on 15 Years E H of T E Y Labour AV

R S N EVE O T S D H SIGNEACT R CONT

30 YEARS EXPERIENCE

613-277-9713

TREE SERVICE

MEADOW REACH UP TO 279,000

0314.R0011950041

ROOFING

Proudly serving Ottawa and surrounding areas since 1995. The GM has his Degree in Interior Design and is an artist as well. If you are looking for Professional Renovations with a Guarantee backing the craftsmanship, this is the Renovator for you.

TREE SERVICE

Roof Top Snow Removal

0425.R0012042853

Also available Trailer Rentals for Garbage Removal

Tree & Stump Removal Tree & Hedge Trimming Free Estimates Fully Insured Seniors Discounts

Call Ray 613-226-3043 Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

B0404.R0012010310

20 Years experience - 10 Year Workmanship Guarantee

0725.R0012223522

R0011950118

R0012150307_0613

ROOFING

Residential Shingle Specialist UĂ&#x160;+Ă&#x2022;>Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;7Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;i`Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iiĂ&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160;,iÂŤ>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;7iÂ?VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x160;UĂ&#x160;7Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;ii

CertiďŹ ed RerooďŹ ng g & Flat Roof Installers s Extended Warranty Free Estimates s Reasonable Rates s Fully Insured

Master Painters

20 years experience, Interior/Exterior, %SZXBMMJOHr1MBTUFSJOHr8BMMQBQFSJOH 1SPGFTTJPOBM&OHJOFFS 2 year warranty on workmanship FREE ESTIMATES

ROOFING

JM

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PAINTING

613-293-4104

ROOFING

Member of CRC Roof PRO

Cell: (613)978-3443

25 Years

R0012311858

www.axcellpainting.com

ROOFING

26

Safari Plumbing Ltd. The White Glove Plumberâ&#x201E;˘ 613-224-6335

(613)623-9410

A.G. DESIGNS & RENOVATIONS

CONSUMER ALERT!

s&REE7RITTEN%STIMATES s.O#HARGEFOR-INOR0REPARATION s&REE5PGRADETO@,IFEMASTER4OP ,INE0AINT

Landscaping: Interlock Pavers - Patio Stones Retaining Walls - Decks - Sheds - Fencing etc.

RENOVATIONS

Are You Fed Up With Your Plumbing Leaks And Slow Drains?

 / ,",Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160; 8/ ,",Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;ÂŁnĂ&#x160;9Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160; 8* , Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;+1/9Ă&#x160;7", -*Ă&#x160; Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;9,Ă&#x160;1, / Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;" Ă&#x160;/ tĂ&#x160;" Ă&#x160; 1  /tĂ&#x160;UĂ&#x160;-/** Ă&#x160;, *,-Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;, --Ă&#x160;-*,9 

Tree & Shrub: Pruning - Removal - Planting Hedge Trimming - Bed Design & Installation

613-733-6336 Website â&#x20AC;&#x201C; www.Brennan-brothers.com

PLUMBING

Before you decide to call any plumber, make sure you know the facts. Find out what most plumbers hope you never find out! Avoid the 6 Costly Mistakes people make every day when choosing a plumber. Call our 24 hour pre-recorded Consumer Awareness Message at 1-800-820-7281.

Lawn: Cutting - Fertilizing - Aerating Seeding - Top Dressing - New Sod

15% Fall Discount

Call (613)301-1582 Email: neweramasonry@live.com

West: ROB 613-762-5577 East: CHRIS 613-276-2848

Complete Service Including:

PAINTING

MASONRY

CTS MASONRY

1-3 yds of Garden Soil, Topsoil, Stone, Mulch & Riverstone

R0012258728-0822

Custom Home Specialists

0418.R0012029168

UĂ&#x160;/Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;>Â?Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x20AC; UĂ&#x160; VÂ&#x153; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;

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R0011561700

UĂ&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x153;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;`iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192; UĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x160;,iĂ&#x152;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x152;iÂŤĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x192; Walls UĂ&#x160;*>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x160;,i}Ă&#x2022;Â?>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160;7>Â?Â&#x17D;Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;­Ă&#x203A;>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;ÂŽ EĂ&#x160;,>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;i`Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160;Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;iĂ&#x20AC;Li`Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;LĂ&#x192;

613-843-1592

Lawn/Tree Landscape Maintenance Limited

www.heritagelawncare.ca

STONE SPECIALISTS IN: UĂ&#x160;-ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;>Â&#x201C; UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;1ÂŤ}Ă&#x20AC;>`iĂ&#x192;

LANDSCAPING

R0012329878

INTERLOCK

613

INSULATION

1010.R0012349115

HOMES EVERY WEEK CONTACT: SHARON AT 613-688-1483 or email srussell@thenewsemc.ca


R0012349110

Connected to your community

R0012197108

Come to Worship - Sunday 10:30 Bible Preaching, Hymn Singing & Friends

Minister - Rev. William Ball Organist - Alan Thomas Nusery & Sunday School, Loop audio, Wheelchair access

St Catherine of Siena Catholic Church in Metcalfe on 8th Line - only 17 mins from HWY 417

470 Roosevelt Ave. Westboro www.mywestminster.ca

 sWWW3AINT#ATHERINE-ETCALFECA

Holy Eucharist Sunday 8:00 & 10:30 am Wednesday 10:00 am Play area for children under 5 years old 934 Hamlet Road (near St Laurent & Smyth Rd) 613 733 0102 www.staidans-ottawa.org

Email: admin@mywestminister.ca

613-722-1144

Come & worship with us Sundays at 10:00am Fellowship & Sunday School after the service

St. Aidanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church R0012277150

1564 John Quinn Road Greely ON K4P 1J9 613-821-2237

Worship 10:30 Sundays

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WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH R0011949754

Only south Ottawa Mass convenient for those who travel, work weekends and sleep in!

Heb. 13:8 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and forever

Tel: (613) 276-5481; (613) 440-5481 1893 Baseline Rd., Ottawa (2nd Floor) Sunday Service 10.30am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12.30pm Bible study / Night Vigil: Friday 10.00pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1.00am Website: heavensgateottawa.org E-mail: heavensgatechapel@yahoo.ca

R0011949605

Sunday 7 pm Mass Now Available!

The Redeemed Christian Church of God

Heavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gate Chapel

43 Meadowlands Dr. W Ottawa

613.224.1971 R0011949536

email: pastormartin@faithottawa.ca website: www.faithottawa.ca

Riverside United Church 3191 Riverside Dr (at Walkley)

414 Pleasant Park Road 613 733-4886 www.ppbc.ca

R0012277209

Invites you to our worship service with Rev. Dean Noakes Sundays at 11 am,

meets every Sunday at The Old Forge Community Resource Centre 2730 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K2B 7J1

Rideau Park United Church Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x160;6Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;i

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;`i>Ă&#x2022;ÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;°V>Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;ÂŁxĂ&#x2C6;

Sunday Services: Bible Study at 10:00 AM - Worship Service at 11:00 AM A warm welcome awaits you For Information Call 613-224-8507

3150 Ramsayville Road

R0011949466

Join us for worship, fellowship & music Nursery, children and youth ministries Sunday Service at 10:30 am Rev. Kathryn Peate

R0011949529

613-737-5874 www.bethanyuc.com

Ottawa Citadel

Celebrating 14 years in this area!

613.247.8676

(Do not mail the school please)

Sunday 11:00 a.m. Worship & Sunday School 1350 Walkley Road (Just east of Bank Street) Ottawa, ON K1V 6P6 Tel: 613-731-0165 Email: ottawacitadel@bellnet.ca Website: www.ottawacitadel.ca

St. Clement Parish/Paroisse St-ClĂŠment at lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŠglise Ste-Anne

Sunday Masses: 8:30 a.m. Low Mass 10:30 a.m. High Mass (with Gregorian chant) 6:30 p.m. Low Mass

We welcome you to the traditional Latin Mass - Everyone Welcome For the Mass times please see www.stclement-ottawa.org 528 Old St. Patrick St. Ottawa ON K1N 5L5 (613) 565.9656

R0012134411



                 

                   

South Gloucester United Church located at 2536 Rideau Road (at the corner of Albion) 613-822-6433 UNITED.CHURCH@XPLORNET.CA

â&#x20AC;&#x153;An Attitude of Gratitudeâ&#x20AC;? Sunday October 13th. Please join us at 9:00 for a time of thanksgiving. Even if you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t join us, please take the time to say thanks to those that matter to you. Happy Thanksgiving to everyone from South Gloucester United Church.

R0012347159

2400 Alta Vista Drive (613) 733 0131 Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m. Sunday School; Ample parking; OC Transpo route 8 A warm welcome awaits you. Minister: Alex Mitchell sttimothys@on.aibn.com www.sttimsottawa.com

R0011949715

St. Timothyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Presbyterian Church

    

All are Welcome Good Shepherd Barrhaven Church Come and Worshipâ&#x20AC;Ś Sundays at 10:00 am Pierre Elliott Trudeau School 601 LongďŹ elds Dr., Barrhaven

You are welcome to join us!

R0012274243-0829

R0011949687

ALL WELCOME Sundays at 10:30 a.m. The Salvation Army Community Church Meeting at St. Andrew School 201 Crestway Dr. 613-440-7555 Barrhaven www.sawoodroffe.org

Email: admin@goodshepherdbarrhaven.ca Telephone: 613-823-8118

Service Time: Sundays at 10:30 AM

We are a small church in the city of Ottawa with a big heart for God and for people. newhopeottawa.co

265549/0605 R0011949629

For more information and summer services visit our website at http://www.stmichaelandallangels.ca â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Everyone welcome â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Come as you are â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Gloucester South Seniors Centre

Location: St. Thomas More Catholic School, 1620 Blohm Drive

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program provided (Meets at the 7th Day Adventist Church 4010 Strandherd Dr.) Tel: 613-225-6648, ext. 117 Web site: www.pccbarrhaven.ca

355 Cooper Street at Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

NOT YOUR AVERAGE ANGLICANS St. Michael and All Angels Anglican Church 2112 Bel-Air Drive (613) 224 0526 Rector: Rev. Dr. Linda Privitera

4550 Bank Street (at Leitrim Rd.) (613) 277-8621 Come for an encouraging Word! R0011949748

Worship - Sundays @ 6:00 p.m.

Giving Hope Today

R0011949704

Worship services Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

BARRHAVEN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH off 417 exit Walkey Rd. or Anderson Rd.

Sunday Services Worship Service10:30am Sundays Prayer Circle Tuesday at 11:30 Rev.10:30 Jamesa.m. Murray

Watch & Pray Ministry

Worship and Sunday School 9:30am Contemplative Worship 11:15am

Bethany United Church

Dominion-Chalmers United Church

R0011949732

Two blocks north of Carlingwood Shopping Centre on Lockhart Avenue at Prince Charles Road.

