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Inside Students NEWS

Findlay Creek sisters use their birthday wishes to help others in need. – Page 3

protest loss of activities Half of all public schools fail to register teams Eddie Rwema eddie.rwema@metroland.com

NEWS

Garbage collection will change to every two weeks starting Oct. 29. – Page 7

SPORTS

Charity ping pong tournament gears up for Sept. 28. – Page 25

EMC news – Nearly 200 public high school students protested the loss of their extracurricular activities outside Premier Dalton McGuinty’s office in Alta Vista on Sept. 19. Eleven public high schools failed to sign up for regular season play in the National Capital Secondary School Athletic Association this year, after teachers withdrew from extracurricular activities such as supervising clubs or coaching sports’ teams in protest of the Liberal government’s legislation. The new legislation, Bill 115, freezes teachers’ wages, bans strikes for two years and prevents them from banking sick days. Danielle Saunders-Gauthier, a Grade 11 Ridgemont High School student who has played basketball, volleyball, rugby and football for her school, organized the protest. “The message we are trying to send out is that the bill was really negative not just to the teachers but to students as well,� she said. Danielle took a basketball course this summer to prepare her to play in the fall NCSSAA season. “I didn’t have any idea that by the time this (fall) comes around, there was going to be no sports team anymore,� said Danielle. Across the city, students have staged protests to express their outrage over Bill 115, said Danielle. See STUDENTS, page 4

EDDIE RWEMA/METROLAND

Olympians Conlin McCabe, left, and Alexandra Bruce, far right, were at Alta Vista Public School on Sept. 19 with a mission to inspire students like Mitchell Grenon and Niem Ahmed to never give-up on their goals and dreams.

Olympians offer life lessons to students Alta Vista Public School children treated to visit by athletes on Sept. 19 Eddie Rwema eddie.rwema@metroland.com

EMC news – Olympians Conlin McCabe and Alexandra Bruce received a hero’s welcome as they walked into the gymnasium of Alta Vista Public School on Sept. 19. The athletes said they hoped to inspire the students to work hard to achieve their goals whether it was winning an Olympic medal or achiev-

ing success in the classroom. “As long as you have belief in yourself and in what you are doing, then you can really achieve anything you want to,� said Bruce, who finished fourth in badminton women’s doubles at the 2012 London Summer Olympics. “Don’t let the highs get to high and the lows to low,� said McCabe. The duo were among more than 100 Olympic and Paralympic athletes who swept through Ottawa on Sept. 19, visiting 20 schools, CHEO and both the Senate and House of Commons on Parliament Hill. McCabe, a native of Brockville, and Bruce, who hails from Toronto, shared their story and asked students to never give up on their own goals and

dreams. McCabe said it worked for him, and it can work for them too. “I put in so much work and so much sacrifice and now that I have a medal, it is just amazing,� he said. McCabe captured silver as a member of the men’s eight rowing team on Aug. 1. “It has just been an amazing experience, such a warm welcome home and great opportunities that have come from it – I couldn’t be happier,� he said. Bruce and her teammate made history by making it to the medal round as no Canadian has ever won an Olympic badminton medal or even made the semifinals. “Being at the Olympics was

such an unbelievable experience,� she told the students, adding that competing on a world stage was hard to describe. The only way people can excel in life is if they learn how to work as a team, said Bruce. During the question and answer session, the kids wanted to know how the Olympians were able to be successful. The answer was “work hard.� For Alta Vista Public School vice principle Sandy Owens, the visit introduced kids to their future role models. “It lets them know that if they have a dream they can work hard and succeed. They are good models for our student,� she said.

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NEWS

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Bruce House executive receives jubilee medal Long-time advocate for HIV/AIDS advocacy and support Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

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EMC news - A long-time advocate for people with AIDS and HIV was recently honoured for his efforts when he received a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. Bruce House executive director J.J Koornstra was presented with the medal by Ottawa Centre MPP Yasir Naqvi at the opening ceremonies for the 2012 Scotiabank AIDS Walk for Life on Sept. 15. “I believe this award is more than a personal recognition of my contributions over many years to build a stronger more inclusive society,” Koornstra said. “I truly believe this is also recognition of the very social justice and human rights issues for which I and countless others have advocated and will continue to advocate for.” For the past 40 years, Koornstra has dedicated his time to ensuring equal rights for everyone. The long-time advocate for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender and queer

community was described as a passionate supporter for those who have been affected by HIV or AIDS. Naqvi said the medal represented all the hard work and dedication Koornstra has given to his community. “He continues to demonstrate the kind of compassion and dedication to community service that should serve as inspiration to us all,” Naqvi said. As executive director of Bruce House, a residential care facility for HIV patients, Koornstra is said to work tirelessly outside the centre to promote HIV education and awareness and works at improving the quality of life for patients and their families. In celebration of the Queen’s 60 years on the throne, the province of Ontario will award more than 2,000 Canadians with Diamond Jubilee Medals. Across Canada, 60,000 citizens will receive a medal. More information about the award is available on the Governor General’s website at www.gg.ca.

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Findlay Creek kids with big hears reach out to less fortunate Mia and Madeleine Jolicoeur offer birthday donations to charity enth birthday. According to the kids mother, Julie, the family started getting involved with charities when both children celebrated their second birthdays. “We realized that after their ďŹ rst birthday that we wanted the celebration to focus more on getting together with friends and families rather than bringing and opening presents,â€? said Julie. “We also ďŹ gured if we made it “normalâ€? for our kids to do that every birthday then hopefully they wouldn’t know anything other than giving back in honour of their birthday.â€? When they were younger, the parents would choose a local charity for them to support, but now the girls choose their own organizations to support. Last year, Mia collected $250, which she used to purchase a pumpkin oral arrangement for 20 patients at Queensway Carleton Hospital. “Last year Mia wanted to ‘give owers to people who are sick’ so my husband and I found a orist who donated her time, collected cash donations from the guests and partnered with the Queensway Carleton Hospital to make Mia’s wish come true,â€? said Julie. As for Madeleine, she wanted to give books to kids who may not have access to them. “Researching this on the internet led me to First Book Canada, an organization

Eddie Rwema Eddie.rwema@metroland.com

EMC news - A four-yearold Findlay Creek girl, is making it a tradition to use her birthday wish to brighten the lives of those in need. As she celebrates her ďŹ fth birthday, Mia Jolicoeur will once again be asking her party guests to bring a donation instead of a gift to support the Heron Road Emergency Food Centre. In 2009, the centre served 13,059 clients in 2009 and that number jumped to 16,381 clients in 2011, representing a 25 per cent increase. For her third birthday, Mia collected more than 50 kilograms of food from her guests and this year she is hoping to collect more than 60 kilograms. Mia and her family are hoping to deliver the food donations to the Heron Road Food Centre next month. “It is nice helping out other people,â€? said Mia. Louisa Simms, executive co-ordinator of the food bank, was amazed seeing a four-year -old caring enough about people who didn’t have enough food. “A child that little to have that kind of a heart, imagine what she is going to be when she is an adult. It is overwhelming,â€? said Simms. While Mia chose to support the food bank, her sixyear-old sister Madeleine, has decided to collect donations for the Canadian Guide Dogs Association for her sev-

EDDIE RWEMA/METROLAND

Mia and Madeleine Jolicoeur use their birthday wishes to brighten the lives of those in need. The family has been giving birthday donations to different charities since the girls were one year old. that does that exact work, we partnered with them to help kids in Ontario,� Julie said. “There are years that they have an idea and we work to make it happen; other years

they choose a very speciďŹ c organization.â€? Julie said the initiative has helped the girls understand how fortunate they are and how to demonstrate to them

that even though they are young they can have a big impact on the community and world around them. “Words can’t really describe how proud we are of

both girls, that they now take ownership of their birthday charity decisions and have never questioned why it is something that is important to our family,� said Julie.

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Diane Deans Councillor/Conseillère Quartier Gloucester-Southgate Ward

New Bus Pads and Bus Shelters in Gloucester-Southgate Ward At my request, OC Transpo will begin the construction of asphalt bus stop pads and bus shelters at various bus stops within Gloucester-Southgate Ward. As some of you may know, two bus shelters were already installed this summer at Queensdale and Mavis and Queensdale and Bank. The following bus stops will see new improvements this fall: s *OHNSTONAND"ANKnNEWASPHALTBUSPAD s (EATHERINGTONAND&AIRLEAnNEWASPHALTBUSPAD s 1UEENSDALEAND#ONROYnNEWASPHALTBUSPAD s 1UEENSDALEAND&IRSTnNEWASPHALTBUSPADANDBUSSHELTER s "ANKAND3T"ERNARDnNEWBUSSHELTER These improvements will make these bus stops more comfortable and accessible for customers. Construction is anticipated to start by the end of September and completed by the end of October or early November, weather dependent. I have been advised by OC Transpo that transit service should not be impacted as a result of the work, although bus stops may have to be temporarily relocated. Reminder of the City of Ottawa’s Emerald Ash Borer Strategy As many residents know, in the summer of 2008, Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was discovered in Ottawa. EAB is an invasive insect that is destroying ash trees in Ontario, Quebec and the United States. Since the City discovered EAB in Ottawa, staff have been working with experts to look at solutions, mitigation measures and options to help slow the spread and reduce the impact of the loss of 25% of our forest cover. As part of the City’s strategy to combat EAB, you may see markings on trees in your neighbourhood or on the right of way in front of your home. These markings help inform City staff of the work that is being undertaken as part of the City’s EAB strategy. What do the markings mean? s !RED8INDICATESTHATTHETREEWILLBEREMOVEDDUETOAHIGH EAB infestation or because they are structurally unstable. s !SILVERTAGINDICATESTHATTHETREEWILLBEINJECTEDWITHA biological insecticide to protect the tree. s !SILVERTAGWITHAGREENDOTINDICATESTHATTHETREEHASBEEN INJECTED For more information on the City’s Emerald Ash Borer Strategy please visit the City of Ottawa’s website at Ottawa.ca/eab or call 3-1-1.

EDDIE RWEMA/METROLAND

Hundreds of students gather at Premier Dalton McGuinty’s Ottawa office in Alta Vista on Sept. 19 to voice their anger with the loss of their extracurricular activities due to disagreements between the teachers’ unions and the province.

Students gather to protest Bill 115 Continued from page 1

“These programs are extremely important. It is where you get the best memories of high school,� said Danielle. According to numbers given by the public school board, nearly half of Ottawa high schools will have no extracurricular sports teams this fall. Gary Schreider, co-director of the NCSSAA, said the

schools were unable to provide any volunteer coaches who met the board’s criteria to fill in for the teachers by the entry deadline date. Gabriel Paul, a Grade 12 student at Canterbury High School, said he was protesting because he believes the bill is taking away a lot of basic rights from teachers – like the right to strike. “I believe that is not right whatsoever and I also believe

the teachers are not handling this correctly,� he said. Paul, who is part of Canterbury’s jazz and concert band, added that taking away extracurricular activities from students is just not right. “It has taken away one of the things that I enjoy most from school,� he said. Kai Benson, another Canterbury student, was looking forward to forging a career in music and said she now

feels those hopes may soon be shattered. “Ninety per cent of my curriculum is outside school. Music is what I want to do the rest of my life and this bill is taking away what to me is the most important thing in our education,� she said. “I am here because I want the premier to understand that students have a voice and that we are not going to be voting for him next election.�

Walter Used To Eat Frozen Dinners Alone

Recruitment for City of Ottawa Advisory Committees and Boards The City of Ottawa is seeking applications from individuals interested in serving as a Citizen Appointee to the Ottawa Police Services Board or one of the new Advisory Committees. These groups focus on the City’s Term of Council Priorities and allow an individual to share their expertise and enthusiasm on topics such as arts and culture, the environment, and social services. You can make a difference and show your civic pride by becoming a volunteer member on one of these committees.

Green Bin Tip: Looking for a way to make taking care of your green bin more fun? Why not create a ďŹ tted kitchen container liner out of old newspapers; a simple origami instruction sheet can be found in the Garbage & Recycling section of ottawa.ca.

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

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To be eligible to apply, you must be a resident of the City of Ottawa and 18 years of age or older. (Please note that City employees are not eligible.) For more information and a full list of available positions please visit the City of Ottawa website at www.ottawa.ca, or contact Diane Blais at 613-580-2424 ext. 28091 or by e-mail at committees@ottawa.ca


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Youth-led leadership pilot project to begin in Overbrook Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - Three university students have formed a youth council aimed at allowing Ottawa youth to organize and run their own social programming. Fawad Khan, Idil Houssein and Basel Zbib all grew up in what they call rough neighbourhoods. Each said they were faced with tough choices in high school and knew a lot of students who chose drugs over school work. Now all three attend the University of Ottawa and credit their success to social

programs when they were teenagers. In an effort to make more teenagers succeed, the three have created a youth council. The council’s first project, a youth leadership program, is already underway. “We feel as youth ourselves, we would be able to actively bring youth into the program,” said Zbib. “Our program is all about building a program based on giving the youth life skills and help them develop the ability to engage more youth to participate.” It is a battle between negative environments and negative influences, Zbib said, and

the group wanted to fight that battle with one thing, connecting youth to their community. “We wanted to build a social leadership program with weekly activities and workshops which will actively involve the community they live in,” he said. The first step for the three is a pilot project in Overbrook. Called Project Overbrook, it will see leadership skills workshop and weekly events being held. The council said they hope to have about 10 to 20 students, but even if only five students come out, the three will work just as hard. “If at the end of the day

all we do is change one high school student’s life, then I will see it as a success,” Houssein said. The project idea began when Houssein joined a future community builders group at the Overbrook-Forbes Community Resource Centre. A former McCann Boys and Girls member, she saw the potential to create something similar and invited Khan, a co-worker at the time to help. Khan loved the idea and invited best friend Zbib and fellow South Keys schoolmate to complete the trio. Over a 12-week period, the three worked on Project Greenlight at Hub Ottawa and formed the project which kept a close eye on the ball, a strong focus on developing programming for at-risk youth. Helping them succeed along the way is OverbrookForbes Community Resource Centre community officer

Medhi Louzouaz., who all three admit is part of making the program both succeed and sustain over time. Louzouaz, Khan said, has helped them make connections with the city they may never have made and has guided them in finding much needed grant money. The resource centre has also helped with finding the community space to hold the workshops. “I think this idea is amazing,” Louzouaz said. “Because when it comes to any community events, this council and this programming will give the students a chance to participate in their own way.” The three youth, all who have participated in more than one city-run summer camp or Boys and Girls Club, say what they hope will attract youth is that this is a program run by youth for youth. “Summer camps are great, but are run by adults and once it is over, there is nothing left

for students to join or do,” Houssein said. The goal for the program, she added, is for the youth to want not only to participate, but to become leaders and to create the sustainability these three feel is needed when it comes to high school social programming. Project Overbrook will include workshops where high school students will develop the tools to hold their own workshops, activities and programming in their communities. Once youth are eager to run the programs and create new ones, the three say they will move onto another city neighbourhood. “It is all about building the tools so they can continue on their own,” Houssein said. For more information about the program, to join or volunteer please contact the youth council at projectoverbrook@ gmail.com.

3 Ways to Buy a Home for Less Money Ottawa & Area - If you're like most homebuyers, you have two primary considerations in mind when you start looking for a home. First, you want to find the home that perfectly meets your needs and desires, and secondly, you want to purchase this home for the lowest possible price. When you analyze those successful home buyers who have been able to purchase the home they want for thousands of dollars below a seller's asking price, some common denominators emerge. While the negotiating skills of your agent are important, there are three additional key factors that must come into play long before you ever submit an offer. This topic has been the subject of extensive analysis by Industry Experts, and a summary of their findings, and a specific step-by-step purchase plan for homebuyers, can be found in a new special

report called "Homebuyers: How to Save Thousands of Dollars When You Buy". This free report outlines the psychology of how a seller sets their asking price, and gives you 3 simple steps to follow, before you even set foot in a seller's home, which could help you to successfully slash thousands of dollars off the price of the home you want. To order a FREE Special Report, visit www.OttawaFreeHomeInfo.com or to hear a brief recorded message about how to order your FREE copy of this report call toll-free 1-800-217-1897 4014. and enter 1014 . You can call any time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Get your free special report NOW to find out how you can save thousands of dollars when you buy a home.

MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

Fawad Khan, Idil Houssein and Basel Zbib have created a youth council with one goal in mind, create programming for youth, run by youth.

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NEWS

BRIDGING COMMUNITIES

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Ward 22 Update

Public meeting to look at market’s future All residents welcome to participate

Welding of the arches is ongoing and arch pieces continue to arrive at the site as needed. The north steel deck is near completion and the south steel deck will commence work thereafter. After the decks and arches are complete, work will begin to install the stay cables. As you know, this project is a priority for me. I am working closely with city officials to ensure the project continues to move forward and is completed as quickly as possible and to the highest quality and standards. If you are interested in the construction of the new bridge, you can see live pictures of the bridge construction through a link on my website at www. stevedesroches.ca. Riverside South Rapid Transit Environmental Assessment Public Open House I would encourage residents to come out to the Public Open House for information on the future plans for the Riverside South Rapid Transit Service. The City of Ottawa has initiated a Planning and Environmental Assessment (EA) Study to define a bus rapid transit corridor from Greenbank Road (Barrhaven) to Leitrim Road (Riverside South). In order to engage the public and obtain feedback into the planning and design of this facility, an Open House has been scheduled to present the Recommended Transit Project, associated mitigation measures, and the proposed implementation strategy on Tuesday, October 2nd, from 6:308:30pm at Steve MacLean Elementary, 4175 Spratt Road. City of Ottawa representatives will be available at the Open House to discuss the project, answer any questions and receive public feedback on any aspect of the study. Adult Crossing Guard Needed in Riverside South The Ottawa Safety Council is seeking the community’s assistance to recruit an adult crossing guard for Riverside South. If anyone is interested in giving back to the community and increasing the safety during the commute to and from school please contact my office. House at the End of the Street now in Theatres As you may have noticed, the movie The House at the End of the Street opened in theatres this past weekend. The movie features a scene shot in our very own ward at the corner of Albion and Fenton Roads in the Leitrim/Findlay Creek community. Elizabeth Shue stars in the movie. I am pleased to see feature films such as this one being filmed here in Ottawa as it highlights our city as a viable location to the world’s film market, bringing potential future opportunities. The filming of feature films and television series within the city provides a significant economic spin-off for local businesses. Between 2009 and 2010, the City saw an average of approximately 500 days of film shooting, which translated into over $20 million being spent directly in the local economy. The continued growth of these creative industries is an integral part of the City’s new Economic Development Strategy. Reminder - South Ottawa Race Day on Sunday, September 30th, 2012 at the Rideau Carleton Raceway. For more information or to register for this event, please visit www. southottawaraceday.ca. Slow

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Please contact me if I can be of assistance. (613) 580-2751 Steve.Desroches@Ottawa.ca www.SteveDesroches.ca Follow me on Twitter and Facebook Support Local Businesses – Shop Locally! 6

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Remember - Please in Our Community!

Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - The next step in the ongoing Byward Market visioning exercise will be a resident-led public meeting, according to the area community association. The meeting will take place at St. Brigid’s Centre for the Arts on Oct. 15 at 6:30 p.m. and will be organized by the Lowertown Community Association. According to Sylvie Grenier, the association’s planning and development committee chairwoman, the goal of the evening is to have an open discussion about how residents would like to see the market area evolve. “Our concerns of losing the traditional market are being addressed,” Grenier said. “But we had it in mind for there to be a public meeting.” The Byward Market “visioning exercise” began in the spring after the city’s planning committee and the Byward Market Business Improvement Area (BIA) agreed to look at what the market should become and how it should get there. In an effort to stop the market from becoming overwhelmed by restaurants and bars, a committee was formed, featuring members of the community, city staff and the BIA, to come up with ways to maintain the traditional market characteristics of the area. The city has also hired a consulting firm from New York, Project for Public Spaces, to work on the exercise, which will look at the needs and desires for the market.

FILE

The Lowertown Community Association will hold a public consultation on Oct. 15 for residents to discuss the Byward Market. The meeting is part of the residents’ participation in a Byward Market “visioning exercises” which will look at what the market should becomes and how it should get there. The firm, Grenier said, will hold a stakeholders meeting at the end of the month. The Lowertown community rallied behind the BIA to get an exercise of this nature underway and according to Grenier, the association and residents participating in the exercise expected more public consultations to take place, but so far, none were planned. As a result, the association scrapped its next board meeting to allow a public consultation on the issue. “What we always had in

mind was a public consultation, but so far, that is not what was happening,” Grenier said. The meeting will be more of a round table discussion, Grenier explained. With residents able to speak frankly on how they would like the market to take shape in the coming years. In addition to the meeting, the association released a survey through its website in the summer asking residents to participate. “The survey is a key portion of the LCA (Lowertown Community Association) participation,” Grenier said. The survey looks at residential issues and concerns such as safety, convenience, acces-

sibility to transit, cycling infrastructure, parking and traffic. More specific questions regarding the market are also included, asking for feedback on cleanliness, public spaces, heritage, development, safety and noise levels. So far, about 140 people have filled out the survey. If residents can not make it out to the meeting, Grenier encourages them to go to the website at lowertown-basseville.ca to complete the survey. All the information gathered at the meeting and the results of the survey will be compiled and handed over to the consultation firm. “We hope everyone comes out,” Grenier said. “It’s really important.”

