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2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Decision Making

07

Year 7

33

Year 8

59

Year 9 (City Campus)

75

Years 10 - 12 (VCE/VET)

Welcome

05

Year 7

Senior School Contacts

Year 8

03

Year 9

Welcome

Years 10 - 12

02

Contents

Contents

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Welcome “Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.” - Maimonides One of the most controversial topics in education is determining what it is that young people should know, understand and be able to do following their time at school. At ELTHAM College we ask you to consider Maimonides – what you are taught may be important, may be interesting, may be valuable to you, but the really important skill that will nourish you throughout your life is learning how to learn, how to think critically, reflectively and independently. School should be a place that inspires and enriches the life of its community, growing hearts and minds to produce young people who will become effective and engaged global citizens. In a volatile and changing world it is not knowledge on its own that will enable you to thrive and make positive and ethical contributions to society, but that important ability to adapt, to think critically and creatively, and to be open to new skills and new ways of thinking. We are currently experiencing exponential advances in the use of technology, interacting with other socio-economic and demographic factors to create ‘a perfect storm’ of change. This has resulted in major disruptions to employment opportunities. New kinds of jobs are emerging, partly or wholly displacing others. The skill sets required for fulfilling and rewarding employment are changing, and this is transforming how and where people work. You will probably make frequent and substantial career changes over the course of your working life. You will certainly be required to develop the habit of life-long learning. What is more, education hopes not merely to meet the needs of students in seeking employment; it must enrich your understanding of yourself and your society, so that you can become someone with a sure sense of your identity, your abilities, your dreams and your responsibilities. The school curriculum must prepare its young people for a future that perhaps only they can imagine. So go ahead! Imagine. Create. Think. Learn. You will then face the challenges of the future with confidence and skill. Des Davey, the very first ELTHAM College Principal, spoke often of the ‘educational triangle ‘; a partnership represented by the three leaves of the College logo – the student, the home and the school. For you, the student, this partnership means that your endeavours, your hopes and your dreams are supported by the whole College community. Remember to engage fully in every moment of your daily school life. Every lesson, every co-curricular event or club presents an opportunity to become more than what you are now. Seize the day! Helen Lucas Director, Curriculum

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ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Senior School Contacts Senior School

Subject Teachers

Main Reception 9437 1421 reception@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au

All Senior School staff can be contacted by phone on 9437 1421, or via email. All of our email addresses utilise the same format (first name initial followed by surname) as shown in this example: mpobjoy@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au or use the contact list on mE.

Senior School Office 9433 9954 snroffice@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au Mike Brennin Deputy Principal 9433 9841 mbrennin@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au Mark Pobjoy Director, Senior School 9433 9936 mpobjoy@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au Helen Lucas Director, Curriculum 9433 1421 hlucas@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au

Contents

Trish Douglas VCE Coordinator 9433 9974 tdouglas@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au

Year Level Coordinators Stephanie Lim-Duke Year 7 Coordinator TBC 9433 9821 sduke@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au

Welcome

Angus Fonstin Year 8 Coordinator 9433 9811 afonstin@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au Nicole Wellington Head of Year 9 9433 9973 nwellington@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au Lesley Moulin Year 10 Coordinator 9433 9838 lmoulin@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au Brad Stelfox Year 11 Coordinator 9433 9955 bstelfox@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au

Year 7

Simone Kenny Year 12 Coordinator 9433 9826 skenny@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au

Wellbeing Kellie Jasper School Psychologist 9433 9868 kjasper@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au

Year 8

Michelle Karavas School Psychologist 9433 9956 mkaravas@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au

LifeWork Advisors Margie Jordan 9433 9801 mjordan@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au

International Student Team

Year 9

Franceen Challons International Partnerships and Admissions 9433 9845 fchallons@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au

Years 10 - 12

Angela Cronwright Administration Assistant, International Students 9433 9998 acronwright@elthamcollege.vic.edu.au

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Decision Making The first step in making any decisions about a school program and a possible future career is to understand yourself, namely: •

who you are

what you like and do not like

what you are good at, and

your values

Contents

There is no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ choice. Life will take you on a complex journey involving many changes and career decisions. At each step it’s all about making the best decision you can at the time, using the best resources available. For times when you aren’t sure what to decide, try to choose reversible options rather than irreversible ones. You could also try making a pros and cons list, although keep in mind that not all items put onto a list are equal with the same weighting because some mean more to you than others. The thinking and reflecting process is an ongoing one, which we encourage you to engage with fully. The following resources can help you in the important process of getting to know yourself and learning about the world of work and where you might best fit.

Careers/Jobs Welcome

Myfuture (myfuture.edu.au): is a comprehensive career information service. It has a career exploration tool and provides job information. It can be particularly useful for putting together job resumes and course applications. Set up a careers profile and reflect on your skills and values.

Year 7

Job Outlook ( joboutlook.gov.au/Default.aspx): Explore careers that you are interested in learning more about. Discover their future outlook and the types of skills, knowledge and abilities you may need. You can get ideas about what careers you might like to aim for now or in the future. Career Bullseyes (myfuture.edu.au/bullseyes): Explore career pathways by selecting a learning area that you enjoy.

Integrity ELTHAM College is committed to ensuring the integrity of all student work.

Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Demonstrating academic integrity is about producing and submitting assessments in an honest and fair way, acting and communicating ethically, and showing respect for the work of others. All ELTHAM College students and staff are advised to consult the Student Academic Integrity Policy to ensure compliance. At VCE level the Policy is consistent with VCAA requirements.

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Core Subjects

Contents

Year 7 08 Community Health Program Humanities – Geography and Economics

11

Humanities – History, Civics and Citizenship

12

Languages Other Than English (LOTE) – Chinese

13

Languages Other Than English (LOTE) – French

14

Mathematics

15

Music

16

Outdoor Education

17

Physical Education

18

Science

19

Sport (Interschool)

Year 7

10

Welcome

09 English

Modules Home Economics 20 Get Up and Go with Food 21 Multimedia

Food Sustainability for You, Me and the Planet

22 Media Remix

Year 8

23 Image Remix 24 Making Things Move Performing Arts

25 Dance 26 Crew’s Control 27 Donkeys, Damsels and Dictators 28 Introduction to Performing Shakespeare and Other Classics 29 Living Art

Year 9

30 Picture This

Years 10 - 12

Visual Arts

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Year 7 Core Subjects Community Health Program The Community Program is structured across the year as detailed below and expanded in Year 8 for age and stage appropriate growth. Our Year 7 Community Health Program aims to prepare students for life at school and beyond, ensuring they understand and value their place in the world. Through this program students are empowered to develop the wisdom, confidence, optimism, curiosity, flexibility and resilience they need to become passionate, connected and engaged citizens of our ever-changing world. Students will thrive in a learning culture that celebrates diversity and promotes trust and respect from interpersonal to community relationships. The program requires students to be active in their learning and positively contribute to a culture that values open minds, empathy, compassion and an understanding of self. Term 1: Students will: •

learn how to be effective communicators

think creatively and critically

develop effective problem solving and decisionmaking skills

develop the ability to recognise and express emotions appropriately

build personal resilience

develop their ability to lead and be part of a team

focus on healthy habits (study skills, sleep, nutrition, mindfulness) and on building positive relationships. Students meet their Year 11 Mentor who will assist them in fostering connections and provide them with leadership and support during their transition to Secondary School Term 2:

focus on relationships, sexual health and cyber-safety Term 3:

focus on understanding self and developing identity through the ‘I am 13’ time capsule project Term 4:

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ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

focus on risk-taking, protective and help-seeking behaviour. Students will also prepare for Year 8 transition and orientation


English

Content

Students will further develop skills in:

During the year students will explore the following:

critical thinking

a range of creation stories, myths and legends

analysing how text structures influence and are dependent on audience, purpose and context

Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

Pixar’s Up

creating a literary interpretation of texts that they study

a range of poetry

a range of media texts

comparing and contrasting texts

analysing the language used in media texts

writing and presenting a persuasive speech

Students participate in a range of formative and summative assessment tasks including the presentation of a persuasive speech and both analytical and creative thinking.

Year 7

writing creative pieces such as poetry and stories

Year 8

Year 9

writing analytical text responses

Years 10 - 12

Welcome

Skills

Contents

The study of English at ELTHAM aims to develop students’ creativity and imagination whilst covering the essential English skills of reading, viewing, listening, speaking and writing. Students study English for five hours a week including a library lesson. They read a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts and create analytical and creative responses. Students also build their persuasive writing and speaking skills by participating in the Carson Trophy Public Speaking Competition and ongoing discussion and group activities arising from their study of texts. Building upon the foundations learnt in primary school, students regularly complete grammar, punctuation and spelling exercises. They are also strongly encouraged to read a range of texts regularly.

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Year 7 Core Subjects Humanities Geography and Economics Geography focuses on ‘Place and Livability’ and ‘Water in the World’. Students consider what we mean by livability and how it is measured. They consider the livability of a range of places, including ELTHAM College. This study leads into an analysis of how chocolate is manufactured and the impact this industry has on people and places. The power of consumers to promote ethical businesses is also examined. Students then study water as a resource and the impacts of water scarcity and water stress upon people and countries. The management of water is also considered.

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Skills

Content

Students will develop skills in:

‘Place and Liveability’ looks at where we live and how we live, what factors influence the decisions people make about where to live and their perceptions of the liveability of places. Through these themes, students will explore ways in which people and organisations make decisions in relation to the allocation of resources. This unit also develops the students’ mapping skills.

critical thinking

explaining processes that influence the characteristics of places

identifying, analysing and explaining spatial distributions and patterns and their implications

identifying, analysing and explaining interconnections within places and between places

collecting and recording geographical data from primary and secondary sources

fieldwork

using ethical protocols

analysing maps

identifying relationships and trends, and generating a range of alternatives for an economic issue

evaluating the potential costs and benefits of actions

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

‘Water in the World’ examines the many uses of and varied access to water, develops understanding of the environment and the differences between developed and developing countries using studies from Australia, Asia and Africa. Students gain an understanding of the physical and economic challenges of water scarcity. A range of assessment tasks may be undertaken, including a field work report, the creation of an infographic, and a comparative report or tests.


Humanities History, Civics and Citizenship

Skills

Content

Students will develop skills in:

Students begin with an examination of early man and the Neolithic revolution. As part of this study they examine Otzi the iceman and the archaeological site at Lake Mungo. This is followed by an examination of Ancient Greece, including a discussion about different types of government such as democracy and oligarchies.

analysing and corroborating sources

analysing different perspectives

developing and researching historical inquiry questions

analysing issues about national identity

identifying ways that student can be informed citizens

planning and communicating in a variety of forms

A range of assessment tasks may be undertaken including a research report, a source analysis, the creation of a museum exhibit, an essay, an oral presentation, tests and an examination.

Welcome

identifying continuities and changes

Year 7

Year 8

sequencing significant events in chronological order

Year 9

critical thinking

Years 10 - 12

Contents

History, Civics and Citizenship, focuses on Ancient History, specifically the ancient civilisations. Students examine societies and their structures, look at the place of evidence in discovering knowledge, and at the process of piecing together the story from primary and secondary sources.

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Year 7 Core Subjects Languages Other Than English (LOTE) Chinese The focus is on starting to develop students’ ability to communicate in simple language about aspects of their daily life. They start to develop an understanding of how languages operate as a system, and the differences between their mother tongue and the target language. Students learn to recognize and use accents or relate characters to their sound and meaning as part of understanding other language systems. This leads into developing accurate pronunciation especially of sounds not in their mother tongue, such as tones. The prescribed language tasks are also designed to enhance students’ intercultural understanding. Topics are selected because of their importance in the systematic acquisition of the language and cultural understandings related to the specific target language, and may also relate to, or complement, aspects of study in other domains. Students exchange information and ideas based on specific themes and topic and the individual student’s language competence at this level. Skills

Content

Students will further develop skills in:

During the year students will explore the following:

greeting in Chinese

numbers

family and pets

sports and school activities

country names

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familiarisation with pronunciation system – pinyin such as four tones and coding/decoding pinyin spelling system familiarisation with character formation system such as the sequence of character writing and character components

recognising characters in the texts as well as writing simple characters

using sentence structures accurately

expressing simple ideas and meanings in the targeted language

engaging in small group work and whole class activities

individually completing online work regularly

typing characters in applications

writing characters

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

Students will be assessed on their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.


reading

greetings, numbers and age

speaking

listening

talking about yourself, your preferences and your family

writing

days, months, seasons and weather

cultural differences between France and Australia

sport, travel and daily routines

Throughout the year, students participate in a range of formative and summative assessment tasks. They complete vocabulary tests, participate in role-plays and prepare oral and written responses to course content covering the four strands of learning – writing, reading, speaking and listening.

Welcome

The course will cover:

Year 7

Students will further develop skills in:

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

The aim of the course is to expose students to the French language and culture in a stimulating and lively manner. In the first instance speaking and listening skills are emphasised. Reading and writing are introduced progressively once the students are familiar with the material in the spoken form. At the end of the course students should be able to talk and write simply about themselves and others. Students are introduced to French culture through participation in a variety of cultural activities. They are exposed to key grammatical concepts in an informal way through role-play, songs, pictures, stories and videos. Students also take part in a range of structured activities, covering all language skills.

Contents

Languages Other Than English (LOTE) French

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Year 7 Core Subjects Mathematics Mathematics fosters logical and critical thinking skills students will use in years to come in ways they never imagined. They will begin with methods for classic operational algorithms before looking at statistics, algebra and measurement in detail, with project based learning used to supplement and further their understanding. A familiarity with this content will act as a foundation for Year 8 Mathematics. Selected students will take part in the Mathematics Enrichment Programme (MEP) these students will take part in a number of additional activities beyond the curriculum including the APSMO Olympiad, Australian Mathematics Challenge and more.

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Skills

Content

Students will develop an understanding of the following mathematical areas:

The main areas of focus of this course are: •

reintroduction to algorithmic methods learned in primary school

number

introduction to algebraic notation and basic concepts

handling data

shape, space and measure

working with chance, basic probabilities and looking at effects on outcomes

understanding how we find area and perimeter of a number of shapes

algebra

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Music

instrumental technique

reading music notation

rhythm

melody and phrasing

dynamics and articulation

ensemble playing

performance skills

all Year 7 students are given a musical instrument at the beginning of the year. They will learn to play this instrument in group lessons throughout the year and will rehearse and perform together as a class band. The students will be given the opportunity to choose which instrument they wish to play. The instruments from which can choose include: flute, clarinet, trumpet, trombone, and percussion

the students will present two concerts throughout the year, toward the end of Term 2 and at the end of Term 4. These concerts will feature performances by large and small ensembles, solos, duos and trios. The concerts provide an opportunity for the students to demonstrate the skills they have learned throughout the year

Welcome

Year 7

The main areas of focus of this course are:

Year 8

Students will further develop skills in:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

The study of music fosters logical and critical thinking skills and encourages creative thinking. Music builds imagination and intellectual curiosity, and also helps develop language and reasoning. Learning a musical instrument encourages the development of discipline and commitment, and performing in an ensemble develops teamwork skills.

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Year 7 Core Subjects Outdoor Education Outdoor Education is an integral part of each student’s educational experience at the College. The program fosters in each student a feeling of personal achievement, a connection to their LA groups and an increasing level of independence. Students are expected to take on appropriate responsibilities within their group and contribute to the overall group. At Eumarella Bush Camp in Anglesea, students will explore a marine environment finding a balance between structure and independence, effort and relaxation, excitement and stillness, comfort and challenge. Skills

Content

Students will further develop skills in:

The main areas of focus of this course are:

planning and producing camp meals using a Trangia stove

becoming self-sufficient with hygiene practices including food storage

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preparing packs for an overnight hike

recognising different surf conditions eg. rips and currents and making safe decision when entering water

recognising confidence and anxieties when exposed to various activity settings

understanding the concept of journey programs

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

students will be encouraged to enjoy the fun and educationally diverse activities that occur over the five days of this compulsory program. Under the guidance of experienced staff, students will live as an independent community in tents and prepare their own meals in the natural environment. They will engage in a range of marine-based activities including safe surfing and canoeing. They will also participate in mountain bike riding, a challenge course, environmental education and bush walking in the coastal hinterland


fundamental motor skills

game play and strategy

volleyball, water polo, soccer, softball, fitness, badminton, netball and basketball

safe equipment usage

team play and sportsmanship

organisation

students will be subjectively assessed upon their ability to demonstrate and further develop skills in the following areas: teamwork and sportsmanship, cooperation and attitude, effort and participation, fundamental motor skill ability and knowledge and understanding of rules, tactics and strategies

Welcome

The units typically include:

Year 7

Students will develop:

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

Students begin to analyse how body control and coordination influence movement composition and performance and learn to transfer movement skills and concepts to a variety of physical activities. Students explore the role that games and sports, outdoor recreation, lifelong physical activities, and rhythmic and expressive movement activities play in shaping cultures and identities. They reflect on and refine personal and social skills as they participate in a range of physical activities. Students refine basic and complex motor skills in isolation and with fellow students, and apply these skills in increasingly complex games and activities. They combine motor skills, strategic thinking and tactical knowledge to improve individual and team performance. Students will aim to maintain regular participation in moderate to vigorous physical activity and aim to perform confidently and efficiently in a range of movement environments (indoor, outdoor, and aquatic).

Contents

Physical Education

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Year 7 Core Subjects Science In science, claims need to be based on evidence, usually collected by carrying out a scientific investigation in the form of a fair test. Throughout the year students will expand their ability to think scientifically, design and carry out fair tests and learn the fundamentals behind their research. Students will be assessed in a variety of ways including tests, projects, and practical reports.

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Skills

Content

Students will develop skills in the following areas:

The course will cover:

the study of ecosystems and the classification of living things

Semester 1: •

water is life

the study of water as a special substance with unique physical and chemical properties. These unique properties enable us to use the physico-chemical processes of separation science to provide us with water fit for drinking

water chemistry

ecosystems

understanding how objects start moving, stop moving or change their velocity when affected by an unbalanced force. Gravity and friction are two forces that affect all motion on Earth

understanding how the relative positions of the sun, Earth and moon can be used to explain predictable phenomena including eclipses, seasons, tides and phases of the moon

scientific investigations that involve scientific questions and developing hypothesis

gathering data through accurate measurement and repeated trials

explaining and summarising patterns in scientific data

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

Semester 2: •

rockets and forces

astronomy


Sport (Interschool) As a member of the Eastern Independent Schools of Melbourne (EISM) ELTHAM College’s Year 7 students are given opportunities in a broad range of sporting pursuits. In addition to representing the College at Swimming, Athletics and Cross Country carnivals, Year 7 students are offered the following sports, which occur throughout Terms 2, 3 and 4 on Monday afternoons:

Term 2: hockey, tennis Term 3: football, volleyball, table tennis (mixed) Term 4: basketball, soccer Girls

Contents

Boys

During Term 1, Year 7 students are provided with a range of activities by our specialised staff and coaches including a swimming capability assessment and an introduction to track and field athletics disciplines.

Welcome

Term 2: basketball, soccer Term 3: hockey, netball Term 4: tennis, volleyball, table tennis (mixed)

Skills

hand-eye coordination

various skill development

teamwork

resilience

self discipline

Year 8

Year 9

increased fitness

Years 10 - 12

Year 7

The skills engaged through participation in interschool sport include:

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Year 7 Modules Home Economics Get Up and Go with Food It is heating up in the kitchen and we are ready to get up and go with food! Students will use the design process to develop their food production skills and explore factors influencing healthy food choices to ‘Get Up and Go with Food!’ Will creating your very own pasta sauce recipe be a highlight or a challenge? The assignment for this module will enable students to design then produce their recipe at home for their family. This is a great module to choose for your first Home Economics experience, or if you have a love of developing recipes that you could copyright as your own.

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Skills

Content

The Home Economics module at Year 7 has a strong

The course is structured in the following way:

focus on skill development through food preparation. Students will be able to:

food production incorporating food preparation, safety, hygiene and storage

use kitchen tools and gas and electric ovens

understanding why we eat what we eat

work safely in a kitchen

follow and design a recipe

make food choices using the Healthy Eating Pyramid

the design process investigating, generating, managing, producing and evaluating one or more recipe(s) that are produced at home

respond to a design brief

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Home Economics Food Sustainability for You, Me and the Planet

The course is structured in the following way: •

food production incorporating food preparation, safety, hygiene and storage

use kitchen tools and gas and electric ovens

understanding why we eat what we eat

work safely in a kitchen

follow and design a recipe

make food choices using the Healthy Eating Pyramid

the design process investigating, generating, managing, producing and evaluating one or more recipe(s) that are produced at home

respond to a design brief

Welcome

The Home Economics module at Year 7 has a strong focus on skill development through food preparation. Students will be able to:

Year 7

Content

Year 8

Skills

Year 9

Using the design process, the assignment will enable students to design, produce and evaluate their own recipe at home.

Years 10 - 12

Students will be cooking up a feast! Will Roo Burgers be on the menu? How will we adapt a San Choy Bow recipe to lower the food footprint? Can you handle the heat in the kitchen?

Contents

Growing food, weighing waste, counting food miles and recording packaging will help students to consider good food choices. Building on students’ knowledge of food safety, hygiene and production, this module will develop food production skills while also exploring food choices and the consequences of these.

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Year 7 Modules Multimedia Media Remix Students looking for an opportunity to enhance their exposure to the world of filmmaking and exploring what makes a great movie should try this module. With an initial focus on film and media analysis, followed by storyboarding, students will then learn about composition, shot types, camera angles and camera movement. They will explore narrative, genres and various elements of film style. Finally, the footage taken will be edited using Adobe Premiere Pro with a focus on creating a professional product, with the additional help of sound FX and music. Skills

Content

Students will:

The course will cover:

follow the Design process to plan and produce a movie based on the Design brief provided

ensure they follow the 3 phases of film production

producing a movie which identifies all of the main camera shots and angles used to produce most movies

attain a greater knowledge of film language, in particular camera shots and angles

production of a time lapse and 360 VR video

pre-production, production and post-production elements and correct procedure

students will become competent in flying a drone and taking photos and video from a variety of angles

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enhance their technical ability when filming and editing their movies

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Multimedia Image Remix

develop the ability and confidence to express themselves through work

use a variety of photography techniques and elements

development of a photo based folio that incorporates and showcases all of the photographic elements students have been exposed to

manipulate images to create works and convey ideas using Adobe Photoshop

analyse how technical and symbolic elements are used in media artworks to create representations influenced by story, genre, values and points of view of particular audiences

development of a folio that showcases a range of images that have been manipulated and/or enhanced in some way using the tools learnt in Adobe Photoshop

students will become competent in flying a drone and taking photos from a variety of angles

demonstrate the ability to follow the Design Process

Welcome

Year 7

The course will cover:

Year 8

Students will:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

Budding photographers should go no further than this module. Students will enhance their ability to take professional looking photos, and by learning to digitize, the images will be further enhanced using Adobe Photoshop. Students will learn how to manipulate images and combine multiple images to help meet a design brief. There will be a continuing focus on design principles and research into how media and advertising companies manipulate images to create a certain look or to appeal to various target audiences – everything that is needed to create an advertising campaign to meet a design brief.

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Year 7 Modules Multimedia Making Things Move In this module the world of robotics, programming and 3D print design is the focus. Students use the Lego Mindstorms platform to learn programming and building, incorporating sensors such as infrared, colour and touch. Students will build and program a base model robot followed by a more advanced robot capable of competing in a robot wars competition. Students will enter the advancing world of coding, during which they will work through a series of simpler coding workshops building up to more advanced forms of coding, some of this code will be used to fly drones and Sphero Robotic balls around a set course. Finally, students will need to respond to a design brief as they attempt to create their very own 3D printed object. Skills

Content

Students will:

The course will cover:

explore the implications of robotic technology in our society

introduction to robots (history, progress, types etc.)

discover the constant advancements in robot technology

discussion/debate on robots place/impact on society

program Lego Mindstorms robots using EV3 software

LEGO Mindstorms introduction (build and programming)

build Lego Mindstorms robots

advanced robot design, build and programming

be exposed to a wide variety of robotic technologies and programming languages

drone rules, operation and programming

3D Design and ability to use a printer

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learn the design process and how to create their own 3D printable object

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Performing Arts Dance Dance is a window to self-expression, and a great tool for discovering the power of kinaesthetic communication. This subject involves a mix of practical and theoretical elements.

presenting dance work individually and as a group

dance history and theory

exploring influential choreographers

kinaesthetic technique, knowledge and skills in choreography

presenting on music and style choices

development of group and individual work

developing kinaesthetic awareness

researching dance styles and exploring contemporary practice

Welcome

Year 7

The main areas of the course are:

Year 8

Dance has a strong focus on skill development in the following areas:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

Students will explore the history of dance through ritual to contemporary practice. Students will create a group piece as choreographed by a professional choreographer, and develop their own solo work in a discipline of their choice. Students will explore technique, music choice, storytelling and dynamics throughout the module.