The West Ottawa Church of Christ

R0012227559

All are welcome to come hear the good news in a spiritually uplifting mix of traditional and forward looking Christian worship led by the Reverend Richard Vroom with Sunday morning services at 8:30 and 10.

DČ&#x2013;Ă&#x17E;Äś_Ă&#x17E;Ĺ&#x2DC;ÂśĹ&#x2DC;Č&#x2013;ÇźĂ&#x152;sĹ&#x2DC;ÇźĂ&#x17E;OĘ°Ç&#x2039;sĜǟĂ&#x17E;ŸĹ&#x2DC;Ĝʰ_Ă&#x17E;É&#x161;sÇ&#x2039;ÇŁsOĂ&#x152;Č&#x2013;Ç&#x2039;OĂ&#x152;Ęł

Pleasant Park Baptist

R0012294701

R0011948513

R0011949616

(613)733-7735

ËĄË&#x;ˤÂľÇ&#x2039;ssĹ&#x2DC;EĹ&#x2DC;Ĩ Ç&#x160;Ÿ_Ę°šǟǟÉ  www.woodvale.on.ca info@woodvale.ca ɠɠɠʳɠŸŸ_É&#x161;ÄśsʳŸĹ&#x2DC;ĘłO ʚ˼ˠˢʺ˧˥˨Ë&#x161;˥ˢ˼˥ NĂ&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Äś_OÇ&#x2039;sĆźÇ&#x2039;ŸÉ&#x161;Ă&#x17E;_s_ĘłƝĜsÇŁsOĜĜŸÇ&#x2039;É&#x161;Ă&#x17E;ÇŁĂ&#x17E;ÇźČ&#x2013;ÇŁŸĹ&#x2DC;Ë&#x161;ÄśĂ&#x17E;Ĺ&#x2DC;sĘł

R0012149121

R0012281323

www.riversideunitedottawa.ca R0012003076

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ǢČ&#x2013;Ĺ&#x2DC;_É´ǢsÇ&#x2039;É&#x161;Ă&#x17E;OsÇŁ Çź ˨ŸÇ&#x2039;Ë Ë Ĺ?

Refreshments / fellowship following the service

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Sunday Worship at 11:00am

10 Chesterton Drive, Ottawa (Meadowlands and Chesterton) Tel: 613-225-6648 parkwoodchurch.ca

Sunday Worship - 10:00 a.m. Nursery and Sunday School Minister: James T. Hurd Everyone Welcome

R0012199911-0711

For all your Church Advertising needs Call Sharon 613-688-1483

Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

27


Connected to your community

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2014 TRAVERSE LS LEASE PAYMENT

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TRAVERSE FWD LTZ SHOWN††

S U L 2 YEARS/40,000 KM COMPLIMENTARY OIL CHANGES ON ALL 2014 MODELS** P TO GUARANTEE OUR QUALITY, WE BACK IT

160,000-KM/5-YEAR

Whichever comes first. See dealer for limited warranty details.

POWERTRAIN WARRANTY

VEHICLE PRICING IS NOW EASIER TO UNDERSTAND BECAUSE ALL OUR PRICES INCLUDE FREIGHT, PDI AND MANDATORY GOVERNMENT LEVIES. Prices do not include applicable taxes and PPSA. Consumers may be required to pay up to $799 for Dealer fees.***

ONTARIOCHEVROLETDEALERS.COM

For the latest information, visit us at chevrolet.ca, drop by your local Chevrolet Dealer or call us at 1-800-GM-DRIVE. ▼Based on a 60/48/48/48 month lease for 2014 Chevrolet (Cruze LS 1SA/Trax FWD LS 1SA/Equinox FWD LS 1LS/Traverse FWD LS 1LS). Annual kilometre limit of 20,000 km, $0.16 per excess kilometre. OAC by GM Financial. Monthly payments may vary depending on down payment/trade. A down payment or trade of $0 and/or $0 security deposit is required. Total obligation is $10,769/$13,395/$16,266/$20,606. Option to purchase at lease end is $6,686/$8,524/$12,038/$15,748. Excess wear and tear and km charges not included. Other lease options available. ▼/***Freight & PDI ($1,600/$1,600/$1,600/$1,600), registration, air and tire levies and OMVIC fees included. Insurance, licence, PPSA, dealer fees and applicable taxes not included. Offers apply as indicated to 2014 new or demonstrator models of the vehicle equipped as described. Offers apply to qualified retail customers in the Ontario Chevrolet Dealer Marketing Association area only (including Outaouais). Dealers are free to set individual prices. Quantities limited; dealer order or trade may be required. Limited time offers which may not be combined with other offers. GMCL may modify, extend or terminate offers in whole or in part at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for details. +Based on WardsAuto. com 2012 Upper Small segment, excluding Hybrid and Diesel powertrains. Standard 10 airbags, ABS, traction control and StabiliTrak®. ®Bluetooth is a registered trademark of Bluetooth SIG Inc. ♠Comparison based on 2012 Wards segmentation: Middle/Cross Utility Vehicle and latest competitive data available and based on the maximum legroom available. Excludes other GM brands. ††2014 Cruze LTZ, MSRP with freight, PDI & levies $28,489. 2014 Trax FWD LTZ, MSRP with freight, PDI & levies $30,089. 2014 Equinox FWD LTZ, MSRP with freight, PDI & levies $37,539. 2014 Traverse FWD LTZ, MSRP with freight, PDI & levies $48,289. Dealers are free to set individual prices. †Offer valid only to eligible retail lessees in Canada who have obtained credit approval by GM Financial, have entered into a lease agreement with GM Financial, and who accept delivery from October 1, 2013 through January 2, 2014 of a new eligible 2014 model. General Motors of Canada will pay the first month’s lease payment (inclusive of taxes and any applicable pro-rata amount normally due at lease delivery as defined on the lease agreement). After the first month, lessee will be required to make all remaining scheduled payments over the remaining term of the lease agreement. This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives available on GM vehicles. General Motors of Canada Limited reserves the right to amend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without prior notice. Void where prohibited by law. Additional conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for details. **The 2-Year Scheduled Lube-Oil-Filter Maintenance Program provides eligible customers in Canada, who have purchased, leased or financed a new eligible 2014 MY Chevrolet, Buick, or GMC vehicle (excluding Spark EV), with an ACDelco oil and filter change, in accordance with the oil life monitoring system and the Owner’s Manual, for 2 years or 40,000 KMs, whichever occurs first, with a limit of four (4) Lube-Oil-Filter services in total, performed at participating GM Dealers. Fluid top offs, inspections, tire rotations, wheel alignments and balancing, etc. are not covered. This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives available on GM vehicles. General Motors of Canada Limited reserves the right to amend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without prior notice. Additional conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for details.

28

Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013


news

Connected to your community

Ottawa delegation ready to embark on China mission Sabine Gibbins

sabine,gibbins@metroland.com

News - The city’s largestever mission to China is set to take flight on Oct. 12. Mayor Jim Watson will lead a delegation of representatives from Ottawa’s business, technology, tourism and education sectors on the trip. The mayor introduced members of the delegation at C-COM Satellite Systems. Inc., a south Ottawa based company and one of the partners on the mission on Oct. 7. The company hopes the trip will help it to develop business relations for the export of their mobile antenna systems. Ottawa signed its first sister-city agreement with Beijing in 1999, during Watson’s first term as mayor. “Since that time we have worked diligently to build upon a special relationship,” he said. They will also be travelling to Shanghai at the invitation of Canada’s consul general. Walt Hutchings, managing director of investment and trade at Invest Ottawa, said the trip is an important business venture.

“(When you’re) doing business in China, it’s really important to have deadlines,” he said. “It’s also really important to bring the right people to the table to get things done.” Having the mayor at the table for business meetings is of the utmost importance, he said. “When the mayor is there, and they want things to happen, they will,” he said. “We can use the mayor’s presence to help move their transactions forward.” China recognizes Ottawa as the leader in innovation in Canada, said Hutchings. “Many of the cool new technologies that have been developed here are really needed in China,” he said. “By working with the Chinese in these areas, we should be able to develop outcomes that are win-win for both China and Canada.” Noah Buckley, president and CEO of Ottawa tourism, said the trip will help encourage tourism from China. “We have had a fair amount of experience in China in the tourism sector and we’ve been quite heavily involved in Chi-

Sabine Gibbins/Metroland

Mayor Jim Watson is flanked by members of the delegation who will be joining him on a trip to China on Saturday, Oct 12. This trip will feature representatives from Ottawa’s business, technology, tourism, and education sectors. na in the last six years, on the tourism side,” he said. Canada reached an important milestone about four years ago when it received an approved destination status for China, Buckley said. “This makes it much easier for Chinese visitors to come to Canada, and with a population of 1.4 billion, one of the larg-

est international travel markets in the world, they automatically became a very important market for us,” he said. “Since that time, doubledigit growth to Canada has come from a sourced market – China. China is growing at approximately 20 per cent in terms of visitation as a source market for not only Canada

but for Ottawa as well.” To put that in a little bit of perspective, he pointed out that four years ago, China would have been the eighth most important offshore market for Canada, but now they have escalated up to number four. He estimated they would move past Germany on the list

as early as next year. Nearly 300,000 Chinese visit Canada every year, and 10 per cent stay in Ottawa. Dana Borschewski, director of admissions at Elmwood School, said the private school recruits students from different countries around the world, and China is one they’ve been focusing on. “International students really help to increase the diversity within our students’ population,” she said. While in China, she will be meeting with parents, schools, and students, to identify more opportunities, as well as interviewing candidates who have already applied for admission. Watson said this trip will focus on promoting several types of businesses in Ottawa. “We are trying to broaden the base of delegates that are coming so that they can go and meet their purposes under the umbrella of the mayor,” he said. “There’s no question, a more diverse delegation means that we have more people on the trip and it also means that we have an opportunity to help more companies.”

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Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

29


Local events and happenings over the coming weeks — free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: ottawawest@metroland.com

Oct. 11-12

The Nepean Fine Arts League invites you to its bi-annual art exhibition and sale on Oct. 11 from 3 to 9 p.m. and Oct. 12 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Ukrainian Banquet Hall located at 1000 Byron Ave. Admission and parking are free. For more information please contact Erika Farkas 613-4402683 or email Erika_farkas@ yahoo.ca.

Oct. 17

Do you have stories to tell? Stories of courage, of humour, of a different time in history? No great expertise is required, but some exercises can help develop an interesting style. These sessions are easy-going, encouraging appreciation, not critiquing. A weekly theme helps provide stimulus. Join us to start writing the anecdotes of a joyous autobiography on Wednesdays from 1:30 to 4 p.m. Sessions run from Oct.