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Strandherd-Armstrong Bridge Update I am pleased to report that work continues to progress on the Strandherd-Armstrong Bridge site. As you may recall, the bridge is being built on the east shore in Riverside South and will be moved into place using the temporary structure this coming winter. As part of this important launching process, work continues to complete the erection components on both the shore and over the river. At this time, more than half of the assembly components are now complete.

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Steve Desroches Deputy Mayor Councillor, Gloucester-South Nepean


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Dalton McGuinty, MPP Ottawa South

HELPING SENIORS STAY AT HOME, SAFELY

FILE

Garbage collection will change to every two weeks starting Oct. 29, while green bin pick up and recycling will continue to happen every week.

Garbage collection goes biweekly on Oct. 29 Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - Garbage collection will change to every two weeks starting Oct. 29, and the city is offering some high-tech tools to make the transition easier for residents. With the new web-based collection calendar tool, peeking out the front door to see if your neighbours put out their trash will be a thing of the past, IT subcommittee chairman Coun. Tim Tierney said. The tool offers a searchable online calendar, as well as weekly collection reminders by phone, email or Twitter. You can also choose whether you want the alerts to arrive the evening before or the morning of your collection day. Information can be found

at ottawa.ca/en/garbage_recycle/. As of last Monday, four days after its launch, there were more than 5,300 searches logged and 1,337 people signed up for household reminders. Starting Oct. 29, green-bin materials will be collected each week and the frequency of cardboard and container recycling won’t change, but garbage pick up will be reduced to every two weeks. As a result of the transition, 158,000 households in Ottawa will get a new garbage collection day. Waste will be picked up by new “dual-collection” trucks that can collect organic and recyclable materials at the same time, reducing the number of trucks on the road. The changes are expected

to save the city $10 million each year and were approved by city council in an 18-4 vote in April. Some councillors (Rainer Bloess, Diane Deans, Jan Harder, Bob Monette and Tim Tierney) would have preferred to see seasonal biweekly pickup, which they said would have quelled fears of stinking garbage piling up in the summer months. Switching to biweekly pickup is expected to divert an additional 10,000 to 20,000 tonnes of organic waste from the landfill, Weir said. That will boost the diversion rate from the current 44 per cent to around 54 per cent. But that still leaves Ottawa 15,000 tonnes short of its 60 per cent diversion target, said Bloess, the councillor for

Innes Ward. The city will never be able to achieve that diversion target until it tackles the “ICI sector” – industrial, commercial and institutional organizations, Bloess said. The city is currently only focusing on residential waste collection and has yet to roll out the greenbin program to apartment buildings before ICI collection is even considered. Weir said city staff expect to hit the goal of a 60 per cent diversion rate by the end of this new waste contract, which will be in 2016. The new web tool will also make it possible to add solid waste collection data to the city’s open data catalogue, which people can use for research or to development web or mobile applications.

Our government is proposing a new tax credit that would make it easier for seniors to stay safely in their homes longer. The Healthy Homes Renovation Tax Credit would make it more affordable for seniors to make upgrades to their homes, such as installing a ramp or a lift. It would also help boost the economy and support jobs in the renovation sector — about 10, 500 jobs every year. The tax credit would be available to senior homeowners and tenants, and people who share a home with a senior relative. It would be claimed on the Personal Income Tax return for 2012 and following years. The maximum credit would be $1,500 each year. Homeowners should save their receipts for eligible expenses made on or after October 1, 2011.

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

7


OPINION

Your Community Newspaper

EDITORIAL

Meeting Ottawa’s infrastructure challenge

F

ollowing the presentation of a report on the state of the city’s infrastructure last week to the city’s finance committee, it has become clear Ottawa has an infrastructure problem. The potential consequences of this problem were brought sharply into focus recently when a portion of highway 174 was closed by a sinkhole. While the extent of Ottawa’s problem is not so acute as the east-end sinkhole, the

report indicates that without a significant infusion of cash to increase maintenance activity, the city runs the risk, in the long run, of seeing things like sinkholes, broken water mains and collapsed roofs popping up like dandelions from Carp to Carlington to Cumberland. We cannot afford to let this happen. Just ask anyone who had to sit in traffic on Montreal Road or Barrhaven residents who saw watering restrictions imposed in 2011 following the

Woodroffe Avenue water main break how much fun it is to have critical infrastructure fail. Yet despite a two-per-cent infrastructure levy that was imposed from 2008 to 2010, more than $400 million in federal and provincial stimulus cash and the $340million Ottawa on the Move program, the city is only able to scrape by when it comes to maintaining things like roads, recreation facilities, libraries and other civic buildings. This means the city needs

to find $165 million per year, up from the $80 million it’s currently spending, to maintain what it already has and even more once new infrastructure is added by 2022. As Mayor Jim Watson said following the presentation of the report to council, there are several ways this maintenance can be paid for: adding debt, increasing taxes or seeking funding from other levels of government. Looking to other levels of government, at least in the

short term, appears to be a non-starter – the province is looking to spend less money, not more, and the federal government is poised to slash thousands of civil service jobs in Ottawa to get its own fiscal house in order. Borrowing money to pay for what are permanent, ongoing needs is a dubious course of action. The need to maintain infrastructure isn’t going to stop anytime soon, so why mortgage the future to pay for it?

That leaves us with finding additional money to pay for this vital, necessary work. This can be done in two ways. The city can raise taxes or money can be cut from other areas of the city budget. Things like upcoming capital projects can be put on hold or cancelled, city staff can be cut or services can be reduced or eliminated to shift money to pay for these needs. Either tax hikes or spending cuts will bite taxpayers in the end, but such decisions are the burden of leadership. How council handles these choices will have far-reaching implications for this city – let’s hope it chooses wisely.

COLUMN

Oh no, not more about 1972! CHARLES GORDON Funny Town

I

f it weren’t for the hockey lockout the anniversary of the 1972 Canada-Russia series would not have received so much attention. Whatever the reason, the attention goes on and on and on and it may be that anyone who wasn’t around in 1972 - a good chunk of the population - might have seen more than enough of it. The good news for them is that it should all be over soon. September 28 marks the 40-year anniversary of Henderson’s goal in the final game. Mind you, there is still the 40-year anniversary of the plane ride home, the 40-year anniversary of the team’s welcome in Toronto, and there could be many others. Still, for all intents and purposes it’s over. Not that it hasn’t been interesting, especially to look at the lessons we think we’ve learned from those moments in time 40 years ago. There was a lot of jingoism in Canadians’ attitude toward the series. Along with our love for our team went a certain amount of hatred for the Russians. That seems, if not embarrassing, at least quaint when looked at today. We were willing to tolerate some thuggish behaviour by our team, not to mention the officials, if it was necessary to win the series. There were also judgments made about the way the then-Soviets played hockey. They were emotionless robots, uncreative, unable to play with passion, it was said, despite the incredibly high level at which they played. We wince at that today, with so many Russian players playing so well on “our” teams in the National Hockey League. Perhaps you can argue that Russian players can now play with passion and creativity

because they have been freed from the yoke of Communist oppression. But more likely the difference is in the way we perceive things. Heaven help us that we should be drawing deep philosophical conclusions from hockey anniversaries, but if there is a conclusion to be drawn it is that the world and Canada have changed a lot in 40 years. That may be difficult to fathom for those who feel like it only happened yesterday, but it’s true. To begin with, 40 years ago there were no Russians in the NHL, in fact hardly anyone who wasn’t Canadian. Forty years ago, we feared the Russians in a way we do not now. The Cold War was at its height. The Soviet Union was a closed society. The hotel rooms were lousy and could have been bugged. The Russians didn’t trust us all that much either, although our hotel rooms were better. Everything isn’t wonderful now, but the Cold War is over, the Russian hotel rooms are better and probably not bugged. There is no Soviet Union and there is dissent in Russia - to what avail no one is quite sure. Players from all over what used to be the Soviet bloc are performing, creatively and with passion, in the NHL, or will be, when the NHL begins. Is any of that because we “won” the 1972 series? Maybe. Or maybe it’s because we almost lost it and realized there was something to be learned from the way the Russians played. And they learned that there was something to be learned from the way we played. As for Canadian fans, did we learn anything? Did we learn that it was a little excessive to be as excessive as we were in cheering our boys on? Probably not. Think of the waves of patriotism that swept over Sidney Crosby when he scored the game-winning goal against the United States at Vancouver 38 years later. We are still going to get worked up over hockey. Whether we get too worked up is another question. We’ll get another chance to think about it when the 50th anniversary of all this rolls around in 10 years. You can hardly wait, right?

Editorial Policy Ottawa South EMC welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to patricia.lonergan@metroland.com , fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to Ottawa South EMC, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa, ON, K2E 7L2.

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Web Poll THIS WEEK’S POLL QUESTION

Do you think the Main Library branch needs a new site or $6.3 million in upgrades as suggested by a city report?

A) Borrow the money. Interest rates are low right now, lets take advantage.

A) Build a new one. The existing building is old and is not fitting as the city’s central library.

42%

B) Invest $6.3 million in upgrades as suggested by city staff. There’s no need to move the facility.

8%

C) Do nothing. The main branch doesn’t need upgrades or a new site.

33%

D) I don’t use the library.

17%

B) Bring back the infrastructure levy. This is exactly what it was meant to do. C) Cut back on projects and services. Those are just frills if we can’t afford to maintain our infrastructure. D) If we let things fall apart, maybe the feds and province will pony up!

To vote in our web polls, visit us at www.yourottawaregion.com/community/cityofottawa

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8

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

PREVIOUS POLL SUMMARY

How should the city go about addressing the cost of maintaining its infrastructure?

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SALES: Sharon Russell - 613-688-1483 Kevin Cameron - 613-221-6224 Adrienne Barr - 613-623-6571 MANAGING EDITOR: Patricia Lonergan 613-221-6261 patricia.lonergan@metroland.com NEWS EDITOR: Blair Edwards blair.edwards@metroland.com, 613-221-6238 REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER: Eddie Rwema eddie.rwema@metroland.com, 613-221-6219 POLITICAL REPORTER: Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com, 613-221-6162

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Read us online at www.EMConline.ca Your Community Newspaper


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Anglophones need not apply

I

magine for a moment a new player in Ontario politics. Let’s call it “The Ontario Party.” This fictional party has emerged with the goal of separating from the rest of the country. Fundamental to its party platform is a clause stating that true Ontarians are those whose mother tongue is English. As such, its party leader and candidates refuse interviews with media outlets that don’t publish or broadcast in English. When “The Ontario Party” is elected, its first point of order is to rip the Canadian flag from its once-prominent place in the legislature. It then enacts legislation forcing all business owners in the province to erect signage in English or face hefty fines. Under “The Ontario Party’s” new immigration rules, people from Englishspeaking countries will be given priority over all others, even those who have learned English as a second language. Laws are created to prevent non-English people from running for public office. Funds to French-language and other language schools are degraded. ”The Ontario Party’s” overwhelming message: “If you don’t speak English, you don’t belong here.” Thankfully, this party doesn’t exist. But across the Ottawa River, in Quebec, the Parti Quebecois does. Its

BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse raison d’etre is to prevent the infiltration of English and other languages into Quebec’s language and culture -- which it views as distinct – and of course, to separate from the rest of Canada. Many of the people I know who voted for the PQ deny the underlying prejudice of their government. “Quebec is distinct,” they say. “Quebec is a socialist province, not like the others.” “The PQ is the only party that will protect our collective belief that governments should pay for cradle-to-grave services.” To which I respond – What does any of that have to do with language? The Parti Quebecois’s policies are nothing short of xenophobic. Its supporters buy into this – fearing that non-French speakers that may bring their own political ideas and agendas that are ... well, different. As a result, after nine years of relative harmony between La Belle Province and those outside its borders, the Parti Quebecois’s protectionist platform has once again reminded those

of us in the rest of Canada and elsewhere that there is no place for us in Quebec. I find it sad. Under the Parti Quebecois’s definition of what it means to be a Quebecer, I’m not sure my own children – who, with one Francophone parent and one Anglophone parent, speak both official languages fluently – would be considered valid citizens in the province. Fortunately, we live in my home-province of Ontario and not my husband’s birth place across the river. Because, while Quebec is narrowing its definition of what it means to be a true Quebecer, Ontario has created policies that are more inclusive. In 2009, thanks in large part to Ottawa MPP and then minister of culture, Madeleine Meilleur, Ontario broadened its definition of Francophone to include French-speaking allophones – those whose mother tongue is neither French nor English, but who use French in the home. This has extended access to French-language education and services, in particular to

many immigrant families. It has grown the Francophone population in the province. Under the new definition, Francophones make up 4.8 per cent of the population in Ontario, compared to 4.1 per cent before. A few days ago, my own children proudly donned the Franco-Ontarian flag, on which the trillium and the fleur-de-lys stand side-by-side against a green and white background. The same day, we spent time researching publicly-funded Mandarinlanguage classes, looking to foster another element of our family’s diverse cultural background. This hasn’t always been possible here, granted. Minorities in the province have had to fight hard to preserve their languages and cultures. But as the world shrinks and our communities become increasingly heterogeneous, it looks as though Ontario will continue to grow, protect and foster diversity. Simultaneously, the xenophobic policies of the Parti Quebecois will also continue to have wide reach. With no room for minorities, the Parti Quebecois and its supporters may finally chase out the nonFrench-speakers and get what they want -- an exclusive, homogenous society. But in a world and a country that is ever-inclusive and diverse, frankly, it will be their loss.

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Public board looks for solutions to save school clubs, activities Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

EMC news - Volunteers could salvage sports and other after-school clubs. That was the message delivered during an Ottawa Carleton District School Board meeting on Sept. 18. Sister of former CFL-er Ken Evraire and volunteer, Debborah Evraire said the board needs to talk about solutions to offer sports programs before the deadline for winter registration passes. “It’s unacceptable that 11 of our schools don’t have sports teams playing right now,” she said. “I don’t think the call to the community (for volunteers) has been loud enough.” The fall sports programs were lost as the board couldn’t meet the deadline to register teams set by the Ontario Federation of School Athletic Association (OFSAA). Sports teams and other clubs are in jeopardy this year because the two teacher unions that represent elementary and secondary schools have asked

teachers to reconsider doing extra work in protest of the Putting Students First Act. The legislation freezes teacher wages, ends the banking of sick days and bans strikes for the next two years. Only two Ottawa schools – Glebe Collegiate Institute and Colonel By Secondary School – registered a team for every sport. Eleven of the board’s 25 high schools didn’t register any sports teams for the fall season and nine others registered some teams. LongfieldsDavidson Heights Secondary School will be able to run their field hockey and basketball programs thanks to the help of volunteers in the community. But Theresa Kavanagh, who represents the zone that corresponds with the city’s Bay ward, said the school board needs to work on solutions that will help students in areas of the city where income and cultural backgrounds may impede the parents’ ability to volunteer their time. “I think all the kids should

have the same opportunities,” she said. Barrhaven trustee Donna Blackburn introduced a motion at the meeting directing staff to do everything possible to maintain extracurricular activities at public board schools. “I have been inundated with calls from parents and students from three of the four of my high schools have staged protests,” she said. Director of Education Jennifer Adams said staff will be working with a group of principals and vice-principals on the language in the board’s volunteer policy to make sure there is room for community volunteers to run sports programs and other clubs. She said she thinks the language should allow for qualified volunteers. “Obviously we prefer if teachers and staff were able to run the programs, but we won’t be holding out for that,” Adams said. The deadline to register for winter sports is the end of October so that gives staff five

weeks to work out a plan to offer volunteer-run programs. John Shea, who represents parts of Orléans and Cumberland, said making sure that happens is the number one priority. Both Shea and Mark Fisher, who represents much of the city’s south end, said the practice of using teachers who volunteers leaves the board vulnerable. “Through crisis we are seeing some of the cracks in the system,” Shea said. ANOTHER PLAN

Pam Fitzgerald, trustee for the zone that corresponds with the city’s College ward, asked the board to go a step further. She said extracurricular activities are only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to

the Putting Students First Act and urged her fellow trustees to take a stand on the legislation. In her notice of motion Fitzgerald suggested staff look at the possible financial implications because of the legislation. “The act promises to save $2 billion over the next two years,” she said, adding the board may want to ask for a repeal of the act and come up with alternatives to save money, such as an amalgamation of the public and Catholic boards. Adams said superintendent of facilities Mike Carson will study the impacts of the reduction of grants and some of the other aspects of the legislation. Peter Guilani, president of the Ottawa-Carleton Elemen-

tary Teacher Federation, said trustees don’t need a study to tell them the legislation is bad. “We don’t think you need a financial analysis to stake a position,” he said. “If it’s wrong, it’s wrong.” Shirley Seward represents the zone that corresponds with the city’s River ward, attempted to have Fitzgerald’s motion added to the agenda, but without unanimous support the item was postponed until the next board meeting. Seward, who said staff could look at the case of Brookfield High School as an example, where parents managed to save several sports programs by coming together over a weekend and to find volunteers to run sports teams in time for the fall OFSAA deadline.

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Mark Fisher, a trustee for much of the city’s south end, said the board’s practice of relying solely on teachers to operate sports teams and other clubs makes the board vulnerable to labour actions by the teachers.

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Create a designer look on a budget (MS) - Interior designers have a knack for pulling together furniture and accessories to create rooms with widespread appeal. But not every homeowner has the resources to hire a professional to help turn their interior from drab to fab. Fortunately, it doesn’t always take a pro to transform a home’s interior. The key to creating a beautiful room is planning. Designers do it and so should you. Measure the dimensions of the room and create

a sketch of the area using graph paper or computer software. Be sure to plot any windows or doors on the drawing so that you will be aware of obstacles. Homeowners unsure of what they want should browse through magazines or pictures on the Web for inspiration. Search for key phrases that describe your design style, such as Tuscan, farmhouse, country, colonial, etc. Then read up on the components of these styles that define

it. This will help you select items that fit with the style. Once a particular style has been chosen, create a design board just like the professionals. Cut out swatches of fabric, select paint swatches, find magazine pictures that fit with your goal and arrange them on a piece of poster board. See how the items work together. If you are unsure of colors, see which shades were used in the inspiring picture and determine if it will coordinate with your

home. When designing, identify or create a focal point in the room and build off of that. This may be a large window, fireplace, or even the entertainment center if it’s a family room. Place furniture around the focal point and then move outward. It’s also important to keep scale in mind. Large walls or tall ceilings will create plenty of wall space. A small print or wall hanging will be lost in such an area. Be sure to choose furnishings

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Quality workmanship at competitive prices At The Cabinet Shop, getting that kitchen or bathroom of your dreams is just a simple phone call away. The business, a 2,000 square foot custom manufacturing facility of kitchen and bathroom cabinetry, is located five kilometers west of North Gower at 3435 Roger Stevens Drive. Owners Deborah Gervais, an accredited kitchen and bath designer; and Alex Clayton, cabinet maker extraordinaire have been at the Roger Stevens Drive location since 2006. Collectively, they have more than 40 years of combined experience in the manufacturing, construction and design industries. “We offer custom cabinetry and millwork at very reasonable prices,” notes Gervais.

“Our pieces are of exceptional quality and are all done by hand… and our price points are very reasonable considering what we do for it.” With The Cabinet Shop, clients get that one-on-one experience and Gervais said she and Clayton take pride in their work and will cater to their clients’ specific needs. “Everything we do is built and set to the space you have, so it all fits properly,” she said. Interior design services can help clients plan their project (and choose the proper finishes, hardware and accessories) and The Cabinet Shop also uses 20-20 design software to produce detailed three-dimensional renderings of what your new kitchen our bathroom could look like.

“We go to your home and measure up the space, with a free consultation by appointment. The experience is much more personalized that way,” Gervais stated. All cabinetry is created on-site in the manufacturing facility, which is equipped with a variety of machinery, including a complete countertop cutting station. Another unique feature to the woodworking shop is the self-contained spray booth. Its state-of-the-art finishing equipment allows The Cabinet Shop to provide custom staining to their clients as well. “Everything comes in here (manufacturing facility), we build it and finish it here and then ship it out. Everything is done in-house,” Gervais commented. They also offer a variety of wood, thermofoil and laminate doors from suppliers including Richelieu, Premoule and Caron, in addition to

The net i b a C p o h S

local suppliers. Laminate post-formed counter and bar tops from Premoule are also available, as are counter and bar tops in materials such as granite, solid surface and engineered stone.

The Cabinet Shop operates on a by appointment basis only and is not a walk-in retail outlet. Their facility is open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and evening and Saturday appointments are also available upon request. To schedule an appointment, please call 613-489-2323 or email thecabinetshop@xplornet.com.