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Year 7 Modules Performing Arts Crew’s Control Students discover just how powerful lighting, sound and set design can be in conveying meaning in theatre. The crew is always in control. In this module students work towards staging a short theatre piece. Along the way they learn how the crew’s job has changed over time and how lighting, set and sound enhance and affect mood, time and the audience during a show. Students will learn how to operate a sound and lighting desk; they will also use simple set and props to convey meaning.

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Skills

Content

Drama has a strong focus on skill development in the following areas:

The course will cover:

the use of expressive and performance skills

the development of theatrical terminology

the use of sound and lighting technology

prop development and set design

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

researching the theatrical, historical and cultural context of plays

developing lighting, sound and the use of props to enhance performance

developing a role for performance

workshops around text and character development

rehearsing and presenting scenes


Performing Arts Donkeys, Damsels and Dictators

researching the theatrical, historical and cultural context of plays

the use of expressive and performance skills

developing a role for performance

the development of theatrical terminology

breaking down and exploring theatre scripts

interpreting and presenting heightened language pieces

workshops around text and character development

rehearsing and presenting scenes

character development

Welcome

Year 7

The course will cover:

Year 8

Drama has a strong focus on skill development in the following areas:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

Using improvisation and physical theatre students will explore their limitless comedic and dramatic potential through rehearsed spontaneity. Students explore contemporary improvisation and the beginnings of improvisation with Commedia Del Arte. Through this they will explore and respond to work they create by sharing stories, creating comic characters and finding moments of stillness and silence. Big choices, small gestures and quick thinking come together in a showcase at the end of term.

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Year 7 Modules Performing Arts Introduction to Performing Shakespeare and Other Classics During the term students will research a play, learn a monologue or duologue and perform it for an audience. Students will find links between themselves and their characters, learn the skills needed for performance - such as effective use of voice, body and space - and evaluate class performances.

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Skills

Content

Drama has a strong focus on skill development in the following areas:

The course will cover: •

researching the theatrical, historical and cultural context of plays

the use of expressive and performance skills

developing a role for performance

the development of theatrical terminology

breaking down and exploring theatre scripts

interpreting and presenting heightened language pieces

workshops around text and character development

rehearsing and presenting scenes

character development

• • •

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Visual Arts Living Art Students will look at and explore contemporary and traditional artists, portraiture, life and our own space whilst thinking about who we are in the world. Exploration is a journey, Art is a journey… explore drawing, painting and making through a range of materials and techniques.

exploring and expressing ideas

visual arts practices – materials and techniques

creating and displaying artworks

responding and interpreting artworks

documentation of the stages and processes involved in producing artworks

practical drawing, painting and printmaking exercises leading to finished art works

an introduction to the analysis and discussion of contemporary and traditional artwork by artists

Welcome

Year 7

The course will cover:

Year 8

Art has a strong focus on skill development in the following areas:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

Assessment for Living Art is based upon the completion of a folio of final pieces and responses to artworks.

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Year 7 Modules Visual Arts Picture This Through the use of concepts such as optical illusion and image distortion, ‘Picture This’ explores the use of imagery and how it can be further applied to everyday things such as posters, magazine covers. Art meets design! Skills

Content

Art has a strong focus on skill development in the following areas:

The main areas of the course are: •

introduction to the design process

exploring and expressing ideas

creative, critical and reflective thinking

visual arts practices – materials and techniques

creating and displaying artworks

responding and interpreting artworks

practical drawing, design, painting and printmaking exercises leading to finished art works

documentation of the stages and processes involved in producing artworks

introduction to the analysis and discussion of contemporary and traditional artwork by artists

working in both 2D and 3D forms

Assessment for Art is based upon the completion of a folio of final pieces and responses to artworks.

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ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


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Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


Contents

Year 8 Core Subjects

34 Community Health Program 36 Humanities – Geography and Economics 37 Humanities – History, Civics and Citizenship 38 Languages Other Than English (LOTE) – Chinese 39 Languages Other Than English (LOTE) – French

Welcome

35 English

40 Mathematics Music

42 Outdoor Education 43 Physical Education 44 Science

Year 7

41

45 Sport (Interschool) Modules 47 A Food Truck Parked in my Backyard Multimedia

48 Freelance 49 The Moving Image

Performing Arts

Year 8

Home Economics 46 Around the World in 10 Dishes

50 Acting Essentials 51

Become a Dancer

53 Delightful and Dramatic Design 54 Landscapes 55 Sculpture and Ceramics 56 Symbols in Art

Years 10 - 12

Visual Arts

Year 9

52 It’s Your Line Anyway

33


Year 8 Core Subjects Community Health Program Our Year 8 Community Health Program builds on the skills developed in Year 7 and continues to prepare students for life at school and beyond, ensuring they understand and value their place in the world. Confidence, optimism, curiosity, flexibility and resilience are needed to become connected and engaged citizens of our ever-changing world. Students thrive in a learning culture that celebrates diversity and promotes trust and respect. The program requires students to be active in their learning and positively contribute to a culture that values open minds and empathy. A focus on understanding the self and the importance of fording healthy habits helps set the foundation for success at school and beyond. Skills

Content

Students will:

During the year students will explore the following:

learn how to be effective communicators

Term 1:

think creatively and critically

develop effective problem solving and decisionmaking skills

develop the ability to recognise and express emotions appropriately

build personal resilience

develop their ability to lead and be part of a team

focus on healthy habits (study skills, sleep, nutrition, mindfulness)

Term 2: •

Year 8 Retreat: ‘Be Your Own Superhero’. Building positive relationships and understanding self with a focus on future thinking.

Term 3: •

focus on sexual health, cyber-safety risk-taking, protective and help-seeking behaviour through the ‘Party Safe’ unit

Term 3: •

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ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

continued focus on healthy habits and future thinking. Students will also prepare for Year 9 transition and orientation


English

researching

critical thinking

the creation of a literary interpretation of texts that they study

identifying and discussing the various persuasive techniques in a media text

writing analytical text responses

writing creative pieces such as poetry and stories

comparing and contrasting texts

writing and presenting a persuasive speech

analysing and explaining how language has evolved over time

Assessment therefore consists of both short and extended writing pieces, as well as participation in The Carson Trophy Public Speaking Competition with a formal persuasive oral presentation on a topic of their choice.

Welcome

During the year, students study lyrics and poetry, nonfiction argumentative essay writing, creative writing and the novel ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ by John Green and the ‘Bone Sparrow’ by Zana Fraillon. They read Shakespeare’s ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ and study the film, ‘The Blind Side’. Public speaking and language analysis of texts in the media are also important parts of the course.

Year 7

Students will develop skills in the following areas:

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

They learn to listen, read, view, speak, write, create and reflect on increasingly sophisticated texts with accuracy, fluency and confidence. In writing, they learn to appreciate, enjoy and use the English language to communicate with accuracy in spelling, grammar and punctuation. They develop a sense of its richness and power to evoke feelings, convey information, form ideas, entertain, persuade and argue.

Contents

English aims to extend the literacy skills that students have developed during their first eight years of schooling and to stimulate their interest in this essential subject. Students study English for five hours a week including a library lesson and typically make great advances in their knowledge and understanding during this important year of adolescence.

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Year 8 Core Subjects Humanities Geography and Economics Geography and Economics class covers two units: Changing Nations and Landforms and Landscapes. In the unit on changing nations students analyse population change and migration patterns. They examine how population change impacts society and the economy. As part of their study on physical geography, students investigate natural processes that shape landforms and landscapes. They analyse human interconnection with the environment and evaluate land management strategies. Skills

Content

Students will develop skill in the following areas:

‘Changing Nations’ examines the changes in global migration and the rise of megacities. Students analyse push and pull factors that influence migration to urban environments and the changing nature of Australia’s population. Furthermore, as part of this unit, students study refugee movement on a national and global scale. As part of their studies, students explore how this movement of people influences economic changes. When studying megacities, students will look at the impact of material and non-material living standards in cities located in developing and developed nations and the costs and benefits of these actions.

critical thinking

explaining processes that influence the characteristics of places

identifying, analysing and explaining spatial distributions and patterns and explain their implications

identifying, analysing and explaining interconnections within places and between places

collecting and recording geographical data from primary and secondary sources

using ethical protocols

fieldwork

analysing maps

identifying relationships and trends, and generating a range of alternatives for an economic issue

evaluating the potential costs and benefits of actions

‘Landforms and Landscapes’ is a study of the geomorphic environment. Students explore volcanic and mountain landscapes and undertake a field trip to Organ Pipes National Park. Students compare Victoria’s volcanic environment to other regions of the world. Furthermore, they study how humans use and change landscapes. A range of assessment tasks may be undertaken including a fieldwork report, a data analysis, an extended response and tests.

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ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Humanities History, Civics and Citizenship History, Civics and Citizenship, focuses on Medieval History, specifically Medieval Europe and Medieval Japan. Students examine both societies including their social structure, key events and how they changed overtime. Students strengthen their skills in using primary and secondary resources and in developing reasoned arguments.

identifying continuities and changes

analysing and corroborating sources

Students examine the social, political, cultural and economic changes that occurred during the Middle Ages. They investigate the significant causes and effects of developments and cultural achievements in

analysing different perspectives

developing and researching historical inquiry questions

analysing issues about national identity

identifying ways that students can be informed citizens

planning and communicating in a variety of forms

medieval societies and examine how they influence modern society. Students develop their understanding of historical perspectives through the analysis of several types of different sources, including primary and secondary sources. They analyse significant achievements and challenges that caused each society to progress or decline during the medieval period. Students will understand how groups express their identities, including religious and cultural identity, and how this expression can influence their perceptions of others and others’ perception of them. A range of assessment tasks may be undertaken such as a research report, a source analysis, an essay, an oral presentation, a role play and tests.

Welcome

sequencing significant events in chronological order

Year 7

critical thinking

Year 8

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Students will develop skills in the following areas:

Contents

Skills

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Year 8 Core Subjects Languages Other Than English (LOTE) Chinese The focus is on building on simple language, going from discussing personal topics to the world around them. Within each topic and between topics, time is dedicated to the acquisition of new language, structures, communication conventions, ways of thinking about and expression ideas, cultural knowledge and language awareness. Students become increasingly aware of the role and systematic nature of language and culture in everyday life. They are able to read or listen to short texts in order to locate items of information, and to write a series of linked sentences, using models. Students exchange simple opinions about themselves, family, activities and belongings as well as creating and performing short skits. Pronunciation is becoming more established and students gain confidence in how to say new words.

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Skills

Content

Students will further develop skills in:

The course will cover:

developing ways of acquisition of new language – pinyin, characters, and sentence structures

daily routine

clothing and colours

familiarisation of how ideas are structured and expressed

place, house plan and location

applying new characters to sentences based on models

making a phone call

making simple conversations based on common and familiar topics

engaging in small group work and whole class activities

individually completing online work regularly

interpreting written texts

typing characters in applications

writing key characters listed for each topic

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

Students will be assessed on their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.


getting around the city

reading

personal relationships

speaking

influences of the media

listening

talking about food

writing

the differences between Australia and French speaking countries

Throughout the year, students participate in a range of formative and summative assessment tasks. They complete vocabulary tests, participate in role-plays and prepare oral and written responses to course content covering the four strands of learning – writing, reading, speaking and listening. Each of these areas is assessed.

Welcome

The themes are:

Year 7

Students will continue to develop their competency across the areas of:

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

Exposes students to the French language and culture in a stimulating and lively manner. The program focuses on consolidating and developing understanding and control of language structures and grammatical features. The study of grammar, and especially the differentiation between past, present and future tenses, becomes more formalised through the introduction of grammar exercises and testing, however, the focus is on ensuring that students engage with French culture as well as with the French language.

Contents

Languages Other Than English (LOTE) French

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Year 8 Core Subjects Mathematics Mathematics fosters logical and critical thinking skills students will use in years to come in ways they never imagined. They will study in more detail than ever before a number of familiar topics including algebra and statistics. A familiarity with this content will act as a foundation for their journey through Year 9 mathematics at the City Campus. Assessment will take the form of formal written tests and individual/team project reports. Skills

Content

Year 8 mathematics provides students with the opportunity to develop the following skills:

The course will cover: •

integers

measurement

fractions, decimals and percentages

lines, shapes and solids

algebra

equations and inequalities

rates and ratios

statistics

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using efficient mental and written strategies to make estimates and carry out the four operations with integers, and apply the index laws to whole numbers solving everyday problems involving profit and loss rates, ratios and percentages, with and without the use of technology simplifying a variety of algebraic expressions and connecting expansions and factorisation of linear expressions

writing and solving linear equations

converting between units of measurement and determining length, area and volume of shapes/objects

collecting and expressing data to address a real life situation and apply related core terms of mean, median, mode, range

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Music

Students will further develop skills in:

During the year students will:

reading and notating rhythmic and melodic patterns

hearing and singing intervals of the major scale

create an 8 bar two-part rhythmic original composition

describing the main elements of music: melody, harmony, rhythm, beat, texture, dynamics, and use these to analyse song structure and film score

analyse a film score and identify ways in which the composer uses the elements of music to advance the story and create emotion

drawing on music from a range of genres and cultures to create their own composition

analyse a contemporary song with a political, social or historical message, and describe how the music complements the lyrics

create an original contemporary song in pairs or groups

recognise and identify aural intervals of the major scale

recognise and identify rhythmic elements, movable doh, ostinato, major and minor tonality

Welcome Year 7

Content

Year 8

Skills

Year 9

To complete the course, students will compose their own song in pairs or groups, using evidence from listening and analysis to interpret, rehearse and perform, demonstrating technical and expressive skills. Students evaluate musical choices they and others have made to communicate ideas and intentions as performers and composers of music from different cultures, times and locations.

Years 10 - 12

Students will complete several units of work, one of which will be on the four family groups that make up the instruments of the orchestra. They will also study film music and analyse ways in which composers manipulate the elements of music when film scoring to convey emotion to advance the story. Students will also complete units on the history of Australian music, copyright, and music in society, in which they analyse a pop/rock song which expresses a particular social or political theme.

Contents

This course explores music as a language, which is first received aurally (listening) then orally (spoken) and only then is it introduced in its written form. Students will develop skills in musicianship and aural training by developing inner hearing abilities, studying musical letter and rhythmic names, and by exploring solfa hand signs and using these as visual representations of pitch to hear and notate moveable “Doh” (transposition). Students will complete rhythmic and melodic dictations, using these skills to create and perform an original two-part rhythmic composition. They will also demonstrate an understanding of canon as a musical form, ostinato as a musical feature and the art of conducting in 2/4, 3/4 and 4/4 metre. Students will study intervals, pentatonic scales and key signatures.

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Year 8 Core Subjects Outdoor Education Outdoor Education provides students with the opportunity to select either a mountain, alpine or river environment. Under the guidance of experienced staff, students will explore and use the local resources, live as an independent community in tents and prepare their own meals in the natural environment. Skills

Content

Students will further develop skills in:

The course will cover:

Grampians :

Mountain Environment: Over five days, students camp at a different campsite each night and engage in a range of mountainbased activities including climbing, abseiling, bushwalking, survival activities and bike touring.

Mt Stirling:

Alpine Environment: Students engage in cross country skiing as part of a program designed for both beginners and advanced skiers. All students complete three skill sessions on skis before embarking on a ski tour of the mountain and hopefully skiing to the summit.

Glenelg River – River Environment:

The River program is based upon a journey model. It aims to promote community living and utilises the group’s resources to complete a challenging, yet achievable expedition. Five nights will be spent camping in tent accommodation in designated campsites along the banks of the Glenelg River with canoes as the mode of transport between sites.

becoming self-sufficient with hygiene practices including food storage

preparing packs for journey based hiking

recognising different weather and environmental conditions and making decisions accordingly under the guidance of experienced staff

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planning and producing camp meals using a Trangia stove

recognising confidence and anxieties when exposed to various activity and location settings

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Physical Education

fundamental movement

game play and strategy

softball, lacrosse, AFL, fitness, water polo, indoor cricket, European handball, tennis and badminton.

safe equipment usage

team play and sportsmanship

organisation

students will be subjectively assessed upon their ability to demonstrate and further develop skills in the following areas: teamwork and sportsmanship, cooperation and attitude, effort and participation, fundamental motor skill ability and knowledge and their understanding of rules, tactics and strategies.

Welcome

Year 7

The units typically include:

Year 8

Students will develop skills in:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

Students aim to further build upon the knowledge and skills acquired in Year 7 Physical Education. Students aim to become proficient in not only learning and developing these skills in isolation, but by also sequentially combining multiple skills in game play on a consistent basis. They aim to display critical thinking through utilising tactics and strategies in game play and activities and demonstrate the ability to perform as an effective team member. Students are encouraged to see the link between maintaining fitness as a way to enhance wellbeing and measure their own fitness and physical activity levels and identify factors that influence motivation to be physically active.

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Year 8 Core Subjects Science In Science, claims need to be based on evidence, usually collected by carrying out a scientific investigation in the form of a fair test. Throughout the year students will expand their ability to think scientifically, design and carry out fair tests and learn the fundamentals behind their research. Students will be assessed in a variety of ways including tests, projects, and practical reports. Skills

Content

Students will develop skills in the following areas:

The course will cover:

examining cells as the basic units of living things.

Semester 1:

exploring the properties of the different states of matter which can be explained in terms of the motion and arrangement of particles.

life: characteristics of life and cell biology

citizen scientist: individual scientific investigation

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exploring energy’s appearance in different forms, including movement (kinetic energy), heat and potential energy, and causes change within systems.

examining the stages in the formation of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, including indications of timescales involved. Students will identify a range of common rock types using a key based on observable physical and chemical properties.

understanding that carrying out investigations assists in evaluating claims.

scientific investigations that involve scientific questions and developing hypothesis.

gathering data through accurate measurement and repeated trials.

explaining and summarising patterns in scientific data.

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

Semester 2: •

ice and fire: physical and chemical changes

eco-energy invention: physics of energy

CSI: eltham: forensics


Sport (Interschool) As a member of the Eastern Independent Schools of Melbourne (EISM). ELTHAM College’s Year 8 and 9 students are also given opportunities in broad range of sporting pursuits. In addition to representing the College at Swimming, Athletics and Cross Country carnivals, Year 8 and 9 students are offered the following sports, which occur throughout Terms 2, 3 and 4 on Thursday afternoons:

Girls Terms 2 and 3: netball, hockey basketball, table tennis Term 4: tennis, volleyball, softball, soccer, badminton (mixed) During Term 1, Year 8 students are provided with a range of activities by specialised staff and coaches that includes preparations for interschool track and field athletics carnivals and participate in a variety of recreational activities. Skills

Welcome

Terms 2 and 3: football, basketball, soccer, table tennis Term 4: cricket, tennis, volleyball, hockey, badminton (mixed)

Contents

Boys

hand-eye coordination

various skill development

teamwork

resilience

self discipline

Year 8

Year 9

increased fitness

Years 10 - 12

Year 7

The skills engaged through participation in interschool sport include:

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Year 8 Modules Home Economics Around the World in 10 Dishes The world is your oyster! Pick up a passport and join the journey to many destinations across the globe. This module provides students with hands on opportunities to experience the world through Home Economics. Students will explore food culture, products, preparation and cooking techniques. By identifying a part of the world that is intriguing and utilising the design process students will create and produce a memorable two course meal at home.

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Skills

Content

The Home Economics module at Year 8 continues to have a strong focus on skill development through food preparation. Students will be able to:

The course is structured in the following way:

understanding food culture is all around us

the design process: investigating, generating, managing, producing and evaluating a two course meal produced at home

work safely, independently and collaboratively in the kitchen

follow and modify recipes

devise work plans

select and safely use kitchen equipment

identify and evaluate criteria for successful food productions

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

food production incorporating food preparation, safety, hygiene and storage


Home Economics A Food Truck Parked in My Backyard

food production incorporating food preparation, safety, hygiene and storage

work safely, independently and collaboratively in the kitchen

understanding food culture is all around us

follow and modify recipes

devise work plans

the design process: investigating, generating, managing, producing and evaluating a two course meal produced at home

select and safely use kitchen equipment

identify and evaluate criteria for successful food productions

Welcome

The course is structured in the following way:

Year 7

The Home Economics module at Year 8 continues to have a strong focus on skill development through food preparation, students will be able to:

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

Food Trucks allow us to explore food culture, trends and products. Students will learn food preparation and cooking techniques to produce an array of foods that could be on their Food Truck menu. By selecting the module, students will get their creativity flowing, build on their experience at Swiper’s Gully Coffee Shop and push themselves that step further in Home Economics.

Contents

I opened the window and could not believe my eyes; a food truck had landed in my backyard. What will happen next? Food envy? A love affair or simply hard work?

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Year 8 Modules Multimedia Freelance This module will ensure any budding photographers will have the ability to understand much more about what is required to get great photos in all conditions. Students will experiment with manual camera settings, in particular, aperture, shutter speed and scene modes. They will become confident in recognising when each setting is applicable in changing environments. Students will further develop their skills in Adobe Photoshop by manipulating images to an impressive standard and further enhancing all shots taken to add to their folios.

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Skills

Content

Students will:

The course will cover:

develop the ability and confidence to express themselves through their work

use a wide variety of photography techniques and elements

development of a photo based folio that incorporates and showcases all of the photographic elements students have been exposed to

manipulate images to create works and convey ideas using Adobe Photoshop

analyse how technical and symbolic elements are used in media artworks to create representations influenced by story, genre, values and points of view of particular audiences

development of a folio that showcases a range of images that have been manipulated and/or enhanced in some way using the tools learnt in Adobe Photoshop

students will become competent in flying a drone and taking photos from a variety of angle

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Multimedia The Moving Image

follow the Design process to plan and produce a movie based on the Design brief provided

producing a movie which will be entered into a local film competition

ensure they follow the 3 phases of film production

attain a greater knowledge of film language, in particular genre and story structure

editing an existing movie clip to completely change its genre

production of a time lapse and 360 VR video

pre-production, production and post-production elements and correct procedure

students will become competent in flying a drone and taking photos and video from a variety of angles

enhance their technical ability when filming and editing their movies

Welcome

Year 7

The course will cover:

Year 8

Students will:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

The ‘Moving Image’ module will have students create films to be considered for the VCE Media ELTHAM on Film Festival and the ACMI Screen iT Competition. Students will further advance their ability to read the language of film, in particular genre and style elements. They will realise the importance of following the full filmmaking process from pre-production to post-production when developing and creating their own films with a strong focus on storyboarding, scripting and elements such as lighting, sound and narrative.

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Year 8 Modules Performing Arts Acting Essentials Students think outside the box and beyond the page to create engaging and distinctive characters in performances and theatre. Students will engage with group master classes, live performance, text and script and examples of distinctive performances to deepen their knowledge of theatrical skills and dramatic techniques.

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Skills

Content

Drama has a strong focus on skill development in the following areas:

The main areas of the course are: •

researching the theatrical, historical and cultural context of plays

the use of expressive and performance skills

developing a role for performance

the development of theatrical terminology

breaking down and exploring theatre scripts

interpreting and presenting play scripts

workshops around text and character development

rehearsing and presenting scenes

character development

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Performing Arts Become a Dancer Dance is a window to self-expression, and a great tool for discovering the power of kinaesthetic communication. This subject involves a mix of practical and theoretical elements.

presenting dance work individually and as a group

dance history and theory

exploring influential choreographers

kinaesthetic technique, knowledge and skills in choreography

presenting on music and style choices

development of group and individual work

developing kinaesthetic awareness

researching dance styles and exploring contemporary practice

Welcome

Year 7

The main areas of the course are:

Year 8

Dance has a strong focus on skill development in the following areas:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

Students will explore the history of dance through ritual to contemporary practice. Students will create a group piece as choreographed by a professional choreographer, and develop their own solo work in a discipline of their choice. Students will explore technique, music choice, storytelling and dynamics throughout the module.

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Year 8 Modules Performing Arts It’s Your Line Anyway This improvisation workshop will give students the training, tricks and tuition they need to explore the wonder of rehearsed spontaneity. Through ongoing improvisation competitions, students will engage with a number of the classic theatrical techniques that underpin contemporary improvisation. As they contribute to group works and share personal experiences they create comic and dramatic scenes utilising physical theatre, on-the-spot decision making and melodramatic techniques culminating in an end of term improvised performance.

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Skills

Content

Drama has a strong focus on skill development in the following areas:

The main areas of the course are:

quick thinking

character development

team work and listening skills

physicalising and creating character

expressive skills and performance skills

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

creating improvisation troupes and exploring activities together

exploring modern improvisational roots throughout history

developing understanding of the rules of improvisation


Performing Arts Delightful and Dramatic Design

presenting design work through performance

operation of a sound and lighting desk

exploring influential theatre makers

the use of theatrical technologies such as projection and smoke machines

presenting plays for performance

the development of a theatrical design for a play

interpreting scenes for performance and discussion

researching theatrical context

Welcome

Year 7

The main areas of the course are:

Year 8

Drama has a strong focus on skill development in the following areas:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

Students will design and produce a short theatrical piece with a focus on lighting, sound and set design. They will operate a sound and lighting desk; they will also use a simple set and props to produce this short theatrical piece. The students will discover the relatively short history of theatrical sound and lighting while exploring the endless possibilities these new techniques and technologies have given us.