17 to Dec. 5 and include comfortable surroundings, time for chat and refreshments. For full information and registration call 613-695-0505 or email clderwent@gmail.com. IODE Walter Baker Chapter will meet Oct. 17 at 1 p.m. at 453 Parkdale Ave., between Foster Street and Gladstone Avenue. Women of all ages are invited to attend and learn about volunteer work. For more information, please visit

our website at iodewalterbaker.weebly.com or call Alia at 613-864-6779.

Oct. 18

Artworkz Gallery will host a Pink Party and Breast Cancer Fundraiser on Oct. 18 from 6 to 10 p.m. Come out and support the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation. Wear pink, enjoy a drink and view the spectacular pieces on display. Admission is free and proceeds from the cash bar will go to support the foundation. Artworkz is a new gallery located at 104-55 Murray St. in the Byward Market. It is a non-profit gallery that features a wide variety of artists.

Oct. 18-19 Celebrating FineFine Food,Wine & Beer Celebrating Food,Wine & Beer

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Tickets: (all inclusive) Tickets: $50 inclusive)fun. networking 6:00 pm $50 - 9:00 pm (all and To Purchase call 613.828.5556 or or To Purchase 613.828.5556 Tickets: $50call (all inclusive) email info@nepeanchamber.com Atemail Cedarhill Golf & Country Club info@nepeanchamber.com To Cedarhill PurchaseDrive, call 613.828.5556 or 56 Nepean

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Making a difference at a

One Star

Ottawa’s premier chamber choir, Seventeen Voyces, presents Nosferatu, the 1922 silent classic directed by F.W. Murnau and starring the terrifying Max Schreck for a chilling prelude to Halloween. The film will be presented on a giant screen accompanied by live choral music and organ virtuouso Matthew Larkin. The screenings will take place on Oct. 18 and 19 at 7:30 p.m. at St. Matthew’s Anglican Church in the Glebe (130 Glebe Ave. near Bank St.) The cost is $25 for adults and $15 for students. Visit seventeenvoyces.ca for more information.

Time

An Irish social dance will take place on Oct. 19 at 8 p.m. at St. Margaret Mary Church located at 7 Fairbairn St. The event is for couples or singles of all ages. No experience is needed and all dances will be taught. Admission is by donation and includes free munchies, tea, door prizes and dance lessons. For more information, call Brian at 613-523-9702 or email bmjarmstrong@hotmail. com.

Coordinated by:

NOMINATE SOMEONE TODAY! Nominations will be accepted until November 30 Contact this newspaper or the Ontario Community Newspapers Association at www.ocna.org/juniorcitizen or 905.639.8720 ext. 221

30

Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

Sponsored by:

The Montfort parish garage sale will take place on Oct. 19 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Saint-Louis-Marie-deMontfort Church located at 749 Trojan Ave., in the parish hall. For more information call the church office at 613-7492844.

Oct. 26

Woodroffe United Church’s fall bazaar will take place at 207 Woodroffe Ave. from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Items available include china, books, bake table, silent auction, toys, flea market, jewelry, used furniture and much more. For more information, please contact the church at 613-722-9250. The Friends of the Farm is holding a used book dropoff for our Used book sale fundraiser to be held in June. No magazines, encyclopaedias, or text books please. The drop-off will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Building 72 at the Central Experimental Farm arboretum, located east off the Prince of Wales Drive roundabout. For more information, call 613-230-3276 or email info@friendsofthefarm. ca. St. Matthias Church is holding its Fall Flea Market on Oct. 26 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The event, taking place at 555 Parkdale Ave. will feature houshold articles, toys, jewelry, collectibles, books and good used clothing. For more information, call 613728-3996.

Oct. 27

All are invited to join Britannia United Church’s 140th Anniversary celebration on Sunday, Oct. 27 at 10:15 a.m. Sunday services on Oct. 13 and 20 will reflect the themes for the special anniversary morning service on Oct. 27. Following the anniversary service, attendees are invited to watch a presentation high-

lighting Britannia’s church history.

Oct. 29

A lecture presenting an analysis and critique of the new militarism in Canada and the decline of the peacekeeping tradition, “War, Memory and Reaction: Reshaping History in Harper’s Canada,” will be presented by Ian McKay at 7:30 p.m. at the First Unitarian Church at 30 Cleary Ave. A question-and-answer session and refreshments will follow the lecture. Admission and parking are free. For more information, call 613-725-1066.

Nov. 2

The Friends of the Farm is hosting a craft and bake featuring an incredible selection of items to choose from. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Building 72 at the Central Experimental Farm arboretum, located east off the Prince of Wales Drive roundabout. For more information, call 613-230-3276 or email info@friendsofthefarm. ca. Parkdale United Church is holding its Yuletide Bazaar on Nov. 2 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at 429 Parkdale Ave. The event will feature baked goods, linens, jewelry, crafts and a silent auction. For information, call 613-728-8656.

Nov. 16

Visit the popular Holly and Lace Bazaar on Nov. 16 at the First Unitarian Congregation of Ottawa. The bazaar, taking place at 30 Cleary Ave. from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., will feature a silent auction including valuable art, clothes, collectibles, a flea market and home-made lunch. Great deals on gently-used clothes, books, and timeless treasures. Visit firstunitarianottawa.ca for more information.


Last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s answers

37. Ireland 38. A raised speaking platform 39. Leavened bread 40. Farm animal shelter 41. Oral polio vaccine 44. Chinese fine silk silver 45. Chocolate-colored acidic pulp pod 48. ____ off 49. Hagiographa 50. Manuscripts, abbr. 51. Over the sea CLUES DOWN 1. Stare impertinently 2. Address a deity 3. Converts hide into leather 4. Matrimonial response

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

Aries, patience is a virtue you possess, and you must make the most of your patient nature this week. Keep this in mind when dealing with family and coworkers. Taurus, keep things in perspective and you will have your cake and eat it, too. You can coolly handle tough situations, and that ability serves you well this week. Your imagination is working overtime this week, Gemini. Channel that creative energy and get started on a project you have long been considering.

Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s How It Works: Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Cancer, you will be very content for the next few weeks. Enjoy these good times and invite those closest to you to enjoy them as well.

This weeks puzzle answers in next weeks issue

5. 13th Hebrew letter 6. Dentistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organization 7. Fleshy fungus caps 8. Kill violently 9. License & passport 10. Refereed 11. Arbor framework 12. Luxuriant dark brown fur 14. Group purchasing protest 17. Insecticide 18. An island group of the S Pacific 20. A wooden hole plug 23. A purine base found in DNA and RNA 24. Spanish park 25. Atomic #18 26. Married woman 29. And, Latin

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

Leo, your heightened sense of focus on a particular task has left you wondering how to proceed in another area of life. You may want to seek the advice of others.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

Virgo, you may be tempted to throw caution to the wind. While that may make for a memorable experience, it may not prove wise over the long haul.

30. Cantonese dialect 31. Causing physical hurt 32. Short trips or tasks 35. Small craving 36. Paddled 38. Leuciscus leuciscusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 40. Parting phrases: good____ 41. Figure skater Yuka 42. Opera song 43. Create social or emotional ties 44. Opposite of LTM 45. Icahnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s airline 46. Air Reserve base (abbr.) 47. Russian manned space station 1010

CLUES ACROSS 1. Most favorables 7. 23rd Greek letter 10. Rated higher 12. Immature herring 13. Malignant skin neoplasm 14. Orange-red spinel 15. Hunted beings 16. Be obedient to 17. Excavate with a shovel 18. = to 100 cauris 19. Lose hold of 21. Highest card 22. Western Union message 27. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Show Meâ&#x20AC;? state 28. Early photo process 33. A public promotion 34. A group of statues 36. A single thing

You could get caught up in a social whirlwind this week, Libra. Keep your feet on the ground or you may be swept away in all of the energy. Staying connected to your feelings is empowering, Scorpio. Even if others donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel exactly the same way that you do, they may go along with plans to make you happy. Sagittarius, indulgent behavior wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pay off in the long run. Moderation works best, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be glad you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t overindulge after the fact. Capricorn, work and family responsibilities have put you under a lot of pressure recently. You could be in need of a respite, even if that break is brief.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

Aquarius, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quite possible you will not get much done this week, as you may be too busy encouraging others rather than focusing on your own needs.

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20

Compassion is your speciality, Pisces. Others appreciate your warm nature, so accept their gratitude and affection.

FUTURE SHOP CORRECTION NOTICE

NEWSPAPER RETRACTION FOR THE FUTURE SHOP OCTOBER 4 CORPORATE FLYER In the October 4 flyer, page 2, the 46" / 40" / 50" Sony R450 Series LED TVs (WebCode: 10241858 / 10241038 / 10269268) were advertised as having Smart TV features, however the products do not have this feature.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

Evening Thrills and Chills this Fall Winner -Best New Event in Ontario for 2012

Meeting of the Near West Study Area School Communities

The public is invited to attend a meeting of the Near West Working Group to be held on Thursday, October 24, 2013 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. in the auditorium of Fisher Park Public School, 250 Holland Avenue. Schools Involved: ďż˝ ďż˝ ďż˝ ďż˝

Cambridge Street Community P.S. Connaught P.S. Devonshire Community P.S. Elgin Street P.S.

ďż˝ Elmdale P.S. ďż˝ Hilson Avenue P.S. ďż˝ Fisher Park P.S./ Summit Alternative School

The Working Group will present refined options for consideration and request feedback to assist in developing their final recommendations to the Board of Trustees. The Working Group comprised of area parents and community association representatives, has been meeting over the past several months in an effort to develop a solution that will alleviate the current and future accommodation pressures at Devonshire Community P.S. and Elmdale P.S. The solution will endeavor to make better use of space in other schools within the Near West study area which could result in changes at many area schools.

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October 4 to November 2 (Select Nights)

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There will be a brief presentation at the beginning of the meeting followed by an opportunity for the public to ask questions. Additional information can be found at www.ocdsb.ca/sch/as/ Pages/NearWest.aspx.

