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Make an understated impression. Available in ďŹ ve neutral colours, from subtle, lighter tones through to bolder, darker hues, COLORBOND steel Matt diffuses light to create a soft and textured appearance. Tested in some of Australia’s harshest conditions, its strength and durability are perfect counterpoints to its designer appearance. Visit COLORBOND.COM/MATT or call 1800 702 764

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90+ pages OF COOL IDEAS: PLANTS, POOLS & SHADE SOLUTIONS

Summertime hues SWEET NEW PASTELS TO TRY

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LOCAL DESIGNS WE LOVE! ALL THE inspiration YOU NEED TO ESCAPE

Benchtop appliances WISH LIST

JANUARY $8.50 *NZ$9.50 ( *incl. GST)

the everyday

Home ^

CHYKA’S dream retreat

A MEGAN MORTON makeover

ANNABEL CRABB cooks


Nespresso Quest


JANUARY Home & away

90+ pages OF COOL IDEAS: PLANTS, POOLS & SHADE SOLUTIONS

Summertime hues SWEET NEW PASTELS TO TRY

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Cover stories

LOCAL DESIGNS WE LOVE! Benchtop appliance

ALL THE inspiration YOU NEED TO ESCAPE

WISH LIST

the everyday

Home ^

W

* CHYKA’S dream retreat * A MEGAN MORTON makeover * ANNABEL CRABB cooks

On our cover This wonderful home on the NSW Central Coast was built by an artist and is totally adored by the young family now in residence. Set on 1.5ha, there’s room for children and dogs to run free. Styling by Megan Morton. Photograph by Pablo Veiga. Artwork by Helen McCullagh.

Cover stars Love our cover colours? Make the palette your own with these Dulux paints:

14 Ch 25 S Sweet new pastels to try 35 5 82 139 182

Decorating & design 14 25 35 44 47

All The Rage

Teal Trip

Malay Grey

Hostess extraordinaire Chyka Keebaugh has a new home away from home. Inspired by Miami, our sunny take on Art Deco comes alive under the Australian sun. 20 A year of excellence in Australian design. Set the scene for a summer garden party. New directions for 2019 from home and abroad.

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Living motifs. Cool blues.

People 59 E Industry insiders reveal their summer getaways plus the food, music and books they will be enjoying over the break.

Insider 65 Design news and reviews. 66 N In his Sydney apartment, rug guru Bob Cadry displays favourite finds from a lifetime of travel. 71 How furniture designer and manufacturer Grazia Materia combines family and work. 74 D Australian success story Dinosaur Designs on its resin d’être over more than 30 years. 76 Coffee-table books covering all the good things in life.


Houses 82 O Megan Morton works her interiors magic on a character-rich home in NSW. 92 A smart Sydney home makes the most of its picturesque location. 100 A retreat near Wilsons Promontory in Victoria. 108 This new build in Sydney allows its beach-loving owners to catch waves every day. 116 Home to a young family, this Queensland property has good design and optimum health at heart.

Gardens

Photograph by Armelle Habib.

125 M A Victorian garden that’s a mix of cultivated and wild. 132 H Clever landscaping for a vacation vibe. 136 l Smart planting selections for around the pool. 137 Cl Garden news and to-dos.

Living

Shopping

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173 S m h Homewares inspired by citrus and sea to refresh your home and life. 179 For the dry season. 180 h Umb Take shelter! 182 y G Benchtop appliances showcase. 187 Wh y Stockist details.

146 148 149 151

Cl Annabel Crabb shares recipes for scrumptious afternoon-tea treats and desserts. S One-vineyard wines. Nutritional supplements. N Prestige fragrances. S Pack more into a few days of holidays.

Advice

Community

156 S t t Purpose-designed spaces to foster relaxation. 160 S lR Find out what’s making a splash in pool design. 164 Sm Sh Shade solutions. 168 L htly Environmentally responsible travelling. 169 t D New finishes and fabrics for your home projects. 170 ft L Poodles for pets. 171 ft Th l Property-price projections from the experts.

10 H Readers’ letters. 187 M 190 Sh w ll Readers’ letters. 194 m l The art of Robyn Sweaney hits home.

Reader offer 147 This month, you could win one of 200 Espressotoria coffee machine and capsules sets, valued at $250 each!


FURNITURE & HOMEWARES | INTERIOR DESIGN | PROPERTY STYLING | DESIGN SCHOOL WWW.COCOREPUBLIC.COM.AU


Photograph by Maree Homer (Lisa & H&G August 2015 cover story).