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Year 8 Modules Visual Arts Landscapes Landscapes explores the natural environment and students learn about ways to create artworks in response to the world around them. They will explore how artists have depicted the landscape in history and develop techniques they have used.

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Skills

Content

Art has a strong focus on skill development in the following areas:

The course will cover:

self-expression through art

using a wide variety of art media and techniques, both traditional and contemporary

process based art forms, particularly painting and drawing

the manipulation of non-traditional materials to create works and convey ideas

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

practical drawing, design and painting exercises leading to finished art works

an introduction to sculptural processes

the development of a folio that explores and outlines the planning that goes into the production of finished work

an introduction to the analysis and discussion of contemporary and traditional artwork by artists

working in a variety of media and art forms


Visual Arts Sculpture and Ceramics

self-expression through art

using a wide variety of art media and techniques, both traditional and contemporary

process based art forms, particularly ceramics

the manipulation of non-traditional materials to create works and convey ideas

practical making, designing and constructing leading to finished art works

an introduction to sculptural processes

the development of a folio that explores and outlines the planning that goes into the production of finished work

an introduction to the analysis and discussion of contemporary and traditional artwork by artists

Welcome

Year 7

The course will cover:

Year 8

Art has a strong focus on skill development in the following areas:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

Students will get their hands dirty and their creativity flowing. They will explore the world of sculpture and ceramics through influential artists, their techniques and materials, from the traditional to the contemporary.

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Year 8 Modules Visual Arts Symbols in Art Students will begin to interpret some of the most puzzling artworks in history and learn more about the people who made them. They will develop their own symbols and create artworks using them. They will use a range of materials to develop these artworks such as drawing, painting and sculpture materials.

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Skills

Content

Art has a strong focus on skill development in the following areas:

The course will cover: •

practical making, designing and constructing leading to finished art works

using a wide variety of art media and techniques, both traditional and contemporary

an introduction to a variety of techniques and processes

process based art forms

the manipulation of non-traditional materials to create works and convey ideas

the development of a folio that explores and outlines the planning that goes into the production of finished work

an introduction to the analysis and discussion of contemporary and traditional artwork by artists

working in a variety of media and art forms

self-expression through art

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


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Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


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ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Year 9 60 English 61

English as an Additional Language (EAL)

62 Home Economics 64 Integrated Units 65 Languages Other Than English (LOTE) – Chinese 66 Languages Other Than English (LOTE) – French 67 Mathematics

Welcome

63 Humanities

68 Music 69 Outdoor Education 71

Science

72 Sport (Interschool)

Year 7

70 Physical Education

Year 9

Year 8

73 Think Like You Mean It

Years 10 - 12

Core Subjects

Contents

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Year 9 Core Subjects English English within the City Experience Program draws on many resources and opportunities offered in an inner urban environment. Students explore back alleyways and laneways for text to include in poems. As well as creating their own texts students examine exemplar texts, initially addressing key structures and features then discussing why they have been employed. Story telling structures assist students in understanding how narratives are created. Critical literacy underpins much of what is explore in year 9 English, students are encouraged to develop partnerships and connections within the wider community. Skills

Content

Students will develop skills in:

Students are exposed to a wide range of city-focused texts, especially in the ‘City Crime’ unit which looks at a range of notorious city crime scenes and their associated visual and written texts. ‘Un-social Media’ explores the power of new media in a world where the line between producers and consumers of content is becoming increasingly blurred. Students also develop an oral presentation on a current issue as a formal assessment piece, in addition to short and extended writing pieces.

Observations, as they describe settings and construct written character studies. •

a greater appreciation of the choices that creative artists and writers make in striving for effects and outcomes.

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editing skills through the proofreading of written pieces.

analysing skills focusing on authorial choices in key texts with distinct literary features.

storytelling in front of peers and a wider audience.

developing oral narratives.

developing persuasive skills through both analysis and creation of persuasive texts.

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


English as an Additional Language (EAL) The EAL course is designed for international students to improve their language development. This course is studied alongside the student’s other mainstream choices including English.

communicating in everyday English.

reading and writing a range of different text types.

getting around the city: people, places and communication

understanding and using English grammar.

studying in an English speaking environment.

identity and belonging: defining the self and how to present oneself effectively

small group work, whole class discussion, research, individual assignments, and activities.

keeping people’s attention: speaking skills and note taking

negotiation where appropriate of individual content based on interests and areas of need.

ideal homes and town planning: forming opinions and making recommendations

identifying aims: health/lifestyle and academic aims

Welcome

Year 7

The course will cover topics such as:

Year 8

Students will develop skills in:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

The EAL course is interactive and designed to improve communication and study skills in order to prepare students for their senior years of schooling. In addition to improving everyday communication skills, students will be introduced to the language they will encounter in various mainstream subjects.

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Year 9 Core Subjects Home Economics In Home Economics, students further develop food literacy knowledge using a variety of recipes and equipment to grow understanding of food production, safety and hygiene. Students complete a series of food design challenges incorporating the preparation, dehydration and storage of meals and snacks for the Year 9 Outdoor Education program. They will also respond to a design brief and produce a shortbread biscuit inspired recipe.

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Skills

Content

Students will develop skills in the following areas:

During the year students will explore the following:

the proficient use of tools

problem solving with minimal guidance

food production and history to understand, “Is food for survival or social?”

learning greater independence in the kitchen environment

students are required to complete detailed work plans to show their understanding of production techniques, safety and hygiene

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Humanities

critical thinking

identifying, analysing and explaining spatial distributions and patterns and their implications

collecting and recording geographical data from primary and secondary sources

fieldwork

using ethical protocols

analysing maps

identifying relationships and trends, and generating a range of alternatives for an economic issue

evaluating the potential costs and benefits of actions

sequencing significant events in chronological order

identifying continuities and changes

in Geography and Economics, students investigate food security, the interconnection between food production and land and water degradation; the challenges of water supply and competing land uses for Australia and other areas of the world. Students understand economic concepts around sustainability and resource management and the impact on living standards. They explore the processes that have shaped and continue to shape cities around the world, to appreciate the common humanity shared across time and distance. Students use the local environment and resources to explore these concepts and create products that reflect direct experience, research, and expert and public opinions.

analysing and corroborating sources

analysing different perspectives

developing and researching historical inquiry questions

identifying ways that student can be informed citizens

planning and communicating in a variety of forms

in History and Civics and Citizenship, students investigate the making of the modern world considering the causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution. They investigate the history of Australia and significant events that shaped and developed early Australian society and structures, considering different perspectives and opinions of non-Europeans in society, culture and values.

over the course of the year a range of concepts are re-visited in different contexts and students’ understandings are presented in front of live audiences, in writing, on live radio, or through the use of visual media.

Welcome

Year 7

The course will cover topics such as:

Year 8

Students will develop skills in the following areas:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

Humanities is a diverse subject and involves students working in integrated modules that have cross-curricular priorities. Local and global issues dictate the content of Year 9 Humanities as students study geographical, historical and economic concepts as well as considering what it means to be an informed citizen. In Civics and Citizenship, students evaluate the ways in which city-dwellers have faced and continue to face different challenges.

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Year 9 Core Subjects Integrated Units Throughout the year curriculum teams in Year 9 come together to best utilise the urban learning environment. Based around key partnerships, students are offered the opportunity to make significant community connections, as well as positively impact their surroundings. The integrated curriculum across the four terms responds to the unifying thematic: What is a city? The sub-themes are: How does a city work? What challenges does the city face in the future? What are your responses/solutions to these challenges?

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Skills

Content

These skills include:

Key partnerships form an integral part of the focus of the integrated units and these partnerships include:

developing creative responses to design challenges

brainstorming and idea generation

Science Gallery Melbourne

research skills including interviews

RMIT School of Media and Communication

developing collaborative skills

University of Melbourne Medical School

presentation skills including storytelling

Lort Smith, Melbourne Polytechnic

The Moth, Carlton Connect, The City of Literature

Melbourne, World Vision

Share the Dignity

RMIT Gallery, Sacred Heart Primary School (Fitzroy)

Melbourne City Council

Woods Bagot-Architecture

Monash University- Science Future Leaders

Brotherhood of St Laurence

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Languages Other Than English (LOTE) Chinese

directions and places in the city

give and follow directions and ask for directions to major city landmarks and tourist destinations.

seasons, dates and Chinese festivals

talk about dates, seasons, holidays and special times such as Chinese New Year.

school subjects and timetables

discussing how long they spend on certain activities

understand the customs associated with Chinese New Year and be able to respond to greetings during Chinese festivals

talk about school subjects and their opinions of them

continue to learn Chinese characters, extend the range of radicals students can recognise, and write short passages of linked sentences such as personal letters or a short speech.

Throughout the year, students participate in a range of formative and summative assessment tasks. They complete vocabulary tests, participate in role plays and prepare written and oral responses.

Welcome

Year 7

Topics include:

Year 8

Students continue to develop their skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing and translating. They will:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

The focus is on consolidating skills from previous years. Topics are selected because of their potential to contribute to systematic acquisition of the language and cultural understanding. Students use a range of learning tools, including multimedia, and employ both directed and independent learning to learn new sentence structures, communication conventions, ways of thinking about the topics and their expression, as well as comparisons between languages and societies.

65


Year 9 Core Subjects Languages Other Than English (LOTE) French At this level, students will build on and extend previously attained skills and knowledge. Familiar language begins to be understood in a more formal way through the study of present, perfect, imperfect and future tenses as well as other grammatical concepts such as object pronouns, adjectives and comparatives. Students will express ideas, experiences and facts through the production of original oral and written texts as well as participate in a variety of individual and group work. The study of French will enable students to develop a greater understanding of the culture of French speaking countries which will lead to a deeper appreciation of their own personal identity, beliefs and values.

66

Skills

Content

Students will continue to develop their competency across the areas of:

The themes are: •

holidays and what makes an ideal holiday

reading

passions and future plans

speaking

life stories

listening

writing

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

Throughout the year, students participate in a range of formative and summative assessment tasks. They complete vocabulary tests, participate in role-plays and prepare oral and written responses to course content and researched topics.


Mathematics

formulating and solving mathematical problems based on noisy real phenomena

communicating mathematical concepts and solutions

constructing and critiquing logical mathematical arguments

working collaboratively

Welcome

Year 7

In Semester 1 students explore the different ways in which spatial problems can be represented, using techniques such as scale, ratios, coordinate systems, similar shapes and the trigonometric ratios to represent and solve a variety of real world spatial phenomena and problems. Semester 2 focuses on the representations of data, both graphical and algebraic. Students collect and model data with both linear and non-linear functions and make connections between their models and the real phenomena which they represent.

Year 8

Students will develop skills in the following areas:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

Mathematics aims to develop students’ understandings of mathematics as purposeful and meaningful representation of reality and has a strong focus on applied mathematical problem solving and mathematical modelling. Making use of their city context, students learn to formulate problems based on complex real situations, selecting appropriate mathematical tools to represent and then solve them. Assessment for Year 9 Mathematics is centred around a series of performance tasks, in which students apply their skills to solve complex problems in real contexts.

67


Year 9 Core Subjects Music Music the students actively participate in listening to and creating music. This fosters understanding of other times, places, cultures and contexts. The students listen to, compose and perform music with increasing depth and complexity. Students in this module will study a series of composers from the Baroque era through to the 20th century. During this course students will complete weekly lessons in aural perception, with the focus being on intervals and scales. Their aural skills will gradually develop across the module also by using the Auralia software in the music lab and on their smart phones. As a student progresses in their study of music, they learn to value and appreciate the power of music to transform the heart, soul, mind and spirit of the individual. Year 9 students will use this appreciation of music when they create their own collage of music and put it to images they choose from their lives. Putting the music and photos together will create powerful slideshows that represent the power of music in their lives.

68

Skills

Content

Students will:

During this course the students will:

know how to recognise rhythmic, melodic and harmonic patterns and beat groupings

arrange music for their own life PowerPoint using Audacity software

learn how to hear and sing intervals

be able to describe the main elements of music: melody, harmony, rhythm, beat, texture, dynamics

create a PowerPoint slideshow of photos from childhood that will accompany their life soundtrack created on Audacity

be able to draw on music from a range of cultures, times and locations as inspiration for their own musical arrangements

recognise and identify aural intervals up to and including an octave

use Auralia music software to practice interval and chord recognition

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Outdoor Education

minimal impact camping

preparation of packs for journey based hiking

producing dehydrated meals and snacks in the Home Economics room

planning and producing camp meals using a Trangia stove

being self-sufficient with hygiene practices including food storage

recognising different weather and environmental conditions and making decisions accordingly under the guidance of experienced staff

becoming aware of your own confidence and anxiety when exposed to various activities and locations

Welcome

Year 7

Following a preparation and packing session prior to departure, students travel to Wilson’s Promontory and spend five days journeying through the National Park, including staying one night at Victoria’s most remote lighthouses on mainland Australia.

Year 8

Students will develop skills in the following areas:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

The Outdoor Education program is designed to promote student leadership, community living, challenge, team-work, decision making, ownership of outcomes and independence. This is achieved by students participating in a five day bushwalk around the southern part of Wilson’s Promontory.

69


Year 9 Core Subjects Physical Education Physical Education is run as a 20 week elective program where the students have the opportunity to participate in a number of team and individual pursuits centered around the many wonderful sporting facilities that that the city has to offer. The program aims to initiate team work, improve fundamental motor skill development, increase cardio-vascular fitness and promote a life long approach to health, fitness and well-being. Skills

Content

Students will:

Over the course of the 20 week elective students will participate in the following activities:

perform conf idently and eff iciently in a range of movement environments (indoor, outdoor and aquatic) refine basic and complex motor skills and apply these skills in increasingly complex games and activities

70

maintain regular participation in moderate to vigorous physical activity and monitor exercise intensity

explore the process for improving healthrelated f itness

effectively use strategic thinking and work with both more- and less-skilled peers to improve game performance

work independently to improve performance

work in a group to create a game, and establish rules and procedures for its safe conduct

evaluate the performance of a partner and provide constructive feedback based on performance criteria to assist skill development

describe and analyse the various roles required in competitive sports

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

fitness activities around both the Tan Track and Albert Park Lake

spin and boxing classes at MSAC

indoor volleyball, basketball and water polo at MSAC

outdoor soccer and netball at Albert Park Lake

yoga at Flagstaff Gardens

an Amazing Race around and through the Tan Track


The course will cover:

design, carry out and report on experiments

our body systems and their robotic counterparts

connect ideas about how systems work within a city context

energy concepts: issues and solutions

urban ecology

represent and explain phenomena using a range of models and data

3.6 billion years of evolution

engage creative and critical thinking

the chemistry of acids and bases

learn how to work safely, accurately and efficiently in a scientific laboratory

use the experimental method to answer a scientific question

Welcome

Students will develop the ability to:

Year 7

Content

Year 8

Skills

Year 9

For a portion of the year, students will also study Chemistry at the Research Campus where they have access to the Senior Science Laboratories. They will investigate a diversity of chemical reactions including those of acids and bases. They will also design, carry out and formally write-up a practical investigation activity.

Years 10 - 12

Students will explore science within the context of the city. Science classes will involve hands on learning and excursions around the CBD. Students will examine the connections between ideas as they design their own experiments and develop their ability to explain their observations. They will utilise and extend their creative and critical thinking skills through problem solving and by developing representations of science concepts. Working in the dynamic environment of the city, they will respond to the varied events and programs on offer. For example, the City Campus has a relationship with the Science Gallery Melbourne, an internationally recognised science and art initiative which has a different theme each year. The science curriculum includes learning around the theme on offer, enabling students to access and contribute their own work to the program.

Contents

Science

71


Year 9 Core Subjects Sport (Interschool) As a member of the Eastern Independent Schools of Melbourne (EISM). ELTHAM College’s Year 8 and 9 students are also given opportunities in broad range of sporting pursuits. In addition to representing the College at Swimming, Athletics and Cross Country carnivals, Year 9 students are offered the following sports, which occur throughout Terms 2, 3 and 4 on Thursday afternoons: Boys Terms 2 and 3: football, basketball, soccer, table tennis Term 4: cricket, tennis, volleyball, hockey, badminton (mixed) Girls Term 2 and 3: netball, hockey, basketball, table tennis Term 4: tennis, volleyball, softball, soccer, badminton(mixed) During Term 1, Year 9 students are provided a range of activities by our specialised staff and coaches that include preparations for interschool track and field athletics carnivals and participate in a variety of recreational activities.. Skills The skills engaged through participation in interschool sport include:

72

increased fitness

hand-eye coordination

various skill development

teamwork

resilience

self discipline

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Think Like You Mean It Design Thinking

design thinking

thinking techniques

creating prototypes

testing Solutions

critical analysis of factors that impact on design solutions

investigation of how the characteristics and properties of materials, systems, components, tools and equipment can be combined to create designed solutions

assessing the need to develop design briefs and use a range of materials, systems, processes, components, tools and equipment to develop design ideas

applying design thinking, creativity, innovation and enterprise skills to develop, modify and communicate design ideas

evaluating design ideas, processes and solutions for success, recognising the need for sustainability

Welcome

The course will cover:

problem solving

Year 7

problem finding

Year 8

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

Over the course of a term students will be presented with a targeted provocation/problem and be tasked with designing and prototyping a solution. Design thinking is a five step process which seeks to understand users, challenge assumptions, redefine problems and create innovative solutions. This process will be scaffolded for students, combining critical thinking and creativity to solve real problems. They will learn to apply the best creative and analytical tools to develop a skillset broadly applicable in real world contexts. As a component of the subject, students will be taught a variety of prototyping techniques specific to their solutions.

73


Choosing a Year 10 Program

80

Choosing a Year 11 Program

81

Choosing a Year 12 Program

82

Subject LIst Year 10 -12

84

Subject List Year 10

174 External VET Cluster Subjects LifeWork Centre 175

LifeWork Centre

FAQ

177

Frequently Asked Questions

Glossary

179 Glossary

Appendix A

181

Key Dates for Subject Selection

Contents

Assessments

79

Welcome

77

Year 7

Victorian Certificate of Education

Year 8

Subject List

76

Year 9

Structure

Years 10 - 12

Years 10 - 12

75


Victorian Certificate of Education The VCE is the certificate that the majority of students within Victoria receive upon satisfactory completion of their secondary education. This certificate provides pathways to further study or training within university or TAFE and/or employment. VCE VET subjects (Vocational Education and Training) are competency based subjects that provide students with the opportunity to develop work related competencies and skills. VCE or VCE VET subjects are broken up into four units, commonly referred to as Units 1, 2, 3 and 4. To satisfactorily complete the VCE a student must have a satisfactory result (S) for a minimum of 16 units. This must include: •

at least three units from the English Group (English, English as an Additional Language, English Language and Literature), two of which must be a Unit 3–4 sequence

an additional three Unit 3–4 sequences of studies other than English, which may include any number of English sequences once the English requirement has been met.

VCE Explained Video Year 10 - 12 subjects Programs for our students in Years 10-12 are designed to run over a three year period, allowing students to develop a plan that suits their needs. Year 10 subjects: •

the compulsory core subjects – English, Humanities, Sport and Fitness, Mathematics and Science run for a whole year, i.e. two semesters

the majority of elective subjects run for one semester in length, and are designed to explore a wide range of areas

VCE Units 1 and 2 subjects: •

may be undertaken separately or as a sequence

in most instances Unit 1 and 2 subjects provide background knowledge and preparation for Unit 3 and 4 subjects

VCE Unit 3 and 4 subjects: •

must be undertaken as a sequence

VCE VET subjects (Units 1-4): •

these are competency based subjects that provide you with the opportunity to develop work related competencies and skills

students obtain credit for VCE units and also receive a nationally recognised VET Certificate

Integrity ELTHAM College is committed to ensuring the integrity of all student work. Demonstrating academic integrity is about producing and submitting assessments in an honest and fair way, acting and communicating ethically, and showing respect for the work of others. All ELTHAM College students and staff are advised to consult the Student Academic Integrity Policy to ensure compliance. At VCE level the Policy is consistent with VCAA requirements.

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ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Assessments Year 10 subjects: •

Year 10 achievement is calculated according to a percentage grade awarded to each weighted assessment and a cumulative letter grade is reported at the end of each semester (see table below).

VCE Units 1 and 2 subjects: •

Students are required to meet the outcomes specified in the subject Study Design. Each SAC (School Assessed Coursework) is awarded a percentage grade and a cumulative letter grade is reported at the end of each semester (see table below).

These subjects are also given a ‘S’ or ‘N’ result, which is reported externally to VCAA and contributes to the 16 units required to complete the VCE .

VCE VET Subjects: Results for VCE VET subjects are reported according to the table below. Table A: Internal Marking Scheme Years 10 - 11 subjects

VET subjects

A+

90 - 100%

Very High

21 - 25

84 - 100%

A

80 - 89%

High

18 - 20

72 - 83%

B+

75 - 79%

Medium

15 - 17

60 - 71%

B

70 - 74%

Low

12 - 14

48 - 59%

C+

65 - 69%

Very Low

5 - 11

20 - 47%

C

60 - 64%

D+

55 - 59%

D

50 - 54%

E+

40 - 49%

E

30 - 39%

UG

Below 30% (ungraded)

Welcome

Year 7

Unit 3 and 4 subjects are given a study score out of 50 by VCAA. The score is based on the School Assessed Coursework (SAC) and external exam results for the subject. Students are reminded that all school assessed coursework scores are statistically moderated against the external examination results of the ELTHAM cohort in this subject.

Year 8

Year 9

Students are required to meet the outcomes specified in the subject Study Design. Each SAC (School Assessed Coursework) is awarded an internal percentage grade, based on the numerical score mandated by VCAA, however, no cumulative score is awarded.

Years 10 - 12

Contents

VCE Units 3 and 4 subjects:

77


Assessments continued mE

Semester Report

Intended Use

Absent

Shows ‘Absent’ and the assessment is removed from the semester grade calculation.

Student was absent for the assessment and was unable to make it up for legitimate reasons.

Submitted – Mod

Shows ‘Modified’ and the assessment is removed from the semester grade calculation.

Student is on a modified program and completed the modified assessment.

Not Submit – Mod

Shows ‘Not Completed’ and the assessment is removed from the semester grade calculation.

Student is on a modified program and did not completed the modified assessment.

Failed to Complete

Shows ‘Not Completed’ and the semester grade calculation treats the assessment as a 0.

Student did not complete, or did not hand in the assessment, even after significant follow up.

Exempt

Shows ‘Exempt’ and the assessment is removed from the semester grade calculation.

Student is not required to complete the assessment, they may have joined the class late or are exempt for other reasons deemed appropriate by the Director of Curriculum.

Not Assessed

Shows ‘NA’ and a semester grade is not calculated.

These are not used for weighted assessments in the Senior School.

Submitted Pending Marking Not Satisfactory Satisfactory Not Submitted

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ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Choosing a Year 10 Program A Year 10 program is made up of 7 subjects. All students do the 5 core subjects and up to 4 elective subjects. These elective subjects can be a combination of the Year 10 elective subjects with one VCE Unit 1/2 subject, or made up of all Year 10 electives. Any variations to this program will need to be applied for using the Year 10 Program Variation Application form which can be found on the LifeWorks page on mE (LifeWork Centre), and discussed with the Year Level Coordinator and/or the VCE Coordinator. The exception is that two VCE Unit 1/2 subjects in Year 10 may be considered if VCE Hospitality or an externally run VCE subject is the second one, as they run outside the normal school timetable. Students must still apply via the form. Please see Appendix A for relevant due dates.

Template Year 10 Program Electives

Semester 1

English or EAL

Humanities or Humanities Pathways (EAL)

Maths

Science

Sport and Fitness

Semester 2

English or EAL

Humanities

Maths

Science

Sport and Fitness

Each semester consists of 7 Subjects: 5 Core and 2 Electives Students will be required to nominate up to 4 electives for their program in 2020. The electives can be chosen from the Year 10 elective subjects and Year 11 level, VCE Unit 1/2 subjects.

Contents

Core

Welcome

Semester

Students can also meet with a Lifework Advisor to discuss their selections. Please make an appointment with the LifeWork Centre. Parents are welcome to attend these appointments.

3.

Students need to select their electives online in preference order from 1 to 4 (1 being the most preferred subject). Information about how to access the online Subject Selection form will be emailed to students and parents early in Term 3.

4.

Students MUST nominate up to 3 RESERVE SUBJECTS and also include a reserve VCE subject (if they have nominated a VCE elective), before having a parent/guardian sign the form and submitting it in hard copy to the LifeWork Centre. Any variations to this program will need to be applied for using the Year 10 Program Variation Application form which can be found on the LifeWorks page on mE (LifeWork Centre), and will also need to be submitted in hard copy at the same time. Please see Appendix A for all due dates.