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Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

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Classifieds

Oawa East News Oawa South News Oawa West News Nepean-Barrhaven News The Renfrew Mercury

Community

Business Directory

Thursday October 10, 2013

City launches neighbourhood project toolkit Online service designed to help residents organize events, initiatives Laura Mueller

laura.mueller@metroland.com

News - A new website launched by the city will help give residents ideas and tools for how to make their neighbourhoods more liveable. The Neighbourhood toolkit, available at ottawa.ca by searching Neighbourhood Connection, offers tips and information about contacts and processes involved with planning a community-based project, engagement activity or event. The toolkit is aimed at helping groups facilitate volunteer-driven projects that make creative use of public space or contribute to making communities more vibrant places to live. “People come to community projects at the neighbourhood level with varying capacities to take on projects,” said Julea Boswell, a city planner involved with the Neighbourhood Connection initiative. “This can help zero in and fill in the blanks for experienced activists or (help people) start from the beginning.” The website is meant to make the resources of the city planning department’s Neighbour-

hood Connection office available to groups in the more than 100 Ottawa neighbourhoods. The office’s Better Neighbourhoods grant program can only serve about four communities each year, so the online toolkit is a way to extend the office’s resources into other communities, Boswell said. The website toolkit is broken down into four sections the represent the four basic stages of a project’s lifecycle: Get Inspired, Get Started, Make it Happen and Project Wrap-up. In addition to ideas, articles, tips and information on relevant bylaws, the site also has practical tools like checklists and a way to gain contacts for local media through the city’s media relations office. Much of the information already existed on the city’s website, but now it’s gathered and linked in one spot to make it easier to find, Boswell said. She also invited people to contact the Neighbourhood Connection office by emailing neighbourhoods@ottawa.ca with suggestions about other information or links that could be added to the site. See BETTER, page 40

Brier Dodge/Metroland

Panda-monium Vincent Campbell, left, from Gatineau, carries the ball for the Ottawa Gee Gees during the return of the Panda Game, the local rivalry with the Carleton Ravens. The Gee Gees won the game 35-10 over the Ravens.

Committee picks Can-Am League for empty ballpark Laura Mueller

laura.mueller@metroland.com

News - After dreaming of an AA baseball team, Ottawa will instead be settling for the return of a Cam-Am league franchise in 2015. City council balked at the proposed $40-million price tag of bringing a AA minor league, professional team to the Ottawa Baseball Stadium in Overbrook and asked staff to go

back to the drawing board. The only option that made financial sense is a $4.75-million contract with the low-level CanAm league, which fielded a team called the Ottawa Rapidz that lasted one unsuccessful year in 2008. Mayor Jim Watson called the Can-Am proposal “a realistic and affordable plan” that is good for baseball fans and taxpayers. “There is an opportunity to

put this facility to the use that was intended … and also open it up as a community space,” he said. The main savings are in the cost to the city to fix up its Coventry Road stadium. While the minor league team would have needed to see $40 million in taxpayer-funded repairs and upgrades to the 20-year-old facility, the Can-Am league is comparatively a bargain, requiring about $750,000 in fixes

and upgrades up front. The annual net cost for the city to operate the stadium will be $400,000, said city manager Kent Kirkpatrick, but that will rise to $650,000 by 2018. Kanata South Coun. Allan Hubley was the only member of the finance and economic development committee to vote against the deal during an Oct. 1 meeting.

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See LIGHT, page 37


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Connected to your community

Simply e-mail or mail in your favourite holiday recipe (with a picture if possible) by November 7th, 2013. Be sure to send it with your name, address, and phone number. If chosen, we will publish your recipe in our

Holiday Recipe Favourites Supplement Book on December 12, 2013

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Holiday meat Package ($120 Value)

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1 of 2 $100 Gift Baskets courtesy of Kardish Foods www.kardish.com

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Your community’s favourite holiday recipes for 2013.

1. Employees of participating sponsors and their immediate families and Metroland Media employees are not eligible to compete in this contest. 2. Contestants must abide these general contests rules and all specific rules applied to contests to be eligible to win available prizes. 3. Prize winner selection is by random draw. Winners must correctly answer a skill-testing question to win. Prize winners will be contacted by telephone. 4. Winners must bear some form of identification in

Contest Rules:

order to claim their prize. 5. There is no cash surrender value to prizes and they must be accepted as awarded. 6. Metroland and participating companies assume no responsibility whatsoever damages, be they physical or monetary, injury or death, as a result of this contest or any part of it. 7. Metroland and participating retailers reserve the right to limit the numbers of entries received from any particular contestant(s).

Watch your upcoming papers for prizing!

8. Metroland and the participating companies reserve the right to change, rearrange, and/or alter any of there contests policies at any time whatsoever without prior notice. Also these contest rules are subject if necessary to comply with the rules, regulations, and the laws of the federal, Provincial, and local government bodies. 9. Ads will be published September 26, October 3, 10,17, 24, 31, 2013. 10. One entry per household.

NOTE: All recipes must be typed or neatly handwritten. All others will not be accepted. Photocopies from books and magazines will not be accepted.

E-mail us at:

34

Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

1010.R0012348282

contest@thenewsemc.ca


Community

Connected to your community

Environmental projects eligible for grants Ottawa West News staff

Community - Are you looking for an opportunity to put your environmental ideas into action? The City of Ottawa is now

accepting applications for the 2013 community environmental projects grant program. The program has funding available to community groups and non-profit organizations who want to undertake envi-

ronmental stewardship projects in the areas of improving storm water management, enhancing and protecting natural areas or reducing our environmental impact.  Successful projects must be complete within one year of

receiving funds.  River Ward City Councillor @CouncillorMcRae For details on funding eligiConseillère, quartier Rivière bility criteria, the application process and an online application, visit ottawa.ca/cepgp or Happy Thanksgiving! contact Julia Robinson at 613My husband Paul and I wish you and your family a 580-2424, ext. 21609.

Happy Thanksgiving.

Airport Parkway Pedestrian/ Cycling Bridge – October Update On October 4, 201, the Deputy City Manager of Planning and Infrastructure, Nancy Schepers, P.Eng., announced that construction of the bridge is temporarily suspended. This decision was made in response to design concerns that were raised by professional engineers as construction progressed over the summer. Specifically, the concerns are related to maintenance and the overall lifecycle of the bridge.

Trick or Treat with the Mayor

This is an important connection in our community and as such, I have closely monitored progress on this project since the early planning stages. I too share the frustration and disappointment that many of you have expressed regarding the delays that have taken place with respect to this project. I want to assure you that I will continue advocating on your behalf to make certain that this project is built safely and to the highest quality standards.

Mayor Jim Watson invites you to an evening of safe Halloween fun in support of the Ottawa Food Bank’s Baby Supply Cupboard.

Saturday, October 26, 2013 – 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Ottawa City Hall, 110 Laurier Avenue West Trick or treat with the Mayor and your favourite costumed River Ward City characters in Jean Pigott Place and enjoy classic Halloween movies in Andrew S. Haydon Hall. The fun continues outside on Marion Dewar Plaza where you can decorate your very own miniature pumpkin and enjoy horse-drawn wagon F A Lrides. L 2 0 1 1 • Canada derives its name from the Iroquois word kanata, meaning “village” or “settlement”.

Admission is a • James Naismith invented basketball in 1891. @CouncillorMcRae donation to the • Canada’s official colours – red and white – were Ottawa Food Bank’s proclaimed by King George V in 1921. Baby Supply Cupboard. • Canada’s “Maple Leaf” flag was first flown on

I have asked the Deputy City Manager to conduct an independent, third party review of this project. Elected officials, due to their governance roles, place trust in professionals to design and build important community projects. This trust extends to those persons who we are privileged and honoured to represent. I want to ensure that City staff, and the external contractor, designer and consultants are Councillor • Conseillère, held accountable for their respective rolesquartier and legal responsibilities. I also want stringent processes put in place to prevent this situation from happening again.

The third party independent review will look at every step of this project. While this review is underway, the City has hired Delcan Corporation to examine the design and construction elements to date. Delcan will Ward Cit River identify any necessary design modifications required Please join me in the celebrating our to complete bridge and the Citymagnificent expects to receivecountry b the results of this review by mid-November 2013. F A L proudly displaying our flag in your

Please advise us if you require an accessibility-related accommodation. • Canada est un terme dérivé du mot iroquois kanata, qui signifie « village » ou « colonie ».

2 0 1

P

February 15, 1965.

I will further update you when the results of the • Terry Fox inspired millions of Canadians during his 1980 Delcan reviewcross-country are available willmoney continue to closely runand to raise and awareness for cancer monitor progress onresearch. this project to ensure that this connection is built safely and to the highest quality standards. Joignez-vous à moi pour célébrer notre merveilleux pays

Jo

• Canada est un drapeau terme dérivé dudans mot iroquois kanata, qui affichant avec fierté notre votre résidenc signifie « village » ou « colonie ».

Your Strong Voice at City Hall

• James Naismith a inventé le basketball en 1891.

• James Naismith a inventé le basketball en 1891.

ou votre entreprise. As always, I appreciate hearing from you and • Les couleurs officielles du Canada – le rouge et le encourage you to keep in proclamées touch withparme asGeorge it allows blanc – ont été le roi V en 1921. me to serve you better.arborant It is anlahonour and aaprivilege • Le drapeau feuille d’érable été hissé pour la première foisat le 15 février being your strong voice City Hall.1965.

• Les couleurs officielles du Canada – le rouge et le blanc – ont été proclamées par le roi George V en 1921.

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• Le drapeau arborant la feuille d’érable a été hissé pour la première fois le 15 février 1965.

• Terry Fox a inspiré des millions de Canadiens et de Canadiennes lors de son marathon transcanadien en 1980 en vue de collecter des fonds pour la recherche sur le cancer et de sensibiliser la population à cet égard.

• Terry Fox a inspiré des millions de Canadiens et de Canadiennes lors de son marathon transcanadien en 1980 en vue de collecter des fonds pour la recherche sur le cancer et de sensibiliser la population à cet égard.

R0012349548-1010

Maria McRae

2013066028

311

L

• Canada its name from theCity Iroquois word kanata, The City Solicitor hasderives confirmed that the intends meaning “village” or “settlement”. to pursue legalhome action toor recover costs, including business. • James Naismith invented basketball in 1891. @CouncillorMcRae but not limited to those related to any delays, • Canada’s official colours – red and white – were claims, design proclaimed review changes and construction by King George V in 1921. modifications. • Canada’s “Maple Leaf” flag was first flown on

February 15, 1965.

• Terry Fox inspired millions of Canadians during his 1980 cross-country run to raise money and awareness for cancer research.