Alex Clayton Deborah Gervais, AKBD

613-489-2323 fax 613-489-3720 ph

3435 Roger Stevens Drive North Gower, ON

Interior Design Services Available Manufacturers of quality kitchen and bath cabinets to suit all budgets. Postformed and custom countertops also available in laminate, granite, marble, solid surface, and more...

www.thecabinetshopottawa.com 12

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

and accessories that fit with the scale of the room. In other words, a huge sectional may overpower a small living room. When choosing colors, make sure they are cohesive. Research the color wheel that artists use to help with designing the room. Some colors are complementary or opposites and still work together. Homeowners nervous about color should choose a color from fabric or furniture and use a few different shades of the same color in the room. Select an accent color that can be used on trim or as a spot of color on a pillow or accessory. When plotting wall hangings or other decor, odd numbers often look more pleasing to the eye. Experiment with different sizes of framed artwork or different shaped accessories for visual appeal. For example, a few rectangular shaped items with a circular clock and a conical flower vase can mix it up in the room. This is where looking at magazine layouts can be extremely helpful. Many stores sell items that mimic the look of higher-priced items. When

copying a designer room, select pieces that are similar, but not necessarily the same brands. Consider shopping at second-hand stores or antique shops for discounted pieces. With a little new fabric or stain, many items can look like new again. Shopping online also may enable shoppers to find items more readily and see how they look in staged rooms. When designing, it never hurts to think outside of the box. Items that were intended for outside may work well inside as well. Hanging lanterns or plant stands could be put to use in a rustic room. Save some money by making some items yourself. For instance, if you cannot find a particular throw pillow or drapery that fits with your style, go to a fabric store and purchase fabric to make your own. Decorating doesn’t have to cost a fortune or look like you pieced odd items together. By following the guidelines of a designer room and selecting lowerpriced items that mimic the shape and scale of similar accessories, it’s possible for any homeowner to create a room for less.

Greet Guests With a Touch of Glass (MS) -- The trend of using decorative glass to create dramatic entryways continues to grow as homeowners choose to stay in their homes longer and remodel for extended personal enjoyment. Adding a “touch of glass” with a new front entry door can be one of the most effective and economical ways to enhance a home’s curb appeal. Beyond aesthetics, a new entry with decorative glass can add value to the home. According to a national home valuation study conducted by Therma-Tru(R) and TNS, an independent research organization, simply installing a new entryway door has been shown to increase the perceived value of a home by more than $24,000 on average. Manufacturers offer a wide array of choices for entryways incorporating decorative glass doorlites, sidelites and transoms. These choices allow homeowners to create a custom look for the home while making a statement about the homeowner’s personal sense of style. The recently-introduced Avonlea(TM) and Maple Park(TM) decorative glass options from Therma-Tru

(available at www.thermatru. com) are perfect examples of the beauty decorative glass can add to the home. With its fluid lines and free flowing leaf pattern, the Avonlea glass package is inspired by nature and features bronze water and clear baroque glass with black nickel caming. The Maple Park decorative glass option creates a peaceful, comforting design element for the home. With its water and granite glass married with clear bevels and a soft arc, the Maple Park glass creates a Craftsmaninspired look, well suited for all types of homes. Entryway systems that incorporate decorative glass also offer the added benefit of allowing more sunlight into the home without energy loss, making for a more attractive, more energy-efficient interior. Some of the most stunning designs are available in impact-rated versions that provide added home security and protection from severe weather conditions, such as high winds and heavy rain. Other decorative glass options include vented sidelites to allow both air and natural ventilation into the home.


Equipping the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Man Caveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Home design trends:

Sensual kitchen spaces

Guys who are gaming enthusiasts can outfit their man caves with a pool table and favorite arcade games.. shop around for a deal and see what can be picked up from swap Web sites or online bidding sites. Also, check out the classified section of the newspaper to find local deals on equipment being unloaded by others for a steal. * Furnish the place. The cornerstone piece of furniture could be a large leather sectional to fit many guy friends. Or, if the man cave is to be a solitary spot, a comfortable recliner. Remember to also include a small refrigerator for refreshments. * Lock it up. For those who want to keep the man cave offlimits, install a lock to keep unwanted visitors out. * Enjoy the space. The man cave is a place where guys can kick back and relax and do what they prefer -- something that may be off limits in the rest of the house.

from the outside world. Up until recently, designers and consumers did not afford these same sensual attributes to their kitchens, Crawford explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over the past 40 years, most of the attention in design has been paid almost exclusively to the way things look rather than to the way they feel.â&#x20AC;? That has changed with the arrival of sensual kitchen decor choices such as the latest â&#x20AC;&#x153;must feelâ&#x20AC;? surface to hit the countertop industry -- Elements by Durcon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ultra-smooth to the touch and slick, Elements is probably the most seductive, sensual surfaces available for most discerning kitchen

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percent of respondents said that they have a man cave or room in their home and another 13 percent said the male domain is in the planning or construction phase. No matter what the man cave will entail, there are some steps guys can take to ensure the plans go smoothly. * Create the theme. This is a chance for the man to dream up any design style he prefers. Maybe the walls will be covered in sports memorabilia. Perhaps he desires a dark, solitary space. The room can also be a mix and match of any style, as long as itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the desire of the guy. * Tech it out. Chances are the focal point of the man cave will be a big-screen television. If budget allows, go for the biggest and best TV with all the peripheral equipment. If budget is a bit more modest,

lovers out there,â&#x20AC;? said Mark Hanna, President Leeza Distribution Inc., one of North Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading distributors of premium countertops such as Elements by Durcon. Molded from a blend of fine quartz, epoxy resin, and recycled glass, Elements is solid, non-porous, never requires sealing, and is homogenous in consistency. Its unique manufacturing process produces an incredibly durable and silky smooth countertop surface. Renowned for its unique ultra-smooth finish, Elements has definitely become the countertop of choice for designers and discerning homeowners seeking more sensual options for their kitchen countertop surfaces. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Elementsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; distinct â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hot silkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; finish is what makes its countertops so unique,â&#x20AC;? said Nancy Soccio, designer of Dolce Design. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You just canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help to touch and feel these countertops. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re incredibly smooth and add a nice touch of sensuality to the kitchen.â&#x20AC;? More information on ultra-smooth, durable countertops is available at leezadistribution.com and elementsbydurcon.com.

2730 Iris S

A room in the house devoted entirely to male interests is becoming much more popular in recent years. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;man cave,â&#x20AC;? as itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s come to be called, can shun the decorating style of the rest of the house, and decor may be all the choice of its visionary creator. The manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s domain is no longer relegated to the garage or a dusty corner in the basement. Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guys are devoting an entire room to a particular interest of their choice. Some prefer a work-out room with equipment that rivals the nearest gym. Others want to deck-out the room in surround sound and a projection screen to create the ultimate home-theater experience. According to a recent survey by ServiceMagic, a business that connects homeowners with contractors, about 40

(MS) -- According to design experts, the latest hot trend in kitchen decor is the use of different textures, colors and surfaces to create a sensual sanctuary that engages all of our five senses -- sight, hearing, smell, taste, and most of all touch. In her book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sensual Home,â&#x20AC;? Elle Decoration editor Ilse Crawford explains this recent interior design movement as creating private havens with your decor to soothe and enhance each of the senses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As modern life threatens to become increasingly standardized, suburbanized, unnatural, and uniformly lit, the home is, for many of us, the last bastion of the senses,â&#x20AC;? she writes. This is why she recommends we tune our homes to involve all of our senses and â&#x20AC;&#x153;restore the balance between mind and body.â&#x20AC;? In fact, homeowners were already creating these sanctuaries in other rooms of their homes, like the master bedroom and bathroom. Master bedrooms featured sensual silk bedding, cozy comfort duvets, seductive colours and lighting while master bathrooms hosted soothing sensuous spa-like environments created to relax and unwind

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

13


14

For the latest information, visit us at chevrolet.ca, drop by your local Chevrolet Dealer or call us at 1-800-GM-DRIVE. *Offer applies to the purchase of 2012 Chevrolet (Cruze LS R7A/Sonic Sedan LS R7A/Equinox LS FWD R7A/Orlando LT R7A). â&#x2122;Ś$2,000/$1,850/$7,500 is a manufacturer to dealer delivery credit (tax exclusive) for 2012 Chevrolet (Equinox LS/Orlando LS & 1LT/Silverado 1500 Ext. & Crew Cab) and is reflected in offers in this advertisement. Other cash credits available on most models. See dealer for details. â&#x20AC;Ą0% purchase financing offered by GMCL for 84/84/72 months on 2012 Chevrolet (Cruze LS R7A/Sonic Sedan LS R7A/Silverado 1500 LS Crew Cab 4WD R7B). O.A.C by Ally/TD Auto Finance Services/Scotiabank. Rates from other lenders will vary. Example: $10,000 at 0%/2.67%/2.85%/2.14% APR, monthly payment is $119.05/$130.65/$131.46/$148.12 for 84/84/84/72 months. Cost of borrowing is $0/$974.60/$1,042.64/$664.64, total obligation is $10,000/$10,974.60/$11,042.64/$10,664.64. Down payment and/or trade may be required. Monthly/Bi-weekly payment and cost of borrowing will vary depending on amount borrowed and down payment/trade. â&#x2122;Śâ&#x2122;Ś$1,500/$1,500/$9,500 is a manufacturer to dealer delivery credit (tax exclusive) for 2012 Chevrolet (Cruze/Sonic/Silverado 1500 Crew Cab) and is reflected in cash purchase offers in this advertisement. Such credit is available only for cash purchase and by selecting lease or finance offers, consumers are foregoing such credit which will result in higher effective interest rates. Other credits available on most models. See dealer for details. */â&#x2122;Ś/â&#x20AC;Ą/â&#x2122;Śâ&#x2122;ŚFreight & PDI ($1,495/$1,495/$1,495/$1,495/$1,495), registration, air and tire levies and OMVIC fees included. Insurance, licence, PPSA, dealer fees and applicable taxes not included. Offers apply as indicated to 2012 new or demonstrator models of the vehicle equipped as described. Offers apply to qualified retail customers in the Ontario Chevrolet Dealer Marketing Association area only (including Outaouais). Dealers are free to set individual prices. Dealer order or trade may be required. Limited time offers which may not be combined with other offers. GMCL may modify, extend or terminate offers in whole or in part at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for details. ***Factory order or dealer trade may be required. ŠThe Best Buy Seal is a registered trademark of Consumers Digest Communications, LLC, used under license. +Based on WardsAuto.com 2012 Upper Small segment, excluding Hybrid and Diesel powertrains. Standard 10 airbags, ABS, traction control and StabiliTrakÂŽ. ÂŽBluetooth is a registered trademark of Bluetooth SIG Inc. â&#x20AC; â&#x20AC; 2012 Sonic Sedan LTZ, MSRP with freight, PDI & levies $22,134. 2012 Chevrolet Equinox LTZ, MSRP with freight, PDI & levies $35,729. 2012 Orlando LTZ, MSRP with freight, PDI & levies $30,134. Dealers are free to set individual prices. â&#x2C6;&#x17E;Offers available until September 30, 2012; participating lenders are subject to change. 0% purchase financing offered on approved credit by TD Auto Finance Services, ScotiabankÂŽ or Ally Credit for 84 months on new or demonstrator 2012 Chevrolet Malibu, Orlando (excluding LS and 1LT models), Equinox (excluding LS models), Cruze (excluding LS 1SA models) and Sonic (excluding LS models) and 2012 GMC Terrain (excluding SLE1 models); 72 months on 2012 Chevrolet Avalanche and Silverado Light Duty Trucks and 2012 GMC Sierra Light Duty Trucks; 60 months on 2012 Chevrolet Traverse, 2013 Malibu, 2012 Buick Enclave and 2012 GMC Acadia; 48 months on 2013 Chevrolet Spark. Rates from other lenders will vary. Down payment, trade and/or security deposit may be required. Monthly payment and cost of borrowing will vary depending on amount borrowed and down payment/trade. Example: $16,995 at 0% APR, the monthly payment is $202.32 for 84 months. Cost of borrowing is $0, total obligation is $16,995. Offer is unconditionally interest-free. â&#x2122;Śâ&#x2122;Śâ&#x2122;ŚOffer only valid from September 1, 2012 to October 1, 2012 (the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Program Periodâ&#x20AC;?) to retail customers resident in Canada who own or are currently leasing (during the Program Period) a Chevrolet Silverado or GMC Sierra (1500-3500), Chevrolet Avalanche/Colorado/S10; GMC Canyon/Sonoma; or Isuzu Light Duty Series, or any competitive pickup truck with a pickup bed. Qualifying customers will receive a $1,000 credit towards the purchase, lease or factory order of an eligible new 2012 or 2013 Chevrolet Silverado, Avalanche or GMC Sierra or 2012 Chevrolet Colorado or GMC Canyon which must be delivered and/or factory ordered (factory order applies to 2013 MY only) during the Program Period. Only one (1) credit may be applied per eligible vehicle sale. Offer is transferable to a family member living within the same household (proof of address required). This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives available on GM vehicles. The $1,000 credit includes HST/GST/QST/PST as applicable by province. As part of the transaction, dealer will request current vehicle registration and/or insurance to prove ownership. GMCL reserves the right to amend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without prior notice. Void where prohibited by law. Additional conditions and limitations apply. 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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Pro-intensification group starts up in Ottawa Ottawa Urbanism wants a voice in helping build the capital into a world-class city laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - A new pro-intensification group is looking to get away from community activism that opposes development and instead promote creating a vibrant, worldclass urban experience in the nation’s capital. Ottawa Urbanism officially formed on Sept. 19 with the election of an executive team and board of directors. Around 30 people came to the Bethel Field House in the Golden Triangle to hear about the initiative. “One of the most problematic things is the debate over planning is divisive,” said Felix Macias, secretary of Ottawa Urbanism and one of its founding members. “It doesn’t fit into the greater sense of what it means to live in the city.” The group grew out of an online discussion forum on skyscraperpage.com. In Feburary of 2012, Macias and other founding members began meeting at the James Street Pub to discuss forming the group. Executive members include newly-elected president Philip Ghosh, a Centretown lawyer;

Tyler Saikaly, vice president of research and proposals; Thom McVeigh, vice president of development reviews; Lucia Harper, director of communications; and three members-at-large of the board of directors: Peter Drake, Liam Mooney and Luke Schnurr. The group’s activities are still to be determined, but will rest on its vision statement: “Ottawa Urbanism strives for an Ottawa recognized for the richness and vibrancy of its urban experience, for its quality of life, its cutting-edge architecture, and design; a city where it’s easy and desirable to live an urban lifestyle.” Ghosh, a founding member and now president, said he hopes Ottawa Urbanism can shift the debate over development from a focus on height to a focus on the quality of design and how building can better integrate communities. “We want to be a voice for people who have a legitimate view that is not being adequately expressed.” Ghosh said he is familiar with other urbanist- and planning-focused groups in the city, including the Federation of Citizens’ Associations, and he hopes Ottawa Urbanism can find its own voice and

LAURA MUELLER/METROLAND

The first executive members and board of directors of Ottawa Urbanism pose for a photo after their first annual general meeting on Sept. 19. President Philip Ghosh appears fourth from the right. work in conjunction with existing groups. “We will go where the membership wants us to go, but I’m hoping to focus on intensification,” Ghosh said. The group won’t just be focusing on downtown Ottawa. “Urbanism goes beyond the core,” Macias said. “It’s about connected communities.” Championing pedestrian and cycling issues, as well as transit-oriented development, is a citywide concern, Macias said. Even Ottawa’s rural villages, such as Manotick and Carp, contain a smaller ex-

ample of urban experience and share similar concerns, Macias said. The group’s constitution stipulates a minimum of quarterly meetings, but Ghosh said he hopes the group will meet monthly. The group has already discussed adopting a policy against accepting donations from developers in order to avoid a perception of working on their behalf. A few subcommittees are also in the works. To contact or join the group, email: ottawaurbanism@gmail.com.

PHILIP GHOSH

Ottawa Urbanism’s first president grew up in Hunt Club Park, but moved to the boundary of Westboro and Wellington West in his teens – a place he said was “much more enjoyable” to live in. His community involvement stretches back more than a decade to when he became involved in Ottawa’s youth cabinet advisory committee at city hall as the youth advisor on transit issues. He continued to be involved in planning issues while

studying as an undergraduate history student at Carleton University. During that time, he worked for the city’s markets management team, which oversees vendors and activities in the ByWard and Parkdale markets. He studied law at Queen’s University and was called to the bar this year. Ghosh doesn’t have any political or development ties, but said he has maintained an interest in urban issues through his youth in Ottawa and his studies in Kingtson.

R0011624171

Laura Mueller

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

15


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Heritage advisory group rejects Sussex demolitions Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news – Heritage advocates accused the city and National Capital Commission of paving over a compelling national story as they plan to demolish three Sussex Drive homes to widen the road. The road needs to be widened to straighten out a curve between the Royal Canadian Mint and Boteler Street and to provide bicycle lanes and a wider sidewalk to give the street the feel of Confederation Boulevard, a ceremonial route that runs through downtown, including Wellington Street. The widening is a longstanding project led the NCC to purchase the three homes in the 1980s as part of a plan to redevelop the “Mile of History” section of Confederation Boulevard. But during an Ottawa Built Heritage Advisory Committee meeting on Sept. 20, heritage advocates said the project attempts to rewrite Canada’s history where a compelling national narrative already exists. The committee rejected city staff’s recommendation to allow the demolitions. That recommendation will go to the planning committee and then city council for final approval. One of the homes, a row-

house at 277 Sussex Dr., was the first Canadian home of former governor general Adrianne Clarkson, whose family fled the Japanese invasion of Hong Kong when she was three years old. The young refugee would later take up residence down the street from her childhood home at Rideau Hall as Canada’s head of state. In any other country, such a journey would be celebrated with a commemoration, said Nancy Miller Chenier, chairwoman of Lowertown Community Association’s heritage and development committee. “Sadly, these humble residences don’t fit within the vision for a Confederation Boulevard,” Miller Chenier said. “Would visitors be horrified to see a modest rowhouse?” “It makes you wonder why the national interest couldn’t be to protect what they have already almost erased,” said Chris Mulholland, heritage committee chairman. “If you erase all the heritage that’s there, what’s worth having it as a national boulevard?” Retaining the homes, especially 277 Sussex Dr., would “speak eloquently to the humble roots of our country,” said Leslie Maitland, president of Heritage Ottawa. “The history of Ottawa is more than embassies,” she

said. The homes are designated heritage under Part 3 of the Ontario Heritage Act as part of the Lowertown West Heritage Conservation District, which does not afford them complete protection from demolition. A plan to widen the road has been in the works since the 1960s due to the need to increase safety at the curve, said John Smit, manager of urban development review. The $30 million worth of changes will better accommodate cyclists and pedestrians, he said. There will be bike lanes in both directions and the sidewalks will be up to three metres wide. The speed limit in that 1.5kilometre section is currently 40 kilometres per hour and the city plans to increase it to 50 kilometre per hour after the curve is straightened out. David Jeanes, a heritage advocate who spoke at the meeting as president of Transport Action Canada, said the transportation rationale for the project is flawed. The natural traffic calming of the curve slows traffic down as it approaches one of the few pedestrian crossings in the area. If cyclists aren’t comfortable sharing the road with motorists, there are side street options nearby. The city could get away with includ-

ing chevron markings called “sharrows” that indicate cyclists and motorists should share the road, Jeanes said. “Do the sidewalks need to be widened? What is the pedestrian volume here?” Jeanes asked. “Here, it has not been shown that transportation trumps heritage.” Heritage committee members asked city and NCC staff why the possibility of moving the buildings farther back from the road wasn’t considered. The NCC’s project manager, Richard Daigneault, said that option was considered, but removing the buildings wouldn’t have a significant enough impact to warrant the cost. The committee couldn’t go into more detailed questioning about the heritage impact study because the consulting firm, ERA Architects Inc., that wrote the report was not in attendance for the Sept. 20 meeting. The demolitions will also mean a $14,000 reduction in annual tax revenue for the city. END OF HERITAGE?

The Sept. 20 meeting could very well be the last for the Ottawa Built Heritage Advisory Committee. The committee was slashed as part of governance restructuring at

FILE

Lowertown’s heritage and development committee has affectionately called Adrienne Clarkson, Lowertown’s first governor general because she lived at 275 Sussex Dr. The home, including three others, may be demolished to make room for the city’s plan to widen the road. city hall, and it will be reborn as a subcommittee of planning committee with four city councillors and three citizen representatives. The move already prompted two of the committee’s skeleton crew of members to quit, and if one more person quits before the last scheduled meeting in November, it will spell the end of the heritage committee. Mulholland said he knew the planning committee would not follow the com-

mittee’s recommendation, so he wondered if the advisory committee would be wise to side with city staff and recommend the demolitions – with some conditions to try and retain some of the heritage value of the buildings. His fellow committee members disagreed. “I would rather go out saying, ‘No, we don’t want demolitions,’” said committee member Elizabeth Eagen. “Even if we know that city council will approve them.”