5.

Please note that subject clashes may occasionally occur when building the timetable. It is a complex puzzle and unfortunately not all students can have all of their subject choices accommodated. Therefore, please consider your nominated reserve subjects carefully, in case these need to be included in your program. Pay particular attention to due dates.

Year 8

2.

Year 9

Students and parents are invited to attend the Subject Selection Evenings held online on Tuesday 14 and Thursday 16 July 2020, where they will have the chance to hear from subject teachers.

Years 10 - 12

1.

Year 7

Subject Selection Process

79


Choosing a Year 11 Program A Year 11 program is made up of 6 subjects; one core English subject and 5 elective subjects, which can be a combination of the VCE Units 1/2 subjects with one VCE Units 3/4 subject, or made up of all VCE Units 1/2 subjects. Any variations to this program will need to be applied for using the Year 11 Program Variation Application form which can be found on the LifeWorks page on mE (LifeWork Centre), and discussed with the Year Level Coordinator and/or the VCE Coordinator. Please see Appendix A for relevant due dates.

Template Year 11 Program In each semester: 6 Subjects, comprised of 1 English/EAL or Literature and 5 other subjects. Please note: Two reserve subjects need to be chosen in the event your subject combination can not be timetabled. Semester

Core

Semester 1

English or Literature or EAL Unit 1

Semester 2

English or Literature or EAL Unit 2

Subjects

Subject Selection Process 1.

Students and parents are invited to attend the Subject Selection Evenings held online on Tuesday 14 and Thursday 16 July 2020, where they will have the chance to hear from subject teachers. Students can also refer to the official VTAC Year 10 Guide for Subject Selection

2.

Students should access the Morrisby website to explore their career and subject recommendations.

3.

Students will meet with a Lifework Advisor to discuss their selections. Information about how appointments will be booked will be emailed to students and parents early in Term 3.

4.

Students should select electives online in preference order from 1 to 5 (1 being the most preferred subject). Please note that a parent/guardian signature is required. For due dates please see Appendix A. Information about how to access the online Subject Selection form will be emailed to parents and students early in Term 3.

5.

Students MUST nominate up to 2 RESERVE SUBJECTS before having a guardian sign the form and submitting it in hard copy to the LifeWork Centre. Any variations to this program will need to be applied for using the Year 11 Program Variation Application form which can be found on the LifeWorks page on mE (LifeWork Centre), and will also need to be submitted at the same time, in hard copy.

Please note that subject clashes may occasionally occur when building the timetable. It is a complex puzzle and unfortunately not all students can have all of their subject choices accommodated. Therefore, please consider your nominated reserve subjects carefully, in case these need to be included in your program. Pay particular attention to due dates.

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ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Choosing a Year 12 Program A Year 12 program is made up of 5 subjects; one core English subject and 4 elective subjects, which can be a combination of VCE Units 3/4 subjects with one Higher Education University extension subject or made up of all VCE Units 3/4 subjects. Any variations to this program will need to be applied for using the Year 12 Program Variation Application form which can be found on the LifeWorks page on mE (LifeWork Centre), and discussed with the Year Level Coordinator and/or the VCE Coordinator. Please see Appendix A for relevant due dates.

Template Year 12 Program In each semester: 5 subjects, comprising of 1 English/EAL/Literature and 4 other subjects

Subject Selection Process 1.

Students and parents are invited to attend the Subject Selection Evenings held online on Tuesday 14 and Thursday 16 July 2020, where they will have the chance to hear from subject teachers. Students can also refer to the official VTAC Year 11 and Year 12 Guide for Subject Selection and Tertiary courses.

2.

Students should access the Morrisby website to explore their career and subject recommendations.

3.

Students can also meet with a Lifework Advisor to discuss their selections. Please make an appointment with the LifeWork Centre. Parents are welcome to attend these appointments.

4.

Students will need to select their subjects online. Information about how to access the Online Subject Selection Form will be emailed to students early in Term 3. For due dates please see Appendix A.

5.

Both the student and guardian will sign the form and submit it in hard copy to the LifeWork Centre. Any variations to this program will need to be applied for using the Year 12 Program Variation Application form which can be found on the LifeWorks page on mE (LifeWork Centre) will also need to be submitted in hard copy at the same time.

Contents

English or Literature or EAL Unit 4

Welcome

Semester 2

Year 7

English or Literature or EAL Unit 3

Year 8

Semester 1

Subjects

Year 9

Core

Years 10 - 12

Semester

81


Years 10 - 12 Subject List Arts 88

Art

Year 10**

VCE Units 3/4

90

Certificate III in Music Industry (Performance)

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

91

Certificate III in Music Industry (Sound Production)

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

92

Certificate III in Screen & Media (Creative Digital Media)

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

93

Certificate IV in Screen & Media

94

Design

Year 10

95

Digital Art

Year 10

96

Drama

97

Film and Media

98

Media

99

Music

100

VCE Units 3/4

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

Music Performance

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

101

Studio Art

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

102

The Dramatic Arts

103

Theatre Studies

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

104

Visual Communication Design

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

Year 10

Year 10

Year 10

Business 108

Accounting

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

109

Business Management

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

110

Certificate II in Hospitality

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

111

Certificate III in Hospitality

112

Economics

113

Financial Affairs

Year 10

114

Law and You

Year 10

115

Legal Studies

VCE Units 3/4 VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

Computing 116

Applied Computing

English

82

120

English Pathways (EAL)

Year 10*

121

English

Year 10*

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

123

English as an Additional Language (EAL)

Year 10*

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

125

Literature

Year 10

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Health and Physical Education 130

Outdoor Education - Journey to the Top

Year 10

131

Certificate III in Sport & Recreation

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

132

Health and Human Development

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

133

Sport and Fitness

134

Physical Education

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

Year 10*

Humanities 138

A Beginner's Guide to Ideas

Year 10

139

Extended Investigation

140

Geography

Year 10*

141

History and Civics and Citizenship

Year 10*

143

Geography

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

144

Australian and Global Politics

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

142

Humanities Pathways (EAL)

145

History – 20th Century

146

History – Revolutions

Year 10

VCE Units 3/4

Chinese (First Language)

153

French

Year 10

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

Mathematics 158

Mathematics

Year 10*

160

General Mathematics

161

Further Mathematics

162

Mathematical Methods

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

163

Specialist Mathematics

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

Year 7

152

VCE Units 3/4

VCE Units 1/2 VCE Units 3/4

Science 166

Biology

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

167

Chemistry

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

168

Engineering for the 22nd Century

169

Physics

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

170

Psychology

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

171

Science

Year 10*

172

Citizen Scientist - Science Needs You

Year 10

173

The Power of the Brain

Year 10

Year 8

Certificate III Applied Languages (Chinese)

VCE Units 1/2

Year 10

* Year 10 core subject ** The duration of this subject is for the whole year and equates to two elective options at Year 10

Year 9

151

Year 10

Years 10 - 12

Certificate II Applied Languages (Chinese)

Welcome

VCE Units 1/2

LOTE 150

Contents

VCE Units 3/4

83


Year 10 Subject List Arts 88

Art

Year 10**

94

Design

Year 10

95

Digital Art

Year 10

97

Film and Media

Year 10

99

Music

Year 10

102

The Dramatic Arts

Year 10

VCE Units 3/4

Business 113

Financial Affairs

Year 10

114

Law and You

Year 10

English 120

English Pathways (EAL)

Year 10*

121

English

Year 10*

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

123

English as an Additional Language (EAL)

Year 10*

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

125

Literature

Year 10

VCE Units 1/2

VCE Units 3/4

Health and Physical Education 130

Outdoor Education - Journey to the Top

Year 10

133

Sport and Fitness

Year 10*

Humanities 138

A Beginner's Guide to Ideas

Year 10

140

Geography

Year 10*

141

History and Civics and Citizenship

Year 10*

142

Humanities Pathways (EAL)

Year 10

150

Certificate II Applied Languages (Chinese)

Year 10

VCE Units 1/2

153

French

Year 10

VCE Units 1/2

LOTE

Mathematics 158

Mathematics

Year 10*

Science 168

Engineering for the 22nd Century

Year 10

171

Science

Year 10*

172

Citizen Scientist - Science Needs You

Year 10

173

The Power of the Brain

Year 10

* Year 10 core subject ** The duration of this subject is for the whole year and equates to two elective options at Year 10

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VCE Units 3/4


85

Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


Arts


87

Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


Arts Year 10 Art This subject caters for students who like making things, find art and design challenging and enjoyable, and would like to expand on their skills. It introduces individuality in the art making process, to initiate the exploration of new techniques and processes, and to encourage the development of individual ideas and style.

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Skills

Content

Students will:

The course will cover:

explore and develop ideas

develop skills in a range of media

make personal art responses

broad and innovative exploration, trialling materials and techniques and exploring ideas, directions and personal concepts in a range of media

critically appraise and document their own and other artist’s work

providing evidence of idea development in a visual diary

visually analyse and evaluate a range of artwork

creating a range of finished work

develop personal viewpoints about the meanings, messages and qualities within their own work and a range of other artwork

discussing the meanings and messages in artworks and respond using developing art vocabulary

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Units 3/4 Art Units 3 and 4 in Art focus on making personal art responses through a broad and innovative investigation of an art form and then finally presenting a comprehensive body of work that realises technical skill and awareness of aesthetic qualities.

Content

Students will:

The course will cover:

make personal art responses

Unit 3: Artworks, ideas and values

prepare a sustained and articulate body of their own artwork

critically appraise and document their own and other artist’s work

visually analyse and evaluate a range of artwork

making a broad and innovative exploration, trialling materials and techniques and exploring ideas, directions and personal concepts in a considered and insightful way to produce a body of individual work

develop personal viewpoints about the meanings, messages and qualities within a range of artwork

interpreting the meanings and messages and comparing artwork through the application of interpretive frameworks

Welcome

Skills

Contents

You will learn to interpret different aspects of an artwork’s meanings and messages and compare artworks through the application of interpretative frameworks. You will also learn to discuss and debate artworks and the different meanings and messages to support personal points of view.

discussing commentaries and developing viewpoints on the meanings and messages in artworks

Year 8

Year 9

completing with skill and aesthetic awareness a resolved body of work

Years 10 - 12

Year 7

Unit 4: Artworks, ideas and viewpoints

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Arts CUA30915 Certificate III in Music Industry (Performance Units 1/2 and 3/4) In partnership with COASMP RTO No. 41549 The Certificate III in Music Industry (Performance) is designed for students thinking about working in the music industry as a performer. The course will provide you with a wide range of knowledge and skills to be able to maximize your employment in the music industry. At the completion of Units 3 and 4 students will gain a study score but the Certificate III in Music Industry (Performance) can only be awarded to students who have successfully completed the full Units 1 to 4 sequences.

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Skills

Content

At the completion of Certificate III in Music Industry (Performance), and depending upon the sequence you choose, students will be able to:

Throughout the course, you will be involved in: •

developing and extending your repertoire, developing your performance skills

explain how the Australian music industry works

promote your musical works, build business and management skills

contributing to backup performance for a performance

perform in a local amateur environment, in a group and/or as a soloist, using improvisation

using computer music software for writing, recording and performing songs

compose and arrange a song

use recording equipment to produce demos of your songs

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


CUA30915 Certificate III in Music Industry (Sound Production Units 1/2 and 3/4) The Certificate III in Music Industry - Sound Production is designed for students thinking about working in the music industry in a variety of roles including sound engineer in a recording studio or live situation, audiovisual operator or as a musician developing skills to record their own music. This course will provide you with a wide range of knowledge and skills to be able to maximize your employment in the music industry. It is aimed at both musicians and non musicians, depending upon the stream chosen, who want to develop skills in the use of the technology associated with the music industry.

Contents

In partnership with COASMP RTO No. 41549

live sound production

explain how the Australian music industry works

set up and operate equipment used for live sound production

recording your own music as well as a variety of music groups including bands, choirs and ensembles

record a variety of music ensembles

using computer music software for writing, recording and performing

copyright, recording and performing

Year 7

The course will cover:

Year 8

At the completion of Certificate III in Music Industry Sound Production students will be able to:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Welcome

Students who complete the sequence of Units 1 to 4 will gain a study score as well as a Certificate III in Music Industry - Sound Production.

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Arts CUA31015 Certificate III in Screen and Media (Creative Digital Media) (Units 1/2 and 3/4) Students will learn a variety of computer applications. These include industry based software programs related to audio, video, graphics and multimedia authoring and design. Correct working methodologies are also addressed in the curriculum. Students produce a variety of products that are image based for digital reproduction and acquire skills in the production and design of video and animation, digital print media and internet use and research. All assessment tasks are project based. Some of the areas include: 2D graphics, text and audio in multimedia presentations, updating WebPages, manipulation of digital images, creation of interactive sequences and writing content and/or copy. Please note: Units 1 and 2 of this subject will be offered in 2021 and not in 2022. Packaging Rules Students must have completed VCE Units 1 and 2 of this Certificate to enrol in VCE Units 3 and 4. To be awarded the CUA31015 Certificate III in Media (Creative Digital Media), competency must be achieved in eleven (11) units of competency.

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three (3) core units of competency

eight (8) elective units of competency

Skills

Content

Students will develop skills in the following areas:

This subject uses a combination of media, such as movies, music, animation and graphic design. It is recommended that students have a keen interest in digital design, animation and interactive media. This subject is a nationally recognised qualification and will provide students with a VCE study score.

software skills in the use of programs including Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Dreamweaver and Animate

interface design

animation

web design and creation

multimedia and design software

following the design process

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


ten (10) elective units of competency

For ELTHAM students there is an additional $700 cost associated with the camp that students are required to attend. Skills

Content

The course aims to provide students with industry standard video and audio capture skills, along with editing postproduction skills using the latest technology. The course covers short narrative film writing and music video production including preproduction and post-production.

Students can begin the Screen Course at Year 11 or 12. Term 1: •

Students will develop skills in:

workshops with industry professionals who will conduct training in script writing and how to get the best out of a camera. The film camp is designed to reflect an industry production, where each student will be scheduled to direct and then crew on morning and afternoon.

writing

time management

Term 2:

problem solving

confidence with technology

team building and group work

training on the industry digital editing programme Premiere. Students will be allocated an edit suite each and will be trained while editing their movie.

Term 3: •

students will work in teams to plan for their music video production. This next phase includes workshops with industry professionals who will conduct training in lighting, project management and coordination of cast and crew.

Year 9

three (3) core units of competency

Term 4: •

students will complete outstanding paperwork and promote their films to festivals and online.

Years 10 - 12

Welcome

To be awarded the Certificate IV in Screen and Media, competency must be achieved in thirteen (13) units of competency.

Year 7

Packaging Rules

Year 8

The Certificate IV in Screen and Media is a nationally recognised qualification. Experienced filmmakers can use the course to build their skill base. Those with minimal experience will be supported to develop the necessary skills within the course. Successful completion of the qualification aims to enhance the student’s chances of entering the film, media or television industries and can provide a credit transfer towards further film production courses.

Contents

CUA41215 Certificate IV in Screen and Media (credit towards the VCE of a Unit 3/4 sequence)

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Arts Year 10 Design In this subject, you will be looking at how drawing can be combined with graphic design to create what we see every day in advertising, websites and packaging. Students will be introduced to the use of illustration in some of the different forms of everyday design contexts. For example: symbols, collage and designs on CD covers, shopping bags, wine labels and t-shirts just to name a few. It is recommended you enjoy drawing and have a keen interest in design and creativity. Even if you think you cannot draw, the best way to learn is to have a go while being guided. Skills

Content

Students will:

The course will cover:

be able to use a variety of illustration techniques in the creation of a range of solutions to design problems

the steps involved in the design process and its application

be creative in the whole process of developing the idea through to making the final presentation, while having fun at the same time

the different styles of images for different purposes, and how this affects the target audience

the functions of graphic design in our society, industry processes and the client/artist relationship

various media including markers, colour and grey lead pencils, soft drawing material, collage and the computer

learn to draw

be able to apply and control media to represent form (3D)

Assessment for design is based upon the completion of four units of work: the design process, symbology for communication, making new from the old and designing for reality. Each unit consists one or more practical tasks relevant to the unit.

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creating imagery utilising both photography and computer software

making 3D solutions based on the digital outcome

the course covers work in the areas of: optical art, photo mosaics, photo montages, kinetic art surrealism, low polygon 3D and multiple exposure photographic techniques

use a range of digital technology in the production of final art pieces

apply the concepts and techniques of artists in the production of their own work

use Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator for the purposes of their own work

analyse and evaluate the works of others as well as their own

Welcome

Year 7

Students will develop the ability to:

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

This subject introduces students to a variety of digital art forms. The subject is based around the digital image which may be created through photography and computer generated imagery. Students will work through a range of topics to provide very different experiences with regard to concept, photography and technology. The emphasis is both on the digital and the art as separate yet combined experiences. Students will also look into the practice of artists to understand the potential for manipulating these technologies in a creative way. They will work through a range of topics that explore ideas, principles and properties of the various media in order to appreciate the potential and limitations of digital art. They will be encouraged to use time outside of class and often there will be two different tasks running concurrently. Most works will draw inspiration from contemporary and historical artists as the basis for an idea/concept.

Contents

Year 10 Digital Art

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Arts Units 1/2 and 3/4 Drama The study of Drama focuses on the creation and performance of characters and stories in ways that move beyond reality of live as lived. Students draw on a range of stimulus materials and play-making techniques to develop and present devised work. Students also explore a range of performance styles and conventions, dramatic elements and production areas. They use performance and expressive skills to explore and develop role and character. They analyse the development of their own work and performances by other drama practitioners. Drama involves some work (after school and weekend rehearsals) outside the traditional classroom timetable, especially in the lead up to the ensemble production and during the performances. In 2020 only Drama 1 and 2 or Theatre 1 and 2 will run, not both. The subject chosen to run will be based on whichever has greater student numbers. Skills

Content continued

Students will develop skills in the following areas:

Unit 2: Australian drama

use, explore, describe, analyse and evaluate playmaking techniques including the use of stimulus materials

manipulate dramatic elements, performance and expressive skills in an ensemble and solo performance

explore and manipulate conventions and stagecraft

collaborate on and present performances

the use and documentation of the processes involved in constructing a devised solo or ensemble performance

students create, present and analyse a performance based on a person, an event, an issue, a place, an artwork, a text and/or an icon from a contemporary or historical Australian context

students use performance styles from a range of historical, cultural and social contexts including styles that move beyond reality of life as lived

Content Unit 1: Dramatic storytelling •

creating, presenting and analysing a devised performance

written analysis of a student’s own performance work and of a performance by professional drama practitioners

learn about and use stagecraft, conventions and performance styles associated with theatre that moves beyond reality of life as lived.

develop awareness and understanding of how characters are portrayed in naturalistic and nonnaturalistic performance styles and document the processes they use

Unit 3 focuses on: •

working with given stimulus material and guidelines to structure a performance

transformation of object, time, place and character in performance

after performing to an audience the students describe, reflect upon, interpret, analyse and evaluate the construction and performance of their ensemble production

students will also analyse and evaluate a performance that uses non-naturalistic performance styles selected from the prescribed VCE Drama Unit 3 Playlist

Unit 4 focuses on:

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the development of skills in transformation of character, time, place and object

using playmaking techniques to develop a short mini solo performance in response to given stimulus material


Year 10 Film and Media

research and develop production skills

work in collaborative team environments

analyse film narrative and visual representations

consider how production and story elements structure narratives

design, plan and produce short films and other media products

develop time management, project planning and problem solving skills

production and story elements are the key areas of filmmaking. These will be discussed in relation to the Tom Twyker film ‘Run Lola Run.’

Day in 60 Seconds •

film your average day in less than sixty seconds. Before you start, create a shot list. Think about how you’re going to use editing techniques to condense the events of a single day into a minute

Garage Band •

in this outcome students are to create an opening title sequence for one of the PSST movie files and then build an original sound track using Garageband. Titles can be built in either Premiere or in Photoshop but must use fonts from the online site Dafont

Google Time •

Google time is more of an attitude and culture than an Outcome

20% of your media time is set aside to pursue an area of interest for you, where you may develop skills and or create media products informed by your own research and interest

Welcome

Year 7

Film Analysis

Year 8

Students will develop the ability to:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

This course will provide students with the opportunity to develop competencies in digital film production. Students will gain knowledge and practical experience in the skills and processes involved in producing short films and specialist media skills. The course provides students with an insight into the Year 11 and 12 media courses.

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Arts Units 1/2 and 3/4 Media The media has a significant impact on people’s lives. It influences the way people spend their time, helps shape the way they perceive themselves and others, and plays a crucial role in the creation of identity. Students analyse social media networks, study films and consider the way media messages are developed. In the media rooms, students often work in groups to appreciate different opinions, to develop ideas, perspectives and to realise projects. Student learn to plan and produce short films. The Media courses involve a balance of practical and theoretical work. The course is suited to hard working, creative students who have a genuine interest in film, photography and or journalism; those who are confident with English will thrive in this environment. Students considering a career in the media should also consider Certificate IV in Screen and Media. Skills

Content

Students will:

Unit 1: Media form, representations and Australian stories

research new media

manipulate photographic and digital images

create and analyse visual representations

work in collaborative team environments

develop time management, project planning and problem solving skills

consider how production and story elements structure narratives

design, plan and produce either film or photography based media products

develop an understanding of the relationship between the media, technology and the representations present in media forms

design, plan and produce films and/or photography tasks

analyse who owns and controls the Australian media

Unit 2: Narrative across media forms •

develop an understanding of production and story elements while analysing films

develop practical skills through undertaking assigned roles during participation in specific stages of a media production

develop an awareness of ‘new media’ and its impact on the democratic process

Unit 3: Media narratives and pre production •

develop an understanding of production and story elements while analysing two films

analyse films to better understand the way media texts are shaped by our cultural values

develop media skills by testing equipment and ideas

plan a major production in either film, photography or web based media

Unit 4: Media Production and issues in the Media

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produce the planned production from Unit 3

discuss the dynamic and changing relationship between the media and its audience

analyse the regulation of relationships between the media and its audience in Australia

evaluate ethical and legal issues in the media


Year 10 Music The Year 10 Music elective helps students develop a broader understanding of music. Students are given the opportunity to perform as a soloist, as a member of an existing College ensemble and to perform within the Music class. To enhance their developing performance skills, students will also hone their skills in reading and writing music, including composing original music. All students studying this subject must be learning from a private instrumental/singing teacher, either at the College or externally, and have done so for at least two years prior. The course requires occasional evening performances and out-of-hours ensemble rehearsals.

original composition/arrangement

end of semester written exam

solo performance recital (10 minutes)

Skills

Content

Students develop the ability to:

select a repertoire, rehearse and perform within the music class and to audiences

work on practice and performance skills

listen to and discuss a range of musical styles and performances

develop a basic experience of improvisation on your instrument

perform as a soloist or member of a group

be technically flexible on a chosen instrument/voice

develop your listening and analysis skills

understand basic music and aural theory

Welcome

concept of music quiz

Year 7

Year 8

historical understanding and context quiz

Year 9

concert review (written response)

Years 10 - 12

Contents

Assessments include:

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Arts Units 1/2 and 3/4 Music Performance Are you currently learning a musical instrument? Why not have your talent count as part of a music subject? VCE Music enables you to develop a broader understanding of music. Practical music making plays an important role in this course. Students are given the opportunity throughout the year to perform as both a soloist and as a member of an existing College ensemble. To enhance developing performance skills, students also develop skills in reading and writing music, including composing of their own music. It is recommended that students have a deep commitment to, and passion for music to complete this subject. A minimum of two years of lessons and performance experience on your instrument/voice is recommended. During these Units students must undertake weekly private instrumental lessons on your instrument/voice, either at the College or externally. The course requires occasional evening performances and out-of-hours ensemble rehearsals. In Units 1 and 2 students will complete a number of assessment tasks, including solo and group performances, written theory and aural tests, and technical work. Skills

Content

At the completion of VCE Music Performance students will have:

Unit 1 and 2: •

build performance and musicianship skills

investigate the work of other performers

identify technical, expressive and stylistic challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and practise related technical work

students also devise an original composition or improvisation

the ability to perform confidently as a soloist or member of a group

technical flexibility on your chosen instrument/ voice, solo technique and sight reading skills

developed your listening and analysis skills

an established level of music theory and aural knowledge

created and composed your own music

Unit 3:

developed skills to analyse in depth the music you perform

present convincing performances of group and solo works in a range of styles

develop instrumental techniques that interpret the works and expressively shape their performances

develop skills in unprepared performance, aural perception and comprehension, transcription, music theory and analysis

Unit 4:

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refine ability to present convincing performances of group and solo works

select group and solo works that complement works selected in Unit 3

further develop and refine instrumental and performance techniques


Units 1/2 and 3/4 Studio Art Units 1 and 2 focus on using sources of inspiration and ideas as the basis for creating artworks. Based on a design process, students explore a wide range of materials and techniques as tools for translating ideas, observations and experiences into visual form.