EDITOR’S LETTER H G

Australian HOMES

“You can live design daily without needing to be rich” were just a few of the wise words issued by editor Beryl Guertner when she launched Australian House & Garden in 1948. We pay homage to her work and the magazine’s ongoing success in our new book, Australian Homes: 70 Years Well Lived ($59.99, Bauer Books). Available from magshop.com.au and all good booksellers.

oised at that strange juncture between the end of the year and a new one, I always feel a bit discombobulated. A quick poll reveals similar sentiments among colleagues and friends. We might be bodily in the office or at Christmas functions and school concerts, but mentally we already have one foot on the sand and a toe in the water. This issue is dedicated to easing the pressure over the next few weeks and helping you to make some time for relaxation. On the entertaining front there’s a suite of desserts to sink your teeth into, from handy home cook and media personality Annabel Crabb (page 139). And there are plenty of shopping opportunities (from page 173) to browse through in case you haven’t completed your designed and/or made homewares, furniture, fittings gift hunting – from beach towels and and accessories contains gift ideas galore. Wrapping brollies to picnic essentials, refreshing up the shopping opportunities is a wide-ranging white wines and summer fragrances. array of coffee-table books (page 76), all reviewed As ever, our annual Style Awards by senior features editor Elizabeth Wilson. (page 35) highlights the breadth of Australian talent and creativity leaps from every creativity in this country. Supported by King Living, this year’s line-up of locally page of our own book, produced to mark the occasion of H&G’s 70th birthday. I mentioned it in passing last month and now Australian Homes: 70 Years Well Lived is on sale at last! A journey through seven decades of Australian living, it is full of wonderful imagery, iconic buildings, jaw-dropping A new OPTIMISM interiors and details about the people and times that B have influenced the way we’ve lived. What is clear from the book is that Australians do summer well, and this issue demonstrates that in spades. Built around the idea of escape, the homes, travel destinations and insider tips should help you slip swiftly into holiday mode. Enjoy! 1958-1967

y the 1960s, Australians were eyeing a sunny less freeform and organic than the previous decade. and prosperous future. Some of the boisterous Curves were more regular and geometic – cylinders colour palettes – and clashes – were carried over were a recurring theme. They signalled a sensuousness from the previous decade, as were the floating creeping into our homes. furniture styles signalling more relaxed living. But Cool Scandinavian style also travelled Down Under, some homeowners, from Toorak to Toowoomba, championed by local tastemakers Marion Hall Best remained tethered, style-wise, to England’s apron (H&G lauded her “delirious world of colour”) and Artes strings. They still favoured the trad look, with Queen Studio. The Scandi wave was epitomised by Marimekko fabrics and light timbers, from blond to radiata pine, Anne tables and floral fabrics on bloated sofas. The latter part of the decade, however, proved not used in airy furniture styles as well as on internal all apron strings were constricting. Carnaby Street walls. “The Scandinavians started it,” H&G declared. English Mod – all psychedelic hues, geometrics “Timber is the great mixer. It gets on with all other materials.” And shaggy white flokati and swirling paisleys – burst into rugs, it would appear. the consciousness. We amped up the ‘NOTHING WAKES We mixed in other ways, too, as colour, which was already more UP A ROOM AS project-home builders, such as Pettit saturated than in the previous SMARTLY AS & Sevitt, brought architectural design decade, smoky pastels having had A MIXTURE to regular homeowners, who toured their day. Mix and not-so-match was display homes at weekends. all the go as lipstick reds, jewel-like OF PATTERN.’ In the pursuit of all things cool, turquoises, emeralds and fiery oranges mingled within the one space. Violets were cashed-up Australians devoured Italian style, in far from shrinking and, as we took a shine to sheen, designs from B&B Italia, Kartell and Cappellini, many colours were pushed to the full. As if this wasn’t enough, in plastic, which facilitated flowing shapes. (“Plastic H&G welcomed “pattern pandemonium. Nothing is streets ahead of any other material,” H&G enthused, wakes up a room as smartly as a mixture of pattern. when environmental concerns didn’t cross our minds.) The magazine’s pages in the 1960s tell the story: Adventurous decorating demands it…” This visual cacaphony was often offset by dark plastic chairs and tables, Mylar wallpaper and timber, especially teak, which even made forays onto mirrored walls, representing “gleam and glitter, a the ceiling. If you couldn’t stretch to the real deal, brave new world”, were the perfect conduits for bold new wood laminates obliged. Furniture styles were colour. So, too, were some truly dizzying patterns.