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Neighbourhood crime prevention making strides Communities working to curb crime before it happens Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - Eight years ago, Lucie Marleau was moved into a war zone when she bought her new home in Vanier, having saved up for 10 years to make the purchase. A concentration of absentee landlords left her adrift on a street of homes housing drug use, prostitution and constant partying. Police had to be called an average of three times a week to deal with dangerous and intimidating behaviour and Marleau stopped inviting friends over because of the loud partying and beer bottles and dog excrement thrown onto her patio. She felt desperate and fearful. Then Crime Prevention Ottawa offered her some help to work on changing the neighbourhood. “I – and others – took (Crime Prevention Ottawa’s) motto to heart,” Marleau told the city’s community and protective services committee on Sept. 20. “I became the change I wanted to see in my community.” Since 2007, Marleau and Together for Vanier are one of three neighbourhood groups to have been involved in Crime Prevention Ottawa’s community-based crime prevention initiative. Between 2006 and 2011,

each of the three neighbourhoods, including Vanier, Lowertown East and PinecrestQueensway, have seen more than a 20 per cent drop in crime. “That’s not just a statistical drop,” said Rideau-Vanier Coun. Mathieu Fleury, whose ward contains two of the targeted communities: Vanier and Lowertown East. Those two neighbourhoods each saw a 20 per cent drop in crime, while west-end neighbourhood Pinecrest-Queensway had a 27 per cent drop in crime. Crime also went down across the city, but by a lesser margin: 15 per cent. The approach offers hope that communities facing a seemingly insurmountable challenge of overcoming crime and the effects of poverty can turn their neighbourhoods around. It’s a three-pronged approach that involves creating safe and welcoming physical environments and being actively engaged with partners in the community. But perhaps the most important element is building a group of actively engaged residents. From neighbourhood gatherings, movies in the park and community gardens to safety audits, walkabouts and youth leadership development, pushing for improvements wouldn’t be possible without passionate resident driving the change, said Nancy Worsfold, executive director of Crime Prevention Ottawa. “This is a community approach, looking at the community context in which people were living,” Worsfold said. “This approach engages more people, builds resilience in the community and innovative solutions.”

Part of that resiliency involves making the initiatives self sufficient, so Crime Prevention Ottawa has worked to find outside funding for the projects. Community-based crime prevention initiatives in Lowertown and PinecrestQueensway haven’t received Crime Prevention Ottawa funding since 2010. Even without direct funding, the iniatives have taken on a life of their own. In Lowertown, a successful push for community engagement has lead to reclaiming Jules Morin Park from drug traffickers and users as well as sex workers. Now, work is just beginning on renovations to the park to provide it with a soccer field and make the park one level. “A space once dominated by the hustle and bustle of a vibrant community was vacant,” said Holly Brown, community development coordinator at the Lowertown Community Resource Centre. “With persistence we are coming to re-own our park.” This year, Crime Prevention Ottawa launched an online resource to support community-based crime prevention: the Neighbourhood Toolkit. It offers info and resources to help residents create safer communities and build community spirit. The website can be found at toolkit.crimepreventionottawa.ca/. To connect with Crime Prevention Ottawa and its community-based projects, follow @nancyCPO on Twitter, follow Worsfold’s blog at crimepreventionottawa.wordpress.com or look up Crime Prevention Ottawa on Facebook.

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R0011632067

MEC EVENTS & WORKSHOPS DATE

EVENT

TIME

COST

Mondays

Bike Maintenance 101

6:00 PM

Free

Tuesdays

Natural Running 101

12:00 PM Free

Tuesdays

Women Only Meetup Run

6:00 PM

Free

Wednesdays Bike Maintenance 201

6:00 PM

Free

Thursdays

Backcountry 101

12:00 PM Free

Thursdays

Meetup Run

6:30 PM

Free

Fridays

Walk to 5k 10 Week Program

6:30 PM

$20

Sundays

Meetup Ride

8:00 AM

Free

Sundays

Run a 10k 10 Week Program

9:00 AM

$20

5:30 PM

Free

SPECIAL EVENTS October 2

Learn to Ride

October 21

MEC Ottawa Fall Classic 5k/10k 9:00 AM

$15

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366 Richmond Road, Ottawa 613.729.2700 | mec.ca/events R0011639441-0927

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

City needs to double infrastructure repair spending Maintenance bill needs to increase to $165 million by 2022, committee hears Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - The city’s first-ever in-depth report on its infrastructure reveals that Ottawa needs to boost repair spending from $80 million to $165 million a year by 2022. Just days after spending $4.9 million to repair a sinkhole on highway 174 caused by a collapsed culvert, the report revealed the city isn’t spending enough to stay on top of repairing its roads, underground pipes and bridges. The report was particularly important in the context of a recent significant failure of a key piece of city infrastructure: the highway 174 sinkhole. “The cost in terms of both dollars and quality of life was very real,” Watson said. The money will be needed to repair and upgrade Ottawa’s $30 billion in roads, water, transit, recreation and cultural infrastructure. None of the infrastructure is unsafe right now, but transportation infrastructure, such as roads, has the highest percentage in really poor shape, with 25 per cent of the city’s $11.2 billion in transportation infrastructure rated in poor to very poor condition.

Transit infrastructure is in the best shape, with $1.4 billion of assets rated 79 per cent in good to very good condition. The report didn’t include detail on how the city will pay for the increases, but the options are limited: raise it from taxes, or take on more debt. Funding could theoretically come from the federal and/or provincial levels of government, although no new infrastructure programs are forthcoming. The infrastructure report was only tabled on Sept. 19; debate and discussion will take place on Oct. 2. During that meeting, city treasurer Nancy Schepers will also present a proposed plan for finding the needed funds, which are all expressed in 2012 dollars and don’t account for inflation. There are spikes in the city’s infrastructure spending in 2012 and 2014 from the city’s Ottawa on the Move road rebuilding project, which shows that city council has already made infrastructure repair a priority, said Alain Gonthier, the city’s asset management boss. “With Ottawa on the Move you’ve allowed yourself a bit

of breathing room,” Schepers added. The city currently carries around $1.4 billion in debt, which is less than the limits set by city council and the province. Schepers wouldn’t say whether taxes would have to go up, but Watson was firm on maintaining a maximum tax increase of 2.5 per cent annually. Last year alone, the city added $1 billion in new infrastructure assets it will have to pay to maintain over the years. When asked if the report was a wake-up call that the city should cut back on building new infrastructure and focus instead on maintaining the assets it already has on the books, Watson said city council’s focus on reining in the urban boundary was an attempt to do just that. “Obviously we’re always going to be growing, but we have to have smart growth,” Watson said. “(It’s) one of the reasons why I was fighting to preserve the urban boundary. The farther out we go, the more expensive it is. We know that growth does not pay for itself.” River Coun. Maria McRae, who heads the city’s environment committee, said the city needs to include future maintenance costs in the “financial implications” sections of reports before council approves

FILE PHOTO

A car fell into a sinkhole on the off-ramp at the highway 174 eastbound exit to Jeanne d’Arc during evening rush hour on Sept. 4. The city’s first in-dept report on its infrastructure revealed the city needs to increase repair spending by $165 million a year by 2022. projects. “It’s short sighted and myopic of council sometimes,”

said McRae, adding that councillors are sometimes just focused on “snipping the rib-

bon,” not on what it will cost to maintain infrastructure over its lifetime.

Inspire Us 2012026014

The Order of Ottawa

City Council has created the Order of Ottawa as a way of recognizing excellence in our community. Nominate a deserving resident by October 10, 2012. Visit ottawa.ca/orderofottawa

ottawa.ca

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

19


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Weeding, watering and arithmetic Vanier school uses gardening to teach students Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - A Vanier elementary school has turned its community garden into an extension of the classroom, teaching students life lessons, the importance of food sustainability and what it takes to work as a team. Queen Elizabeth Public School is getting ready this fall to harvest its community garden for the second time. Maintained by teachers, students and their families, the garden, situated in a portion of grass once used for overflow parking, is now bursting with tomatoes, beans, pumpkins, squash and sunflowers. Queen Elizabeth teacher David Row is one of those who helped get the garden off the ground. “This garden is a chance for the children to experience and learn from something natural,” he said. At some point, Row added, all the students in the school have participated in the garden

project. “Any time I have come out to do some work in the garden, I am always met with a line up of kids who want to help,” he said. Grade 5 student Meriam Zeghal is one of the students who has worked hard all spring, summer and now fall on making the garden a success. “I love reading, if you see me, I am always reading, but gardening this year, it is just as good as reading,” she said. Zeghal isn’t the only one who has found virtue in gardening. Grade 4 student Thomas Lortie said the biggest thing he learned this season was patience. “You have to wait a long time for stuff to grow,” he said. Once it was time to enjoy the fruits of their labour, Lortie’s class harvested some of the vegetables and made a salad, which the fourth grader said he could not eat enough of. The project was made possible from a $1,000 grant through Metro’s Green Apple School Program in 2011. According to Row, it was enough to get seeds in the ground and shovels in students’ hands. During the past winter,

MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

Queen Elizabeth Public School is getting ready to harvest its community garden. The garden, which began in 2011 grows everything from berries to pumpkins. From left, are Meriam Zeghal, Ahmed Rashid, Thomas Lortie and Carter Anderson-Schultz. the students sold seeds they harvested in the fall to raise money for the garden’s 2012 crops. “The grant got us started and then we were able to sustain the garden through the sale of the seeds and a generous donation from another school-run fundraiser,” Row said. Students who participated in an entrepreneurial achieve-

ment program last spring donated a portion of the proceeds to the garden project, he said. The rest is all labour, which students, families and teachers all have jumped at the chance to help with. “Teachers, students and their families helped water and weed the garden during the summer - that is how we survived the drought,” Row

said. There were no signs that the garden suffered at all, with three-metre tall sunflowers and pumpkins the size of boulders. “One of my favourite things was to come here with my family and garden,” Zeghal said. Row said the best part the garden has offered him and the

students is the joy of learning about gardening. From gaining strength to braving grubs and worms to creating their own compost for the garden, the children, Row said have impressed him. “The smiles on their faces when they are working out here, the engagement, the participation, it is unparallel to anything else.”

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Experience the phenomenon of a hauntingly magical and stirring outdoor exhibit of thousands of hand-carved pumpkins, all set against the night-time backdrop of historic Upper Canada Village.


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Ice Skating

Beautification committee to organize community clean-up Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - Vanierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s selfappointed clean-up team will hold an official neighbourhood clean up next month and are calling on fellow residents to roll up their sleeves and join in. The Vanier Beautification group decided on Oct. 13

as the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s official clean up day. All residents are encouraged to participate, either on their own or with the committee. The clean up effort is part of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cleanup the Capital campaign, which is already underway. The campaign sees community organizations across the city holding clean up events, including a separate cleanup

effort in Vanier from Sept. 28 to 30. The committee will order supplies through the city of Ottawa for the event, including leaf and garbage bags, rakes and graffiti removal materials. For more information about the event, please contact the Vanier Beautification at vanierbeautification@gmail.com.

Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ďŹ nd a spot for that new purchase? Reduce the clutter! Sell it in the ClassiďŹ eds.

China disabled peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performing arts troupe By Michael Crabb

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a workout for all ages Ice skating is a low-impact activity that provides exceptional cardiovascular health beneďŹ ts. Just like walking, running or swimming, ice skating can offer a great workout while being easy on the joints! Look no further than the City of Ottawa Recreational Skating School to get an introduction to skating. Or you can learn specialties such as ďŹ gure skating, speed skating or power skating. Courses are offered at various times, every day of the week, for ages two years and up. If private lessons are more your style, these can be arranged too! Lesson plans are specially designed to accommodate the participantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skill level. Call 613-580-2596 for information or register to learn, improve or master the ability to skate. All participants must wear CSA approved hockey helmets.

Skater safety is a top priority at the City of Ottawa and safety starts with a properly ďŹ tted helmet. Children aged 10 and under, as well as skaters of all ages at a beginner skill level, are required to wear a Canadian Standards Association (CSA) approved helmet while attending City of Ottawa indoor public skate sessions. Some tips for choosing a helmet: s "UYAHELMETTHATlTSNOW NOT one to grow into. s .EVERBUYAUSEDHELMET s -AKESUREYOURHELMETHAS been tested for safety (Helmet will have a CSA sticker inside) To learn more about our helmet safety requirements, visit ottawa.ca or call the Public Skating Information line at 613-580-2666. Remember to skate smart â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all skaters, regardless of age, and skill levels are encouraged to wear a CSA approved helmet while skating.

Want to practice your skating? Use our convenient Public Skating search tool found on ottawa.ca to ďŹ nd the many public skating locations and times in your area!

Skating is a great way to be active and enjoy our Ottawa winters!

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

21


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Power of mother nature unleashed at museum Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

Canadian Citizenship not For Sale Our Conservative Government is taking action to strip citizenship and permanent residence status from people who do not play by the rules; who lie, cheat, and scam the system. Having Canadian citizenship is an honour and a privilege, and we will apply the full strength of Canadian law against those who cheapen its integrity. Our Government’s investigation into this type of fraud continues to grow, with nearly 11,000 individuals potentially implicated in applying for citizenship or maintaining permanent resident status illegitimately. We have already started the process of revoking 3,100 fraudulently obtained citizenships. In most cases, those under investigation will use deceitful immigration representatives to fraudulently create evidence of living in Canada while actually residing overseas. This deception is created so that they can falsely document their status and later apply for citizenship. Investigations have found that a family of five may pay upwards of $25,000 over four or more years to create the illusion of Canadian residence. This fraud hurts everyday Canadian families. Those who illegitimately obtain permanent residence or citizenship status have access to taxpayer subsidized education, health care, and other social benefits without ever contributing as taxpayers themselves. It also hurts the reputation of the majority of immigrants who come to Canada by following the rules with honesty and integrity. Over the past six years, under the leadership of Stephen Harper and the Conservative Government, Canada has had the highest sustained level of immigration in history. We are committed to creating an immigration system that brings the world’s best and brightest to Canada, while protecting it against those who would abuse our generosity. Pierre Poilievre MP for Nepean-Carleton

EMC news - Children and adults alike will have the chance to create an earthquake, combine gas and goo to make a volcano, peer into the eye of a tornado and watch the awesome power of a tsunami at a new exhibit opening at the Museum of Nature. The museum’s latest exhibition, Nature Unleashed, will open on Sept. 28 and focuses on weather and other natural phenomena, offering specta-

tors a look inside natural disasters. Museum of Nature curator Caroline Lanthier said the exhibition focuses on four main features, earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes and tornadoes, with plenty for spectators to do and see. “It is all about learning the science behind the natural disasters and the impact these disasters have on humans,” Lanthier said. The first thing people will see is a look at the Earth. “It is Earth 101,” Lanthier said. “It is all about what is

earth, and why we have natural disasters.” The exhibit offers visitors the opportunity to touch and learn through sounds, pulleys and mechanical interactions, including the chance to create an earthquake or build a volcano. The main feature of the exhibition, Lanthier said, is the tornado theatre. There, visitors will be able to stand in the middle of a wind tunnel and watch as a tornado comes toward them and surrounds them. “It feels like you are inside

the middle of the tornado,” she said. The attraction is made possible by video footage from a storm hunter, Sean C. Casey. Already lived through a natural disaster? There will be an opportunity to become a small part of the show, with a spot to write down personal disaster experiences and post it to a wall. The exhibition will be at the museum until May 5. The museum will also feature a 3-D movie, Tornado Alley, created by Casey.

HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF

Mom, can we go to another one?

Get the whole Ottawa story by visiting our 10 community museums. They’re affordable, easy to find, fun to visit and offer hands-on activities that kids love.

Start your trip at ottawamuseumnetwork.ca Check out what’s happening: Billings Estate National Historic Site

Nepean Museum

Culture Days Activities: Canoe Tours and/or Embroidery Sessions Saturday, September 29 and Sunday, September 30

Early Settler School Sunday, September 30 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Bytown Museum Culture Days Big Hairy Workshop! Saturday, September 29 and Sunday, September 30 11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Cumberland Heritage Village Museum Culture Days in Cumberland! Saturday, September 29 and Sunday, September 30 10:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.

Diefenbunker: Canada’s Cold War Museum Culture Day at the Bunker Saturday, September 29 1:00 p.m.- 3:00 p.m.

Osgoode Township Historical Society and Museum P.D. Day Camp- Pirate Day! Friday, October 5 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

Pinhey’s Point Historic Site Séance at Pinhey’s Point Friday, October 19 from 7:00 p.m.

Vanier Museopark Spooky Tales in Richelieu Forest Saturday, October 27 from 7:00 p.m.

Watson’s Mill Fall Harvest Festival Saturday, October 6 10:00 a.m.- 3:00 p.m.

Goulbourn Museum Spooky Fall Crafts Sunday, October 14

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1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Police look to replace unilingual officer Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

LAURA MUELLER/METROLAND

Environment committee chairwoman Coun. Maria McRae and Mayor Jim Watson plant a new tree in a yard on Southmore Drive East on Sept. 24 after giving an update on the city’s emerald ash borer strategy.

City to test new chemical against ash borer beetles laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - An experimental chemical insecticide and a different way to process infected ash wood are two new ways the city is fighting the emerald ash borer. Two dozen Ottawa trees will be injected with a new insecticide called Confidor over the next couple of weeks, making the city only the second Canadian municipality to try the treatment against the beetles, which burrow under ash trees’ bark, slowly killing them. Its recent Health Canada approval means it isn’t even available for sale yet, so Ottawa is getting the insecticide for free from the company as it assesses Confidor’s effectiveness and impact. That announcement came with news that the beetles have spread farther across the city. New locations identified this year include: Barrhaven, north Kanata, Fitzroy Harbour, Stittsville, Richmond, Manotick, Metcalfe, Vernon, Vars and Navan. Environment committee chairwoman Coun. Maria McRae said it is “pretty frightening” how quickly the emerald ash borer is spreading across Ottawa. The beetle was first identified here in 2008. “It’s really quite a tragedy to see the number of trees lost,” said Mayor Jim Watson, adding he doesn’t want to see Ottawa lose its reputation as a green city. The city has already injected 2,309 trees with an insecticide called Tree Azin, including 262 new trees as part of $1 million in extra EAB funding approved by city council in July. The city expects to have 4,000 to 5,000 trees on a two-year inoculation cycle by the end of 2013. Some trees can’t be saved by Tree Azin insecticide injections at a cost of $200 to $400

per tree, so the city has a strategy to plant a variety of species to replace them. The city will have planted just shy of 4,000 new trees in 2012 by this fall: 1,267 trees were planted along streets and in parks this spring, and another 2,700 will be planted this fall thanks to the rest of that $1 million in extra funding. Many of those trees will be larger 50-millimetre diameter trees, which residents have said they’d rather see than the 25-millimetre diameter trees the city has been planting. The city will send a notice to residents on streets where planting will occur before planting a new tree beside a dying ash tree. If the tree is a city tree on private property, that property owner will be given a second notice before the city comes to plant the new tree, and a marker will be placed on their lawn to show them where it will go.

In the future, McRae hinted that the city would be open to adding a new tool to its arsenal: biological pests. Wasps are being used to fight the emerald ash borer in Minnesota, and Ottawa’s forester is watching to see if it’s something worth talking about for this city. NO MORE ASH AT TRAIL ROAD

Infested ash wood will no longer be shipped or stored at the city’s Trail Road landfill site. Ottawa Cedar Lumber, a company located just east of Ottawa, successfully bid to sort of process the city’s ash wood. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency also signed off on the bid. According to the city, the family company at 2188 Dunning Rd. in Cumberland operates a sawmill and has been producing rough-cut wood and

large volumes of wood chips for the past eight years. Owner Luc Laplante said he plans to turn much of the usable wood into lumber for flooring or furniture, but the city has discussed buying back some of the wood at a reduced rate to be used in the future light rail stations, perhaps for benches or wood paneling. The leftovers can be turned into chips for co-generation energy production. Signing on with Ottawa Cedar Lumber will reduce the risk of spreading the bugs by minimizing the processing time and moving the wood directly to the processing site. The city also expects the tipping cost fees of 30 per cent to drop. Tree removal was set to resume on Sept. 24. Homeowners on streets where infected ash trees will be cut down will receive a notice one week in advance.

R0021641085

Laura Mueller

EMC news - A language barrier has put the appointment of the new Vanier Community Police Centre officer under review. Const. Matt Hunt stepped into the community police officer position after Const. Marc Daviault was offered another position within the police force. The constable has already met with residents and even attended the very first Overbrook community safety meeting on Sept. 20. But it was only days earlier, when at a meeting of the Vanier Beautification committee on Sept. 18, it was announced that his position was in jeopardy. “I received email confirmation from the vicepresident of the community association that he will be replaced by a bilingual officer,” said Lucie Marleau, Vanier Beautification chairwoman. Police spokesman Henri Lanctôt confirmed Hunt’s position is under review. “Ideally, Ottawa police would like to have a bilingual officer in the role,” said Lanctôt. Vanier has a large francophone community and news that Hunt, a unilingual officer, was the new community police centre officer left some people attending a Sept. 11 meeting of the Vanier Community Association unimpressed. The community association wrote a letter to police Chief Charles Bordeleau expressing disappointment that bilingualism wasn’t prioritized. “We have concern that a unilingual officer would be less able to offer service to our francophone community,” said Mike Bulthuis, Vanier Community Association president. “Community policing is an important service and we are wondering what the police would do to ensure services to the francophone

community would be met.” The association is still waiting for a response from Bordeleau and want to know the police’s strategy if Hunt remains in the position. Lanctôt added the chief, a fully bilingual officer, is aware of the situation and is looking into it. “It is important to make sure the needs of the community are met,” Lancotôt said. According to Bulthuis, this is not about Hunt. “We have heard only positive things about Matt (Hunt) and are keen to work with him if he remains in the position,” he said. Hunt, a former school resource officer, said earlier this week he was juggling both his former and new positions until the resource position was filled. President of the Ottawa Police Association Matt Skof said the association will fight a decision to remove Hunt from his new position. “Matt (Hunt) is an incredibly skilled officer and I am not sure how Matt isn’t capable of doing his job,” Skof said. “That centre represents more than just one francophone community.” The application process, Skof said, does not require an applicant to be bilingual - it is listed as an asset. “He placed first in qualifying for this position and it is sad that someone else’s prejudice is threatening that,” he said. The president said he spoke with Hunt and said the officer wants to work in Vanier and wants to have the chance to receive French language training. Skof, an officer for the past 16 years said he spent a number of those years working in Vanier and said he has never seen language stop any of the officers from doing their job. At this point, it is uncertain what will happen to Hunt’s new position, or if he will remain in his previous one.