Assessments consist of a range of written responses and the creation of folios of work as well a final Year 12 examination where work from Units 3 and 4 are examinable. Skills

Content

Students will learn to:

Unit 1: Artistic inspiration and techniques

develop artworks through a design process

interpret art ideas and the use of materials and techniques used by artists from different times and locations

analyse artworks

present a folio of finished artworks that develop from the design process

discuss and research a variety of professional art practices and styles for both traditional and contemporary artists

discuss a range of art industry issues in an informed manner

explore a range of materials and techniques

Unit 2: Design exploration and concepts •

develop a series of individual works through visual research and inquiry

Unit 3: Studio production and professional art practices •

formulate an individual design process

present an individual design process that offers a range of potential solutions to be used to create a folio of work

discuss the artwork of other artists and the ways their styles have developed

Unit 4: Studio production and art industry contexts •

produce a cohesive folio of individual work

produce a document to focus, reflect and evaluate your work

explore the art industry

Year 7

explore a variety of materials and techniques

develop art ideas through the study of a range of australian artists work

Year 8

Year 9

develop ideas and starting points into visual form

Years 10 - 12

Welcome

You will explore professional art practices in relation to particular art forms and the development of distinctive styles in artworks.

Contents

Units 3 and 4 focus on the implementation of the design process leading to the production of a range of potential directions and the production of a cohesive folio of finished artworks. You will use an exploration proposal to define an area of focus. You will use the design process to explore and develop ideas to produce a range of potential directions (Unit 3) and a cohesive folio of finished artworks (Unit 4).

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Arts Year 10 The Dramatic Arts The Dramatic Arts unit will concentrate on the acquisition of knowledge around theatre history and influential directors, creatives and practitioners from the modern and pre-modern period. It will also include a substantial practical component focusing on acting styles and theatrical techniques. This introduction to drama and theatre will prepare students looking to explore these subjects in more depth before VCE. Students undertaking this subject will not be disadvantaged if acting is not their main interest area.

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Skills

Content

Students develop the ability to:

theatre history, theatrical conventions and styles

performance skills

design techniques/elements

analytical and evaluative skills

apply theatre styles and conventions when interpreting play scripts for performance

use performance skills, dramatic elements and expressive skills

analyse the use of production roles (lighting, sound, set, costume, props, direction, acting etc.)

analyse and evaluate play scripts in performances

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Units 1/2 and 3/4 Theatre Studies Students focus on production roles such as acting, lighting, sound, set, directing, costume and make-up. Theatrical performances are the formalisation of drama performance skills and play a fundamental role in any community. The development and exploration of text has been used since ancient times to inform, challenge and engage audiences. Theatre allows students to explore character and role in great depth. It demands focus, and promotes teamwork. Stimulus material, excerpts and play texts will be a major focus and students will be expected to engage in the production process required to take at least one play from page to stage. Drama skills such as improvisation and the creation of original works will also be necessary. To undertake Units 3 and 4 in this subject it is recommended, though not essential, that you have successfully completed Units 1 and 2. Theatre Studies involves a significant component of work outside the traditional classroom timetable, especially in the lead up to the production.

Contents

Calling all those who have a love and appreciation of theatre, even those who do not want to act!

Unit 1: Pre-modern theatre styles and conventions

interpretation, analysis and evaluation

application, analysis and evaluation of elements of theatre composition

script research and interpretation

acting, rehearsal techniques and performance of plays and/or scenes

production roles - acting, direction, set design, costume design, sound design, make-up design, lighting design, properties

application, analysis and evaluation of theatre technologies

context, background, and distinctive traits of premodern theatre styles

staging scenes from Ancient Greek, Farce, Elizabethan and Realism plays

analysis of live pre-modern theatre performances

Unit 2: Modern theatre styles and conventions •

context, background, and distinctive traits of modern theatre styles

staging scenes from Surrealism, Absurdist and Epic Theatre

analysis of live modern theatre performances

Unit 3: Producing theatre •

researching, developing and presenting a play script for performance

utilises knowledge and skill from Units 1 and 2 to interpret and present a play script

focus on production roles such as lighting, sound, props, costume, make-up, acting and direction

analyse and evaluate a professional production

Unit 4: Presenting an interpretation •

analyse and evaluate a professional production

interpreting a monologue through design or acting and direction

Years 10 - 12

Year 7

These include:

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Welcome

Please note: In 2020 only Drama 1 and 2 or Theatre 1 and 2 will run, not both. The subject chosen to run will be based on whichever has greater student numbers.

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Arts Units 1/2 and 3/4 Visual Communication Design If you are creative and enjoy drawing and playing with computer graphics, then you will enjoy this subject. Visual Communication Design across all four units gives you an insight into how the whole design industry works, from the initial idea through to the making and production of final pieces of visual communication. There is a very large component of practical work with written work being spread over three of the four Units. The computer, although a very effective tool for producing final images, plays a small part in the production of work. You will need to be motivated and self-directed, and have developed time management skills, as this subject is highly demanding. To undertake Units 3 and 4 in this subject it is essential that you have successfully completed Units 1 and 2 unless you have a full understanding of technical drawing gained through alternative means. Assessment for Visual Communication Design is based upon a range of practical based tasks that satisfy the requirements of each outcome. Where there is a written component to satisfy the outcome, a series of short answer responses will be the structure of the assessment. Skills

Content

Students will learn to:

Unit 1: Introduction to Visual Communication Design

draw as a means to design; observational, technical and visualisation

develop concepts and ideas

work through the design process to complete an end product(s)

use Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop in the creation of final presentations

discuss advertising, professional practice and analyse how ‘they design it’

formulate and work independently in the solving of design problems

explore and present final tasks which involve the three areas of drawing; observational, technical and visualisation, using a range of materials

analyse advertising

Unit 2: Applications of visual communication within design fields •

the type and imagery relationship

formulation of an individual design process in the production of final presentations

Unit 3: Visual communication design practices •

explore and present final tasks which involve the three areas of design; industrial, communication and environmental

analyse design industry practice

formulate an individual design process in the production of two final presentations

Unit 4: Visual communication design development, evaluation and presentation

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produce the two final presentations started in Unit 3

the pitch – sell what you have created back to your client


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Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


Business


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Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


Business Units 1/2 and 3/4 Accounting Accounting is about processing, reporting and using financial information as a basis for effective decision-making. Business owners and managers, or anyone working in the financial sector, needs financial information to evaluate performance and make sensible decisions. If you enjoy working with detail and logical processes, then you are likely to enjoy Accounting. You will be required to think logically and often deal with figures. This course will suit students who are interested in learning how businesses record, report and use financial information. It is strongly recommended that students complete Units 1 and 2 before undertaking Units 3 and 4. Assessment will be based on research activities and assessments completed under test conditions. This study enables students to: •

acquire knowledge and skills to record financial data and report accounting information in a manner appropriate for users’ needs

develop ICT skills in an accounting system and make effective financial decisions

develop the capacity to identify, analyse and interpret financial data and accounting information

the focus is on financial accounting for a single activity sole trading business and emphasises the role of accounting as an information system

students use the double entry system of recording financial data and prepare reports using the accrual basis of accounting

Unit 4: Control and analysis of business performance •

this unit provides an extension of the recording and reporting processes from Unit 3 and the use of financial and non-financial information in assisting management in the decision-making process

investigates the role and importance of budgeting and undertake the practical completion of budgets for cash, profit and financial position

students interpret accounting information from reports and graphs, and analyse the results to suggest strategies on how to improve the performance of the business

use financial and non-financial information to improve the decision-making processes of a small business owner

Unit 1: Establishing and operating a service business •

this Unit focuses on the establishment of a small business and its accounting and financial management

the cash basis of recording and reporting is used

Unit 2: Accounting for a trading business

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Unit 3: Recording and reporting for a trading business

this Unit focuses on accounting for a sole proprietor of a single activity trading business

using a single entry recording system for cash and credit transactions

students analyse and evaluate the performance of the business, then suggest strategies on how to improve it

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


establishing a business within a legal framework

financial record keeping

analysing business information

research aspects of business management using ICT and print material

staffing a business and establishing a customer base

effective marketing

improving business operation

effective ways to meet the needs of the business

accurately using management terms

Unit 3: Managing a business

research and development

case study analysis

key processes and issues concerned with managing a business efficiently and effectively

applying management change

business objectives

interpreting and evaluating business information

managing human resources

examine different types of businesses and respective objectives

corporate culture

management styles and management skills and the relationship between the two

Unit 1: Planning a business

strategies to meet objectives

businesses as major contributors to the economic and social wellbeing of a nation

Unit 4: Transforming a business

fostering new business ideas

application of business knowledge and concepts to practical situations

Content

importance of key performance indicators to determine current performance

entrepreneurship

positioning a business for the future

factors affecting business ideas

study a theoretical model to undertaken change

environments in which businesses operate

consider a variety of strategies to manage change

importance of leadership in change

Welcome

Unit 2: Establishing a business

Year 7

These include:

Year 8

Content Continued

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

Business Management examines the ways businesses manage resources to achieve objectives. This subject follows the process from the first idea for a business concept, to planning and establishing a business, through to the day to day management of a business. It also considers changes that need to be made to ensure the continued success of a business. Students develop an understanding of the complexity of the challenges facing decision makers in managing these resources. A range of management theories is considered and management theories are considered and analysed through investigating contemporary case studies. A range of assessment tasks may be undertaken such as a multimedia presentation, a written report, a case study analysis, an oral presentation or tests. Examinations will also be held in this subject.

Contents

Units 1/2 and 3/4 Business Management

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Business Units 1/2 and 3/4 Hospitality The Hospitality program is drawn from the national training package and offers portable qualifications which are recognised throughout Australia. These qualifications provide students with the knowledge and skills to prepare them for a diverse range of occupations in the hospitality industry, including: commercial cookery, catering and food and beverage service. Students work in a training restaurant and industrial kitchen with paying customers. This subject is conducted onsite at Swipers Gully Hospitality Training Centre at ELTHAM College. Students attend the class one evening a week. The theory and practical classes are from 4.00pm to 9.30pm. Students receive a meal on arrival and theory class begins at 4.30pm for approximately 45 minutes. The students then prepare for restaurant, which opens at 6.30pm. Students are required to have a full uniform for each session. The cost of the full uniform is approximately $185. The cost of the online textbook comes from composite fees.

SIT20316 Certificate II in Hospitality (Units 1/2) Units 1/2 students attend Monday or Tuesday. Packaging Rules To be awarded the SIT20316 Certificate II in Hospitality, students must achieve competency in twelve (12) units of competency.

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six (6) core units of competency

six (6) elective units of competency

Content

Skills

Certificate II in Hospitality provides students with the necessary training and skills for the achievement of competency in food and beverage service. We offer a blended delivery in the first year where students will develop skills in both front of house and in kitchen operations.

Depending on the electives chosen, Units 1/2 include:

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

sourcing and using information in the hospitality industry

showing social and cultural sensitivity

preparing simple dishes

working effectively with others

participating in safe work practices

using hygienic practices for food safety

producing dishes using methods of cookery


SIT20416 Certificate II In Kitchen Operations Back of House (Units 3/4) Students can specialise in Kitchen Operations or Food and Beverage for Units 3/4, and attend either Wednesday or Thursday.

Skills

Certificate II in Kitchen Operations allows students to work in the kitchen using a limited range of food preparation and cookery skills to produce food and menu items. The course provides the skills and knowledge for competency in a range of kitchen functions and activities in preparation for work in various hospitality enterprises where food is prepared and served.

These include: •

using cookery skills effectively

preparing appetisers and salads

preparing stocks, sauces and soups

preparing poultry dishes

preparing vegetables, fruit, eggs and farinaceous dishes

SIT30616 Certificate III in Hospitality Front of House (Units 3/4) Certificate III in Hospitality provides the necessary training and skills for the achievement of competency in food and beverage service. Students will only complete five units which allows them to obtain a statement of attainment. Content

Skills

Certificate III in Hospitality allows students to develop the operational skills required for the hospitality industry. Using discretions and judgement they work with some independence and under limited supervision using plans, policies and procedures to guide work activities.

These include: •

serving food and beverage

processing financial transactions

providing advice on food

preparing and serve non-alcoholic beverage

preparing and serve espresso coffee

Welcome

Content

Year 7

Students who elect to complete the five units in Units 3/4 Kitchen Operations can get a full Certificate II in Kitchen Operations.

Year 8

five (5) elective units of competency

Year 9

eight (8) core units of competency

Years 10 - 12

Contents

To be awarded the SIT20416 Certificate II in Kitchen Operations, competency must be achieved in thirteen (13) units of competency.

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Business Units 1/2 and 3/4 Economics Economics is about how we make the best use of the scarce resources we have – at an individual, organisational and government level. It considers how best to balance competing interests in order to improve the wellbeing of people, and focuses on understanding financial dynamics and contemporary events that affect us every day. Economics will appeal to students who are interested in learning how economic forces affect the lives of people, and influence the operations of government and business. It is a subject that has a particular focus on understanding what is happening in contemporary Australian society and economy. There are no prerequisites for Units 3 and 4, although it is strongly recommended that students have completed Unit 1 and/or Unit 2 Economics. A range of assessment tasks may be undertaken such as a multimedia presentation, a written report, a case study analysis, an oral presentation or tests. Examinations will also be held in this subject. Skills

Content

These include:

Unit 1: The behaviour of consumers and businesses •

a study of the way humans behave and decisions made to meet the wants and needs of society

the consumer’s role in the economy and the way they interact with businesses

a study of economic models and theories

using economic tools and theories to analyse and predict economic outcomes

investigation of motivations and consequences of both consumer and business behaviour

understanding the role of market in allocating resources

the impact of technology and how it alters business and consumer interaction

Unit 2: Contemporary economic issues

defining key economic concepts and terms and using them appropriately

acquiring economic information f rom a range of sources

constructing graphs to represent and interpret economic information

• •

the decisions made by consumers, businesses, governments and how they affect others

trade offs

the pursuit of growth in incomes and production

the goal of economic sustainability and long term economic prosperity

the importance of economic growth

Unit 3: Australia’s economic prosperity •

the allocation of resources

the role of the Australian Government

the factors that affect price and quantity

key measures of efficiency

reasons for government intervention

Unit 4: Managing the economy

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macroeconomic goals

policy instruments which influence these goals

understanding how the Australian Government can alter the composition and level of government outlays and receipts to influence aggregate demand and achievement of macroeconomic goals


Year 10 Financial Affairs

economic reasoning and financial concepts

basic accounting principles, reports and terms

analytical reasoning

financial management

role of governments and other institutions in the economy

cost/benefit analysis

preparing financial records

role and significance of savings and investments for individuals and the economy

researching and understanding economic issues and problems of global significance

consumerism

how goods and services are produced and how markets work

study of global issues such as global poverty and global money markets

alternative economic systems

Welcome

Course content will include:

Year 7

Students will develop skills such as:

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

A range of assessment tasks may be undertaken such as a multimedia presentation, a written report, a case study analysis, an oral presentation or tests. There will also be an examination at the end of the semester.

Contents

Financial Affairs introduces students to economics, accounting and financial literacy by examining the way individuals and countries manage their resources. Economics is a social science looking at the behaviour and decision making of individuals in our society. This subject aims to make students aware of how the world operates and how the choices we make affect us as individuals. These choices impact on other individuals and groups in our society and ultimately the decisions that are made by businesses and governments throughout the world.

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Business Year 10 Law and You In this subject students develop an understanding of Australia’s system of government, exploring the concept of democracy through comparison with other systems of government. As part of this study, students analyse a contemporary issue of their own choice which is challenging society today. In addition, students explore Australia’s legal system and examine interesting criminal and civil law cases. Throughout the course students will link the key concepts taught to events within the wider community. A range of assessment tasks may be undertaken such as a multimedia presentation, a written report, a case study analysis, an oral presentation or tests. There will also be an examination at the end of the semester.

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Skills

Content

These skills include:

identify the key values and origins of Australia’s legal and political systems

describe the power of courts in Australia

identify the differences between criminal and civil law and apply legal principles to case scenarios

explain the role of parliament in the law making process

analyse a contemporary issue within society

evaluate the protection of human rights in Australia and overseas

critically evaluating information and ideas relating to Australia’s legal system

accounting for different interpretations and points of view from political parties

recognising and considering multiple perspectives to resolve contentious policy issues such as asylum seekers, euthanasia and climate change

analysing parliament’s response to a contemporary issue in society

presenting evidence-based legal arguments using specific legal language

using key legal terms

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Units 1/2 and 3/4 Legal Studies

define legal terminology and use it appropriately

discuss, interpret and analyse legal information

apply legal principles to relevant cases and issues

evaluate the legal system and key legal concepts

synthesise legal principles and information

the Victorian justice system, addressing both the criminal and civil systems

methods and institutions of the justice system, in considering the appropriateness of determining outcomes

court hierarchy and other Victorian legal institutions and the roles of the judge, jury, legal practitioners and parties involved in cases

investigation of the extent to which the principles of justice are upheld

Content Unit 1: Guilt and Liability •

focus on criminal and civil law

different sources of law

Unit 4: The people and the law

presumption of innocence

key concepts of criminal law and types of crime

understanding the institutions that make and reform our laws

legal reasoning to determine culpability and the impact of crime on individuals and society

the relationship between the Australian people and The Australian Constitution and law making bodies

key concepts in civil law and different civil laws such as defamation and family law

how the Constitution establishes law making powers and protects people through checks and balances

an understanding of the High Court and its role in protecting and interpreting the Constitution

understanding of the relationship between Parliament and the Courts

the roles of individuals, the media and law reform bodies in influencing law reform

Unit 2: Sanctions remedies and rights •

protecting rights of individuals and what happens when rights are infringed

enforcement of criminal and civil law

in-depth study of two criminal and two civil cases looking at how the principles of justice were achieved

how rights are protected in Australia compared to other countries

Welcome

Unit 3: Rights and Justice

Year 7

Student will learn to:

Year 8

Content continued

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

To undertake Units 3 and 4 in this subject it is recommended, though not essential, that you have successfully completed Units 1 and 2. A range of assessment tasks may be undertaken such as a multimedia presentation, a written report, a case study analysis, an oral presentation or tests. Examinations will also be held in this subject.

Contents

If you are interested in the workings of the legal system, the resolution of cases, and learning about the law and your rights and responsibilities, you will enjoy Legal Studies. This subject investigates the ways in which the law and the legal system relate to and serve individuals and the community. It is about how the justice system works, who makes laws, how they are made, and the laws that exist in society. Legal Studies also focuses on the resolution of cases and disputes through the legal system. Students explore contemporary legal issues and cases, and consider the concepts of fairness and justice within the legal system.

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Computing Units 1/2 and 3/4 Applied Computing VCE Applied Computing focuses on the strategies and techniques for creating digital solutions to meet specific needs and to manage the threats to data, information and software security. The study examines each component of an information system including people, processes, data and digital systems (hardware, software, networks). Students investigate legal requirements and ethical responsibilities that individuals and organisations have with respect to the security and integrity of data and information. They develop an awareness of the technical, social and economic impacts of information systems, both currently and into the future. Assessment for Computing Units 1 to 4 takes a variety of forms – some extended tasks, completed over a number of lessons, combining both software and theory elements, and some time-limited tasks in the form of a written test or report. To undertake Units 3 and 4 in this subject it is not necessary to have studied Units 1 and 2. Skills

Content Continued

This study is designed to enable students to:

Unit 3: Data Analytics

understand digital systems, understand the roles and applications of cybersecurity, data analytics and programming

apply the problem-solving methodology to analyse needs and solve problems

apply project management techniques to assist with the development of digital solutions

identify and evaluate innovative and emerging opportunities for digital solutions and technologies

Content Unit 1: Applied Computing •

interpret solution requirements and designs, collect and manipulate data, analyse patterns and relationships, and develop data visualisations to present findings

design, develop and evaluate a software solution using a programming language

Unit 2: Applied Computing

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analyse, design, develop and evaluate an innovative solution involving a digital system

respond to a case study to examine capabilities and vulnerabilities of a network, design a network solution, discuss the threats to data and information, and propose strategies to protect the security of data and information

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

extract data from large repositories, manipulate and cleanse data and apply a range of functions to develop software solutions to present findings

Design and create infographics or dynamic data visualisations in response to a research question

Unit 4: Data Analytics •

develop and evaluate infographics or data visualisations that present findings to a research question

respond to a case study to investigate the current data and information security strategies of an organisation, including threats to data strategies to improve current practices


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Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


English


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Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


English English Pathways (EAL) This subject is for international students who require additional English language development, and they will study Pathways alongside their mainstream English subject, to consolidate their English language competence. This course is interactive and designed to improve communication and study skills in order to prepare students for senior schooling, whilst studying aspects of Australian culture and life. Essay structure, vocabulary extension and consolidation as well as refining of grammatical skills, are prioritised at this level and homework exercises using a range of grammar text are regular and important. English language texts including novels, newspapers, textbooks, films, television shows, websites and language learning software, are the key resources for this subject. Most analytical and creative tasks on reading, writing, listening and speaking are centred on the study of a chosen literary text. The focus will lie on communicative English, that international students will rely on to negotiate modern Australia. Skills

Content

Students will develop skills in the following areas:

The course will cover:

speaking

conventions of real world texts

listening, including the use of audio files

writing and vocabulary building

examining ideas and values within poetry, film, novels and plays

spelling, punctuation and grammar

current media issues

decoding text

literary devices used by authors

reading for meaning

persuasive language features

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Year 10 English English provides a fundamental basis for effective participation in society. It develops and refines students’ ability to critically analyse the ways in which texts are constructed and interpreted. Students develop competence and confidence in creating their own written, oral and multimodal texts in an environment which values creativity and diversity. English fosters thinking skills which underpin all other disciplines. Completion of English is fundamental to entry and success at VCE level. Aptitude across the three strands – reading, writing and oral communication – provides a firm foundation for VCE English, Literature or EAL.

familiarisation with, and analysis of a range of different text types and genres

analysing how writers construct meaning and develop characters, ideas and themes in narrative texts

recognising different ways of interpreting texts as well as the strategies used by readers to make meaning

accurately using structures, features and conventions of a range of print, non-print and multimodal texts to suit a specific audience, purpose and context

planning and revising

small group work, whole class discussion, research, individual assignments and activities

Welcome

Year 7

Students read and respond to a wide selection of novels, poetry, short stories, films and a rich range of other visual media. They compare the similarities and differences between texts in terms of how they deal with ideas, issues or themes from different perspectives to reflect particular values. They respond both analytically and creatively to selected texts, as well as analysing arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts that debate a topical issue in the Australian media. They will also prepare an oral presentation of a point of view.

Year 8

These skills include:

Year 9

Content

Years 10 - 12

Skills

Contents

Assessment takes the form of extended written responses and one oral presentation.

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English Units 1/2 and 3/4 English The ability to communicate effectively is a vital skill in our world. Language plays a significant part in determining how we think and feel. To be able to respond to the range of information and ideas available, you need a good understanding of the way language is used to manipulate us as readers. Print is only one medium. Students must be able to read, write, speak, listen and think - using language to evaluate, criticise, analyse, persuade and reflect across a range of media and literary texts. Skills

Content

Students will learn to:

Unit 1:

identify and discuss ideas, themes and issues in set texts, and construct personal responses

explore ideas and issues orally, giving considered reasons for a point of view and listening actively to the views of others

analyse language used in the presentation of a debate in the contemporary media, and learn to construct a persuasive response to that topic

experiment with a variety of writing styles for different purposes and audiences

create written texts for a specified audience, purpose, language and context

Students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts and create their own texts intended to position audiences. They will also prepare an oral presentation of a point of view. In developing creative responses to texts, students explore how purpose and audience affect the choices they make as writers in developing ideas and planning work, making choices about structure, conventions, and language to develop voice and style. Unit 2: Students explore how comparing texts can provide a deeper understanding of ideas, issues and themes. Students produce a written comparison of selected texts, discussing important similarities and differences. They identify and analyse how argument and persuasive language are used in text/s that attempt to influence an audience, and create their own text that presents a point of view. Unit 3: In this unit students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts that debate a topical issue in the media, identifying, discussing and analysing how the features of selected texts create meaning and how they influence interpretation. They construct a sustained and reasoned point of view in oral form. Unit 4: In this unit students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in texts. Students explore the meaningful connections between two texts; they produce a written analysis comparing texts, discussing important similarities and differences and exploring how the texts deal with similar or related ideas, issues or themes from different perspectives to reflect particular values. Students use their knowledge of argument and persuasive language as a basis for the development of their own persuasive texts in relation to a topical issue that has appeared in the media since 1 September of the previous year.