Rivi

River Ward City Councillor Conseillère, quartier Rivière

Tel./Tél.: 613-580-2486 Maria.McRae@ottawa.ca 311 MariaMcRae.ca @CouncillorMcRae

City of Ott Tel/Tél. : (6 www.Mar

City of Ottawa/Ville d’Ottawa, 110, avenue Laurier Avenue West/ouest, Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013 35 Tel/Tél. : (613) 580-2486 Fax/Téléc. : (613) 580-2526 Maria.McRae@o www.MariaMcRae.ca @CouncillorMcRae


news

Connected to your community

Rideau River pathway closed due to Hwy 417 construction

NOTICE OF COMPLETION OF TRANSIT PROJECT ASSESSMENT PROCESS Kanata North Transitway (Highway 417/March-Eagleson Interchange to North of Maxwell Bridge Road)

Ottawa West News staff

News - The multi-use pathway near Hurdman Bridge will be closed for three weeks due to construction along Highway 417. The closure, which includes both sides of the Rideau River, started on Oct. 7 and will remain closed for three weeks. A marked detour will route both pedestrians and cyclists around the construction. For cyclists and pedestrians travelling along the west side of the river, the detour will go through the University of Ottawa’s Lees Campus, across the Lees Avenue overpass and

The Project The City of Ottawa is proposing a new bus rapid transit (BRT) facility (approximately 6.25 km) along March Road between Highway 417/MarchEagleson interchange and Maxwell Bridge Road. This project will provide a connection to future east-west Transitway near Eagleson Interchange area and will help to improve transit service in the Kanata North area. Two park and ride lots are planned at Innovation Drive and at the northern terminus of the Transitway. This project is in accordance with the 2008 Transportation Master Plan (TMP) and supports the City of Ottawa’s transportation and growth management objectives by introducing high quality transit service in the area. Process The environmental impact of this transit project was assessed according to the Transit Project Assessment Process (TPAP) as prescribed in Ontario Regulation 231/08. As part of the Transit Project Assessment Process, an Environmental Project Report (EPR) was prepared to document the planned project, the anticipated environmental impacts and the proposed mitigation measures. Go to ottawa.ca/transitconnectstudy for more information.

along Robinson Avenue, back to the Rideau River. For cyclists and pedestrians travelling on the east side of the river, there will be short and intermittent delays, from the times of 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. with an on-site flag person to direct traffic. Part of the Highway 417 expansion project, which began in the spring, this project will add an additional lane in each direction of the highway between Nicholas Street and the Hwy 417/174 split. The additional lane will be used for rapid transit during the 2015-18 construction of the Confederation Line.

Ottawa District Office 2430 Don Reid Drive Ottawa, ON, K1H 1E1

Ottawa Public Library Branches • Main Branch 120 Metcalfe Street Ottawa, ON, K1P 5M2 •

Carp 3911 Carp, Ottawa K0A 1L0

Educational Institutions Carleton University MacOdrum Library (MADGIC) 1125 Colonel By Drive Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6

Eastern Region Office 1259 Gardiners Road Kingston, ON, K7M 8S5

City of Ottawa • City Hall Client Service Centre 110 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, ON, K1P 1J1 •

Beaverbrook Depot 2 Beaverbrook Rd Ottawa K2K 1L1

Hazeldean 50 Castlefrank, Ottawa K2L 2N5

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University of Ottawa Morriset Library 65 University Street Geography & Govt. Document Sec, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5

SAVEN

There are circumstances where the Minister of the Environment has the authority to require further consideration of the transit project, or impose conditions on it. These include if the Minister is of the opinion that the transit project may have a negative impact on: • matters of provincial importance that relate to the natural environment or has cultural heritage value or interest; or, • a constitutionally protected Aboriginal or treaty right

Y

IN AN

Before exercising the authority referred to above, the Minister is required to consider any written objections to the transit project that he or she may receive within 30 days after the Notice of Completion of the EPR is first published.

Energy-Efficient Complete Systems

If you have discussed your issues with the proponent and you object to the project, you can provide a written submission to the Minister of the Environment no later than November 12, 2013 to the address provided below. All submissions must clearly indicate that an objection is being submitted and describe any negative impacts to matters of provincial importance (natural/cultural environment) or Aboriginal rights.

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Further information on this Transit Project Assessment Process is available by contacting either of the following project contacts. Mr. Jabbar Siddique, P. Eng. City of Ottawa 110 Laurier Avenue West, 4th Floor Ottawa, ON, K1P 1J1 Phone: 613-580-2424 Ext. 13914 Fax: 613-580-2578 E-mail: Jabbar.Siddique@ottawa.ca

Effective Date of Notice: October 11, 2013 R0012351079-1010

Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

Outstanding No Hassle ReplacementTM Limited Warranty and 10 Year Parts Limited Warranty Protection*

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Under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act and the Environmental Assessment Act, unless otherwise stated in the submission, any personal information such as name, address, telephone number and property location included in a submission will become part of the public record files for this matter and will be released, if requested, to any person.

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Although not required, a copy of the objection is requested to be forwarded to the Director and project contacts listed below.

Ms. Agatha Garcia-Wright, Director - Environmental Approvals Branch Ministry of the Environment 2 St. Clair Avenue West, 12A Floor Toronto, ON, M4V 1L5 Phone: 416-314-7288 E-mail: Agatha.Garciawright@ontario.ca

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Ministry of the Environment • Environmental Approvals Branch 2 St. Clair Avenue West, Floor 12A, Toronto, ON, M4V 1L5

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The EPR is now available for a 30-day public review period beginning October 11, 2013 at the following locations:

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news

Connected to your community

Light rail could offer attendance boost, Watson says Continued from page 33

He questioned why the city is in the baseball business when it’s getting out of things like operating a municipal golf course and discontinuing the Nepean equestrian park. During the meeting, councillors wanted to know what the $40 million would have included, but that information is secret because it’s part of Mandalay Baseball’s confidential bid the city rejected. The city and many of its baseball fans had set their hopes on a team affiliated with the Blue Jays. Instead, Ottawa will get a franchise in a six-team league that is not affiliated with the major leagues. The team will play 50 home games a season, leaving time for community events at the stadium, according to a city staff report. Gloucester-Southgate Coun. Diane Deans was critical of the plan and questioned why the city would tie its hands with a baseball contract just as the construction of light-rail near the stadium site could boost the property’s value for sale and redevelopment. Watson said light rail provides an opportunity to give the stadium and baseball games an attendance a boost. David Gourlay of Champions for Ottawa Baseball said the process of stirring up fan support and lobbying for a pro team has shown him that there are not enough financial resources or partnership opportunities right now to make a AA team

viable here. “Yes, baseball belongs here and an affiliated team would be a good choice,” he said. “Clearly, we are not there now.” Supporting baseball in Ottawa would have required city council to recognize its benefit and invest in it over the long term, which hasn’t happened, Gourlay said. If the Can-Am experience goes well, it could pave the way for a higher-level team in the future, said College Coun. Rick Chiarelli, who has long promoted baseball in the city. Council’s other baseball champion, Orléans Coun. Bob Monette, said the contract guarantees there will be less loss to taxpayers and creates a foundation the city can build on. The proposed contract with the league, which still needs council’s final approval, would give Can-Am a 10-year lease and two five-year options to renew. It also recommends the city seek additional tenants, likely sports-related, to rent office space in the stadium. Some councillors wondered whether that was enough of an out for the city in case a better team came along or it became obvious that selling and redeveloping the land would be more beneficial to the city. Peter Bachelor, a well-known local high-school baseball coach and member of Friends of the Blue Jays Fan Association, advised the city

to partner with a company that has “deep pockets” and possibly sell the stadium. That option isn’t on the table now because there is “no appetite” to see the facility torn down, the mayor said. It would cost $367,000 in utility and minor maintenance costs to

keep the stadium sitting empty, city staff said. The Can-Am League was originally established in Ontario and Upstate New York in 1936 and folded a number of times before restarting in 2005. Nearby teams include Trois-Rivieres and Quebec City.

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Public Vehicle/Equipment Auction

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Cars: (2)08 Accent, 60-109 kms; 07 Focus, 193 kms; 07 Versa, 75 kms; 07 Aveo, 90 kms; 07 6, 155 kms; 07 Jetta, 186 kms; 07 Town Car, 251 kms; (2)07 3, 77-105 kms; 06 Civic, 132 kms; 06 G6, 182 kms; (2)06 Focus, 187 kms; 06 Vibe, 201 kms; 05 Corolla, 20 kms; (2)05 Focus, 120-184 kms; (2)05 Century, 49-145 kms; 05 Gr Am, 112 kms; 05 Civic, 192 kms; (3)05 3, 141-205 kms; 05 Gr Marquis, 90 kms; 05 Matrix, 184 kms; (2)05 Impala, 122-153 kms; 05 G6, 246 kms; 05 M Class, 143 kms; 05 Lesabre, 128 kms; 04 Impala, 140 kms; 04 Aveo, 83 kms; 04 Intrepid, 130 kms; 04 PT Cruiser, 174 kms; 04 XG350, 178 kms; 04 Epica, 148 kms; 04 Taurus, 214 kms; 04 Civic, 147 kms; (2)04 6, 197-207 kms; 04 Focus, 152 kms; 03 Civic, 174 kms; 03 Gr Am, 218 kms; 03 BMW 3, 190 kms; (2)03 Malibu, 158-188 kms; 03 PT Cruiser, 107 kms; 03 Sunfire, 158 kms; 03 Taurus, 232 kms; 03 Focus, 174 kms; 03 Passat, 148 kms; 03 Mustang, 195 kms; 03 Alero, 138 kms; 03 Aerio, 168 kms; (2)03 Century, 129-200 kms; 03 Gr Prix, 183 kms; 03 Outback, 219 kms; 03 Deville, 172 kms; 02 Focus, 195 kms; 02 Deville, 104 kms; 02 Corolla, 186 kms; 02 Cavalier, 339 kms; 02 Protégé, 194 kms; 02 Civic, 229 kms; 02 Accord, 238 kms; 02 PT Cruiser, 136 kms; 02 Sonata, 118 kms; 02 Gr Prix, 208 kms; (2)02 Sebring, 169-220 kms; 02 Gr Marquis, 142 kms; 01 Jetta, 211 kms; 01 Camry, 164 kms; 01 Regal, 148 kms; 01 Cr Vic, 243 kms; 01 Impala, 200 kms; 01 Gr Prix, 218 kms; 01 Civic, 166 kms; 00 Towncar, 220 kms; 00 RX300, 246 kms; 00 Malibu, 182 kms; 00 Corolla, 169 kms; 00 Cougar, 180 kms; 00 Impala, 172 kms; 00 Lesabre, 99 Sonata, 232 kms; 98 kms; 97 EL 1.6, 207 kms; 97 Sentra, 157 kms; 95 XJ6, 188 kms SUVs: 10 Escape, 96 kms; 08 Patriot, 71 kms; 08 Durango, 171 kms; 07 Explorer, 180 kms; 07 Edge, 134 kms; 06 Escape, 134 kms; 06 Xtrail, 190 kms; (2)05 Cherokee, 75 kms; 05 Rendezvous, 136 kms; (2)04 Santa Fe, 161-263 kms; 03 Envoy, 221 kms; 03 Escape, 164 kms; 02 Freelander, 167 kms; 02 Santa Fe, 230 kms; 02 Cherokee, 290 kms; 01 Sportage, 175 kms; 99 Blazer, 113 kms; 98 CRV, 261 kms Vans: 07 Caravan, 168 kms; 07 Pacifica, 214 kms; (3)06 Caravan, 178-248 kms; 06 Econoline, 162 kms; 05 Uplander, 180 kms; 05 Montana, 163 kms; (2)05 Sedona, 124-170 kms; (2)04 Venture, 117-168 kms; 04 MPV, 204 kms; 04 Quest, 103 kms; 03 Odyssey, 173 kms; (3)03 Windstar, 120-186 kms; 02 Silhouette, 171 kms; 02 Venture, 176 kms; 02 Caravan, 211 kms; 00 Odyssey, 178 kms; 99 Express, 106 kms; 97 Safari, 236 kms. Light Trucks: 09 Tucson, 114 kms; 08 F250, 232 kms; 08 Ram, 70 kms; 07 Titan, 237 kms; 06 Sierra, 400 kms; 06 F350, 344 kms; 06 F150, 143 kms; 05 Colorado, 98 kms; 05 F250, 147 kms; 05 F150, 230 kms; 04 Sierra, 301 kms; 03 Ram, 153 kms; 01 F150, 141 kms; 99 F150, 189 kms; 95 F150, 148 kms Heavy Equipment/Trucks: 06 Western Star 4900, 1386 kms. Emergency Vehicles: 09 E450 Ambulance, 174 kms; 99 Spartan, 78 kms; 98 Spartan, 42 kms; 97 Spartan, 126 kms. Trailers: (5) New 13 utility; (2) New 13 tandem dump; (3) new car hauler; 00 Trailmobile reefer. Recreation: 07 Four Winns Horizon boat; 06 Kodiak Skamper; 03 Chalet popup; 99 Dodge camper, 151 kms. Misc: JBC Tire Changer; Hofmann Tire Balancer; Salter/Sander; JD 332 Lawnmower; generators; pressure washers; finishing mowers; Clark PWX30 Forklift, 5000 hrs; Raymond walkbehind forklift; farm gates/panels; (3)08 Yamaha golf cart; 07 Club Car golf cart; (3) Vermac 1500C road signs; 99 Tycrop MH400. NO CHILDREN ALLOWED List is subject to change. Website will be updated as new consignments are registered Buyers Premium Applies - Terms: Cash; Visa; MasterCard; Interac for $500.00 deposit & Cash, Certified Cheque, Interac for balance due on vehicle Viewing: October 16, 17 & 18,, 2013 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Pictures and description of items available at www.icangroup.ca Click on Ottawa