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SPORTS

Classifieds

Business Directory

Thursday September 27, 2012

Ping pong a charity sport of the future Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC sports - A ping pong celebration set to make its return to the Byward Market aims to encourage everyone in the city to grab a racket, don a head band and the finest ping pong whites to serve up for local charities. The third Ottawa Charity Ping Pong Tournament takes place on Sept. 28 at the SpinBin at 310 Dalhousie St. in support of four charities: Do it for Daron, the Youth Services Bureau, Operation Come Home and Christie Lake Kids. Pointing out that the volleyball charity pool was well saturated, Michael Kirkpatrick and his friends wanted to hold a charitable event with a bit of bounce to it. According to the table tennis enthusiast, ping pong was the natural option. “The ping pong revolution is upon us and the people in Ottawa are responding,” Kirkpatrick said. The event is meant to be fun for everyone. Players ranging from high- to low-skilled, as well as those with no skills at all are encouraged to participate. The registration fee is $40 and each player is guaran-

teed three games. All matches will be refereed. “Ping pong is the sport of the future,” Kirkpatrick said. “It is a sport everyone can play.” One caveat is that organizers have asked that much like in tennis, everyone must dress to impress in the finest “ping pong whites.” The tournament is still accepting donations with this year’s goal to raise $10,000. But as of Sept. 17, Kirkpatrick, who is also the event treasurer, said the event has already raised $20,000. “I am blown away by the kindness and generosity of businesses, participants and donors,” he said. In the past, the last two events raised a total of $7,000. Kirkpatrick credits the boost in donations to the changes from last year’s registration and this year. Those participating in the tournament this year have their own donation web page to solicit donations. “They can get all their friends and family and coworkers to donate, I guess it has really helped,” he said. Beyond what the participants can raise, there will also be a silent auction and a ping pong table will be raffled off. “This event is a lot bigger

than we have done in the past,” he said. For the first time, the event has a title sponsor, Verdun Windows and Doors. The food will be provided by Manotick Village Butcher and all participants will receive an official Ottawa Charity Ping Pong wristband and headband. “This year a lot of people have really stepped up to the plate,” Kirkpatrick said. On top of providing sponsorship, Verdun Windows and Doors will also make a film for participants to take home. There is a 200 participant cut off, so anyone over the age of 19 is encouraged to register quickly. And seeing how bouncing a tiny ball back and forth may not be for everyone, people can also sign up online to be a spectator for $30. Spectators receive two beverage tickets, food and a headband and wristband, too. Local musician Rory Gardiner and The Pelts will be offering up the musical entertainment for the tournament, which begins at 7 p.m. More information about the tournament and the charities the event is supporting is available at www.ottawacharitypingpong.com.

PATRICK BLAKE

The third annual Ottawa Charity Ping Pong Tournament will take place on Sept. 28 at the SpinBin in the Byward Market. All funds raised at the event will be in support of four local charities, Do it for Daron, the Youth Services Bureau, Operation Come Home and Christie Lake Kids.

Bytown Storm athlete named to national junior triathlon team EMC sports - A 17-yearold athlete who trains at the University of Ottawa is one of three girls recently named to the national junior triathlon

team. Samantha Klus, a Bridlewood teen, will compete at the International Triathlon Union World Championship in Auckland, New Zealand from Oct. 18 to 22. She earned a spot on the

team after placing fourth overall, but first among Ontario athletes, ages 16 to 19, in the junior elite provincial championship on Aug. 4 in Ottawa. See TRIATHLETE, page 27

SUBMITTED

R0011639002_0927

blair.edwards@metroland.com

R0011639014_0927

Blair Edwards

Margaret Kellaway, left, presents the Paul van Steen Sports Achievement Award to 17-yearold Samantha Klus during the Bridlewood Community Association’s annual general meeting on Sept. 18.


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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Triathlete ranked sixth among juniors in Canada â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sam is probably one of the strongest female athletes that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever coached,â&#x20AC;? said Greg Kealey, head coach of the Bytown Storm, which Klus joined ďŹ ve years ago. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of coming into her own â&#x20AC;&#x201C; sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very diligent, trains hard and is very focused. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought she had the potential to make the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team.â&#x20AC;? Klus is ranked sixth overall among junior elite triathletes in Canada. A triathlon race starts with a 1.5-kilometre swim, followed by a 40 kilometre cycle and a 10-kilometre run. Kealey said Klus is a dominant cyclist, an ability that will help her compete on the hilly course of New Zealand. Klus is one of the few 17-year-olds to make the worlds, said Kealey â&#x20AC;&#x201C; most of her competition is either 18 or 19. Klus said she was â&#x20AC;&#x153;super excitedâ&#x20AC;? when she learned she landed a spot on the national junior team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very nervous,â&#x20AC;? said Klus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I deďŹ nitely want to see where it takes me and hopefully one day be in the Olympics â&#x20AC;&#x201C; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like the main goal.â&#x20AC;?

Apart from her athletic achievements, Klus also volunteers her time helping to organize local races such as the Dunrobin Kids of Steel Race held in West Carleton earlier this year, and also helped shovel snow off community rinks in Bridlewood last winter. BYTOWN STORM

Five years ago, Klus was playing competitive soccer when her coach suggested she might want to train as a triathlete. Klus joined the Bytown Storm, a triathlon team that trains in various locations across the city including the Kanata YMCA/YWCA and the University of Ottawa Regional Training Centre. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I gave triathlon a try with my mountain bike and I loved it,â&#x20AC;? said Klus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Three different sports means youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not training for the same thing everyday. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so many things you can train for.â&#x20AC;? Every race and course is different, she added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just variety I guess.â&#x20AC;? But training for the triathlon requires a serious time commitment. The young athleteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s day starts at 5 a.m., when Klus wakes up and heads to the pool at the University of Ot-

tawa or Carleton University to swim for 90 minutes. After that, Klusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mom drops her off at Bell High School in Nepean. When the school bell rings, Klus heads home for a quick snack, then sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out the door, headed for running or cycling training at the Kanata YMCA or the Kanata Recreation Complex. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Training is like my way of getting away from life and just focusing on one thing,â&#x20AC;? said Klus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like my way to get away from stress.â&#x20AC;? Bedtime is 10 p.m., giving the teen a solid seven hours rest before she wakes up and begins her training day all over again. Her grueling schedule doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leave much time for activities apart from training and schoolwork, forcing the teen to give up some other activities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get to spend as much time with my friends as I would like, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really supportive,â&#x20AC;? she added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Time management is really tricky.â&#x20AC;? Klus said she hopes to one day study human kinetics at the University of Ottawa and eventually land a job as a physiotherapist or sports psychologist. Klus recently was named the fourth recipient of

Hunt Club/Riverside Community Services Centre

the Paul van Steen Sports Achievement Award. Klus was presented with the award, along with a $250 cheque from the Bridlewood Community Association (BCA) during its annual general meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 18. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very dedicated. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very hard working,â&#x20AC;? said BCA president Margaret Kellaway. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She gives back to her community and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also an excellent example for all Bridlewood residents.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already accomplished so much and the skyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the limit for where sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to go.â&#x20AC;? The Bridlewood teen said winning the Paul van Steen Award means a lot. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paul van Steen â&#x20AC;&#x201C; he was really involved with the Bridlewood community, so it means a lot to get that award and be recognized by my community.â&#x20AC;? The Paul van Steen Award was created by the BCA in 2009 to honour the long-time

Bridlewood resident and recognize residents over the age of 16 who demonstrate sports excellence. Van Steen was an active community member and sports enthusiast who helped create the spring sports program, managed the outdoor rinks, ran a cross-country ski program and refereed the Bridlewood Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hockey Association. He died in 2007 while renewing his hockey referee certiďŹ cation.

R0011630548

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Continued from page 25

Is pleased to announce that effective October 1, 2012, we will become South-East Ottawa Community Health Centre, Hunt Club/Riverside Site Regular services and programs will continue to be offered out of the present location at 3320 Paul Anka Drive. All health and social services offered out of South-East Ottawa Community Health Centre at 1355 Bank Street, Suite 600, will be available to those living in the Hunt Club/Riverside catchment area.

FUTSAL (INDOOR SOCCER) FIFA ONLY INDOOR RULES

REGISTRATION

Program brochures for both sites are available.

BOYS-GIRLS-WOMEN-MEN-COED ALL AGES CALL (613) 692-1235 or visit www.futsalottawa.com

What?

Community Health Week Program demonstrations, health information, activities for children, refreshments and more!!

Where? Hunt Club/Riverside Park Community Centre, 3320 Paul Anka Drive

When?

October 4th 2012, 2 pm to 5 pm

Who?

Everyone, big or small!! Come join us and Councillor Maria McRae as we unveil our new signage

Playing Futsal will enable coaches and the players to raise the level of their game. Futsal is the fundamental training in most Brazilian leagues and throughout South America. The focus on footwork, speed with the ball and quick feet, qualities that lack in most North American soccer players. Playing Futsal will enable the players to get more touches on the ball, which in turn will improve their long term development. The majority of possessions in Futsal are quick 1 or 2 touch combinations with teammates. The game rewards players who keep their head up, who control the ball, who support their team mates and who use one and two touch combination play to work with team mates. Come out and learn why futsal is recognized as the best way to teach the proper fundamentals of soccer and is the only type of indoor soccer endorsed by FIFA. Registration dates When

Location

Time

SSouth-East Ottawa Community Health Centre Sou

Wednesday September 26, 2012 Nepean Sportsplex

Hunt Club/Riverside Site H Hun

Saturday

September 29, 2012 Walter Baker

6PM -9PM

Barrhaven 10AM -2PM R0011635424-0927

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

River Ward City Councillor Conseillère, quartier Rivière Stepping Up the Battle Against the Emerald Ash Borer On Monday, September 24, 2012, Mayor Jim Watson joined me on a beautiful street in Riverside Park to provide an update about the City’s fight to protect Ottawa’s tree canopy from the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB). This invasive beetle has a devastating impact on Ash trees, which make up 25% of the City’s tree canopy. The sustainability of our urban and rural forest infrastructure relies heavily on the replacement of trees removed because of the borer and to that end, Forestry Services continues to inter-plant and replace Ash trees in infested locations. New Trees - Sustaining Our Canopy In the spring of 2012, 1,267 new trees of various species were planted along streets and in parks where a large percentage of Ash trees are present. This fall, using some of the additional $1 million of funding approved by Council on July 11, 2012, the City will plant an additional 2,700 trees, for a total of 3,967 new tree plantings in 2012. The planting program will minimize the impact on our forest cover and these new trees will have additional time to establish themselves prior to the removal of dying Ash trees.

SUBMITTED

Annual Walk of Care Volunteers and walkers enjoy a barbecue at the Walk of Care event held at the Osgoode Multi-use Pathway on Sept. 22. The walk was organized by the Rural Ottawa South Support Services to raise funds that will help rural seniors and adults with disabilities.

If the City’s right-of-way near your property is selected for inter-planting, you will receive a written notification in advance of planting. The City will also install a small compostable sign on the lawn to mark the approximate location of the new tree. Tree Injections – A New Tool for This Fight Tree injections using TreeAzin have formed part of the City’s EAB strategy since its inception in 2008 and Forestry Services continues to evaluate and add Ash trees to the injection program every year. This summer, the City partnered with industry researchers to trial a new injection product. Confidor, approved by Health Canada, is being used on a trial basis on a small number of trees in Ottawa. This trial program will allow researchers to assess the effectiveness of this insecticide and the injection system on Ash trees in Ontario. This product is used in EAB programs in the United States, and Ottawa is now one of two municipalities in Canada to investigate its use as part of our EAB strategy. Wood Handling and Disposal – The City Has a New Partner This summer, through a Request for Proposal process, the City selected a qualified vendor to sort and process Ash wood materials into marketable products. The successful bidder, Ottawa Cedar Lumber, is a family owned and operated company in the forestry business that operates a sawmill facility in the east end of the City. Ash trees will be transported directly to the sawmill for processing into materials such as fuel pellets, etc. Tree Removal – Operations Resume Ash tree removal operations resumed during the week of September 24, 2012. If you have an Ash tree scheduled for removal, you will receive a notification letter one week prior to work taking place. Work will generally take place between 7:00 a.m. and 3:30 p.m., weather permitting.

R0051598757

Your Strong Voice at City Hall I appreciate hearing from you and encourage you to keep in touch with me as it allows me to serve you better. It remains an honour and a privilege to be your strong voice at City Hall.

Tel./Tél.: 613-580-2486 Maria.McRae@ottawa.ca MariaMcRae.ca @CouncillorMcRae 28

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

R0011596973


Your Community Newspaper

CLASSIFIED

FOR RENT

HELP WANTED

British cleaning to British houses. Move in Move out. References available 613-869-0878

KANATA Available Immediately

Make Up To $1500 CASH/wk

DUQUETTE’S FIREWOOD

Seasoned maple and oak, free delivery, Member of BBB. Volume Discounts! www.duquettesfirewood.com

613-830-1488 EARLY BIRD SPECIAL Firewood for sale. 613-839-1485 Firewood, hardwood for sale, $110 a cord, delivered. 613-692-0187 leave message. Mixed hardwood- dried 1 year. $110/face cord. Free delivery to most area’s. 613-229-4004

BUSINESS SERVICES ALL CHIMNEY REPAIR & RESTORATION Brick & stonework. Workmanship guaranteed. Free estimates. Call Jim, 613-291-1228, or 613-831-2550 Anna’s Touch Home Cleaning. Keep your weekends free from housework! Honest ,reliable cleaner. Fully bonded. Back to school special, 25.00 off! First cleaning. With this ad. Call: 613-890-0715. Drew’s Computer RepairWebsite design, certified technician, $25/hour, email drew@dcrtech.net web..dcrtech.net Residential and Business. 613-826-0521. MELVIN’S

INTERIOR PAINTING Professional Work. Reasonable Rates. Honest . Clean. Free Estimates. R e f e r e n c e s . 613-831-2569 Home 613-355-7938 Cell. NO JOB TO SMALL! $$$NEED MONEY$$$ Do you have a pension plan form an ex-employer? (LIRA) or (lock in RRSP) Call NOW! 1-416-357-9585

Men’s Morning Hockey Players & Goalies for recreational hockey, Mondays and Fridays (1 or 2 days a week) 8-9 am at Bell Sensplex from October 15th to April 29th. Call Ian 613-761-3261 or email ian@exelcontracting.ca

www.rankinterrace.com Stittsville Bachelor Apartment. Availability negotiable. Heat, hydro, air-conditioning, gas fireplace, fridge, stove, cable, parking included. No pets. No smoking. First and last, references required. $795/mo. Near bus, shopping, p a t h w a y s . 613-831-3278/613-899-7946.

FOR SALE 2005 KAWASAKI Vulcan 500, $3400 or best offer. Call 613-432-9923 Apples, cider and apple products. Smyths Apple Orchard, 613-652-2477. Updates, specials and coupons at www.smythsapples.com. Open daily til April 1st. Disability Products. Buy and Sell stair lifts, scooters, bath lifts, patient lifts, hospital beds, etc. Call Silver Cross Ottawa (613)231-3549.

HELP WANTED BAKER HUGHES A leader in oilfield services, we currently have outstanding opportunities available for: 1) Equipment Operators for coiled tubing and cementing #1212681 2) Coiled tubing service supervisor - Red Deer #1214944 3) Coiled tubing service supervisor - Clairmont #121936 4) Cementing service supervisors #1215317 5) Operations manager #1214616 To apply, search for jobs at barkerhughes.com/careers Help Wanted!!! Make up to $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.TheMailingHub.com

HELP WANTED

Looking for persons willing to speak to small groups, 1 on 1 presentations. A car and internet necessary. Diana (866)306-5858.

Charity Marketing Not Door to Door Do some good, make some cash!

TREND-SETTER EXTERIORS is looking for Siding Installation Professionals to join our team in Calgary. Truck and tools required. Year round work. Call Al @ 403-984-6276

Need a helping hand? Our dedicated and mature caregivers (50 years+), thoroughly screened and insured, provide light housekeeping, companion care, dementia care, respite care, child care, shopping, transportation, handy work and other services. Call Seniors on Site at 613-422-7676 or visit www.sosonsite.com

CharityFundraisingEvents.com HOMEWORKERS NEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!! Full & Part Time Positions Are Available - On-Line Data Entry, Typing Work, Home Assemblers, Mystery Shoppers, Online Surveys, Others. No Experience Needed! www.ontariojobsathome.com

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Catholic District School Board of Eastern Ontario Box 2222, 2755 Highway 43 Kemptville, ON K0G 1J0 Invites applications for the position of:

REGIONAL SUPERVISOR OF PLANT & MAINTENANCE Eastern Region Education Centre Cornwall, Ontario $62,482 - $74,384 Under the direction of the Manager of Plant and Maintenance, the Regional Supervisor will be involved with all phases of school repairs, building renewal, additions and alteration projects to school facilities. The position will include supervision and direction of the maintenance staff, procurement and implementation of maintenance and service contracts, administration of maintenance activities within the region, supervision and coordination of the moving and installation of portable classrooms; planning, implementation and reviewing of school renewal projects. Please refer to our website www.cdsbeo.on.ca for specific details related to the job description and other requirements. Interested applicants are requested to forward a cover letter and resume, verification of educational qualifications, and professional/personal references by October 1, 2012 to the attention of: Barb Renaud Coordinator of Employee Services Fax: (613) 258-3610 E-mail: hr@cdsbeo.on.ca Only those candidates who are selected for interviews will be contacted. We thank all applicants for their interest.

CAS/VAW Capacity Developer – BILINGUAL F/T Perm. Western Ottawa CRC. $60-$71 annually + benefits. Full job posting, see www.wocrc.ca. Send resume to: Fax 613-591-2501 or e-mail info@wocrc.ca before Oct 5/12 @ 4.30 pm. Responsable du renforcement de la capacité, SAE/ FVV — poste permanent BILINGUE, temps plein, CRCOO. 60 à 71 000 $/an + avantages. Affichage complet sur www.wocrc.ca. Envoyez les CV par télécopieur à 613-591-2501 ou par courriel à info@wocrc.ca d’ici le 5 octobre 2012, 16 h 30.

CL380226-0927

Lyndhurst Gun & Militaria Show at the Lyndhurst Legion. Sunday October 14, 2012, 9 am-3 pm. Halfway between Kingston and Smiths Falls. Take Hwy 15 to 33, follow 33 to the Legion. Admission $5.00. Ladies and accompanied children under 16 free. Buy/sell/trade. Firearms, ammunition, knives, military antiques, hunting gear & fishing tackle. For show info and table inquiries call John (613)928-2382, siderisjp@sympatico.ca. All firearm laws are to be obeyed, trigger locks are required.

PERSONAL

Winter boat storage- Winterizing, shrink wrapping, indoor and outdoor, $335-$425. Mobile shrink wrapping available. 613-267-3470. relax@christie lakecottages.com

5 REASONS why to join Misty River Introductions: (1) You’re single and you’d rather be in love. (2) Thousands of people matched successfully in the last 12 months. (3) See current photos with complete profiles. (4) Meet local people in your own area. (5) We have been successfully matching for 17 years. Call TODAY for your free consultation. call (613)257-3531 or visit us at www.mistyriverintros.com

FINANCIAL / INCOME TAX Consolidate your Debts. 1 monthly pmt, including credit cards, taxes, collection agencies, garnishments, etc. GMC Consulting 24 hrs, Toll Free 1-877-977-0304. Services Bilingues. gmyre@debtzero.ca

World Class Drummer. From Five Man Electrical Band, is accepting new students for private lessons. Call Steve 613-831-5029.

HELP WANTED

PETS DOG SITTING Experienced retired breeder providing lots of TLC. My home. Smaller dogs only. References available. $17-$20 daily Marg 613-721-1530

LIVESTOCK Applehill Stables 6115 Prince of Wales Drive offers riding lessons (beginner-advanced), leasing, boarding with huge indoor arena. 613-489-2446 email applehillstables@rogers.com

REAL ESTATE SERVICES Available Now! Roomy two storey condo townhome in Bells Corners, 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, garage plus two outdoor spaces. Fresh paint, no carpets. $1,700/month plus utilities. Clive Pearce, Broker of Record, Guidestar Realty Corporation, Brokerage. (613)226-3018 (office) and (613)850-5054 (cell).