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Year 10 English as an Additional Language (EAL)

grammatical fluency and competence in written expression

familiarisation with, and analysis of a range of different text types and genres

identifying and discussing ideas, themes and issues in a range of set texts; and construct personal responses

analysing an issue in the Australian media and understanding how writers use language to influence and persuade creating written texts for a specified audience, purpose, language and context

Welcome

Students respond both analytically and creatively to a wide selection of novels, poetry, short stories, film and songs from different cultures, including Australia.

Year 7

Students will develop skills in:

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

Assessment takes a range of forms, covering writing, speaking and listening.

Contents

For international students only. This subject provides a fundamental basis for VCE EAL. Students will improve fluency of communication and be able to actively participate in a range of Australian educational settings. Students will develop and refine their reading skills and be able to analyse how writers use structures, features and conventions to create meaning in a wide range of text types, and various multi media. Furthermore, attention will be given to enable students to recognise culturally different learning strategies and cross-cultural educational pedagogies.

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English Units 1/2 and 3/4 English as an Additional Language (EAL) For international students only. The study of EAL focuses on extending students’ ability to participate effectively in English in academic and social settings. Students extend their language skills through thinking, reading, writing, speaking and listening. Familiarisation with a rich range of English text types will form a fundamental basis for developing VCE skills of evaluating, criticising, analysing, persuading and reflecting. Students immerse themselves in the language through print and visual media with the aim of becoming productive participants in society in the twenty-first century. Students are assessed on writing, speaking and listening. Skills

Content

Students will learn to:

Unit 1:

identify and discuss ideas, themes and issues in set texts, and construct personal responses

communicate fluently and persuasively in writing, taking into account context, purpose and audience

explore ideas and issues orally, giving considered reasons for a point of view and listening actively to the views of others

explore language used in the presentation of a debate in the contemporary media, and learn to construct a persuasive response to that issue

prepare and deliver a formal oral presentation on a subject of your own choosing

experiment with a variety of writing styles for different purposes and audiences

The focus of this unit is on the reading of a range of texts, particularly narrative and persuasive texts, in order to comprehend, appreciate and analyse the ways in which texts are constructed and interpreted. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts and create their own texts intended to position audiences. They will also prepare an oral presentation of a point of view. Unit 2: Students explore how comparing texts can provide a deeper understanding of ideas, issues and themes. They produce a written comparison of selected texts, discussing important similarities and differences. Students also build on their understanding of argument and the use of persuasive language in texts that attempt to influence an audience. Unit 3: The focus of this unit is on listening, as well as reading and responding, both orally and in writing, to a range of texts. Students analyse how the authors create meaning and the different ways in which texts can be interpreted. They develop competence in creating written texts. Students analyse and compare the use of language in written texts that debate a topical issue in the Australian media and construct a sustained and reasoned point of view in oral form. Unit 4: Students explore the meaningful connections between two texts; they produce a written analysis comparing texts, discussing important similarities and differences and exploring how the texts deal with similar or related ideas, issues or themes from different perspectives to reflect particular values. Students develop their own persuasive texts in relation to a topical issue that has appeared in the media since 1 September of the previous year.

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Year 10 Literature This elective is ideal for students who have a passion for literature and enjoy investigating the complex nature of humans and their relationships with others.

Skills

Content

Students will:

The course will cover:

develop an enjoyment of language and literature through reading deeply, widely and critically

appreciate the stylistic and aesthetic qualities of texts

read closely, developing the ability to engage in detailed critical analysis of the key literary features of individual texts and to make relevant connections between them

demonstrate an understanding that the context and perspective of both author and reader influence the reading experience

develop the capacity for critical thinking and understanding of the relationship between literature and society

develop an understanding of literary criticism

develop the capacity for creativity and selfexpression, and the ability to write confident analytical and creative responses to texts

the study of selected literary works of different genres, times and forms, including poetry, short

Contents

The study of literature provides an opportunity to deepen and strengthen students’ understanding of a variety of texts and to consider these in the light of their own understanding and life experience. It is an opportunity for students to extend their imaginative and philosophical horizons through vigorous and challenging discussion and individual reflection and writing. This is a subject that encourages students to stand by their convictions and have the confidence to discuss and write about them with like-minded peers.

an awareness of how the views and values that readers hold may influence the reading of a text

key vocabulary, concepts and practices that equip students for further studies in English and Literature

Year 7

Year 8

an introduction to literary theories and the ways in which the interaction between text and reader creates meaning

Year 9

Years 10 - 12

different ways of deconstructing and analysing texts

Welcome

stories, novels, plays and films •

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English Units 1/2 and 3/4 Literature The study of Literature is a means of exploring and making sense of human experience through the language of a literary work. How does the language manipulate the reader? What are the views and values of the author in that text? Classes focus on themes, key discourses, characters, the social context of the work, and the way in which genre and the conventions of writing are challenged and exploited by writers to particular effect. Literature encompasses the best thoughts of the best minds, and allows us to experience the world through a fresh perspective. If you are considering Literature it is strongly recommended that you have a real interest in reading, and can keep an open mind in viewing others’ perspectives on the world. The course is demanding, both in terms of its written components and the number and difficulty of the texts; therefore, it is generally recommended that you have attained a grade of B+ or more in English in previous years before attempting this study. Skills

Content

Students will develop skills in:

Unit 1:

the close analysis of film, television or multi -media text and print texts, specifically with regard to literary conventions and production elements

commenting, contrasting and comparing the ways in which different media or texts present interpretations of experience

reflecting on ways in which texts represent and reflect on the views and values of individuals and particular groups in society

making creative responses to texts

Students focus on the ways in which the interaction between text and reader creates meaning. Students respond critically, orally and reflectively to the ideas and concerns of texts and gain insights into how texts function as representations of human experience. They develop an awareness of how the views and values that readers hold may influence the reading of a text. Unit 2: Students explore the ways literary texts connect with each other and with the world. Ideas, language and structures of different texts from past and present eras and/or cultures are compared and contrasted. Students analyse the similarities and differences across two texts and establish connections between them. Unit 3: Students focus on how the form of text is significant in the making of meaning, and reflect upon the way meaning changes when the form of the text is changed. For example, students may explore the transformation of prose into film, poetry into performance, or script into stage performance, and analyse how meaning changes when the form of a text changes. Unit 4: Students examine texts from the point of view of a theoretical position and focus on how texts can be assessed from different literary perspectives. Students then focus upon the close analysis of texts with detailed scrutiny of the language, style, concerns and construction of texts.

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Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


Health and Physical Education


Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


Health and Physical Education Year 10 Outdoor Education Journey to the Top This subject provides students with the opportunity to carefully plan and implement outdoor activities with the focus being on our ‘peak trek’ experience – the opportunity to trek for eight days over the rooftop of Victoria. You will learn to live simply and understand what equipment, clothing and safety considerations are essential for such challenging expeditions. In addition to the trek, there are a number of single day activities, which could include mountain bike riding, orienteering, cross-country skiing, caving, rock climbing, surfing and canoeing. Theory work is directly linked to the practical application of the outdoor experiences and assessment for this subject will consist of project work and participation in the Outdoor Education activities. Please note the following information for this elective: •

There is an additional cost of approximately $850 associated with this elective to cover practical components.

Students will complete a level 2 First Aid with a wilderness theme (this course runs for two days during school time).

The single day activities (mount bike riding, canoeing, cross-country skiing, orienteering and caving) might be conducted on weekends during the school term. It is encouraged that students should be able to attend a minimum of two out of the four activities listed

The major eight-day trek will occur at the end of the school year (early December – please speak with Guy if you have any questions in regards to these dates for 2020).

Skills

Content continued

Students will develop skills in the following areas

Risk identification, understanding and management understanding and assessing risk in order to plan mitigation strategies

expedition planning

safety and risk management

first aid

Minimal impact travel and sustainable living

leadership

practical skill in outdoor pursuits

development of minimal impact camping strategies

Exposure to practical skills

physical fitness to complete the challenging walks

basic rope handling technique

bicycle maintenance

navigation techniques

canoeing technique

Content The focus of this course is an understanding of: All aspects of expedition planning

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Route

Food

Equipment

Risk

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explore human impact on the natural environment with an emphasis on travel and outdoor pursuits

Leadership skills •

what does good leadership look like? How can we better lead and be led?

Nationally accredited Level 2 First Aid


Assessment for Sport and Recreation will involve students completing Scored Assessment Tasks in the form of structured questions, assignments, presentations and running practical sessions. Skills

Content

Students will develop skills in:

recreation event planning and coordination

client service and social media tools

communication

emergency response/first aid

industry and enterprise

workplace health and safety

coaching principles

communicating with clients and professionals

teamwork

problem-solving

developing initiative and using enterprise skills

planning and organizing events and activities

self-management

leadership

using technology

Welcome

three (3) elective units of competency

Year 7

twelve (12) core units of competency

Year 8

Year 9

To be awarded the SIS30115 Certificate III in Sport and Recreation, competency must be achieved in fifteen (15) units of competency.

Years 10 - 12

If you enjoy being involved in sport and recreational activities, then this is the course for you. You will learn about and be involved in a variety of sporting pursuits and recreational activities to suit a range of groups and individuals in various contexts. You will get to plan, organise and facilitate varying sport and recreation sessions throughout your studies. You will develop skills in leadership, communication and organisation. You will learn how to assess and manage risk, obtain a first aid certification and plan and conduct a variety of sport and recreation programs. The Certificate III in Sport and Recreation is designed for students interested in working within the sport and recreation industry, such as gymnasiums, aquatic centres, coaching, outdoor recreation and teaching.

Contents

SIS30115 Certificate III in Sport and Recreation (Units 1/2 and 3/4)

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Health and Physical Education Units 1/2 and 3/4 Health and Human Development It is important you have an interest in investigating the factors that influence your health, safety and well-being and that of other individuals, families and communities. You will explore the physical, social, emotional and intellectual development of youth; the way youth cope with pressures to which they are exposed and the role of the Australian family and local communities in providing an environment for growth and development. Time will also be spent examining the health of Australians and the health problems we face; and the global issues such as the differences between people living in industrialised countries and those living in developing countries. Assessment in Health and Human Development will involve students completing written tasks in the form of a reflective diary piece, data analysis, case studies and answering structured questions. A huge variety of skills are developed and used during these Units including: •

gathering and summarising relevant information; analysis of statistics

comparisons of viewpoints

investigation of a number of topics

evaluation of data already collected

team work

individual research

Unit 1: Understanding Health and Wellbeing

Unit 3: Australia’s Health in a Globalised World

students will explain multiple dimensions of health and wellbeing, explain indicators used to measure health status and analyse factors that contribute to variations in health status of youth

students will explain the complex, dynamic and global nature of health and wellbeing, interpret and apply Australia’s health status data and analyse variations in health status

students will apply nutrition knowledge and tools to the selection of food and the evaluation of nutrition information

students will interpret data to identify key areas for improving youth health and wellbeing, and plan for action by analysing one particular area in detail

students will explain changes to public health approaches, analyse improvements in population health over time and evaluate health promotion strategies

Unit 2: Managing Health and Development •

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students will explain developmental changes in the transition from youth to adulthood, analyse factors that contribute to healthy development during prenatal and early childhood stages of the lifespan and explain health and wellbeing as an intergenerational concept students will describe how to access Australia’s health system, explain how it promotes health and wellbeing in their local community, and analyse a range of issues associated with the use of new and emerging health procedures and technologies

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

Unit 4: Health and Human Development in a global context •

students will analyse similarities and differences in health status and burden of disease globally and the factors that contribute to differences in health and wellbeing

students will analyse relationships between the SDGs and their role in the promotion of health and human development, and evaluate the effectiveness of global aid programs


Year 10 Sport and Fitness

oral presentations, team work, individual research, organisation

participation in a range of physical activities

basic human anatomy and physiology including the identification of major bones and muscles in the human body

fitness components and training principles through the use of heart rate monitors

different methods of training - continuous, resistance, fartlek and interval sessions

the benefits of maintaining a healthy lifestyle and health related issues

basic nutrition - through analysis of food intake and creating a healthy eating plan

the importance of leadership and teamwork

Welcome

The focus of this course is an understanding of:

Year 7

A variety of skills will be developed and used throughout the course:

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

Students learn to apply more specialised movement skills and complex movement strategies and concepts in different movement environments. They also evaluate and refine their own and others’ movement performances. Students analyse how participation in physical activity and sport influence an individual’s identity, and explore the role participation plays in shaping cultures. The curriculum also provides opportunities for students to refine and consolidate personal and social skills in demonstrating leadership, teamwork and collaboration in a range of physical activities.

Contents

The Year 10 Sport and Fitness curriculum supports students to refine and apply strategies for maintaining a positive outlook and evaluating behavioural expectations in different leisure, social, movement and online situations. Students learn to apply health and physical activity information to devise and implement personalised plans for maintaining healthy and active habits. Students develop their capacity to initiate and participate in respectful relationships in different contexts. These include at school, at home, in the classroom and when participating in physical activities.

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Health and Physical Education Units 1/2 and 3/4 Physical Education VCE Physical Education explores the complex interrelationships between anatomical, biomechanical, physiological and skill acquisition principles to understand their role in producing and refining movement, and examines behavioural, psychological, environmental and sociocultural influences on performance and participation in physical activity. Students participate in practical activities to examine the core concepts that underpin movement and that influence performance and participation in physical activity, sport and exercise. Assessment for Physical Education will involve students submitting written reports, a reflective portfolio/diary of participation in practical activities, practical laboratory reports, data analysis, case studies and answering structured questions. Skills

Content continued

This study enables students to:

use practical activities to underpin contemporary theoretical understanding of the influences on participation and performance in physical activity, sport and exercise develop an understanding of the anatomical, biomechanical, physiological and skill acquisition principles, and of behavioural, psychological, environmental and sociocultural influences on performance and participation in physical activity across the lifespan engage in physical activity and movement experiences to determine and analyse how the body systems work together to produce and refine movement

Unit 3: Movement Skills and Energy for Physical Activity •

classification of movement skills

biomechanical principles for analysis of human movement

direct and constraints based approaches to coaching and instruction

fuels (both chemical and food) required for resynthesis of ATP at rest and during physical activity, including the relative contribution of fuels at varying exercise intensities

characteristics of the three energy systems for physical activity

Content Unit 1: The human body in motion

Unit 4: Training to improve Performance

musculoskeletal system and the cardiovascular and respiratory systems of the human body

how the muscles and bones work together to produce movement

analyse data to determine the major fitness components and the factors that affect them, and energy systems used in a variety of sporting events and physical activities

the social, cultural and environmental influences on movement

conduct a valid and reliable assessment of fitness using ethical protocols

the heart, blood vessels and lungs function at rest and during physical activity

perform, observe, analyse and report on practical laboratory exercises designed to assess fitness prior to designing a training program and then evaluate and critique the effectiveness of different training programs

evaluate a range of psychological, nutrition and rehydration strategies which affect performance and recovery

Unit 2: Physical activity, sport and society •

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declining levels of physical activity across the lifespan, active transport, gender equity in physical activity and sport, cultural diversity and inclusion in physical activity

the role of physical activity, sport and society in developing and promoting healthy lifestyles and participation in physical activity across the lifespan

strategies aimed at increasing physical activity and/or reducing sedentary behaviour

contemporary issues associated with physical activity at the local, national and global level

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Sport (House and Interschool) All students at the college are expected to participate fully in the House Sporting carnivals of Swimming, Athletics and Cross Country. As a member of the Eastern Independent Schools of Melbourne (EISM). ELTHAM College’s Year 10 - 12 students are given the opportunity to participate in a broad range of sporting pursuits. These include the major carnival events College of Swimming (March), Athletics (April) and Cross Country (September).

Boys Term 1: T20 cricket, tennis, volleyball, hockey, badminton (mixed)

Contents

Year 10 - 12 students are offered a choice of the following interschool sports, which occur throughout Terms 1, 2 and 3 on Wednesday afternoons:

Terms 2 and 3: football, basketball, soccer, table tennis

Term 2 and 3: netball, hockey, basketball, table tennis Additional opportunities exist for participation in the following sports: skiing, golf, kayaking, indoor soccer, girls football Sport is compulsory for all Year 10 and Year 11 students whilst participation in at least one season of sport is encouraged for all Year 12 students. Skills

Year 7

Term 1: tennis, volleyball, softball, soccer, badminton (mixed)

Welcome

Girls

hand-eye coordination

various skill development

teamwork

resilience

self discipline

leadership

Year 9

increased fitness

Years 10 - 12

Year 8

The skills engaged through participation in interschool sport include:

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Humanities


Humanities Year 10 A Beginner’s Guide to Ideas Interested in the process of thinking and philosophy? A Beginner’s Guide to Ideas is recommended for students interested in learning more about various theories of how humans think and develop ideas. This subject will look at issues including ways of knowing, and an introduction to Philosophy and philosophers such as Plato, Thomas Hobbes or Marx. Text: The Story of Philosophy, Bryan Magee Dorling Kindersley Book 2001 (supplied) Students are assessed on their performance in student driven class discussion, and in two extended writing pieces, one of which is 1500 words. Students are also assessed on their ability to manage note-taking, to research and use technology effectively, especially One Note, Word, Inspiration, Google Advanced Search, hyper linking and the creation of PDFs. There is an end of semester examination.

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Skills

Content

Through the course students will have the opportunity to develop skills in:

The course will cover: •

critically analysing language, ideas, arguments and evidence

looking at the influences of philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle

researching, planning and constructing a series of academic papers

an introduction to the ideas of humanist thinking, and the impact of the printing press

the ability to listen actively and respond constructively to others’ views during discussion

looking at the Enlightenment thinkers and the emergence of democratic theories

effective note taking utilising technology as a learning tool

examining the challenging ideas of Marx and Nietzsche

two major writing tasks will be undertaken in the course: a study of a philosopher or a study of a philosophical concept and a research essay on a topic of the student’s choice

there are also four student driven class discussions which form a key element of the assessment

students also maintain an ongoing journal of notes and a written piece on each philosopher

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Skills

Content

Students will develop the ability to:

Unit 3:

formulate, refine and justify a research question

analyse and evaluate evidence and argument

use conventions of academic writing and communicate and explain research

evaluate research methods reflecting on outcomes

techniques to construct arguments and techniques to analyse and evaluate the soundness and validity of arguments

socio-cultural influences in argument

methods for organising, analysing and summarising ideas and information

Unit 4: •

body of knowledge specific to the area of investigation and its significance

methods of evaluation of research methods and findings

structure and organisation of oral presentation

Students submit a 4000 word research report and give an oral presentation on this as their major assessment item

Year 7

organise, synthesise and analyse ideas and information

elements, features and terminology of critical thinking

Year 8

Year 9

use and apply key research concepts and terms and compare research methods

Years 10 - 12

Welcome

Are you a curious and self-motivated student? This subject develops students’ understanding of what constitutes a good research question. They develop an ethical, robust, disciplined and rational approach to gathering, interpreting and evaluating evidence in order to answer the research question. In this study, the student considers how questions are developed and refined to enable the researcher to address the key issues proposed within the limits that time and resources impose. Students conduct a review of relevant literature, and develop research project management knowledge and skills, and ways of effectively presenting and communicating their findings. The investigation may be an extension of an area of curriculum already undertaken by the student, or it may be completely independent of any other study in the student’s VCE program.

Contents

Units 3/4 Extended Investigation

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Humanities Year 10 Humanities Geography Geography is the study of people and their environments. Students examine the characteristics of different natural and human environments, the management of these, and the impact of this variation. All Year 10 students will undertake this semester of Geography unless completing VCE Geography Units 1 or 2 in 2020. In this course fieldwork will be included. A range of assessment tasks may be undertaken such as fieldwork, a written report, a case study analysis, an oral presentation or tests. Examinations will also be held in this subject.

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Skills

Content

Students will develop the skills to:

You will examine:

represent, interpret and critically examine information in a variety of forms such as tables, graphs and maps, including digital media

global well-being - how and why living conditions vary around the world and within nations

consider both the positive and negative aspects of an issue and justify an appropriate course of action

identify and explain indicators of economic performance including those for Australia

link current events to class work

undertake fieldwork

the work of government and non-government programs which attempt to improve human well-being within Australia and overseas including workplace environments

environmental challenges that will affect your future life e.g. changes to coastal environments

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Year 10 Humanities History and Civics and Citizenship

research from a variety of sources, and ask questions to inform historical inquiry

WW II, its impact on the Asia-Pacific region and Australia’s involvement

sequence significant events in chronological order to support analysis of causes and effects

analyse and evaluate broad patterns of change from 1918-present

struggles for human rights and freedom i.e. the civil rights and indigenous rights movements

the nature and impact of the Cold War and the increasing influence of Asia in the post Cold World War

key principles of Australia’s system of justice

Australia’s international legal obligations

analyse and corroborate sources and perspectives of people in the past

evaluate historical interpretations and significance including contested debates

Welcome

Students examine aspects of Australian society in the period 1918 to the present:

Year 7

Students will develop the skills to:

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

All Year 10 students will undertake this semester of History unless completing VCE History Units 1 or 2 in 2020.

Contents

History is about understanding the past and carrying that understanding into other circumstances. Learning about the people, ideas, movements and the events that have shaped societies and cultures is not only interesting - it also helps make sense of current issues. Through the study of Civics and Citizenship, students investigate political and legal systems, and explore the nature of citizenship, diversity and identity in contemporary society. They gain the knowledge and skills necessary to question, understand and contribute to the world in which they live.

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Humanities Year 10 Humanities Pathways (EAL) This subject runs in Semester 1 and introduces Year 10 international students to key foundational concepts and skills within humanities. The course aims to assist students to develop an understanding of aspects of Australian society by examining our geography, economy, history and political system. In addition, students will also reflect upon global issues and our response to them. The course will assist students to build their humanities skills through researching, investigating, interpreting data and responding to questions about the factors that impact and shape the world around them. After completing Year 10 Humanities Pathways in Semester 1, students in Year 10 will be able to choose to undertake either Year 10 Geography and Economics or Year 10 History and Civics and Citizenship in Semester 2.

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Skills

Content

Students will develop the skills in:

The course will cover:

language development (reading, writing, speaking, listening)

geographic features

geographic challenges and our response to them

using and understanding a variety of primary and secondary source materials

key moments in History

evaluating and interpreting data

Australia’s political and economic system

expanding inter-cultural understanding

Australia within a global context

research

fieldwork

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

A range of assessment tasks may be undertaken such as a multimedia presentation, research task, data interpretation, source analysis and tests.


Units 1/2 and 3/4 Geography

Students will develop the ability to:

Unit 1: Hazards and disasters

link current events to class work and fieldwork examples e.g. the expansion of Melbourne’s urban boundary in Unit 3

the variety of hazards and disasters occurring around the world

detailed study of two types of hazards/disasters

the impact of hazards and disasters on people and the environment at a variety of scales

examine how hazards may be managed

undertake fieldwork

Unit 2: Tourism •

the characteristics of tourism – where and how it has developed, how it has changed over time and its different forms

the impact of tourism on people and the environment

how tourism is managed

undertake fieldwork

Unit 3: Changing the land •

land use change

melting ice sheets and glaciers

deforestation

desertification

undertake fieldwork

Year 8

consider both the positive and negative aspects of an issue e.g. rainforest clearing

Unit 4: Human population, trends and issues •

patterns of population change, movement and distribution

responses to population changes in different parts of the world

case study of a country with a growing population

case study of a country with an ageing population

A range of assessment tasks may be undertaken such as a written report, a case study analysis, an oral presentation or tests. Fieldwork is undertaken in each of Units 1-3. Examinations will also be held in this subject.

Year 9

represent, interpret and critically examine information in a variety of forms such as tables, graphs and maps including use of spatial technologies

Years 10 - 12

Welcome

Content

Year 7

Skills

Contents

Geography is the study of natural and human phenomena. Students studying Geography examine the interaction between human activities and natural processes, the reasons for those, and the changes that occur. Students look at how these changes are managed and the impact of these on people and the environment. For example, examining the impact of tourist development on Australia’s coastal landscapes, or looking at the effectiveness of government response to population changes. You may undertake Units 3 and 4 without having undertaken Units 1 and 2 although it is recommended that they are taken as a sequence.