available available october october 5, 2013 2013

our celebrate winter 2013 catalogue! Get ready for winter from head to toe with our Family Outerwear Event. This catalogue offers over 50 pages of coats and boots for the whole family, from dressy to casual, and includes styles to keep you comfortable in all types of weather. In Home Décor we feature our White Sale Event with great savings on over 250 items which includes bed sheets, blankets, towels, fashion bedding and more. Now is the time to stock up and get ready for winter. Enjoy convenient shopping from the comfort of your home, with 24/7 ordering and flexible shipping options.

You can also download the Sears Catalogue iPad App! Scan the QR code with your iPad to download and start shopping with the Sears Catalogue iPad App or visit www.sears.ca/iPad

Pick up your FREE copy at any Sears catalogue location or view it online at www.sears.ca/cataloguecentral Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

37


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Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

Evan Miller, 4, from Arnprior, brushes one of his family’s cows entered in the agricultural component of the Metcalfe Fair on Oct. 6.


news

Connected to your community

A FULLY ESTABLISHED COMMUNITY IN HISTORICAL BATH JUST 15 MINUTES WEST OF KINGSTON

CHECK OUT OUR INVENTORY REDUCTION SALE. PRICE REDUCTIONS OF $10,000 TO $30,000

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Years in the making The new Riverside Memorial Park was packed with smiling faces as the opening was held on Oct. 6. From left, Overbrook-area children Mya Carson, 8, Gabby Carson, 5, Mia Viens, 10, Kayla Wilton, 8, Rebecca Wilson, 6, and Daniel Gauthier, 10, joined Rideau-Rockcliffe Coun. Peter Clark and Overbrook Community Association’s Joanne Lockyer, right, and Sheila Perry, second from right, for the park’s official ribbon cutting. The ribbon cutting was followed by a barbecue and activities. R0012352624

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Connected to your community

Submitted

In an effort to facilitate volunteer-driven community building projects, the city launched a new online toolkit with the Neighbourhood Connections office at ottawa.ca/neighbourhoods.

Better Neighbourhoods applications due Oct. 21 By the end of the year, the website will also feature case studies of the first four Better Neighbourhoods projects from this year. Projects that TICO#50007364

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took place in Vanier, Leslie Park, the Brewer Park community garden biodome in Old Ottawa South and the Kanata Chinese Seniors Support Centre community garden could help inspire other community groups, Boswell said. The application period for the 2014 Better Neighbourhoods program is open until Monday, Oct. 21. Successful groups receive up to $30,000 in financial support and work with their city councillorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office and city staff on projects. At the launch of the toolkit during a Sept. 24 planning committee meeting, Kanata South Coun. Allan Hubley questioned whether a costbenefit analysis had been done for the website. Lee Ann Snedden, manager of policy development and urban design, said the Neighbourhood Connections office has been in operation for two years and is up for a full program evaluation at the end of 2014. That will include a cost-benefit analysis, she said, as well as recommendations on how to proceed in 2015.

Public Meetings All public meetings will be held at Ottawa City Hall, 110 Laurier Avenue West, unless otherwise noted. For a complete agenda and updates, please sign up for e-mail alerts or visit Public Meetings and Notices on ottawa.ca, or call 3-1-1.

Tuesday, October 15 Environment Committee 9:30 a.m., Andrew S. Haydon Hall Ottawa Public Library Board Meeting 5 p.m., Champlain Room Wednesday, October 16 Transit Commission 9:30 a.m., Andrew S. Haydon Hall Environmental Stewardship Advisory Committee 6:30 p.m., Champlain Room Thursday, October 17 Community and Protective Services Committee 9:30 a.m., Champlain Room Ad # 2012-12-6062-21210-S R0012349442-1010

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Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013


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Spinning to win Pam Munro, from Westboro, spins the wheel at the Canadian Diabetes Association’s booth at the women’s show at the Ernst and Young Centre on Oct. 6. The show featured vendors, including several non-profits, seminars, and guest speakers.

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13-09-25 1:08 PM


news

Connected to your community

City puts a stop to Hunt Club pedestrian bridge work Third party to conduct review after red flags raised over design Sabine Gibbins

sabine.gibbins@metroland.com

News - The city has ordered a halt to construction on the Airport Parkway pedestrian and cycling bridge after engineers raised concern over design features. The municipality fired Genivar, the bridge’s original contractor on Sept. 5, and subsequently hired Delcan to review the existing work and plan design modifications. The $6.9-million project includes the bridge, construction of an east-west pathway

between the Hunt Club community and the south east transitway, as well as the Sawmill Creek Constructed Wetland Pathway System. City staff said they are concerned specifically about two parts of the bridge which could hinder its lifespan and maintenance. Nancy Schepers, deputy city manager of planning and infrastructure, said it was her duty to put a stop to the work. “I want to point out how important it is to finish this project, but it has to get to the highest quality standard and the

highest safety standard,” said Schepers, who is also a professional engineer, during a press conference held on Oct. 4. The city has hired an independent, bridge engineering firm, Buckland and Taylor, to perform a third-party review of the project. River ward Coun. Maria McRae said she felt the same frustration as her constituents over the two-year construction delay on the bridge, which was originally supposed to be built in 2011. “The expectation was that this project would be com-

BUILDING A LIVEABLE OTTAWA 2031 Five-Year Review of the Official Plan Transportation Master Plan, Infrastructure Master Plan, Ottawa Pedestrian Plan and Ottawa Cycling Plan The Building a Liveable Ottawa 2031 initiative is the city-wide five year review of land use, transportation and infrastructure policies that make up the Official Plan (OP), Transportation Master Plan (TMP) Infrastructure Master Plan (IMP), Ottawa Cycling Plan (OCP) and Ottawa Pedestrian Plan (OPP) with an eye towards making Ottawa a more vibrant, healthy and sustainable city.

pleted, and to that end I have done everything I could do to keep updated about this project, and feel very supportive of our city staff in that regard,” said McRae, before stating she asked for Schepers’ feedback about completing a third-party review. “This is a really important project to our city,” said McRae. “Not only is it important for pedestrian connection and a cycling connection between thousands of residents who live in Hunt Club to access the southeast transitway, to access the wetland pathways, but there’s also access to a very large shopping plaza where people work.” The city will seek to recover costs, including but not limited to those related to any delays, claims, design review changes, and construction qualifications. Genivar was awarded a contract to design the Airport Parkway bridge in 2010. Construction started on July 6, 2011, and was supposed to finish on Oct. 31, 2011, but was extended to Nov. 28, due to concerns about the concrete. “Nearly two years have

To find out more, drop-in any time between 4 to 8 p.m. at any one of the following information sessions: Date Location October 15 October 17

October 22

October 24

Ottawa City Hall 110 Laurier Avenue West Transit Routes 5, 6 14 and Transitway routes Kanata Recreation Centre 100 Walter Baker Transit Routes 96, 118 and 161 Walter Baker Sports Centre 100 Malvern Drive Transit Routes 170 and 173 Bob MacQuarrie Recreation Complex 1490 Youville Drive Transit Routes 31, 95 and 131

The review is focusing on the following subject areas: • City-wide intensification policies, including where tall buildings are permitted • Urban design and neighbourhood compatibility in urban, suburban and village contexts • Advancing transit-oriented development at rapid transit stations and along priority corridors • Developing a strategy for the City’s employment lands • Evaluating all of the City’s future pedestrian, cycling, transit and road infrastructure requirements and identifying transportation-related solutions and networks • Evaluating and identifying all major public water and wastewater needs, including stormwater management and water and wastewater services in rural areas, and • Assessing affordability and identifying priorities, including comprehensive implementation strategies The OP is being updated in accordance with the Ontario Planning Act. The TMP and IMP updates are being conducted in accordance with Phases 1 and 2 of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment process, an approved process under the Ontario Environmental Assessment Act. Go to ottawa.ca/liveableottawa and add your name to our mailing list for updates and to find out more about the project. If you have any questions, please phone 311 or send any comments you may have to planning@ottawa.ca

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Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

passed since that time, and during which the concrete of the lower portion of the main tower was poured, subsequently demolished, and re-poured in October 2012,” said Schepers. Other work for the project has been completed, including construction of the pathway and lighting, and general landscaping, as well as offsite work such as the bridge railings. As construction progressed this summer, concerns were raised regarding the stay supporting system of the bridge and the constructability of the steel anchorage piece at the top of the tower. “At that point, given the nature of the concerns that were raised, I was not prepared to move forward with these particular elements until I was satisfied that the concerns raised were either dismissed or, if validated, that they were corrected,” Schepers said. Based on the concerns, Buckland and Taylor were called in to do a peer review at the end of August after Genivar refused to make any modifications. McRae warned that as ward councillor, if she was not sat-

isfied with the review, and if there was any information lacking in the document, she would pursue a review by the auditor general. In the meantime, Louis W. Bray Construction Ltd. has temporarily suspended any work on site. It is possible Bray will continue with the construction after the peer review is complete. McRae said the third-party review will also shed light on how the city got to this point. Based on Buckland and Taylor’s recommendation, the city directed Genivar to initiate design modifications for the bridge. The city reached an impasse with Genivar, and their services were terminated. The city awarded a contract to Delcan to modify and assume full responsibility for the bridge design. At the request of the councillor, the city will be initiating an independent, comprehensive third-party review of the entire bridge project and its findings will be reported back to the mayor and council, as well as the finance and economic development committee.