Horse, Tack, Equipment Consignment Sale. Galetta Livestock. SAT. October 6th. Galetta Ontario. 1/2 hour W. of Kanata. Tack 10 am, Equip. Noon, Horses 2 pm. Consign early. 613-622-1295.

AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

Ottawa Public Auction

Ottawa, ON=Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Now Accepting Consignments

Learning and Growing Together in Christ Brent Laton Chair of the Board

TRUE Advice! TRUE Clarity! TRUE Psychics! 1-877-342-3032 or 1-900-528-6256 or Mobile #4486 (18+) 3.19/min. www.truepsychics.ca

MUSIC

AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

UNRESERVED PUBLIC AUCTION

HUNTING SUPPLIES

www.emcclassified.ca

MARINE

Greg Miller

Wm. J. Gartland Director of Education

Eastern Ontario Territory Manager

HELP WANTED

CL391474_0927

FITNESS & HEALTH

613-831-3445 613-257-8629

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

CL418786_0927

All clean, dry & split. 100% hardwood. Ready to burn. $120/face cord tax incl. (approx. 4’ x 8’ x 16”). Reliable, free delivery to Nepean, Kanata, Stittsville, Richmond, Manotick. 1/2 orders avail. (613)223-7974. www.shouldicefarm.

3 bedroom townhouse, 1.5 baths, 2 appliances, unfinished basement, one parking spot. $1038 per month plus utilities.

CL365991

FIREWOOD

CL378296

CLEANING / JANITORIAL

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

Whether its one piece or a full dispersal, call today and get top results for your equipment.

Lanark County’s – Lanark Lodge, “People Caring for People”, is a 163 bed Long Term Care Home accredited with Accreditation Canada that strives to provide progressive resident centred care for our residents in an atmosphere of respect that fosters independence and fulfillment. We are seeking a self-motivated professional change agent for the following management position.

A PARTIAL EQUIPMENT LIST INCLUDES:

OFFICE MANAGER (Posting No. LL2012-165)

Albion Woods Adult Community Sale, Saturday Sept 29th. 8-2. Rain/shine. (off Mitch Owens between Stagecoach/Albion Rd). Something for everyone.

MANDATE: Reporting to the Director of Lanark Lodge, the Office Manager will plan, organize, and direct Lanark Lodge administrative operations, including financial management, payroll, resident business files, resident trusts and billings. You will provide leadership, direction and coordination of administrative services including customer service to residents, families and staff. You will act as coordinator and champion for the Lanark Lodge suite of software applications, collaborating with the IT department on implementation, maintenance, security, troubleshooting, and training. You will oversee the development of administrative systems, business processes and procedures as well as assist with the development and implementation of department goals, objectives, policies and procedures.

Richmond, Heron Lake Estates, 14 Ravenna CR. Large sale, multi-family, great variety. Sept.29th ,rain or shine. 8:00 until 1:00 PM.

FOR RENT KANATA RENTAL TOWNHOMES

3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Bathrooms, 5 appliances and more, located in established area, on site management office, 323 Steeplechase Dr. (just off Stonehaven Dr) Kanata, K2M 2N6, call 613-592-0548

For further details including qualifications and application deadline, visit our website at www.lanarkcounty.ca Lanark County employees value; honesty, respect, communication, accountability, positive attitude, collaboration and teamwork. If you embrace these values and you meet the position qualifications as found on our website, we look forward to receiving your résumé.

2005 JOHN DEERE 200C LC

1997 CASE 821B

2007 BOBCAT T300 HIGH FLOW

AUCTION LOCATION:

BOBCAT 335

2006 FORD F150 XLT 4x4

4054 County Road 43, Kemptville, ON

For up-to-date equipment listings, please check our website:

rbauction.com

FOR MORE Ritchie Bros. Territory Managers – INFORMATION: Greg Miller: 613.922.3464

or Toll Free: 1.800.357.0659

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

CL391301_0927

GARAGE SALE

29


1968 Thunderbird 4 door, 70,000 miles or 120,000 km, 11 to 1 compression, high output 429 CID Thunderjet engine. Engine and C6 transmission are excellent. Black leather interior in good condition. Car needs restoration. $2,800 o.b.o. 613-282-1836, Kemptville. Call anytime!

GARAGE SALE

WEDDING Weddings, Baptisms & Funerals, location of your choice. Also available small weddings, my home, weekdays. The Rev. Alan Gallichan. 613-726-0400.

WORK WANTED

934 Hunt Club, a sophisticated rental property in Ottawa South. New elegantly ďŹ nished two bedroom apartment. 1&2 bathrooms. Includes details such as: â&#x20AC;˘ Open concept kitchen and living area â&#x20AC;˘ Granite kitchen islands â&#x20AC;˘ Refrigerator, stove and dishwasher incl. â&#x20AC;˘ Ceramic ďŹ&#x201A;oors in kitchens, bathrooms and entries â&#x20AC;˘ Laundry hook-up in every unit, as well as on site laundry facility â&#x20AC;˘ Additional storage units available â&#x20AC;˘ Ample parking available www.vipconstruction.ca â&#x20AC;˘ Oversized windows viphomes1@gmail.com â&#x20AC;˘ Oct/Nov occupancy 613-731-2455

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Miniature Horses For Sale Foals, Yearlings, 2 Year Old Brood Mares, Stallions

Please call 613-258-5095

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

REXALL PHARMA PLUS

GARAGE SALE

175277_0212

Eastern Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Largest Indoor Flea Market

CL374515

Mchaffies Flea Market

Is seeking a part-time PART TIME AND FULL TIME POSITIONS AVAILABLE PHARMACY ASSISTANTS AND TECHNICIANS Accepting resumes in store at 339 Raglan St., Renfrew, ON Or fax 613-432-6511

$1350 $1150 0315.CL334946

$1050 $950

Call today:

613.825.9425 weewatch.com Serving Ottawa West and Barrhaven

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

ONE CALL MINTO HAS IT ALL FROM EAST TO WEST YOUR NEW RENTAL HOME AWAITS YOU!

CHOICE SERVICE

0301.332055

QUALITY

CL380008

LOCATION

30

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

FOR SALE

M IL

Y

TURKEY F

252604_1117

NEW CONSTRUCTION!

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

L YO N S F

HUNT CLUB SQUARE

Send A Load to the dump, cheap. Clean up clutter, garage sale leftovers or leaf and yard waste. 613-256-4613.

150 booths Open Every Sunday All Year 8am-4pm Hwy. #31 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 kms north of 401

FOR SALE

LTD

VEHICLES

Need a car or truck and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get financed? Whatever your credit issues we can help. Guaranteed financing is available to everyone regardless of credit history. Call today, drive tomorrow. Call Joseph 613-200-0100.

FOR RENT

www.emcclassiďŹ ed.ca

A

Hobby farm; 53 park like acres. Cheerful 9 room home, large barns, garage. 1,600â&#x20AC;&#x2122; road front. Easy commute to Brockville, Smiths Falls, Ottawa. $179,000. Gerry Hudson, Kingston (613)-449-1668 Sales Representative Rideau Town and Country Realty Ltd, Brokerage (613)-273-5000.

FOR RENT

VEHICLES

CL405416-0927

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

CLASSIFIED CL375465_0913

Your Community Newspaper

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

Locally Grow GrV r n  Vegetable egettable Grain F Fed

TURKEY 3312 County Rd. #21, Spencerville, Ontario www.lyonsturkeyfarm.com

613-658-3148

Member of Turkey Farmers of Ontario NOW TAKING ORDERS FOR THANKSGIVING AND CHRISTMAS

FOR RENT

FOR RENT


Your Community Newspaper

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

CLASSIFIED

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

HELP WANTED

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Youths!

CAREER HUNTING FOR HIGHER INCOME EARNERS %8%#54)6%3s-!.!'%23s02/&%33)/.!,3    n9%!23%80%2)%.#%

WANT HELP? CALL FOR A FREE EXPLORATORY INTERVIEW (613) 498-2290 or 1 877 779-2362

CL400697

Searching for your next career position? If you have experience and a proven track record, there is a secret to winning employment over hundreds of others? The answer is different from what you expect. Our Careeroute service helps higher bracket individuals re-establish their careers: Recently Our Clients Accepted High Paying Careers In Plant Manager Accounting Engineering Logistics Tech. Writing C.W. Armstrong NFP Specialist Counseling Purchasing Admin. Ind. Sales Canada’s Leading Ex. Director 3D Design Foreign Svc Bus. Mgr. Arson Invest. Career Specialist IN OTTAWA & VICINITY “Armstrong’s program worked for me in 3 weeks,” Matt Z. “I owe my position to the importance you placed on “ME”, James K. “After my orientation I was lavished with a 15% raise,” Bruce S. ICTR Inc H.O. Brockville, ON www.ictr.ca

“Over 40 years Career Management Experience… Ottawa, Eastern Ontario and Nationwide.”

COMING EVENTS

COMING EVENTS

HELP WANTED

www.emcclassified.ca

HELP WANTED

Adults!

HELP WANTED

Seniors!

Earn Extra Money! Keep Your Weekends Free!

Routes Available! We’re looking for Carriers to deliver our newspaper!

• • • • •

CL379813

COMING EVENTS

HELP WANTED

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

Deliver Right In Your Own Neighbourhood Papers Are Dropped Off At Your Door Great Family Activity No Collections Thursday Deliveries

Call Today 613.221.6247 613 .221.6247 Or apply on-line at YourOttawaRegion.com 308527

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FOR SALE

HEALTH

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ARTS & CULTURE

Your Community Newspaper

Artists celebrate years of success at Glebe show Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

MARGARET CHWIALKOWSKA

Margaret Chwialkowska paintings are inspired by nature, specifically the Ottawa River. Chwialkowska lives by the river and says she spends a lot of time studying the river. about 10 years ago. “I put my skills to more practical uses over the years, sewing, designing, but when I got back into it and picked up the pallet knife it was like a breakthrough,” she said. Aside from having her work on display at the Glebe Fine Arts Show, she also has

her work at the Foyer Gallery at the Nepean Sportsplex, and in galleries in Perth, Markham, Ont., and Kindersley, Sask. The show also featured art from Canterbury High School students. Bordage said the chance for students to both show off their work while ac-

cumulating volunteer hours offered a unique, exciting opportunity. “We are all parents and all know and understand high school students requirements,” Bordage said, adding the students are fantastic help. Although the show is over for another year, both

Chwialkowska and Bordage said the work does not stop. The artists will now hold a postmortem and discuss what worked and what didn’t and begin early preparations for next year’s show. “Everyone is expected to work on one of the many committees to make this

show happen,” Bordage said. “And everyone is a great at making the show run year after year.” For more information about the show, or how to participate in the 2013 event, please go to the organization’s website at www.glebefineartshow.ca.

R0031613653-0927

EMC community - A great deal of work by artists from across the city went into making the Glebe Fine Arts Show a success this past weekend. The show celebrated its seventh year at the Glebe Community Centre when it took place on Sept. 22 and 23. Linda Bordage is one of two coordinators who worked on the show this year and as an artist herself, she said it is important artists all work on making the show a success. “It is an artist run show,” Bordage said. “The expectation is the artists must do the leg work to make the show happen.” The show has taken place at the community centre every year since 2005. Bordage said it offers a small and intimate place for the 30 artists in the show to exhibit their work. One of the artists who participated in the show this year is Margaret Chwialkowska, an oil painter. “This is one of my favourite shows,” she said. The artist, who’s loved painting since she was a small girl in Poland, had pushed her desire to paint aside to focus on raising a family and career obligations. Chwialkowska only picked up the pallet knife after her children were grown,

32

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012


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Arteast hits St. Laurent Complex Show will highlight works of 50 best members Brier Dodge brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - The annual juried exhibition showcase for Arteast members will take place at the St. Laurent Complex at 525 CĂ´tĂŠ St. starting Sept. 30. The show, which will highlight the best works of about 50 members, will run until Nov. 29. The location is ideal because of the high number of parents taking children to activities and recreational users that pass through the complex, said show coordinator Cheryl Mattice. Arteast holds a permanent spot at the Shenkman Arts Centre, but the larger space and more foot traffic makes St. Laurent the right spot for this show.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;We always have something running at Shenkman, so we need a different spot in order to have the juried awards,â&#x20AC;? Mattice said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And I know from talking to the managers (at St. Laurent) that they really enjoy having it there because it gives people something to look at.â&#x20AC;? The opening reception for the show, where the prizes are awarded, will be Oct. 11 from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Winter Room. Arteast is an east-end based arts group, but does include members from as far away as Kanata, Nepean and Cornwall, Ont. They display work at St. Laurent, Shenkman, and the OrlĂŠans, Cumberland and North Gloucester branches of the Ottawa Public Library. It has a mix of amateur

and professional artists and will show work in nine different categories, including photography, oil painting, mixed media and sculpture. First, second, third and honourable mention awards will be given for each category, with an overall Best in Show Award given as well. All artists who register for the show are accepted, but this year the show only allowed each artist to submit one work. Last year, for the 30th anniversary, artists were allowed to submit multiple works, and the space was jam-packed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This year is more manageable,â&#x20AC;? Mattice said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quite a variety, and some really interesting things that I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen done before.â&#x20AC;?

JANE CASS/SUBMITTED

One of the paintings that will be on display at the annual juried exhibition showcase. Last year, for the 30th anniversary, artists were allowed to submit multiple works, and the space was jam-packed.

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SENIORS

Your Community Newspaper

Fall tradition of burning leaves became a family pastime

T

his time of year, we all smelled the same at Northcote School. The heavy scent of burning leaves penetrated everything we wore and no amount of airing out could eliminate the odour of our smoke-infested clothes. But none of us minded. Burning leaves was something we all looked forward to at our farm and as far as I knew everyone in Northcote did the same thing. None of us minded the smell of smoke on our clothes- well, that is, we five kids and Mother. Father said making the event into a grand affair was something he had little time for: too many other more important things to do on the farm instead of making a party out of burning leaves. Our front and side yards were full of big maple trees and by the time the last days of summer rolled around the leaves were in some places knee deep. We waited until the limbs were completely bare and then on a Saturday it was time to rake the leaves and pile them into big mounds well away from the house and barns. “You’re asking for trouble,” Father would say. “Just

MARY COOK Mary Cook’s Memories one little spark and the whole place would go up in smoke.” Mother paid him no heed, asking him to come up with even one barn or house that had been burned to the ground because of leaf burning out at Northcote. “Well, I sure hope we aren’t the first,” he retorted every year as long as I can remember. I wasn’t big enough or strong enough to manage a rake. So my job was to circle the mounds and with my feet, try to make each pile round, and push any wayward leaves into place. It took most of the day to round up all the leaves and when we were finished we would have about four big piles of leaves in the centre of the yard. Of course, Mother, who made an occasion out of the simplest events, wouldn’t let us light the leaves until after the sun had gone down and the yard was in complete

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darkness. Supper would be early that night; another excuse for Father to complain. He liked everything on time and that included his meals. So by the time we had eaten, cleaned up the kitchen and hauled out chairs to circle the mounds of leaves, nightfall had settled in. We would start out with heavy jackets on to ward off the chill of the fall evening. My oldest brother, Everett, was always in charge of the matches. He had the lighting of the leaves down pat. He rolled sheets of the Renfrew Mercury into tight cones, and he lit the paper, setting it ablaze. That way he could poke the paper deep into the mounds of leaves, making sure it burned from the inside out. Very clever, was my brother Everett. We sat on the kitchen chairs, circling the burning piles, but well back from the fire, we five children and Mother. Father chose to stay in the house reading the Ottawa Farm Journal. If marshmallows were in existence back then, we certainly didn’t know about them. And it is doubtful we could have afforded them anyway. So the only enjoyment we got was sitting on the chairs and watching the raked leaves go up in smoke. Mother always took her mouth organ out on those nights and she expected us to sing along to whatever she was playing. See LEAVES, page 35

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FOOD

Your Community Newspaper

Fall the time to bake with apples

N

ow that fall is officially here, the cool, sunny days are just right for a family outing to visit one of the many apple orchards in Eastern Ontario. While you’re there, ask the orchard staff to recommend which apples are best for eating and which types are better for baking. For this apple cinnamon braid, you’ll need two or three baking apples. The recipe starts with the dough cycle in your bread-making machine and finishes in the oven. Shaping the dough into a braid is very easy. Give the recipe a try now, and you’ll want to make it again for your guests on Thanksgiving weekend. This bread is nice with breakfast, with coffee or for dessert. APPLE CINNAMON BRAID

Dough • 2/3 cup water • 3 tbsp. margarine or butter, softened • 3 tbsp. white sugar • 1 tsp. salt • 2 cups flour • 1 1/2 tsp. bread machine yeast Filling • 2 cups apples, peeled and sliced • 1 tbsp. white sugar • 1 tbsp. flour • 1/4 tsp. cinnamon

PAT TREW

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Spoon the filling down the middle of the rectangle, so that the centre third of the dough is covered. To shape the braid, first make cuts in the long side of the dough. Each cut should be 2.5 centimetres apart, and extend from the outer edge of the dough in to the edge of the filling. Next, starting at one end of the rectangle, fold a strip of dough diagonally over the filling. Now, fold a strip of dough from the other side so it overlaps the first strip in the centre. Continue, alternating sides, so that the filling is completely covered. Cover the dough with a damp cloth and let it rise in a warm place for about 30 minutes or until double. Use a ruler to measure the height of the braid before and during the rising to tell when it’s ready. Bake at 375 F (190 C) for 30 minutes, or until golden brown. When the bread is done, use the aluminum foil to transfer it to a rack. Slide the foil out from under the braid and let it cool. Slice to serve.

Place the ingredients for the dough into your bread machine in the order given. Select the dough cycle. While the machine is working, prepare the apples. Mix all the ingredients for the filling in a microwave-safe bowl and let sit for 15 minutes. Microwave the apple mixture on high for four to five minutes, stirring at one-minute intervals. When the apples are soft and syrupy, the filling is done. Set it aside to cool. When the dough is ready, remove it from the bread machine. Place it on a lightly floured surface, cover with a damp cloth and let it rest for 10 minutes so it will be easier to work with. On the floured surface, roll the dough into a 33-by-20centimetre pan. That’s about three hand widths long and two hand widths wide. Trim the edges of the dough, if necessary, to get the shape. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil, grease the foil and then place the dough on it.

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Leaves burning a fall tradition Continued from page 34

the log house that had been there for three generations would go up in smoke.

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Emerson refused. Audrey with her clear, sweet voice was the only one who could carry a tune and so she and Mother provided what entertainment there was. I would sit on the chair and listen, watching the flames rise towards the sky and wonder why Father couldn’t see the sheer joy of the evening. The old iron pump was right in the middle of the yard and although Mother said there was absolutely no need for it, Father made sure there were several pails on the pump platform just in case the blaze got out of hand. By the time the fire was raging, we took off our jackets as the heat came at us in waves. It didn’t take long for the piles of leaves to be burnt right to the ground and I often wondered if it was worth the effort. When it was all over and we had hauled the kitchen chairs back into the house, Father would let out a big sigh, as if he carried the cares of the world on his shoulders. He would go out to the yard for the first time since supper was over, and he would pump many pails of water, and pour

it over the remnants of the burning leaves. He was taking no chances that the barns and

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ARTS

Your Community Newspaper

Physicist turned artist enjoys science of painting SCIENCE

blair.edwards@metroland.com

EMC entertainment - When the high-tech bubble burst in 2001, it came as a natural career crossroads for France Tremblay. For nearly a decade, the Kanata Lakes woman had worked as a scientist, first studying quantum mechanics at the prestigious Cavendish Laboratory at the University of Cambridge in England, then later developing radar systems for the Department of Defence. From 1996 to 2001, Tremblay managed teams of scientists developing the next generation of telecommunication technology at Nortel Networks. But always in the back of her mind, she carried with her the dream of becoming a fulltime artist, a seismic career switch for a woman who had spent the past 20 years developing impressive academic and professional credentials in the fields of physics and telecommunications. The change in careers came a little earlier than originally planned with the fall of Nortel. “I’m now a full-time artist with science as a hobby,” said Tremblay.