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Humanities Units 1/2 and 3/4 Australian and Global Politics Australian and Global Politics is the study of contemporary power at a national and international level. Students explore, explain and evaluate global political issues, problems and events and the forces that shape these and responses to them. They examine the interconnectedness of twenty-first century global citizens and the impact of globalisation on culture, language, human rights and the environment. Through this study students explore, explain and evaluate national and global political issues, problems and events, the forces that shape these and responses to them. A range of assessment tasks may be undertaken such as a multimedia presentation, a written report, a case study analysis, an oral presentation or tests. Examinations will also be held in this subject. To undertake Units 3 and 4 in this subject it is recommended though not essential to have successfully completed Units 1 and/or 2 Politics. Other subjects such as VCE History or Economics are also an advantage. Skills

Content Continued

Students will develop the ability to:

Unit 2: Global Connections: •

the effects of globalisation and conflict

global interconnectedness

case studies such as; border disputes, international crime, people movement, terrorism, refugees, climate change, aid and development

define and explain key global political terms and use them in the appropriate context

research and synthesise contemporary evidence to draw conclusions

analyse the effectiveness of responses by global actors to contemporary global issues

Unit 3: Global Actors

define and explain a range of political systems

explain and analyse Australia’s political system.

the investigation of key global actors in the 21st century

the in depth examination of concepts of national interest

the use of power (hard and soft) by a state in the Asia Pacific region

Content Unit 1: Ideas, Actors and Power:

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key political terms and concepts

the political spectrum

Unit 4: Global Challenges

the ideas which shape democracy and nondemocratic systems

investigate key global challenges facing the international community in the 21st century

interest groups including two case studies

the role and function of the media in a liberal democracy

examine and evaluate the debates around two ethical issues which underpin the contested notion of global citizenship

the role of political parties

explore the context and causes of global crises

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Units 1/2 History – 20th Century

the nature of political, social and cultural change in the period between the World Wars

the rise of Nazism and causes of World War II

social and cultural developments such as art movements, the jazz and gangster era that reflect and challenge social life

comprehending, analysing and critically evaluating oral, visual and written material

comparing attitudes, beliefs and values of ideologies of the period

using questions to shape inquiry

analysing perspectives of people from the period

Unit 2: 1945 – 2000

comparing historical interpretations of key ideas, events and movements

how the ideologies of communism, capitalism and democracy were spread after World War II

taking notes effectively

using discussion and written form to effectively communicate knowledge and understanding

the manifestations of ideologies in various Cold War conflicts for example, the Berlin Wall, the Korean War and the Vietnam War

the concept of challenge and change is studied in the American Civil Rights Movement and campaigns of terrorist organisations

Welcome

Unit 1: 1918 – 1939

Year 7

Through the course students will have the opportunity to develop skills in:

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

Assessments may include document analysis and evaluation, film analysis, essay and short answer responses as well as research tasks.

Contents

History is about understanding the past and carrying that understanding into other circumstances. Everything has a history. To think historically is to recognise that all problems, all situations, all institutions exist in contexts that must be understood before informed decisions can be made. Historical thinking prepares you for leadership because History is about change – envisioning it, planning for it, making it last. Learning about the people, the ideas, movements and events that have shaped societies and cultures is not only intrinsically interesting but helps make sense of current events and future issues.

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Humanities Units 3/4 History – Revolutions In Units 3 and 4 Revolutions students investigate the significant historical causes and consequences of political revolution. Revolutions represent great ruptures in time and are a major turning point which brings about the collapse and destruction of an existing political order resulting in a pervasive change to society. Revolutions are caused by the interplay of ideas, events, individuals and popular movements. Their consequences have a profound effect on the political and social structures of the post-revolutionary society. The focus is on the French and Russian Revolutions. To undertake Units 3 and 4 in this subject it is recommended, though not essential, that you have successfully completed History Units 1 and/or 2. Assessments in Units 3 and 4 Revolutions include essay writing, a research essay, analysis and evaluation of primary source documents and historians interpretations.

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Skills

Content

Through the course students will have the opportunity to develop skills in:

Unit 3: France, and Unit 4: Russia

critical thinking, analysis and evaluation

asking historical questions to inform an historical inquiry

constructing arguments using primary sources and historical interpretations as evidence

communicating ideas, knowledge and understanding through use of formal written techniques

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

the events and other conditions that contributed to the outbreak of revolution

the ideas that played a significant role in challenging the existing order

the role and contribution of significant individuals

the challenges the new regime faced in attempting to consolidate its power

the changes and continuities in political, social, cultural and economic conditions that influenced leaders to compromise their revolutionary ideals

the diverse revolutionary experiences of social groups and their responses to the challenges and changes to the conditions of everyday life


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Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


LOTE

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ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


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Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


LOTE 10297NAT Certificate II Applied Languages (Chinese) (Unit 1/2 Year 10) In partnership with VSL RTO No. 21269 Scientific, cultural and commercial links mean that Australians increasingly travel, work and study in China. The ability of Australians to communicate in Chinese will serve to strengthen the relationships between the peoples of Australia and China. Chinese is also spoken throughout Asia, as well as by a significant segment of the migrant population here in Australia, increasing its relevance to Australians. Students should have satisfactorily completed Year 9 Chinese, or an equivalent - such as time at an International School in China. It is recommended students have a real interest in learning to express themselves in Chinese, and an interest in life in China and other Chinesespeaking communities. Assessments for Certificate II will consist of role-plays in simulated or authentic social and workplace situations, reading and writing basic social and workplace texts. There is an additional cost associated with this subject. The course consists of four units: •

conducting basic oral communication for social purposes in a Language other than English

conducting basic workplace oral communication in a Language other than English

reading and writing basic documents for social purposes in a Language other than English

reading and write basic workplace texts in a Language other than English

VET II Chinese and VET III Chinese are run over a three year period divided in two halves. Students study VET II Chinese in Year 10 and complete it by the end of Semester 1 in Year 11. VET III Chinese is begun in Semester 2 of Year 11 and completed by the end of Year 12.

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Skills

Content

Students will develop skills in the following areas:

The course will cover:

giving verbal directions (how to get somewhere)

personal details and school

talking about hobbies and leisure activities

shopping

ordering food

illness and medicine

assisting a customer in a shop

entertainment

giving Chinese visitors information about Melbourne Zoo

in the community

Melbourne Zoo

talking about past experience

reading and writing workplace notes

writing sick leave notes

designing posters of events

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

This subject accounts for three units at Units 1 and 2 level. Students who continue with Chinese have the opportunity to participate in the school’s long-running exchange programme with Lu He High School in Beijing.


10661NAT Certificate III Applied Languages (Chinese) (Units 3/4) In partnership with VSL RTO No. 21269

Assessments for Certificate II will consist of conducting routine verbal communications in simulated or authentic social and workplace situations, reading and writing routine social and workplace texts. There is an additional cost associated with this subject.

Contents

The study of Chinese develops students’ ability to understand and use a language which is spoken by about a quarter of the world’s population. It is the major language of communication in China and Singapore, and is widely used by Chinese communities throughout the Asia-Pacific region, including Australia.

conducting routine oral communication for social purposes in a Language other than English

conducting routine workplace oral communication in a Language other than English

reading and writing routine documents for social purposes in a Language other than English

reading and writing routine workplace documents in a Language other than English

Welcome

The course consists of four Units:

Students will develop the following skills:

The course will cover:

giving a set of instructions to a colleague regarding a meeting

travel in China and Australia

Spring festival

obtaining information through a telephone inquiry

history and culture of Beijing

taking a phone message

expressions for talking about modern technology

giving a tourist information about tourist attractions in Beijing

the world of work

advising a tourist about activities at Sovereign Hill

personality and types of jobs

explaining the comparisons between Christmas and Spring Festival

This subject accounts for three units at the Units 3 and 4 level.

writing a resume and a job application

Exchange Programme with Lu He High School, Beijing Students who continue with Chinese in Senior Years have the opportunity to participate in the school’s long-running exchange programme with Lu He High School in Beijing.

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

VET II Chinese and VET III Chinese are run over a three year period divided in two halves. Students study VET II Chinese in Year 10 and complete it by the end of Semester 1 in Year 11. VET III Chinese is begun in Semester 2 of Year 11 and completed by the end of Year 12.

Year 7

The prerequisite for this subject is Certificate II in Applied Language.

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LOTE Units 1/2 and 3/4 Chinese (First Language) This subject is for native speakers of Chinese (Mandarin). The study of Chinese develops students’ ability to understand and use a language which is spoken by about a quarter of the world’s population. It is the major language of communication in China and Singapore, and is widely used by Chinese communities throughout the Asia-Pacific region, including Australia. Studying Chinese can provide a basis for a continued learning pathway for students into a number of post-secondary options, as well as enhanced vocational opportunities in many fields. Students must have completed an appropriate level of study in Chinese, or the equivalent education in the language in a Chinese speaking country. As there is a spoken component on the literature of China, a strong interest in speaking and literature is recommended. Assessments for Chinese First Language will consist of writing imaginatively and persuasively, listening and reading comprehensions and oral presentations on issues. Skills

Content

Students will develop skills in:

Unit 1: Students explore •

personal qualities

relationships with family and friends

analysing and using information from spoken texts and written texts

caring for the environment

the relationship between food, cuisine and culture

exchanging information, opinions and experiences

similarities and differences between the education systems in Australia and China

the expression of ideas through the production of original texts

• •

Unit 2: Students research, investigate and explore •

modern and traditional Chinese arts; Chinese and Western paintings, Chinese songs, calligraphy, paper-cutting, Chinese knot-tying

travel and tourism and the environment

extended and single child families

Unit 3: Students will •

compare Chinese and western legends and myths

discuss the use of modern technology and its impact

discuss the relationship between modern technology and employment

Unit 4: Students undertake

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ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

research on traditional and modern lifestyles

a detailed study on a topic of their own interest, selecting three texts to understand and appreciate aspects of language and culture and context


reading

speaking

listening

writing

socilaising: hobbies, past times and relationships

the arts: exploring creativity, expressing opinions and storytelling

the future: exploring consumer habits, finding solutions to problems and expressing hopes

well being: talking about feelings, giving and receiving advice and giving reassurances

Students will be assessed on their oral skills through dialogues and role plays; writing skills through their ability to write formal and informal text types; their listening skills by demonstrating their understanding of native speakers from various French speaking countries, and their reading comprehension by testing their understanding of a range of texts. Students will have the opportunity to improve their French speaking skills by welcoming French exchange students to their classes usually at the start of Term 3. Students who continue with French in VCE have the opportunity to participate in the College’s longrunning exchange programme with Lycée Joffre in Montpellier. Students spend four weeks in France in the summer break between Year 11 and Year 12. This subject accounts for two elective choices in a Year 10 program.

Welcome

The themes are:

Year 7

Students will continue to build upon previously acquired skills and will develop further competency in:

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

At this level, students build on and extend previously attained skills and knowledge. Knowledge of regular and irregular verbs is consolidated in the present, future, perfect, imperative and imperfect tenses. Language begins to develop sophistication and complexity through the addition of new verb tenses as well as other grammatical concepts. Students express ideas, experiences and facts through the production of original oral and written texts as well as participation in a variety of individual and group work. In addition, students will develop confidence with a range of writing styles and text types. They are also encouraged to develop their awareness of the French-speaking world and of the influence of French culture. They will reflect upon and develop an awareness of the role and nature of language and culture in everyday life, helping them to understand the diversity of the world around them. It is strongly recommended that they are a dedicated student, are very enthusiastic and have a strong passion for the French language and culture.

Contents

Year 10 French

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LOTE Units 1/2 and 3/4 French The study of French at VCE will enable you to deepen your language and understanding of the French culture, to use as a basis for informed comparison with other cultures. This will lead to the further appreciation of your own personal identity, beliefs and values. You will reflect upon, and develop an awareness of, the role and nature of language and culture in everyday life, helping you to understand the diversity of the world around you. A prerequisite for VCE Unit 1 French is successful completion of Year 10 French or equivalent. You must also continue to be dedicated to, and passionate about, the French language and culture. Students who continue with French to VCE have the opportunity to participate in the school’s long-running exchange program with Lycée Joffre in Montpellier. Students spend four weeks in France in the summer break between Year 11 and Year 12. Skills VCE language study is underpinned by the concepts of communicating and understanding languages and cultures. There are five macro skills that inform all language use: listening, speaking, reading, writing and viewing.

Content continued

Content

While there is a no prescribed vocabulary list, it is expected that at the end of Unit 4 you become familiar with a range of vocabulary and idioms relevant to the topics prescribed in the study design. You will be encouraged to use a dictionary from Year 11 to 12. Assessment covers speaking, listening, reading, writing and viewing.

The areas of study for French comprise themes and topics, text types, kinds of writing, vocabulary and grammar. There are three prescribed themes:

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the individual, which includes the following subtopics: personal world (relationship with family and friends, daily life, making arrangements, free time and leisure activities), education and aspirations (student exchanges, tertiary options, job applications and interviews, work experience and vocational pathways), and personal opinions and values (student’s views of an ideal world and views on an issue).

the French speaking communities which includes the following subtopics; lifestyles (lifestyles in France and francophone countries, lifestyles of French speakers in Australia, tourism and travel, migration), historical perspectives (the influence of the past on the present, famous people and historical turning points, traditions and customs), and arts and entertainment ( art, literature, music, theatre, cinema and media).

the changing world which includes the following subtopics: social issues (modern youth, issues of gender, economic crisis, the Global Village, environmental issues), the world of work (people at work, different types of work, vocational pathways, unemployment), scientific and technological issues (technology and innovation, great scientific inventions, the expansion of new horizons)

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

Students are expected to be familiar with and be able to produce the following five kinds of writing: imaginative, personal, persuasive, informative and evaluative.


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Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


Mathematics


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Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


Mathematics Year 10 Mathematics Mathematics is a compulsory subject for all Year 10 students in both semesters. The emphasis of this subject is to reinforce algebraic, numeracy and problem solving skills whilst providing the skills needed to succeed at VCE Mathematics the following year (General Mathematics, Mathematical Methods or Specialist Mathematics). Half way through the year students will be given the choice between the General or Methods pathway. Skills

Content

Mathematics provides students with the opportunity to develop the following skills:

To successfully complete Mathematics, students will need to demonstrate a satisfactory level of understanding of the following content areas:

computation, numerical and algebraic reasoning

collecting, representing, analysing and evaluating information

number

measurement

spatial visualisation and geometric reasoning

exponentials

applying mathematics to solve real-life problems

linear and quadratic equations

trigonometry

probability

statistics

geometry

Students will receive an overall letter grade for each unit (semester) based on topic tests, investigative assignments and end of semester examinations. NB: It is recommended that students undertaking this subject would be advantaged by purchasing the Texas Instruments Nspire CAS (Computer Algebra System) calculator as there will be a CAS component of the course.

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Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


Mathematics Unit 1/2 General Mathematics General Mathematics is for students who wish to study mathematics at Year 11. This course is closely linked to real life applications including business, financial modelling and statistics as well as general problem solving. You must have achieved a satisfactory score in Year 10 Mathematics to take General Mathematics. This course is intended to guide students in to Further Mathematics Unit 3 and 4, with a greater depth and more content than was offered by the previous Further Mathematics Unit 1 and 2 course. Please check the Mathematics pre-requisites for tertiary courses with a LifeWork Advisor. Students will receive an overall letter grade for each unit (semester) based on topic tests, investigative assignments and end of semester examinations. Please note all students undertaking this subject require the Texas Instruments Nspire CAS (Computer Algebra System) calculator.

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Skills

Content

Students will develop skills in the following areas:

The course will cover: •

networks and decision mathematics

statistics

developing in-depth problem solving skills

functions and graphs

understanding real world money problems e.g. compound interest, how google maps works, tax etc.

algebra

matrices

statistical analysis

financial and business mathematics

graphical representation of situations

using technology to solve a range of problems

applying mathematics to solve routine problems and analyse the results

• •

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


Units 3/4 Further Mathematics Further Mathematics is for students who enjoy using mathematics to solve practical problems. Throughout the course there are many applications to real life situations e.g. financial calculations, or using statistics to analyse social trends. Further Mathematics requires that you have satisfactorily completed Unit 1 and 2 General Mathematics. Before selecting a VCE Maths subject, please check the Mathematics prerequisites for tertiary courses with a LifeWork Advisor.

data analysis

number patterns and applications to financial mathematics

display, summarise and interpret results mathematically

matrices and applications

use technology to solve problems

graphs and relations

develop your ability to solve problems logically

apply your knowledge to solve familiar and unfamiliar problems

Welcome

Year 7

Further Mathematics provides students with the opportunity to:

Year 8

Content

Year 9

Skills

Years 10 - 12

Please note that all students undertaking this subject require the Texas Instruments Nspire CAS (Computer Algebra System) calculator.

Contents

Student level of achievement for Further Maths Units 3 and 4 will be determined by internal assessments and two end-of-year examinations.

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Mathematics Units 1/2 and 3/4 Mathematical Methods You should be confident with algebra and have a keen interest in solving problems. You must have achieved a minimum of a B grade average in Year 10 Mathematics. Those with an average grade of C+ or lower must consult with a LifeWork Advisor and their Mathematics teacher before undertaking Mathematical Methods Unit 1. There is a non-calculator component in the assessment of this course. As a result you will need very good numerical and algebraic skills. Please check the Mathematics pre-requisites for tertiary courses with a LifeWork Advisor. Students will receive either an ‘S’ (Satisfactory) or an ‘N’ (Unsatisfactory) at the completion of Unit 1 and Unit 2 based upon their demonstrated competence and achievement of all outcomes. Student level of achievement for Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4 will be determined by two internal assessments and two end-of-year examinations. Each of the two internal assessments will contribute 17% to the study score and the two end-of-year examinations will together contribute 22% and 44% respectively to the study score. Please note that all students undertaking this subject require the Texas Instruments Nspire CAS (Computer Algebra System) calculator from the very first day of the course Skills

Content

Students will develop skills in the following areas:

Unit 1: •

linear and quadratic functions

polynomials

develop logic and problem solving skills

functions, relations and graphs

use technology to solve complex problems

transformations

apply mathematics to solve non-routine problems and analyse the results

• •

Unit 2: •

probability

rates of change and calculus

exponentials and logarithms

trigonometry

Units 3 and 4:

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polynomials and graphs

circular functions

further exponentials and logarithms

applications of calculus

further probability


Units 1/2 and 3/4 Specialist Mathematics

There is a non-calculator component in the assessment of this course. As a result you will need excellent numerical and algebraic skills. The study of Specialist Mathematics Unit 1 and 2 assumes either current study of, or previous completion of, Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2. You should have achieved a minimum of a B+ grade in Year 10 Mathematics. Those with a grade B or lower must consult with a LifeWork Advisor before undertaking Specialist Mathematics Unit 1.

Contents

This course is for students who have a genuine interest in, and enthusiasm for Mathematics. It can be useful for students who wish to pursue tertiary study that involves a large mathematical component (e.g science, engineering, actuarial studies, mathematics, statistics or physical science).

Skills

Content

Specialist Mathematics provides students with the opportunity to:

Units 1 and 2: •

logic and proof

make inferences from analysis and draw valid conclusions

arithmetic and number including number systems, sequences and series

use mathematics to solve complex problems

variation

establish and construct results using formal proofs

advanced algebra and structure

advanced trigonometry, geometry and measurement

vectors

polar co-ordinates

kinematics

statics of a particle

Year 7

Please note all students undertaking this subject require the Texas Instruments Nspire CAS (Computer Algebra System) calculator.

Year 8

Student levels of achievement for Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4 will be determined by internal assessments and two end-of-year examinations.

Welcome

In Unit 1/2 students will receive an overall letter grade for each unit (semester) based on topic tests investigative assignments and end of semester examinations.

functions and graphs

circular functions

complex numbers

advanced calculus

vector calculus

kinematics and mechanics

statistics

Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Units 3 and 4:

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Science


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Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Year 8

Year 7

Welcome

Contents


Science Units 1/2 and 3/4 Biology Biology is the study of living things. We look at how living things function at a cellular level as well as at the level of ecosystems. We look at how living things influence each other and how they may be able to survive challenge by disease-causing agents. We study how living things reproduce and pass on their characteristics, and how this is key in their evolution. To undertake Units 3 and 4 in this subject it is strongly recommended students have successfully completed Units 1 and 2. Those with a grade C or lower must consult with a LifeWork Advisor before undertaking Biology Unit 3. A strong science background in Year 10 may be considered, in exceptional circumstances, if a student is willing to undertake preparation work. Assessments will take the form of formal examinations on concepts and practical work relating to each Area of Study. Students will also carry out an extended practical investigation and present their report in the form of a scientific poster. Skills

Content

Students will develop the ability to:

Unit 1: How organisms function •

cell size, structure and function

crossing the plasma membrane

use primary and secondary data to develop analysis and interpretation skills

energy transformations

functioning systems

carrying out practical tasks involving learning by observation and applying core concepts including field work

survival through adaptations and regulation

organising biodiversity

relationships between organisms within an ecosystem

summarise, understand and apply biological terms and processes

• •

work independently and collaboratively

Unit 2: Maintaining the continuity of life •

the cell cycle

asexual reproduction & sexual reproduction

cell growth and differentiation

genomes, genes, alleles and chromosomes

genotypes and phenotypes

pedigree charts, genetic crosses and genetic decision making

Unit 3: Signatures of life •

plasma membranes, nucleic acids and proteins, gene structure and regulation

structure and regulation of biochemical pathways

photosynthesis, cellular respiration & signals

responding to antigens

immunity

Unit 4: Continuity and change •

changes in the genetic makeup of a population

changes in biodiversity over time

determining relatedness between species

human change over time and dna manipulation

Extra detail for all VCE science course content can be found on the VCAA website.

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Units 1/2 and 3/4 Chemistry

These skills include the ability to:

Unit 1: How can the diversity of materials be explained? •

the study of what holds atoms together in materials (bonding)

introduction to the different types of chemical bonding

bonding in polymers

the Periodic Table and an introduction to quantitative chemistry

develop aims and questions, formulate hypotheses and make predictions

plan and undertake investigations

comply with safety and ethical guidelines

conduct investigations to collect and record data

analyse and evaluate data, methods and scientific models

draw evidence based conclusions

Unit 2: What makes water such a unique chemical?

communicate and explain scientific ideas

hands-on experience with analytical instrumentation including high performance liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

how we interact with the water in our environment and with gases in the atmosphere

chemical reactions that take place in our everyday environment

study of global warming, acid rain, ozone depletion and photochemical smog from a chemist’s viewpoint

Welcome

Content

Year 7

Skills

Year 8

Assessment will require students to sit formal testing on concepts and practical work relating to each outcome for each Area of Study. Students are also required to carry out an extended practical investigation, from hypothesis formulation through to method development and implementation and finally critical analysis of results. A formal report in the form of a poster will be assessed.

Contents

Chemistry explores and explains the composition and behaviour of matter and chemical processes that occur on Earth and beyond. Chemical models and theories are used to explain chemical properties and these properties are then used to understand chemical reactions and processes. Chemistry underpins the production and development of energy, the maintenance of clean air and water, the production of food, medicines and new materials, and the treatment of wastes. To undertake Units 3 and 4 in this subject it is essential that you have successfully completed Units 1 and 2. Those with a grade D or lower must consult with a LifeWork Advisor before undertaking Chemistry Unit 3.

factors influencing fuel choices present and future

study of electrical energy related to batteries

the use of electricity to make chemicals and the principles of rate and equilibrium

Year 9

Unit 3: How can chemical processes be designed to optimise efficiency?

introduction to systematic organic chemistry

study of some food chemistry

analytical chemistry techniques

Extra detail for all VCE science course content can be found on the VCAA website.

Years 10 - 12

Unit 4: How are organic compounds categorised, analysed and used?

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Science Year 10 Engineering Engineers make things happen! Engineering is the branch of maths, science and technology concerned with the design, building, and use of engines, machines, and structures. Engineers use maths and science ideas creatively to find new and efficient solutions to the challenges we face in our everyday lives, both now and in the future. From nanotechnology to skyscrapers, from medical devices to robots, from cosmetics to fabrics technology, engineering makes our modern way of life possible. This single-semester course is suitable for students who have a strong interest in and aptitudes for any of the physical sciences, mathematics, coding/programing, design technology and problem-solving. Ideally, students who select this option have achieved good academic results in maths and science. Assessment will take the form of individual project-based learning reports, a research report and short formal tests on key concepts. Skills

Content

This course will develop skills in the following areas:

This course will provide new knowledge in the following areas:

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applying physics and maths concepts to realworld problems

3D realisation, design and manufacture using CAD software and 3D printing

problem solving using the Engineering Process

working collaboratively

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook

structural engineering: the science and maths behind bridges and buildings

mechanical engineering: the science and maths of moving machines

biomimicry: biological evolution as Nature’s Engineer


Units 1/2 and 3/4 Physics The study of physics has led to a greater understanding of our world, and has had a profound influence on our lives. VCE Physics adopts a contextual (real life) approach to ensure that students appreciate the relevance of physics to their everyday experiences. To undertake Units 3 and 4 in this subject it is strongly advised that you have successfully completed Units 1 and 2. A strong science/technology background may be considered, in exceptional circumstances, if a student is willing to undertake preparation work.

Content continued

Students develop the ability to:

Unit 3: How do fields explain motion and electricity?

understand and use the language and methodologies of physics to solve qualitative and quantitative problems in familiar and unfamiliar contexts conduct and design experimental investigations and apply scientific knowledge to the technology that we use every day

Content

analyse gravitational, electric and magnetic fields in various applications

use and apply concepts related to fields involving magnetic and electric fields in the transmission of electricity

compare Newton’s and Einstein’s explanations of motion and evaluate the circumstances in which they can be applied

Unit 4: How can two contradictory models explain both light and matter? •

explore the use of wave and particle theories to model the properties of light and matter and the evidence to support both models

design and undertake an investigation involving two continuous independent variables. Results are communicated in a scientific poster

Unit 1: What ideas explain the physical world? •

apply thermodynamic principles to analyse, interpret and explain changes in thermal energy within and between systems

investigate and apply a basic DC circuit model to simple battery-operated devices and household electrical systems

explain the origins of atoms, the nature of subatomic particles and how energy can be produced by atoms

Extra detail for all VCE science course content can be found on the VCAA website.