Building a Liveable Ottawa 2031 Release of the Transportation Master Plan, the Ottawa Cycling Plan and the Ottawa Pedestrian Plan What will Ottawa’s transportation network look like in the years to come? How will we move around the city on the bus, in our cars, on our bikes or on foot? How does the way we move around our neighbourhoods fit in with the way the city will physically grow and develop as guided by our city’s updated Official Plan? What can we afford to build and maintain? To find out more, drop in any time between 4 to 8 p.m. at any one of the following information sessions: Date

Location

October 15

Ottawa City Hall 110 Laurier Avenue West

October 17

Kanata Recreation Centre 100 Walter Baker

October 22

Walter Baker Sports Centre 100 Malvern Drive Bob MacQuarrie Recreation Complex 1490 Youville Drive

October 24

City staff will be available to discuss and explain proposed plans for the expansion of the city’s transit, road, cycling and pedestrian networks, as well as the proposed Official Plan and Infrastructure Master Plan policies to guide development in the urban, suburban, and rural areas of Ottawa. Don’t have time to attend a session? Go to ottawa.ca/liveableottawa to learn more. Send your email comments to planning@ottawa.ca R0012336040-1003


news Hydro Ottawa and Christie Lake Kids celebrate success of youth leadership centre

Fire Hydrants: testing For your saFety This fall, as in past years, the City of Ottawa will be testing municipal fire hydrants on various streets throughout your community. Fire hydrant testing may result in temporary inconveniences, such as poor water pressure and brown or rustcoloured water. It is important to note that temporarily discoloured City water is not harmful to your health. This ongoing maintenance procedure ensures that our hydrants are ready, should Fire Services require their use. Over the next few weeks, the City will be testing fire hydrants in the following neighbourhoods:

• • • • •

Leslie Park Briar Green Redwood Qualicum Park Trend Village

For more information on what to do if you experience discoloured water and for daily updates on which streets will be affected, please visit our website at ottawa.ca/firehydrants. You can also call the water information line at 613-560-6089 or the City of Ottawa’s call centre at 3-1-1.

On Oct. 1, Hydro Ottawa and Christie Lake Kids celebrated the success of the first summer camp held at the Hydro Ottawa Sustainable Youth Leadership Centre, located at Belle Island on Christie Lake. This innovative facility is the first and only program in Canada that provides disadvantaged youth with an opportunity to experience and learn about alternative energy while developing leadership skills.

The City would like to thank you in advance for your patience.

“Contributing to the well-being of our community has always been a part of Hydro Ottawa’s core mandate”, said Hydro Ottawa President and CEO Bryce Conrad. “The programs that Christie Lake Kids offers build character and provide youth with practical, hands-on experience. Through our support, we are providing valuable life skills that help at-risk youth grow into healthy successful adults.”

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For seven weeks in the summer and eight weekends during the school year, youth aged 13-17 live and work together on Belle Island, building leadership and teamwork skills. The facility includes roof-mounted solar panels to power lighting, composting toilets, solar-heated showers, and a bicycle-powered water pump that works with a gravity-pressurized water system. More than 300 children and youth from Ottawa are expected to visit the site each summer to explore alternative sources of energy and sustainable living. “I think it’s important that kids can come to places like this because it gets them in touch with a different side of the world”, said Liam, a camper at Christie Lake Kids. “The Hydro Ottawa Sustainable Youth Leadership Centre has provided a one of a kind opportunity for our youth to develop pro social skills, outdoor skills, and a lifelong passion for energy conservation and environmentalism”, said Carole Gagne-Ince, executive director of Christie Lake Kids. “What we’ve started, in partnership with Hydro Ottawa, has a really, really bright future.”

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Hydro Ottawa employees helped construct the new Sustainable Youth Leadership Centre in May and have the opportunity to mentor youth enrolled in the Christie Lake Kids S.T.A.R. (Skills Through Activity and Recreation) Program.

Glebe BIA gets to work on branding Michelle Nash

michelle.nash@metroland.com

News - The Glebe Business Improvement Area is getting ready to unveil a new marketing strategy to help improve the profile of the neighbourhood shopping district. The plans are still being kept under wraps, but co-chairman Gilbert Russell said the goal is to draw people from the community to shop along Bank Street. “The retail landscape in Ottawa is shifting very dramatically and every neighbourhood needs to define why people should come and shop there, and we are doing the same thing here,” Russell said. The branding, Russell said, will have the business association look at how the Glebe is perceived both positively and negatively. Once the branding is revealed, he said the Glebe BIA will begin to host events based around the new marketing scheme. Although the BIA started up in 2008, Russell said much of this branding work is what other business associations would have done in their early years, but for the Glebe, there were bigger fish to fry. “We are a very young BIA, but no sooner than when we started we were fighting Lansdowne,” Russell said. “We were basically born and then running a marathon. Now we are going back to the beginning and building our strategy.” He said it could be a matter of months before the official branding is unveiled, but in the interim the BIA will continue with neighbourhood favourites, like the annual Glebe Spree. In addition, Russell said the BIA needs to hire a new executive director. Former director Christine Leadman left the BIA to head the just up the road to the Bank Street BIA in September. Russell said the association had not been actively looking for a director until now, but regardless they have been receiving a number of resumes. “There are people out there, talented people who want to work for us, so that is really exciting,” he said. “We should have some tough decisions ahead.” The BIA has also been reaching out to the community, via the Glebe Community Association. Recently, Russell attended an Association meeting where he said participating in the association’s conversations offer benefits for both groups. “This is our main market. These are our customers and I feel odd saying customers, because it goes beyond that,” Russell said. “In a specific way, we will help them to get known. I am happy I was there and I know we are going to keep going.” Visit glebebia.com for more information about the organization or to receive updates about upcoming events.

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Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

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Connected to your community

Mayor Jim Watson

Progress Report to Taxpayers Budget: Keeping rates below 2.5%

Community Building

Richcraft Recreation Complex - Kanata (opening late 2013)

ü New rec complexes: Orleans (open); ü ü ü ü

Barrhaven & Kanata (under construction) ü Sensplex East: Opens Sept. 2014 ü Revitalizing Lansdowne Park in time for 2014 football and soccer seasons ü $14M annual housing and homelessness program

Lowest tax rates in 6 years Recreation fees frozen for 3 straight years Lowest debt per capita of any major Canadian city Triple-A credit rating secured

Transportation

Ethics and Accountability

ü $2.1B Light Rail Transit project underway ü $340M for road, sidewalk, sewer and watermain

infrastructure ü Finally fixing the split at Highway 147/417 ü Record investments in cycling ü Reduced bus fares for seniors ü New O-Trains and improved service

#1 in Canada

Sustainable Cities Scorecard (2013)

ü ü ü ü ü ü

Appointed Integrity Commissioner Council expenses now posted online Set up lobbyist and gift registries Implemented a Council Code of Conduct Reduced travel and hospitality costs Froze Mayor’s salary and reduced office budget by 10%

#1 in North America

World Economic Development Scorecard (2013)

How can I help? ( 613-580-2496 * jim.watson@ottawa.ca

: jimwatsonottawa.ca @jimwatsonottawa R0012311370-1010

44

Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013


news

Connected to your community

New plan for Vanier prompts major redevelopments Laura Mueller

laura.mueller@metroland.com

News - A plan aimed at kickstarting redevelopment in Vanier was already doing just that even before it was approved by city councillors. On Sept. 24, the city’s planning committee approved a new plan for Vanier that allows for towers of up to 20 storeys at the east “gateway” into the community – the former Belisle Chevrolet-Cadillac site – and up to 28 storeys at the west “gateway” at Montreal and River Road – the Eastview plaza. Redevelopment plans for the Eastview site were submitted to the city just before the planning committee met, and during the meeting there was discussion about plans for the Belisle site coming to the city with six months. The Official Plan for Vanier is one of the last plans to remain unchanged since the city amalgamated. The old plan encourages big-box style development, allows for buildings of up to 14 storeys in many places on Montreal Road and restricts the ability to mix residential units into commercial buildings, is something the

city now encourages. The new plan would see Montreal Road redevelop mainly with six-storey buildings, stepping back to taller structures 30 metres back from the street in some places where larger lots allow. The plan calls for wider sidewalks and cycling infrastructure with a view to creating a traditional main street feel. Mike Bulthius, president of the Vanier Community Association, said the neighbourhood is grateful for the city’s efforts to promote redevelopment. “We see this as positive for Vanier’s renewal,” he said, adding that it aligns with the community association’s vision of complete community set within a larger city, with traditional main streets. The “nagging fear” of spot rezonings, which are encouraged by the new plan, is an issue for the community association. He wanted assurances that the tall heights allowed art gateway sites won’t creep onto neighbouring properties or be allowed to rise up higher than the Official Plan defines. The need for rezonings was purposefully built into the plan to allow the city to take advan-

tage of Section 37 community benefits payments from developers. The payments, made in exchange for more lenient zoning than current plans allow, would be put towards projects like streetscaping or other public benefits. Carole Larose represented views expressed by a number of College Circle residents that the plan would allow for too much redevelopment at the east gateway site – the former Belisle car dealership at Montreal Road and St. Laurent Boulevard. She worried there wouldn’t be enough of a buffer for noise pollution between a new development and her home. Osgoode Properties’ redevelopment of the aging Eastview Plaza site will “create a new identity for Vanier,” according to its proposal. Three buildings are planning for the site – five-floor a retail-oriented plaza topped by a 11-storey commercial/ residential tower at the corner of Montreal Road and North River Road, a 24-storey condo tower on a five-storey podium at the corner of Selkirk and Montgomery streets and a another condo tower of the same

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height along Selkirk, off North River Road. The new Official Plan would allow for up to 28 storeys on the site. The massive redevelopment would bring 600 new residential units to the area, along with 9,300 square metres of ground-floor retail and 10,200 square metres of commercial, office or condo space. The main retail building and tower would be separated with

a new road from the other two buildings on the southern end of the site. Expanded landscaping on the pocket park at the corner and along North River Road will expand the green space on the site. BELISLE SITE

Although a development application has not yet been submitted to the city, Miguel

Tremblay of FoTenn Planning and Urban Design said he is working on behalf of DCR Phoenix, which wants to build three towers at the former car dealership site at Montreal Road and St. Laurent Boulevard. Tremblay wouldn’t give much detail about the proposal other than that it features three tall buildings and would allow for “meaningful retail” at the ground level. The Official Plan update would allow for up to 20 storeys. An application will be submitted within the next six months, Tremblay said.