Science was Tremblay’s first passion in life. “I loved it since I was a kid,” she said. Tremblay, who grew up in Quebec City, was interested in studying the physical world, with math simply providing the paintbrush to bring her observations to life. “The maths are an essential tool to describe the world we live in,” she said. Tremblay earned a bachelor’s degree in physics at Lavalle University, in Quebec City, a master’s degree in physics at the University of Toronto and finally a PhD degree in physics at Cambridge. “Physics is the best way to do a lot of maths while linking it to the physical world, so I found that exciting,” said Tremblay. “Physics means you study something that’s real.” During her off time while studying in England, Tremblay toured art museums throughout Europe, and developed a second passion in life. “I was having a natural interest in art,” Tremblay said. The fledgling artist visited many of the great museums in France, such as the Louvre and the Musée d’Orsay, as

well as some of the smaller venues devoted to only one artist, such as Picasso and Rodin. “They’re still jewels,” she said. Those tours allowed Tremblay to begin learning the tools she would need to prepare for a career in art. “A seed was planted in my heart in Europe,” she said. “I had a decade to prepare.” When she started working as a scientist, Tremblay used her off hours to learn the fundamentals of painting, such as drawing techniques and the proper way to mix paint. “This is a life-long learning curve,” Tremblay said. “You need to have a lot of tools in your toolbox.” Since 2002, Tremblay has become a full-time artist and part-time scientist – she works as a professor in the electrical engineering department at the University of Ottawa. She has entered high-profile exhibitions in the United States, including the Paint the Parks Top 11 in 2007, 2011 and 2012 as well as The Art of Conservation, an international annual event presented at various prestigious museums and the Society of Animal Artists exhibition from 2010-12. See RESEARCH, page 39

BLAIR EDWARDS/METROLAND

France Tremblay produces nearly 10 paintings a year. The Kanata Lakes painter is the 2008 Grand Prize Purchase Award winner for her piece Southeast View from Zabriskie Point.

R0011636139

Blair Edwards

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Research is key: painter Continued from page 37

She won the grand prize in the Paint the Park Top 100 in 2008 and was selected a ďŹ nalist in the landscapes category and wildlife art category of the Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Magazine Annual Art Competition, which draws entries from nearly 15,000 artists every year. Every year, Tremblay opens her home to the public, participating in the annual Kanata Artists Studio Tour. Tremblay paints landscapes, still life and wildlife pieces using acrylic paint as well as drawing using coloured pencils, graphite and carbon. She lists some of her inďŹ&#x201A;uences as Canadian wildlife artist Robert Bateman, as well as painters Patricia Pepin and John Banovich. In 2002, Tremblay founded an art school that she runs out of her home in Kanata Lakes. RESEARCH

Tremblayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eye for precision inďŹ&#x201A;uenced her taste in art. She said she approaches her paintings from the perspective of a scientist and that her work is the result of careful planning and analysis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of my work is so realistic to the extreme,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That means I have to do a lot of research on the subject.â&#x20AC;?

Every year, Tremblay plans one to two trips to remote areas to â&#x20AC;&#x153;researchâ&#x20AC;? her paintings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every painting you see (on my wall) is the result of my research in the ďŹ eld,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m climbing mountains; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m walking in the deserts â&#x20AC;&#x201C; for me thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the exciting part of the process.â&#x20AC;? Her research trips have included visits to Death Valley in eastern California, the Rocky Mountains in Alberta as well as the Florida Keys. Her research provides an intense study of her paintingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; subjects. For instance, Tremblay spent countless hours in Andrew Haydon Park in Nepean, observing, sketching and studying a speciďŹ c great blue heron, the subject of her acrylic painting, The Sovereign. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can tell you that speciďŹ c bird has lived in Andrew Haydon Park for two years,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not looking at the bird species. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking at the bird â&#x20AC;&#x201C; this isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a bird, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a speciďŹ c blue heron.â&#x20AC;? From start to ďŹ nish, a painting can take between 80 to 200 hours for Tremblay to produce. Tremblay said her future goal remains the same every year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; improve as an artist, learn better technique and design. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just want to do the best painting I can.â&#x20AC;?

Poetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pathway first bilingual event Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - A local poetry group is holding its ďŹ rst bilingual reading on Poetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hill in Beechwood Cemetery. Taking place on Sept. 28 at 6 p.m., the event will feature six readings: three in English and three in French. The event is meant to bridge the gap between the two languages by sharing a common love for poetry. Jane Moore, a committee member of Poetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pathway, is one of the people working to organize the event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This reading is really signiďŹ cant to us,â&#x20AC;? Moore said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This event is about embracing the francophone community.â&#x20AC;? Reading their own works will be Henry Beissel, AndrĂŠe Lacelle, Susan McMaster, Diane Schmolka, Michel A. ThĂŠrien and Nancy Vickers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are really excited about this event, it is really important to us to have both languages represented,â&#x20AC;? Moore said. Poetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pathway was formed in 2003 and seeks to create a â&#x20AC;&#x153;pathwayâ&#x20AC;? from one end of the city to the other. Britannia Beach marks the start and western end of the pathway. Thanks to the support of through support from management at Beechwood

Cemetery; Poetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hill was created in 2005, marking the eastern terminus of the pathway. The 35 kilometre path winds its way through the city and includes 12 different walks. The organization is also supported by the city and has placed seven plaques marking signiďŹ cant spots along the route featuring verses by Canadian poets. Moore said the plaques are a signiďŹ cant part of what they want to accomplish as an organization and are always trying to come up with different ways to reach out to the community to inspire a love for poetry, build a strong membership and ďŹ nd more ways to fund its projects. Aside from poetry readings, the organization holds walks, bike rides, concerts and garden parties throughout the year in an effort to raise the awareness and money to be able to place plaques along the pathway. NEW PLAQUES ON THE WAY

The next step for the organization is to erect the next two plaques, one in English, by Archibald Lampman and one in French by Alfred Garneau in the city-owned portion of Stanely Park. Moore attended the New Edinburgh Community Alli-

MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

The Poetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pathway will hold the non-profitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first bilingual poetry reading will take place at The Beechwood Cemetery, on Poetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hill. ance meeting on Sept. 17 to seek support and to announce the placement of the plaques in the park. Joan Mason, alliance president, said the board has supported Poetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pathway for years and will support the new plaques in the park. The alliance has written a letter to the city in support of the project. â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Edinburgh has much of historic interest. Thousands of visitors every year come to iconic Rideau Hall, and stay to wander through the heritage conservation district with its charming homes, lanes and park,â&#x20AC;? Mason wrote in the letter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our section of

the pathway will become part of the walking tour of the district, self guided or conducted in collaboration with Heritage Ottawa. We see the addition of Poetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pathway as a way to speak to the heart of the Canadian experience.â&#x20AC;? Both plaques will have poems directly linked to the Rideau River and the Ottawa River, which Moore ďŹ nds very exciting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be like you are standing where they imagined what to write,â&#x20AC;? she said. For a full view of the Poetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pathway map or to become a member, please check out the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.poetspathway.ca.

STEP BY STEP, WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;LL FIND A CURE!

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6:30 pm cocktails 7:30 pm dinner

Evening dress Live & silent auctions

Every 29 minutes someone new is diagnosed with a blood cancer in Canada.

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On Saturday, October 13th 2012 WALK with us at Marion Dewar Plaza (City Hall) as we Light The Night in support of ďŹ nding a cure.

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

39


L>C

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Holiday Favourites 2012

Simply e-mail or mail in your favourite summer recipe (with a picture if possible) by November 5, 2012. Be sure to send it with your name, address, and phone number. If chosen, we will publish your recipe in our

Holiday Recipe Favourites Supplement Book on December 6, 2012

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Your community’s favourite holiday recipes for 2012.

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B6CN ;67JADJH EG>O:HID 7:LDC Watch your upcoming EMC papers for PRIZING to be WON

Contest Rules: 6. The EMC and participating companies assume no responsibility 1. Employees of participating sponsors and their immediate families whatsoever damages, be they physical or monetary, injury or and Performance Printing / EMC employees are not eligible to death, as a result of this contest or any part of it. compete in this contest. 7. The EMC and participating retailers reserve the right to limit the 2. Contestants must abide these general contests rules and all numbers of entries received from any particular contestant(s). specific rules applied to contests to be eligible to win available 8. The EMC and the participating companies reserve the right to prizes. change, rearrange, and/or alter any of there contests policies at 3. Prize winner selection is by random draw. Winners must correctly any time whatsoever without prior notice. Also these contest rules answer a skill-testing question to win. Prize winners will be are subject if necessary to comply with the rules, regulations, and contacted by telephone. the laws of the federal, Provincial, and local government bodies. 4. Winners must bear some form of identification in order to claim 9. Ads will be published September 20, 27, October 4, 11,18, 25, their prize. 2012. 5. There is no cash surrender value to prizes and they must be 10. One entry per household. accepted as awarded. NOTE: All recipes must be typed or neatly handwritten. All others will not be accepted. Photocopies from books and magazines will not be accepted.

E-MAIL US AT: Or mail O il tto 57 Auriga A i Dr., D Suite S it 103, 103 Ottawa, Ott Ont. O t K2E 8B2 40

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

0927.R0011636510

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Number of Canadians with first aid training dangerously low: poll Canadian Red Cross

ening health emergency, like choking or cardiac arrest, fewer than half believe they have the skills to provide life-saving basic ďŹ rst aid,â&#x20AC;? says Don Marentette, national manager of ďŹ rst aid programs with the Canadian Red Cross. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Red Cross believes lapsed training

and Canadiansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; low conďŹ dence in their ability to save a life are directly related, and pose a risk in emergencies.â&#x20AC;? While many people believe ďŹ rst aid is usually administered on strangers, polling shows that nearly 60 per cent of Canadians who have had to

provide ďŹ rst aid did so to help a family member. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The reality is, when you learn ďŹ rst aid you are more likely to save the life of a family member than anyone else,â&#x20AC;? said Marentette. There is a signiďŹ cant gap between Canadiansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; percep-

tion of the importance of taking a ďŹ rst aid course and actually taking one. Although nearly 98 per cent of Canadians say knowing how to perform ďŹ rst aid is important, 82 per cent have not taken a ďŹ rst aid course within the last three years.

Worship and Sunday School 9:30 Traditional Worship 11:15

Real God. Real People. Real Church.

Join us Sundays at 10:30 7275 Parkway Rd. Greely, ON 613-821-1056

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;`i>Ă&#x2022;ÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;°V>Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;ÂŁxĂ&#x2C6;

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ËĄË&#x;ˤÂľÇ&#x2039;ssĹ&#x2DC;EĹ&#x2DC;Ĩ Ç&#x160;Ÿ_Ę°šǟǟÉ  ɠɠɠʳɠŸŸ_É&#x161;ÄśsʳŸĹ&#x2DC;ĘłO ʚ˼ˠˢʺ˧˥˨Ë&#x161;˥ˢ˼˥ NĂ&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Äś_OÇ&#x2039;sĆźÇ&#x2039;ŸÉ&#x161;Ă&#x17E;_s_ĘłƝĜsÇŁsOĜĜŸÇ&#x2039;É&#x161;Ă&#x17E;ÇŁĂ&#x17E;ÇźČ&#x2013;ÇŁŸĹ&#x2DC;Ë&#x161;ÄśĂ&#x17E;Ĺ&#x2DC;sĘł

Service Time: Sundays at 10:30 AM

meets every Sunday at The Old Forge Community Resource Centre 2730 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K2B 7J1

Location: St. Thomas More Catholic School, 1620 Blohm Drive

Sunday Services: Bible Study at 10:00 AM - Worship Service at 11:00 AM A warm welcome awaits you For Information Call 613-224-8507

Watch & Pray Ministry

Pleasant Park Baptist

Worship services Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

Invites you to our worship service with Rev. Dean Noakes Sundays at 11am 414 Pleasant Park Road 613 733-4886 pleasantparkbaptist.org

Gloucester South Seniors Centre 4550 Bank Street (at Leitrim Rd.) (613) 277-8621 Come for an encouraging Word! R0011292837

DČ&#x2013;Ă&#x17E;Äś_Ă&#x17E;Ĺ&#x2DC;ÂśĹ&#x2DC;Č&#x2013;ÇźĂ&#x152;sĹ&#x2DC;ÇźĂ&#x17E;OĘ°Ç&#x2039;sĜǟĂ&#x17E;ŸĹ&#x2DC;Ĝʰ_Ă&#x17E;É&#x161;sÇ&#x2039;ÇŁsOĂ&#x152;Č&#x2013;Ç&#x2039;OĂ&#x152;Ęł

We are a small church in the city of Ottawa with a big heart for God and for people. newhopeottawa.co

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ǢČ&#x2013;Ĺ&#x2DC;_É´ǢsÇ&#x2039;É&#x161;Ă&#x17E;OsÇŁ Çź ˨ŸÇ&#x2039;Ë Ë Ĺ?

The West Ottawa Church of Christ

Celebrating 14 years in this area!

613.247.8676

(Do not mail the school please)

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Worship 10:30 Sundays

R0011293034

2203 Alta Vista Drive

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R0011605610

Rideau Park United Church

R0011292694

R0011637444

Recent polling by the Red Cross shows that nearly 40 per cent of Canadians say they have been in an emergency situation where they have had to perform ďŹ rst aid, however, only 18 per cent are currently

certiďŹ ed. The Canadian Red Cross is calling on all Canadians to ensure they have the skills needed to save lives when an emergency happens. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Although 68 per cent of Canadians say they can recognize the signs of a life-threat-

Minister - Rev. William Ball Organist - Alan Thomas Nusery & Sunday School, Loop audio, Wheelchair access

470 Roosevelt Ave. Westboro www.mywestminster.ca

Email: admin@mywestminister.ca

613-722-1144 Parkdale United Church

St. Richardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church

Heavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gate Chapel Heb. 13:8 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and forever

Come & worship with us Sundays at 10:00am Fellowship & Sunday School after the service

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Worship the Lord in the Beauty of his holiness...â&#x20AC;?

Our Saviour Lutheran Church Sunday Worship & Sunday School 10:30 a.m.

R0011293014

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Sunday Services: 8am and 10am Thursday Eucharist: 10am Nearly New Shop/Book Nook Open Thursday, Fridays 1pm - 3:30pm and ďŹ rst Saturday of each month: 10am - Noon 8 Withrow Avenue 613-224-7178

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Tel: (613) 276-5481; (613) 440-5481 1893 Baseline Rd., Ottawa (2nd Floor) Sunday Service 10.30am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12.30pm Bible study / Night Vigil: Friday 10.00pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1.00am Website: heavensgateottawa.org E-mail: heavensgatechapel@yahoo.ca

429 Parkdale at Gladstone Ministers Rev. Dr. Anthony Bailey Barbara Faught - Pastoral Care Melodee Lovering - Youth and Children Worship Service - 10:30 am 613-728-8656 Sunday School for all ages pdale@trytel.com www.parkdaleunitedchurch.ca Nursery Available

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The Redeemed Christian Church of God

715 Roosevelt Ave. (at Carling at Cole) Pastor: Rev. Marek Sabol 6ISITHTTPWWWOURSAVIOUROTTAWACOMs  

43 Meadowlands Dr. W. Ottawa

613.224.1971

Dominion-Chalmers United Church

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355 Cooper Street at Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

Sunday 7 pm Mass Now Available! Only south Ottawa Mass convenient for those who travel, work weekends and sleep in!

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Sunday Services Worship Service10:30am Sundays Prayer Circle Tuesday at 11:30 Rev.10:30 Jamesa.m. Murray

faith@magma.ca www.magma.ca/~faith

265549/0605 R0011293022

in Metcalfe on 8th Line - only 17 mins from HWY 417  sWWW3AINT#ATHERINE-ETCALFECA

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Breakthrough Christian Ministries

Annual Convention

October 12th -15th, 2012 - 7pm Nightly

Riverside United Church 3191 Riverside Dr (at Walkley) .

Sunday Worship at 11:00am R0011588383

Sunday Services 9 am Teen Breakfast Club Adult Sunday School (Childcare provided) 10 am Worship Service Nursery and Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sunday School

ALL WELCOME Sundays at 10:30 a.m. The Salvation Army Community Church Meeting at St. Andrew School 201 Crestway Dr. 613-440-7555 Barrhaven www.sawoodroffe.org

R0011293026

The Church Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Always Longed For... Welcomes All People Come join us!

Refreshments / fellowship following service

Anglican Church of Canada

OUR LADY OF THE VISITATION PARISH

www.stlukesottawa.ca

Sundays 10am Choral Eucharist with Sunday School & Nusery

All are welcome without exception. R0011292656

760 Somerset West

613-235-3416

St. Timothyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Presbyterian Church 2400 Alta Vista Drive (613) 733 0131 Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m. Sunday School; Ample parking; OC Transpo route 8 A warm welcome awaits you. Minister: Alex Mitchell sttimothys@on.aibn.com www.sttimsottawa.com

R0011293044

3:30pm Contemplative Eucharist

5338 Bank Street, Ottawa 613-822-2197 www.olvis.ca Masses: Saturday 5:00 pm Sunday with Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Liturgy: 9:00 & 11:00 am Weekdays: Wed. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Fri. 9:00 am Now open for rentals: www.avisitationbanquetcentre.com 613-822-1777

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Come together at

St. Michael and All Angels Anglican Church 2112 Bel-Air Drive (613) 224 0526 Join us for regular services Beginning September 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sundays at 8:00 & 10:00 a.m. Church school and youth group Rector: Rev. Dr. Linda Privitera â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Everyone welcome â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Come as you are â&#x20AC;&#x201C; www.stmichaelandallangels.ca

R0011606435

Free Methodist Church

NOT YOUR AVERAGE ANGLICANS R0011633831-0927

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Arlington Woods

You Are Invited To One Of The Most Exiting Events That Will Be Taking Place In The Ottawa Region 1505 Carling Avenue

)NTERNATIONAL'UEST3PEAKERSs0RAISE7ORSHIP 0RAISE$ANCERSs'OSPEL!RTIST#HOIRn4ORONTO Healing and Deliverance each night

www.magma.ca/~ruc (613)733-7735 225 McClellan Road, Nepean ON 613-596-9390 www.awfmc.ca

Venez-vous joindre Ă  nous (SituĂŠe au coin du boul. Breadner et Pvt. Deniverville)

St Aidanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church Holy Eucharist 8:00 am & 10:30 am 10:30 am - Play Area for Under 5 934 Hamlet Road (near St Laurent & Smyth) 613 733 0102 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; staidans@bellnet.ca

R0011292719

Minister: James T. Hurd Everyone Welcome

Come Join Us: (Located corner of Breadner Blvd. and Deniverville Pvt.)

R0011588510

Sunday Worship - 10:00 a.m. Nursery and Sunday School September 30th: Victory -- for the Lord, not self

Service protestant avec lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŠcole du dimanche 09:30 Messe Catholique romaine avec la liturgie pour enfants 11:15

Protestant Worship with Sunday School 09:30 Roman Catholic Mass with Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Liturgy 11:15

St Catherine of Siena Catholic Church 10 Chesterton Drive, Ottawa (Meadowlands and Chesterton) Tel: 613-225-6648 parkwoodchurch.ca

Les Services de lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;aumĂ´nerie des Forces canadiennes Services du dimanche de la chapelle militaire

The Canadian Forces Chaplain Services Military Chapel Sunday Services

Friday 12th at 7pm Saturday 13th - Dinner at 5pm followed By The Service at 7pm Saturday 13th - Youth Rally Session starts at 10am-1pm Sunday 14th - Morning at 10am Evening at 7pm Monday 15th at 7pm For info call 613- 292 -2158 613- 440 -2530. vcg.com@hotmail.com Your Time For A Breakthrough Has Come!