Year 7

apply physics models, theories and concepts to describe, explain, analyse and make predictions about diverse phenomena

Year 8

Welcome

Skills

Contents

Assessment tasks include tests, practical investigations, oral presentation and examinations.

investigate, analyse and mathematically model the motion of particles and bodies when moving or stationary

students investigate a selected question in one of twelve areas related to astrobiology, astrophysics, bioelectricity, biomechanics, electronics, flight, medical physics, nuclear energy, nuclear physics, optics, sound and sports science

Years 10 - 12

Year 9

Unit 2: What do experiments reveal about the physical world?

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Science Units 1/2 and 3/4 Psychology Psychology is a study of how human beings function, both mentally and physically. It is a subject that allows students to develop an understanding of the people they meet, work and socialise with; how we grow and develop; and how we interpret our interactions with other people and our physical environment. It is based on scientific methods, which are used in every facet of work in this area. Assessment for Psychology involves practical investigations, evidence based essays and presentations, tests and examinations. To undertake Units 3 and 4 in this subject it is strongly recommended, that you have successfully completed Units 1 and 2. Skills Students develop the ability to: •

develop aims and questions, formulate hypotheses and make predictions

plan and undertake investigations

comply with safety and ethical guidelines

conduct investigations to collect and record data

analyse and evaluate data, methods and scientific models

draw evidence based conclusions

Content

Unit 3: How does experience affect behaviour and mental processes? •

the role of different branches of the nervous system in enabling a person to integrate, coordinate and respond to internal and external sensory stimuli

the ways in which stress can affect the mind and body

the neural basis of memory and learning.

the scientific methodology and ethics involved in psychological research

Unit 4: How is wellbeing developed and maintained? •

the nature of consciousness and how changes in levels of consciousness can affect mental processes and behaviour

mental health continuums and applying a biopsychosocial approach

Unit 1: How are behaviour and mental processes shaped? •

the structure and functioning of the human brain and the role it plays in the overall functioning of the human nervous system

identify the varying influences of nature and nurture on a person’s psychological development, and explain different factors that may lead to typical or atypical psychological development

Unit 2: How do external factors influence behaviour and mental processes? •

how perception of stimuli enables a person to interact with the world around them

the role social cognition plays

factors and contexts that can influence the behaviour of an individual and groups

Content Continued

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Extra detail for all VCE science course content can be found on the VCAA website.


Year 10 Science

Skills

Content

Students will develop the ability to:

Earth and Space Sciences:

analyse how the models and theories they use have developed over time and discuss the factors that prompted their review

develop questions and hypotheses and independently design and improve appropriate methods of investigation, including field work and laboratory experimentation explain how they have considered reliability, safety, fairness and ethical actions in their methods and identify where digital technologies can be used to enhance the quality of data

students explore global systems, including the carbon cycle, and investigate how they rely on interactions involving the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere

students also explore the formation and life of stars and learn how this has influenced the formation of the Universe and the matter within it

Biology: •

students investigate the molecular basis of inheritance, mechanisms of evolution and the manipulation of genetic material to enhance human life

Chemistry: •

students investigate atomic theory and chemical relationships within the periodic table

students investigate different types of chemical reactions and write balanced chemical equations for these factors that influence the rate of chemical reactions

Physics: •

students investigate the laws of motion, forces

and energy in the context of human movement

during sport and exercise

Year 8

Year 9

learn laboratory skills in each of the subject areas of biology, chemistry and physics

Years 10 - 12

Welcome

Assessment will take the form of formal examinations at the end of each Unit, two research reports and two practical investigation reports.

Year 7

During this course, students will actively explore different aspects of biology, chemistry, Earth and space science and physics through four integrated units that explore and embed many fundamental principles and ideas from the different science areas that are of importance to society: What Makes Me, Me?, A Carbon Crisis, Science in Sport and Stardust.

Contents

Science is a study of the physical world – both living and non-living. A curiosity about how the physical world works is an innate characteristic of the human race. An education in science helps people to satisfy that curiosity and take their place in a society of informed individuals who are better able to take part in debate on issues such as energy supply and use, sustainability, health and the environment. All Year 10 students will undertake Science for the entire year (two semesters).

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Science Year 10 Citizen Scientist Science Needs You What are you passionate about? Do you want to make a difference and add to the world’s understanding of the… world? Instead of confirming what science already knows, why not find the answer to your very own question and add to what science knows? Become the scientific expert in your chosen field. This single-semester elective is about doing the kinds of meaningful science that you are passionate about – and contributing to that field as a Citizen Scientist. You choose the field of study and identify the problem that you want to try to solve. For instance, you may wish to work with NASA on finding new exoplanets; conduct a biodiversity survey of the sugar gliders in the ELTHAM College Reserve; be an analytical food scientist and find out how much caffeine there is in your cold-drip, or how much cadmium there is in your kale. With the opportunities to use the latest analytical tools in biology, chemistry and astronomy, and to work with – and learn from – scientists from some of Australia’s leading universities and research institutes, you are the scientist. You may also have the chance to showcase your project in national and potentially international competitions. Your goal will be to design, conduct and publish your own ‘real’ scientific investigation that provides a valued answer to a valuable question. This is the nature of Citizen Science. This elective will teach you how to go from “I wonder?” to “I know!”. You will learn about the way science works in the real world, and learn how to use the many different skills used by scientists, technologists and problem solvers. This course is ideal for those students that want to deepen their skills and knowledge of a topic that interests them deeply, and/or are considering a VCE Science subject where extended practical investigations are now a core requirement and a significant proportion of the final Study Score. It also provides a strong foundation for students thinking about taking the VCE Extended Investigation in Year 12. Assessment is based on the different aspects of the mini-thesis that students produce.

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Skills

Content

Students will develop the following skills:

Students will develop the following knowledge:

identify and frame a scientific research question and testable hypothesis relating to their area of interest

extend and deepen their knowledge of the subject that they are passionate about

understand how to apply ‘The Scientific Method’

conduct a literature review

write a grant proposal for their investigation

know how the findings of science are assessed and distributed to the public

design, conduct and evaluate an extended scientific investigation of their research question

understand how particular modern scientific equipment is used to capture data

collaborate with scientists and or industrial partners on aspects of their research

analyse, summarise and evaluate data using statistical methods

write and publish their mini-thesis in preparation for publication in a peer-reviewed scientific journal

how to use a Gantt planning chart to manage their project

create a scientific poster for their research and/or national and international ‘science fair’ competitions

communicate scientific ideas to a general audience

independent learning skills

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


External VET Cluster Subjects Year 10 The Power of the Brain

This single-semester course will provide new knowledge selected from the following areas:

carrying out practical tasks involving learning by observation and applying core concepts

grey matter anatomy: the structure and function of the nervous system and the brain

using primary and secondary data to develop analysis and interpretation skills

summarising, learning and understanding scientific terms and processes

why did you do that? The study of animal and human behaviours

feeling good: mental health and well-being

working independently and collaboratively

why do you hate everything your parents say and do? Attitudes explained

Welcome

Students will develop skills in:

Year 7

Content

Year 8

Skills

Year 9

Assessment for The Power of the Brain includes practical investigations, essays, tests and an examination.

Years 10 - 12

Choose this subject if you have a strong interest in social or biological sciences, psychology, mental health and understanding human behaviour. Ideally, students who select this option have achieved good academic results in science, especially Biology and Chemistry.

Contents

The brain is an amazing structure; it controls everything we do, think and feel without us even being aware of it. Recent advances in technology have given us an insight into the brain’s structure, which in turn has led to a greater understanding of why some individuals develop mental illnesses and why others cope with everything life throws at them. As we understand more we are able to develop effective tools and techniques to help solve problems in human mental health and behaviour.

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External VET Cluster Subjects As part of the Northern Melbourne VET Cluster, ELTHAM College students have the opportunity to undertake a VCE/VET subject that is on offer via neighbouring schools to complement their VCE studies at the college. More information can be found in the Northern Melbourne VET cluster handbook, hard copies can be found in the LifeWork Centre. Examples of the courses that may be on offer for 2021 can be found below:

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Certificate III in Allied Health Assistance

Certificate II in Applied Fashion and Design Technology

Certificate II in Automotive Vocational Preparation

Certificate III in Beauty Services

Certificate II in Building & Construction (Bricklaying) (Pre Apprenticeship)

Certificate II in Building & Construction (Carpentry) (Pre Apprenticeship)

Certificate II in Building & Construction (Wall and Floor Tiling)

Certificate II in Business

Certificate III in Carpentry (SBAT)

Certificate III in Community Services

Certificate II in Creative Industries

Certificate II in Dance

Certificate III in Early Childhood Education & Care

Certificate II in Electrotechnology (Pre vocational)

Certificate II in Engineering Studies

Certificate III in Events

Certificate II in Furniture Making Pathways

Certificate II in Furniture Making Pathways/Certificate II in Building & Construction (Bricklaying & Carpentry)

Certificate III in Health Services Assistance

Certificate II in Hospitality

Certificate III in Information, Digital Media and Technology

Certificate II in Integrated Technologies

Certificate II in Kitchen Operations

Certificate III in Laboratory Skills

Certificate III in Make Up

Certificate III in Music Industry (Performance Stream)

Certificate III in Music Industry (Sound Production Stream)

Certificate III in Musical Instrument Making and Maintenance

Certificate II in Plumbing (Pre Apprenticeship)

Certificate II in Retail Cosmetics

Certificate II in Salon Assistance

Certificate III in Screen & Media (Creative & Digital Media OR Games Development)

Certificate III in Screen & Media (Video)

Certificate IV in Screen & Media

Certificate III in Sport & Recreation

Certificate II in Visual Arts

ELTHAM College 2021 Senior School Curriculum Handbook


The LifeWork Centre This is what we do! Want to know how to choose your subjects wisely? Look no further, we have the right advice to guide you to successful choices!

The Victorian Careers Curriculum Framework

I Explore

Contents

I Decide

I Plan

taking new subjects from different areas. I Focus For example, if you have always been a strictly Maths and Science person, consider trying out a Humanities or an Art or Business area. Remember you need to explore as many subjects as you can to learn what suits you, what you’re good at and what grabs and keeps your attention. These subjects are the ones you’ll end up enjoying most and will feel most motivated to do your best at. I Discover Once you’ve explored different subjects by trying them out, you’ll have discovered more about yourself, particularly what your strongest areas are. This means you’re well on your way to being ready for the next step of planning future pathways beyond school.

Welcome

I Explore What have you enjoyed doing at school in the past? What have you never tried before but like the sound of, or have always secretly wanted to try? Consider

I Discover

Year 7

At each year level, as you think about what subjects you might like to choose for the year ahead, we will encourage you to use the self-knowledge you have gained over previous years. The image here shows the stages to successful career planning and we can help you with all of these important stages.

I Apply

I Plan When choosing subjects, we will help you plan for your future by making sure you are doing any prerequisite subjects that a university might require as compulsory for you to enrol in a certain course. We meet with you regularly to continually guide you with your planning, as good planning always includes reviews to account for changes, such as when new interests, strengths or ideas develop.

Year 8

I Focus By the time you reach Year 12 you should aim to choose subjects that focus on your main areas of strength and interest. This way you will remain motivated and are likely to stay engaged, enjoy the learning process, do the homework and do well!

Years 10 - 12

I Apply This may refer to applying for volunteer positions, part-time paid employment, scholarships, special leadership opportunities both at school and externally, and also applying for tertiary courses to study after leaving school. LifeWork Advisors will encourage and assist you to make applications for a wide variety of experiences. The way to stand out to employers and in tertiary application interviews is to have shown that you are committed, have done extra-curricular activities as well as community and/or leadership activities, etc. This is also a fun way for you to explore, discover and learn more about what you like and what you are good at!

Year 9

I Decide We can help you learn the vital skills of decision making, as these are important not just for choosing subjects but for the rest of your life! See section on “Decision Making” for tips.

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The LifeWork Centre For subject selection, we work with you and your parents to customise an individual study program with your input being the most important part of this process. At ELTHAM College, there are a wealth of different subjects to choose from. There are a wide range of external options such as university enhancement subjects, school based apprenticeship and traineeship (SBAT) courses, and external VCE VET subjects, run either at TAFEs or at local schools that collaborate. These can all count towards your VCE. If you have an interest in an area, we can find you a related subject somewhere that you can include in your ELTHAM College studies! So tell us what you’d like to try! In Year 10 all students complete the Morrisby Careers Test which provides helpful career and subject recommendations, so always remember to check back over your Morrisby results when choosing subjects. Universities and TAFEs, as well as employers, are calling more and more for students to be trained in the practical skills they will need in the workforce (called vocational education) not just in the theory. That is why at ELTHAM College we offer many subjects with these practical components and you might consider including one of these VCE VET subjects in your program of studies. Support to students is provided via one on one appointments, which parents/carers are welcome to join, throughout their time at ELTHAM College and beyond. We develop individual programs that suit students’ interests, learning needs and styles, and review these regularly to ensure students have maximum engagement with their studies.

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Frequently Asked Questions What is a study score? A study score shows how well you have performed in a study at Unit 3 and 4 level, compared to everybody else in Victoria who took that study. Study scores calculated by the VCAA will be used by the Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC) to calculate the ATAR. The maximum study score is 50. Each year, and for every study, the mean study score is set at 30. A score of between 23 and 37 shows that you are in the middle range of students; a score of more than 38 indicates that you are in the top 15%.

2% of students will get a score on or above 45

9% of students will get a score on or above 40

26% of students will get a score on or above 35

53% of students will get a score on or above 30

78% of students will get a score on or above 25

93% of students will get a score on or above 20

Contents

For studies with large enrolments (1,000 or more):

The maximum study score per subject is 50. Your scaled study scores are used to calculate your ATAR. A maximum of six subjects can be included. The ‘Primary Four’ (the 4 highest scaled scores) are counted in full but must include English, Literature or EAL. Only 10% of the scaled study score of a 5th or 6th subject are counted as 10% additions to the final aggregate score.

Year 7

The ATAR (Australian Tertiary Admissions Ranking) is a percentile ranking of all students in the State, based on their scaled study scores across their subjects. It is one of the tools used by tertiary institutions for selecting who gets into their courses. Many courses may solely use the ATAR, however some courses also require an interview, application form and/or folio.

Welcome

What is the ATAR and how is it calculated?

Total Aggregate Score (out of possible 210) = Primary 4 in full - meaning 100% of scaled study score is counted (must include an English subject) + 10% of 5th subject + 10% of 6th subject.

Please note that there are rules about what subjects can and can’t be together in the Primary Four – e.g. a maximum of 2 Maths, 2 LOTEs and 3 Media-based subjects. These can change from year to year so please check the current VICTER booklet and ask your LifeWork Advisor.

Year 8

Your aggregate score is then ranked against others across the State and converted into an ATAR overall percentile ranking, from less than 30 to the highest rank being 99.95.

Students who undertake Vocational Education and Training (VET) or Further Education (FE) qualifications that are included in the suite of approved VCE VET programs and School-Based Apprenticeships and Traineeships may be eligible for credit towards their VCE. This credit is called a Block Credit Recognition. To be eligible for credit the student must be enrolled in the VCE. Credit will be available for full or practical completion of a nationally recognised qualification or state accredited curriculum - Guidelines can be found at: vcaa.vic.edu.au

Years 10 - 12

What is a block credit?

Year 9

For more explanation on how the ATAR works please visit: vtac.edu.au/results-offers/atar-explained.html#how

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Frequently Asked Questions What is Scaling? Scaling is the process which adjusts study scores produced by the VCAA to take account of the following three principles; •

the English requirement

all studies must count equally

you should be able to take the studies you enjoy, and are good at

VTAC adjusts study scores to allow for any adjustments in the strength of competition between groups of students taking different studies. Once scaled, these scores are used to determine your ATAR. Studies are scaled up only when the strength of competition is high and studies are scaled down only when the strength of the competition is low. Research clearly shows students who select subjects they are skilled at and enjoy, do better than those who simply choose on the basis of scaling. For more explanation on how scaling works please visit: vtac.edu.au/results-offers/atar-explained/scaling.html What are Higher Education Extension subjects? A Higher Education Extension study (sometimes called a VCE Extension subject) is a first-year university subject that students with strong ability in that subject area can take as one of their subjects in their Year 12 program. Such subjects: •

are generally equivalent to a first-year university subject

if successfully completed will normally be credited so that, if a student enrols in that university, they will already have a first year university subject credit on their university record and be able to enter the second year level of that subject in their first year at that university

allow students a taste of what studying a subject at university level is really like

usually contribute to the ATAR

Higher Education Extension subjects or studies are designed for independent, high achieving VCE students. If you are interested in undertaking a Higher Education Extension subject as part of your Year 12, you must discuss this with a LifeWork Adviser and be approved by the Year 12 Level Coordinator/VCE Coordinator before applying directly to the relevant university. What are School Based Apprenticeships or Traineeships (SBATs)? A school-based apprenticeship or traineeship combines: •

part-time, practical (often paid) experience in the workplace

recognised, structured training with a Registered Training Organisation, and

regular school studies

This allows you to begin gaining professional qualifications, training and experience in a career area you are keen to pursue whilst also completing your VCE, as SBAT programs contribute subject credits to the VCE. If you are interested in learning more about a School Based Apprenticeship or Traineeship please discuss the requirements with a LifeWork Adviser.

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Glossary of Terms

GAT – General Achievement Test A compulsory test for all students studying 3 and 4 Units, to gauge knowledge and skills across a broad range of areas. It is used by the VCAA as part of the statistical moderation of SACs and as a quality assurance check on the VCAA’s marking. LOTE Language Other Than English. At ELTHAM College, currently Chinese and French are offered. Pathways The term given to education and training options and the links between them. Prerequisites Victorian Tertiary Entrance Requirements booklet, available online through the VTAC website, is updated yearly and details the prerequisites for tertiary courses up to three years in advance. This makes subject planning easier, as students in Year 10 will know what prerequisite subjects they will need to complete in VCE in order to begin a particular university course. Primary Four The four subjects whose study scores are counted in full in the calculation of a student’s ATAR score. It must include English or EAL or Literature, plus the student’s three highest study scores. ‘S’ or ‘N’ Result For each VCE Unit, each student will receive either an ‘S’ (Satisfactory) grade or an ‘N’ (Not satisfactory) grade. An “S” grade indicates a pass for that Unit.

SBAT School Based Apprenticeship or Traineeship. A nationally-accredited apprenticeship (Certificate III) or Traineeship (Certificate II) generally combining one day a week in paid employment, along with regular periods of study at a TAFE institution in conjunction with VCE studies at school. These are available in a large range of vocational areas from Automotive to Hair and Beauty, from Trades to PE teaching. Scaling An adjustment made to study scores by VTAC, based on a statistical moderation process. Scores are adjusted up when the strength of competition is high within that subject; and down when it is low. The strength of competition is determined by the performance of all Victorian students in that subject across all their other subjects. Scaled study scores are used to calculate a student’s ATAR.

Contents Welcome

of study available to Year 12 students who are academically strong. There are strict entrance requirements set by the university. Many subjects are available and examples range widely, from Politics to Physics, Mathematics to Linguistics. Please consult the VCAA website for how this may contribute to your ATAR.

Year 7

Extension Studies A first-year university course

Year 8

EAL English as an Additional Language.

SAT - School-Assessed Task A school-based assessment similar to a SAC but generally completed over a longer period of time, even across more than one Unit. Only subjects of a practical nature have SATs, such as Studio Arts and VCD where the SAT normally takes the form of a folio. SATs are set by the VCAA, assessed by teachers in accordance with published criteria, reported as a grade and subjected to review by a VCAA-appointed panel.

Semester Two terms or half a year of study. Sequence The combined study of Units 3 and 4 in a VCE subject. A sequence is required to gain a study score. Study Design Published by the VCAA, this document specifies the Content for the Study (subject) and how students’ work is to be assessed. Schools and other VCE providers must adhere to the requirements in the study designs. All students can and should access this document for each VCE subject they undertake. Study Score A score from 0 to 50 that reflects a student’s performance in a VCE subject. It is based on internal school assessments and externally-marked examination results after completing Units 3 and 4 of a VCE subject.

Year 9

ATAR Australian Tertiary Admissions Ranking. The ATAR is calculated by VTAC and is a tool used by universities, TAFE institutions and independent tertiary colleges to select students into their courses. The ATAR is calculated by adding the scaled study scores from an English subject (i.e. English, Literature or EAL) and a student’s three highest scoring subjects. This makes up the Primary Four. Then 10% of scores for any 5th or 6th subjects (and/or a block credit bonus) are added. This Aggregate is then converted to a number between 0 and 99.95.

SAC - School-Assessed Coursework A school-based assessment for a VCE Unit component. SACs consist of a set of tasks that assess students’ achievement of specific learning outcomes. These might include research assignments, essays, tests or reports. Unit 1 and 2 SACs results are only recorded within the College, and provide students with a guide to the level of achievement they might be likely to reach in Unit 3 and 4 of the same subject. Unit 3 and 4 SAC results are reported directly to the VCAA and form part of the student’s study score for that subject.

Years 10 - 12

Aggregate The total of a student’s Primary Four scaled study scores plus any additional scores for 5th or 6th subjects.

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Glossary of Terms A study score can also be referred to as a raw score. Please note that the minimum study scores listed as prerequisites by VTAC are raw scores, not scaled scores. TAFE Technical and Further Education. TAFE courses are provided at TAFE institutions, where education and training focuses on the practical applications of skill and knowledge. Courses can range from Certificate to Degree level and post-graduate qualifications. Tertiary Continuing education after completing Year 12 at school. This can be at a university, TAFE institution or independent training college. University A tertiary education institution offering degree and post-graduate courses requiring a minimum of three years to complete. Unscored VCE Students not wishing to obtain study scores or an ATAR (i.e. those who do not need an ATAR for tertiary course application) can elect to undertake the VCE without external assessment (Unit 3 and 4 exams). Provided they satisfactorily complete all required work and internal assessment, they still gain their VCE. VCAA Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority, which administers the VCE and provides a statement of results to all students at the end of their VCE. VCE Victorian Certificate of Education. A qualification obtained at the end of secondary schooling that is accredited by the VCAA, thus ensuring a standardised, common curriculum is taught and assessed in senior schooling throughout the State. To complete the VCE, a student must satisfactorily complete 16 Units. At least 8 must be at the 3 and 4 level, and 3 Units of an English subject (two of which must be at the 3 and 4 level) must be satisfactorily completed. VCE Units The components of a VCE study. There are usually four Units in a VCE study, numbered 1, 2, 3 and 4. Units are developed by the VCAA and each Unit is normally completed in one semester. Unit 1 refers to the first semester of a VCE study, Unit 3 refers to the third semester of a VCE study. Unlike Units 1 and 2, Units 3 and 4 cannot be taken independently – they must be taken as a sequence. Generally, Units 1 and 2 are undertaken in Year 11 and Units 3 and 4 in Year 12. VCE VET Vocational Education and Training (VET) certificate courses developed into (and accredited by the VCAA as) full Unit 1 – 4 programs of study that contribute to satisfactory completion of the VCE. Examples at ELTHAM are Hospitality, Screen & Media (Creative Digital Media), Music, Chinese, Sport & Recreation and Furniture Making.

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Students obtain a full VCE Study Score, as well as receiving a nationally recognised VET Certificate that can articulate directly into further education and training in the TAFE system through documented pathway agreements. There is no limit to the number of VET subjects that can contribute in full (i.e. in the same way as a standard VCE subject) to a student’s ATAR calculation. Vocational Practical learning directed towards a particular occupation and skills development. VTAC Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre, which handles the application and selection procedure for tertiary course places within Victoria. Decisions on selection are made by each individual institution – VTAC merely administers the process.


Appendix A

2021 Subject selection evening

16 July 2020

Year 9 - Year 11 (current)

2021 Subject selection evening

Early Term 3 2020

Year 9 - Year 11 (current)

2021 Subject selection interviews

7 August 2020

Year 9 and Year 11 (current)

Subject selection forms due

14 August 2020

Year 10 (current)

Subject selection forms due

Welcome

Year 9 - Year 11 (current)

Year 7

14 July 2020

Year 8

Event

Year 9

Year Level

Years 10 - 12

Date

Contents

Key Dates For Subject Selection

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Profile for ELTHAM COLLEGE

Senior School Curriculum Handbook 2021  

Discover the Years 7 - 12 subjects on offer at ELTHAM College in 2021.

Senior School Curriculum Handbook 2021  

Discover the Years 7 - 12 subjects on offer at ELTHAM College in 2021.

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