Advertorial

Kaitlin Corporation Loyalist Country Club Community now in phase seven Established community near Kingston, Ontario, offers ideal retirement lifestyle in a tranquil setting, minutes from the city and on a championship golf course BATH, Ontario – You’ve waited long enough for retirement. Why wait to enjoy it? At Kaitlin Corporation Loyalist Country Club Community near Kingston, Ontario, you can start from the moment you move in. “We are an established community,” says Kaitlin sales representative and Loyalist community member Ted Custance, noting that the development is well past the halfway point. “Other lifestyle projects promise amenities but are still in the planning stages. At Loyalist, our golf course and country club activities are already in full swing.” Equal distance between Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal, with Syracuse, N.Y. an hour-and-a-half to the south, Loyalist Country Club Community is Kaitlin’s signature golf course development in the picturesque town of Bath, 15 minutes from Kingston. Every home is either a detached bungalow, bungalow with loft or bungalow townhome, ideally suited to empty nesters or zoomers approaching retirement and interested in main floor living. Phase Seven, available now, is a grouping of 44 spectacular lots backing onto the 12th and 17th holes of the Loyalist Country Club, an 18-hole championship course that will be hosting a PGA Canada Tour event in 2014. Each home purchase includes membership to the club, providing access to clubhouse fitness facilities, billiard room, library, member’s lounge, outdoor swimming pool and hot tub, for a minimal annual fee. Homeowners also receive a discount on golf. “These homes not only back onto spectacular links, they also offer easy access to boating, fishing and water sports on Lake Ontario,” said Custance, noting that the area is like a mini Ottawa. “We have

culture, sports, dining, recreation; whatever interests you, you’ll find it here.” The latest phase features six detached bungalow and bungalow loft floor plans ranging in size from 1,415 to 2,922 square feet. Boasting large rear-facing windows, front and rear covered porch areas, and views of scenic fairways, they are priced from $364,990. Exterior features include maintenance-free quality siding with brick and stone elevations; painted architectural trimmings; maintenance-free aluminum soffits, fascia, eaves troughs and downspouts; and, fully graded lots with sod. Interior highlights include crafted cabinets in kitchens and bathrooms; quality ceramic tile; luxury 35 ounce broadloom; and, oak pickets and handrails with oak stringers on stairs to second floor. PHASE SEVEN MODEL HOME OPEN FOR VIEWING The stunning 2,050-square-foot St. Andrews furnished model home is now available for viewing. Carefully crafted to blend private areas and ideal entertainment space, the three-bedroom, two-and-a-half bath open concept home features vaulted ceilings, gourmet kitchen with breakfast area and patio doors leading to a cozy covered porch. It is situated on a gorgeous 55- by 110-foot lot overlooking the 12th fairway. SALES OFFICE DETAILS The Loyalist Country Club Community sales office is located at One Loyalist Boulevard in Bath, off of County Road 7 and Highway 33. The office is located in the Country Club and is open daily from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Model home open daily 1pm to 4pm. For additional information call 1-800-353-2066 or 1-613352-5151 or go to www.kaitlincorp.com

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Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013

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Three nights of fright coming to Watson’s Mill Emma Jackson

emma.jackson@metroland.com

News - Anne Currier’s ghost will be the least of visitors’ worries as zombies, witches, ghouls and goblins take over the historic Watson’s Mill in Manotick this Halloween season. For three frightful nights in October, a labyrinth of dark deeds and evil scenes will thrill even the bravest souls who walk into the mill to face their uncertain future. Bubbling cauldrons watched by the wartiest of witches will give way to a pantry of pickled body parts, creatures and other unidentified preserves. Guests should watch out for hungry zombies as they make their way to the torture chambers in the basement. The ghoulish gathering begins Thursday, Oct. 24 at 7 p.m. and continues each night until Saturday, Oct.

26 at 10 p.m. Tickets are $5 and can be purchased at the door. Haunt Nights was created in partnership with the Manotick Village and Community Association, and Watson’s Mill education officer Cam Trueman hopes the new event will make the mill accessible to people who otherwise might not visit. “I’d like to see about one person a minute, so about 200 or 300 people a night,” he said. “In time it will gain momentum and bring more people to the village.” That could raise as much as $5,000 to support regular programming at the mill. Trueman said he has wanted to create a haunted house like this since he started working at the mill. “It’s fun,” he said. “It’s an excellent way to get youth involved at a place they normally might not visit.” About 45 youth volunteers from

inexpensive

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area schools will bring the spooky scenes to life, something organizer Janice Domaratzki said is exactly what the MVCA hopes to encourage among local teens. “It’s all about engaging youth,” she said. Maya Desrosiers, a Grade 11 student at St. Mark Catholic High School, said she volunteered because it sounded like a fun way to get involved. “I don’t like to be scared, but to scare others is awesome,” she laughed. Grade 10 student Tyler Whitteker said he is especially excited to spook people who aren’t paying attention. His strategy will be “sneaking up to people in the darkness,” he said. The MVCA will sell Halloween treats at the door and families are welcome to attend, although the haunted house is not recommended for children under 10. For more information call 613692-6455. To volunteer in the haunted house email manotickyouth@rogers.com.

Emma Jackson/Metroland

Creatures of the night will appear at the mill this October as part of a haunted house program Oct. 24 to 26. Evil witch Katie Sutherland and zombies Tyler Whitteker, Sonia Desrosiers and Maya Desrosiers are just a few of the 45 scary creatures that will take over the mill that weekend.

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Connected to your community

Gloucester High turns into zombie wasteland Cross-country team hosts running promotion event for Monro PS Michelle Nash

michelle.nash@metroland.com

News - Students from Henry Monro Public School ran for their lives as zombies – students from Gloucester High School – chased them during a unique event aimed at promoting running. The event brought children from grades 6, 7 and 8 to the high school on Oct. 3 to participate in the Zombie Run. The event featured a two-kilometre obstacle course race, daring students to race to the finish line with their “lives” intact. Gloucester’s cross country coach Jason Sinkus decided to host the event in an effort to promote the sport. “What better way to enjoy running, when you are running for your lives?” Sinkus said. The “zombies” were all members of the Gloucester cross country team who chased, grabbed and groaned at the students, attempting to turn the student into a zombie by grabbing a flag along their waists.

When Sinkus suggested the idea to his team, they all jumped at the chance and after looking at similar zombie run events, decided to build the course based on what they could find in the physical education department. “They really let their creative juices flow, and I think it turned out really well,” he said. The team played the part well, dressing up in torn clothing, stumbling and growling with blank stares. Sinkus said the Orléans shop Halloween Alley helped out by getting the students zombie-ready. Sinkus said he was impressed with how the younger students worked together to get pass the zombies. “What I think a lot of people don’t realize is that cross country is a team sport, today, these kids are working as a team, this brings them together,” Sinkus said. Sinkus said he sent the word out to the local public schools, hoping to garner interest in running early on in the students. The coach said he sees this becoming an annual event and importantly, a Gloucester High School event. “It’s just great to see them love running without even realizing it,” he said. After the run, the Henry Monro students trained with the cross country team.

Michelle Nash/Metroland

Blake Nolan flees from a ‘zombie’ at Gloucester High School on Oct. 3. Nolan and his classmates from Henry Monro Public School participated in the unique zombie run event, featuring Gloucester cross country track team members chasing the younger students around an obstacle-laden course.

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Visit the oHS website at www.ottawahumane.ca to see photos and descriptions of all of the animals available for adoption. Stop by the Adoption Centre, weekdays 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Give a Dog a Home

Did you know October is Adopt a Shelter Dog month? At the Ottawa Humane Society, there are many dogs to choose from: from Chihuahuas to German shepherds, beagles to bull dogs, the Adoption Centre has dogs of all shapes, sizes, ages and breeds. There are a few canine residents at the OHS who could use a second look from potential adopters. Senior dogs, for example, are eager to find new families to love. Did you know these dogs are often house- trained and have a

Do you think your pet is cute enough to be “THE PET OF THE WEEK”? Submit a picture and short biography of your pet to find out! Simply email to: cfoster@thenewsemc.ca attention “Pet of the Week”

K-9 and Feline Spa

high-energy pup! Every day, adoption counsellors at the OHS work hard to find the perfect match. Dogs at the OHS are all temperament-tested and have had their needs assessed by a dog behaviour specialist. In addition, they come spayed or neutered, microchipped, have been vet checked and come with six week of Petsecure insurance. You can find information on all the dogs available for adoption ottawahumane.ca, or by visiting the shelter at 245 West Hunt Club Rd.

Please note: The Ottawa Humane Society has many other companion animals available for adoption. Featured animals are adopted quickly! To learn more about adopting an animal from the Ottawa Humane Society please contact us: Website: www.ottawahumane.ca Email: Adoptions@ottawahumane.ca Telephone: (613) 725-3166 x258 Time to make a grooming Ottawa West News EMC - Thursday, October 10, 2013 47 appointment 1010.R0012345832

Meet our master of the house, this is Mojo… you know when you humans say “this is a dog’s life”…well we Chihuahua’s mean business…there is no other way to live! At night I get a little chilled, and it is very hard for me to fall asleep, so I have my family well trained to make sure my needs are well met to give me a good nap and keep me warm…that is after I have feasted of course… And besides my family have to keep me in the lifestyle I have grown accustomed to…

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Mojo

good grasp on basic obedience? Another set of long-term residents at the OHS are dogs with high energy levels, such as border collies, huskies, and boxers. These dogs make wonderful companions but need ample exercise and stimulation from their humans. Like being outdoors? These dogs make the perfect pal for the adventurous! Sign up for agility or tracking with you local dog obedience schools; these are great bonding and stimulating activities – sure to wear out your


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