Place your Church Services Ad Here email srussell@thenewsemc.ca Call: 613-688-1483 Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

41


Your Community Newspaper

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REACH UP TO 279,000 HOMES EVERY WEEK CONTACT: SHARON AT 613-688-1483 or email srussell@thenewsemc.ca OR: KEVIN AT 613-688-1672 or email kevin.cameron@metroland.com Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

43


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Entrepreneur grant to help young workers explore their future Not-for-profit to reach out to student start-up businesses Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

EMC news - For educator Marianna Vakopoulos the

business world was a foreign place. The social service worker, who has a background in teaching with the Ottawa Mis-

sion, said she really believed in starting a tutoring business but didn’t know where to start. “I taught adults who were

homeless or at risk of being homeless,” she said. “And I learned that the education piece is much more successful if you take things like life skills into consideration. Really get the whole picture.” Enter Exploriem.org, is a not-for-profit company de-

PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE PROPOSED SBA CANADA CANADATELECOMMUNICATION TELECOMMUNICATIONTOWER TOWER PROPOSED SBA SBA Canada is proposing an antenna system at 1331 Coker Street, which consists of the following:

x Wireless steel self-support tower, 55.0 metres tall and will occupy an area of 900.0 square metres.

x Location: 1331 Coker Street. Site is located

approximately 430 metres west of Old Prescott Road and 345 metres north of Parkway Road.

x The site’s legal description is: PCL 8-1,

SEC 4M-351 ; PT BLK 8, PL 4M-351 , PART 19 & 20 , 4R5427 ; S/T LT306720 OSGOODE

x The facility will include mechanical

equipment cabinets and fencing around the base of the tower. The tower will provide

Industry Canada is responsible for the approval of this antenna system, and requires SBA Canada to review this proposal with the public and local municipality. After reviewing this proposal the City of Ottawa will provide its position to Industry Canada and SBA Canada SBA Canada invites you, within 30 calendar days of the date of this notice, to provide by e-mail or letter your comments, and/or request to be informed of the City’s position on the proposed antenna system. Further information may be obtained through the following contacts: SBA Canada - contracted to: Shehryar Khan FONTUR International Inc. 30 East Beaver Creek Rd, Suite 104 Richmond Hill, ON L4B 1J2 Fax: 886-234-7873 Email: on70573.sba.info@fonturinternational.com

City of Ottawa contact: Melanie Gervais Planner, Development Services City of Ottawa 110 Laurier Avenue West 4th Floor, Ottawa, ON, K1P 1J1 Telephone: 613-580-2424 ext. 24025 E-mail: Melanie.Gervais@ottawa.ca

SBA Canada will respond to all reasonable and relevant concerns, and that the City will be taking into account comments from the public and the proponent’s response to each when providing its position to the proponent and Industry Canada.

signed to help entrepreneurs start their businesses. “It’s like a jewel I found,” Vakopoulos said. The centre – located on the second floor of the Lincoln Fields Shopping Centre – offers a virtual office with mentoring and support services for business owners that are starting out. Executive director and Ottawa Senators founder Bruce Firestone said he started discussing the idea with Carleton University professors Tony Baletti and John Callahan in 2001. The group incorporated the idea in 2004 and created a not-for-profit organization. The centre is staffed by three full-time and two parttime employees and it’s growing. The Ontario Trillium Foundation – in the form of program manager Suzanne Bédard announced a $159,300-grant to help Exploriem offer services to 100 young entrepreneurs over the next two years. Aside from mentoring, and the meeting and office space, they offer events like the Bootstrap Awards – that highlights the work of innovative start-up companies. “The program is a good fit with our mandate of helping to create vibrant communities,” Bédard said. “Not only is Exploriem creating future leaders of business, but future social leaders as well.” Firestone said as a young entrepreneur he would have used a service like Exploriem. “It gives them somewhere to have meetings other than a coffee shop or their mom’s basement,” he said. “If I had had the help available here I would have made fewer mis-

takes.” Adbul Haseeb Awan, started with a tech business that developed a device called the chip tag – something that fits into the car and can be read by scanners in parking garages to negate the need for a pass. Later he developed a company selling wood-frame sunglasses. Awan, who came to Canada as an international student got his start at the University of Ottawa studying business and later got support from Exploriem. “I was fortunate to get involved with Exploriem,” he said. “They’ve provided me assistance and mentoring on every aspect of beginning my career as an entrepreneur. My goal is to create jobs and contribute to Ottawa’s economy.” Aside from providing the 100 entrepreneurs with mentors and other support, Firestone said the Trillium grant will allow staff to provide outreach at local high schools, colleges and universities. “We want young people to consider entrepreneurship as a career path,” he said. Ottawa West-Nepean MPP Bob Chiarelli said he was pleased to be back celebrating the work Exploriem does and looks forward to the centre announcing moving to a larger location in the west end next month. Chiarelli said young entrepreneurs are a “significant building block” of the province’s job creation strategy, calling them the business world’s “farm team.” “The younger generation needs to step up so Ontario can compete with the world economy on new ideas and products,” Chiarelli said.

TOUR DE TÉLÉCOMMUNICATIONS

PROPOSÉ PAR SBA CANADA TÉLÉCOMMUNICATIONS PROPOSÉ PAR SBA CANADA

SBA Canada propose un système d'antenne au 1331 Coker Street, qui se compose de ce qui suit:

• Tour autoportante en acier de 55,0 mètres de • La descripon légale du site est: PCL 8-1, SEC 4M-351, PT BLK 8, PL 4M-351, PARTIE 19 hauteur qui occupera une superficie de 900,0 et 20, 4R5427, S / T LT306720 OSGOODE mètres carrés. • Le site inclut l’installaon d’abris d’équipe• Lieu: 1331 Coker Street. Site est situé à environ 430 mètres à l'ouest de Old Presco Road et ments mécaniques et d’une clôture autour de la base de la tour. La tour procurera de 345 mètres au nord de Parkway Road. l’espace pour les services sans fil et les services de données. Industrie Canada est responsable de l'approbaon de ce système d'antenne, et requiert que SBA Canada examine cee proposion avec la municipalité locale et le public. Après avoir examiné cee proposion, la Ville d'Oawa présentera sa posion à Industrie Canada et SBA Canada. SBA Canada vous invite dans les 30 jours civils suivant la date du présent avis, à fournir par courriel ou par lere, vos commentaires et / ou demande de renseignements sur la posion de la Ville concernant le système d'antenne proposé. Des informaons supplémentaires peuvent être obtenues auprès des contacts suivants: SBA Canada - engagée à: Shehryar Khan FONTUR Internaonal Inc 30 East Beaver Creek Road, Suite 104 Richmond Hill, ON L4B 1J2 Télécopieur: 886-234-7873 Courriel: on70573.sba.info@fonturinternaonal.com R0011639701

44

Contact à la Ville d'Oawa : Melanie Gervais Planificateur, Services de développement Ville d'Oawa 110 Laurier Avenue West 4th Floor, Oawa, ON, K1P 1J1 Téléphone: 613-580-2424 ext. 24025 Courriel: Melanie.Gervais@oawa.ca

SBA Canada répondra à toutes les préoccupaons raisonnables et pernentes, et la ville endra compte des commentaires du public et des réponses du promoteur à chacun lorsque leur posion sera présentée au promoteur et à Industrie Canada. Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

SUBMITTED

Executive Director Dr. Bruce Firestone, left, entrepreneur Abdul Haseeb Awan, and MPP Bob Chiarelli model Abdul’s latest product, wooden sunglasses.


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Bridge not a priority: councillors Existing infrastructure more important in wake of sinkhole brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - Two east-end councillors are backing a motion to de-prioritize a new interprovincial bridge in the wake of the sinkhole traffic mess. The motion was set to come forward at the Sept. 26 council meeting at city hall. Couns. Rainer Bloess and Bob Monette propose the city oppose an east-end bridge. Proposed for one of three corridors, the bridge would connect Gatineau to Ottawa and be an alternate route to heavily-used King Edward Avenue. If the bridge is unavoidable, they still support the city’s position that the preferred crossing is corridor five, known as the Kettle Island corridor. The two other corridors, six and seven, are both further east, connecting with highway 174. They are currently being studied alongside corridor five by the National Capital Commission for a new crossing. Monette said the failure of the old pipe that caused the sinkhole demonstrates the lack of funding in infrastructure. “We saw two weeks of the

community being faced with drastic traffic conditions because of the failing infrastructure,” he said. “So obviously

“Most of us probably won’t be around when they finally get around to building a bridge.” COUN. RAINER BLOESS

more money needs to be put in the road infrastructure before we even look at building a bridge.” Monette said the bridge can’t be made a priority, and light rail transit – as well as community priorities in Orléans like employment – need to come first. Coun. Stephen Blais has publicly urged the prioritization of light rail over the bridge in the past, saying that highway 174 can’t support more traffic until more public transit options are in place. Bloess said that flooding the rest of the city with the traffic from the highway 174 road closure was a real-time example of what could be in store if traffic from a bridge uses highway 174. “This came out of the

whole sinkhole escapade where it became so obvious what the traffic impacts will be if you start throwing another 30 per cent traffic on there,” Bloess said. “We can do all the modeling in the world, but there’s nothing more realistic than seeing the last week and a half to two weeks of traffic backups.” Both Bloess and Monette said that the NCC will finish the study, set to identify the best corridor, in December. The councillors supported the completion of the study, but not an immediate build. The priorities need to be identified, and building a bridge is not something the city should be putting money towards, Monette said. “Let’s focus on what’s really important,” he said. Bloess said a new bridge isn’t a project the city wants to fund right now. “The one thing that needs to be clear is it’s a long ways from actually building a bridge,” Bloess said. “None of the provincial or federal governments have any money, and the city isn’t looking to put any money in… Most of us probably won’t be around when they finally get around to building a bridge.”

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This unaltered female, black and white Syrian Hamster is about 10 months old. She was surrendered to the shelter by her owner on August 21. She is one of many hamsters and other small animals currently available for adoption. She would love a wheel in her cage for exercise, and an extra-special treat would be a hamster ball to explore your home outside the cage,under supervision,of course! For more information about these or other animals available for adoption, please call the Adoption Centre at 613-725-3166 ext. 258 or visit www. ottawahumane.ca.

IS YOUR CAT’S SCRATCHING HABIT LEAVING YOU SCRATCHING YOUR HEAD? Scratching is normal cat behaviour, not a comment on your upholstery. Cats scratch in order to: remove the dead outer layer of their claws; rub their scent onto things to mark their territory; stretch; work off energy; and even to seek your attention when they want something. There are lots of ways to keep your feline friend from ruining the furniture.

Dimitri

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Time to make a grooming appointment

You can’t eliminate scratching behaviours: it’s a normal behaviour for your cat; it becomes a problem only when the object being scratched is an item of value to you. The goal is to redirect the scratching to an acceptable object, such as a scratching post. Provide objects for scratching that are appealing and convenient from your cat’s point of view. Observe the physical features of the objects your cat is scratching. Note their location, texture, shape and height. Substitute a similar object(s) for your cat to scratch (for example, rope-wrapped posts, corrugated cardboard, or even a log). Place an acceptable object (for example, scratching post) near

make her less likely to use the post. Special products for training your cat are available at pet supply stores. If you are considering declawing your cat, consider this: declawing a cat doesn’t remove just the claws — it amputates the end digit from the paw, similar in scope to cutting off a person’s finger at the last joint. This procedure can cause substantial discomfort and complications after the operation. Declawed cats may become reclusive, irritable, aggressive and unpredictable, and may have a tendency to bite as they cannot scratch to give warning. While other, newer methods exist for declawing (for example, laser surgery), the end result is still undesirable for your cat as it prevents her from engaging in normal cat behaviour. The OHS does not support declawing. It should be considered as a final option after you have exhausted other alternatives to eliminate destructive behaviour. However, if you feel that you must either declaw your cat or give her up, the OHS would rather see your cat stay in her

home. If you decide that it is absolutely necessary to have your cat declawed, only have the front paws done, so that the cat can still scratch an itch, climb and defend herself. If this is your decision, consult your veterinarian first and discuss having the surgery done at the same time your cat is spayed or neutered. Other tips If you catch your cat in the act, try making a loud noise (for example, use a whistle, shake a soda can filled with pebbles or pennies, or slap a wall or a table) or use a water-filled squirt bottle. Conversely, when your cat claws the scratching post instead of your couch, make sure you give your cat extra praise and affection. One reason cats scratch is to remove the dead outer layer of their claws. Regularly trimming your cat’s nails can help reduce scratching. You should clip off the sharp tips of your cat’s claws on his front feet every two weeks or so. More companion animal information is available at www.ottawahumane.ca.

Please note: The Ottawa Humane Society has many other companion animals available for adoption. Featured animals are adopted quickly! To learn more about adopting an animal from the Ottawa Humane Society please contact us: Website: lll#diiVlV]jbVcZ#XV Email: 6Ydei^dch5diiVlV]jbVcZ#XV Telephone:+&(,'*"(&++m'*Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

R0011623765

12-5303 Canotek Rd.(613) 745-5808 WWW.TLC4DOGS.COM

0927

Dimitri is a British Shorthair who likes to hang around the front stoop of his home. Some of his favourite things are catching house flies, stalking sparrows and putting up with cuddles from his 4 year old owner. Always welcome for attention, make sure you say a big hello if you see this big boy lazying around on the side walk.

an inappropriate object (for example, upholstered chair). Make sure the objects are stable and won’t fall over when she uses them. You can make these objects more attractive to your cat by spraying them with catnip periodically and hanging a toy from the post. If you cat is refusing to use a scratching post and prefers your rug, try covering a piece of plywood with carpet and spraying it with some catnip. Cover the inappropriate object(s) with something your cat won’t like, such as double-sided sticky tape, aluminium foil, sheets of sandpaper, or a plastic carpet runner with the pointy side up. Only remove the “unappealing” coverings (for example, double-sided sticky tape, aluminium foil, sheets of sandpaper) from the inappropriate object(s) when your cat is consistently using the appropriate objects. This will entice your cat to investigate the more appealing scratching post. Don’t take your cat over to the scratching post and position her paws on the post to show her what she’s supposed to do. This will likely have the opposite effect and

45


Local events and happenings over the coming weeks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: Ottawasouth@metroland.com

Sept. 29: Fish fry and silent auction will be held at St. Thomas the Apostle Anglican Church, 2345 Alta Vista Dr., with two sittings at 5 and 6:30 p.m. Take out is also available. Tickets for the event are $15 for adults and $8 for children. Advance tickets can be purchased from the church office. For more information call 613-733-0336. You are invited to the 18th Annual Lobster Dinner at Rideau Park United Church, 2203 Alta Vista Dr. Please join us for dinner at 6 p.m followed by a comedy skit and musical entertainment, ending with an auction of homemade pies. Tickets for the evening are $35.00 for the lobster dinner, $30.00 for a ham dinner, and $25.00 for take-out. Tickets may be purchased at the church office or by calling 613-733-3156 ext 229. For further information, see www. rideaupark.ca.

versity Women-Ottawa will host Allison Fisher, Executive Director, Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health, to speak on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Building Community: An Aboriginal Perspectiveâ&#x20AC;?. The Centreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drive to bridge traditional knowledge and culture with contemporary health care has the potential to make lifelong wellness a reality for the 30,000 Aboriginal people in Ottawa from 7:30 p.m at Riverside United Church/Anglican Church of the Resurrection, 3191 Riverside Dr.. Public invited to attend. Free of charge.

Oct. 3: Fall fashion show featuring the designs of Judy Joannou. Join us at Manotick United Church and enjoy a glass of champagne and homemade seasonal desserts while the fall designs are revealed. Tickets are $20.00 each. For more information call 613692-4576 or email admin@ manotickunitedchurch.com.

Sept. 30: South Ottawa Race Day, a fundraiser for brain cancer research, at the Rideau-Carleton Raceway, 4837 Albion Rd. Races include a half-marathon, a half-marathon relay, two-, five- and 10-kilometre family fun runs and walks. To register for the event visit www.southottawaraceday.ca.

Oct. 1: Canadian Federation of Uni-

The Riverside Park Community and Recreation Association (RPCRA) invites residents of Riverside Park and Revelstoke to attend their Annual General Meeting (AGM) at the Riverside Churches, 3191 Riverside Drive at 6:30 p.m. In order to vote at the AGM, you must be a member of the Association. Annual membership fees are $5.00 for individuals and $10.00 for households.

Memberships will be available at the door. If you cannot attend, and would like to become a member or renew your membership, email the RPCRA at riversideparkcra@yahoo.ca.The RPCRA is also seeking individuals from these communities to stand for nomination to the board of directors. Please contact Sandra Kearns at riversideparkcra@yahoo.ca or 613-260-8732 to express your interest.

Oct. 12-13: Metcalfe Cooperative Nursery Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual fall garage sale will take place from 4 to 8 p.m. on Fridat, Oct. 12 and from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday Oct. 12 at the Metcalfe Fairgrounds Agricultural Hall, 2821 8th Line Rd. Gently used toys, clothes, baby items, equipment and household goods will be available. For more information on the sale, how to become a vendor or to donate items, call 613-821-3196, email sale@ mcnskids.org or visit www. mcnskids.org.

Oct. 13: Dhadkan means Heartbeat 10th annual fundraiser at the Ottawa Convention Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr., starting at 6 p.m. The event is held in support of the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. The event will feature a Bollywood theme. Tickets are $200

per person with a charitable tax receipt for $100. The price of admission includes all drinks, food and entertainment. For more information visit www.dhadkan.ca or call 613-592-3044.

Oct. 23 Canadian Friends of Peace Now, New Israel Fund of Canada and Ameinu will host the event, Saving Israelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Democracy, An Important Talk on the Future of Zionism by Peter Beinart, author of The Crisis of Zionism on Oct. 23 at 7:30 p.m. at the Temple Israel, 1301 Prince of Wales Dr.

Oct. 26-28: Overeaters Anonymous invites you to attend the Region 6 2012 Convention in Ottawa. Workshops will be provided to help those with compulsive eating behaviours. For more information visit www. oaregion6.org/2012

Oct.16 : Join the members and friends of the Gloucester Senior Adultsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Centre (GSAC) at Pine View Golf Course for a prime rib meal with a cash bar as we celebrate 25 years of fun, friendship and activity. Cost $50. There will be dancing to the music of The Tequila Band. You can get your ticket(s) at the GSAC (second floor of the Earl Armstrong Arena or call 613-749-1974

860-0548 or www.ottawanewcomers@hotmail.ca.

Nov. 3 Tinsel Tea & Bazaar at the Gloucester Senior Adultsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Centre on Nov. 3 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Attractions include a tea room, bake sale, straw draw, crafts, quilts, knitting and crocheting, art gallery, grocery basket, Chinese raffle and a white elephant section. Tickets for the tea are $6. Admission is free for the bazaar.

Ongoing: The City of Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new collection calendar is currently being delivered to homes. Residents are encouraged to watch for their calendar in the mail, as it contains important information regarding waste collection. The new calendar also provides information about upcoming changes to the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s solid waste collection schedules. For more information, please visit ottawa. ca or call 3-1-1. Enjoy unique and captivating activities all summer long. From donkey care to bread making to afternoon milking and ice cream making, there is a daily demonstration sure to please everyone. Visit agriculture.technomuses.ca or 613-991-3044. Alta Vista library presents an exhibition of 19 self-portraits by talented Ridgemont High School visual arts students. You are invited to view the display throughout the summer. The library is located at 2516 Alta Vista Dr. For more information, call 613-7372837 ext. 28. Ottawa Newcomersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Club invites women new to Ottawa to join its activities and meet some new friends. Activities include: bridge, scrabble, walks, luncheons and dinners, book club, sightseeing, travel cafes and craft hours. For more information call 613-

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Gloucester South Seniors, 4550 Bank St., offers a full schedule of activities every week, including contract bridge, carpet bowling, euchre, five hundred, shuffleboard and chess. Membership is $15 per year. The club is easily accessible by OC Transpo Route 144, and offers free parking. For more information call 613-821-0414. Carleton Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bridging program offers mature students a way to qualify for university admission, improve academic skills, and build confidence. Only $200 for a 12-week, part-time course. Register now for September. Call 613-520-2600 ext. 1024 or visit www.carleton.ca/cie. Free skateboarding and sports drop-in from Rural South Recreation. From noon to 7 p.m., Tuesday to Sunday. Call 613-580-2424 ext. 30235 for locations and more information or visit us on the web at www.ottawa.ca/ruralsouth. The Live and Learn Resource Centre in Metcalfe has organized a number of playgroups in the park throughout the rural Ottawa South area this summer. Kids and parents are welcome to join staff from Rural Family Connections in the park for a few hours of fun. Programs for all ages at Trinity Bible Church in Osgoode begin in September. Programs include family night with courses and small groups for adults, indoor soccer, crafts, drama, or nursery for children. Courses and small groups are offered on freed-up financial living, eliminating debt, the Truth Project, The Story, and Alpha on different nights of the week. For more information or to register go to Courses and Small Groups at www.trinitybiblechurch.ca.

OLV

Make the Nepean Hotspurs Soccer Club your choice this winter. This winter the Hotspurs will offer both indoor training programs and league play.

Harvest Supper

For more information phone 613.723.5762 email: info@hotspurs.on.ca visit our website at www.hotspurs.on.ca or drop into the club house, Unit 6, 200 Colonnade Road (South)

Sunday October 14

The Nepean Hotspurs Soccer Club   @LHYZVM*VTT\UP[`:LY]PJL Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

"ANK3TREETs'LOUCESTER THREESITTINGSPM PM

Complete Roast Beef Dinner R0011628842-0920

46

or email gsac@storm.ca

PERPERSON TO  UNDERFREE

Ticket reservations 613-822-1777 or visit www.olvis.ca Proceeds to Our Lady of the Visitation Parish Building Fund

R0011624297-0920


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FUTURE SHOP CORRECTION NOTICE

NEWSPAPER RETRACTION FOR THE FUTURE SHOP SEPTEMBER 21 CORPORATE FLYER On the September 21 flyer, page 21, these products: 16GB and 32GB SanDisk UHS-1 Extreme Pro SDHC Memory Cards (WebCodes: 10182099 & 10182104) were advertised with incorrect pricing. Please be advised that the 32GB price is $119.99, and the 16GB price is $59.99. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

One of Canada’s top Furniture Retailers is now hiring a

Best Buy CORRECTION NOTICE

SALES ASSOCIATE

NEWSPAPER RETRACTION FOR THE BEST BUY SEPTEMBER 21 CORPORATE FLYER We would like to clarify the Bose CineMate Series II Digital Home Theatre System (Bose CineMate SII) (WebCode: 10131232) found on page 6 of the September 21 flyer. Please be advised that the advertised price of $552.99 is applicable only when purchased WITH an HDTV, WITHOUT the HDTV, the home theatre system is $649.99. R0011645654

Home furnishing experience is not necessary, however you must be enthusiastic, personable, presentable and willing to learn. Bilingualism is an asset.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

Apply in person with Resume 1750 Cyrville Road at the corner of Innes and Cyrville

R0011646962

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R0011289878/0301

We Buy Scrap and Supply Roll-off Containers for Scrap Metal Scrap Cars, Aluminum, Copper, Tin, Brass, Car Batteries, Radiators, Appliances… We Pay Cash for Scrap Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

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