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One last thing... 2018 finished on a high with H&G August 2015 Timber, sustainable of course, became an essential implement in the designer’s toolbox. This new home design by Farnan Findlay Architects went with the grain, by featuring spotted-gum cladding on the outside and American oak veneer and plywood indoors, adding warmth and effectively rooting the home to its inner Sydney garden. Plywood was even used on the ceiling in this guestroom, above, and the ingenious joineryused what could have been waste space in the eaves. Eco-friendly matt finishes added to the cosiness – shiny finishes belonged to the more extrovert previous decade. The result is intimate and cocooning.

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awarded Home, Garden, Architecture, Renovation Magazine Brand of the Year at the Australian Magazine Awards. Huge thanks to our readers, the judges and sponsors. AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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H G LETTERS

H&G social

The posts that made your month.

Facebook

YOUR H&G

I was just beginning to think about Christmas when the beautiful December issue cover caught my eye. Each page was filled with great ideas, from setting up my Christmas table to weaving festive touches throughout the house and outdoor areas. It has even inspired me to try my hand at making Christmas cards! Hint to my family who will enjoy the fruit of all this inspiration: a subscription to H&G makes a brilliant gift. Jodee Vaughan, Wanneroo, WA

Instagram

Can’t believe it’s House & Garden’s 70th Christmas issue. What a milestone, what a year – and what a way to celebrate it! December’s H&G illustrates the Australian Christmas at its finest and would surely stir anyone’s spirit. Cheers to you all! Corrine Stevenson, Cameron Park, NSW

Positively inspiring Pinterest

A budget-savvy entertainer’s kitchen found friends on Facebook, Instagrammers took a shine to this light-drenched stairwell, while Pinners pined for a glamorous kitchen by Williams Burton Leopardi. Facebook facebook.com/ australianhouseandgarden Highlights from each issue plus links to our favourite home tours. Instagram @houseandgarden View the most inspirational images from the month at H&G’s HQ and out and about. Pinterest pinterest.com.au/ houseandgardenau Picture-perfect images from our pages and sensational products to covet. For weekly news and inspiration, subscribe to our free e-newsletter at newsletter. houseandgardenmag.com.au.

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

I recently had a health scare and while I was waiting for the results, my husband went out and bought me a copy of H&G – coincidentally, the Wellness issue (November). It provided me with the distraction I so badly needed, and inspired me to look to the future. Thank you, H&G, for helping me to create a positive, well mind and a beautiful home, inside and out. Leeanne Kerr, Daglish, WA

Seek and you will find I currently live in Abu Dhabi due to my husband’s job, and since there is no regular postal service, have had to rely on trips

home to get my fix of H&G. Recently, we visited Dubai and I found the November issue in a bookstore. It did not disappoint! Now I need another trip to Dubai for the next issue. Many, many thanks. Janine Bainbridge, Saadiyat Island, UAE * You can subscribe to the digital issue of H&G to keep up to date, no postal service required. See page 191 for details – Ed.

A room of one’s own As I leafed through the Top 50 Rooms showcase (November) looking for ideas for my own renovation, I was in turn delighted by some rooms and left wondering about the people who lived in others. It brought home to me that there is no one true way in design and what matters is that rooms fulfil the needs of their inhabitants. It was a joy to then read On Home, Frank Moorhouse’s description of simple and connected living, and how perfectly it suits him. An inspiring issue to be sure. Kasey Ball, Murputja, NT

WRITE IN TO WIN

The author of every letter published receives $50. Our favourite also wins a fabulous prize. This month,

Jodee Vaughan of Wanneroo, WA, wins a NutriBullet Balance 1200W blender with smart nutrition sensor technology, valued at $280. For more information, go to bulletbrands.com.au. Email your letter to H&G@bauer-media.com.au with your full name and address or post it to Your H&G, PO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028.

Photograph by Christopher Morrison (Williams Burton Leopardi). Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

Great spirits


EDITORIAL Editor in chief Lisa Green Creative director Melissa Heath Deputy editor & travel John McDonald Interiors & houses Kate Nixon

ART

STYLE

Art director Katrina Breen Deputy art director Shayne Burton Junior designer Sophie Wilson

Senior stylist Kayla Gex Market editor Sarah Maloney Editorial & stylists’ assistant Sara Åkesson

FEATURES

SUB-EDITORS & WRITERS

Senior features editor Elizabeth Wilson Features Sarah Pickette Gardening Helen Young

Chief sub-editor/writer Deborah Grant Deputy chief sub-editor/production Tamarah Pienaar Sub-editor/writer Rosa Senese

CONTRIBUTORS Rachael Bernstone, Adelaide Bragg, Tanya Buchanan, Mindi Cooke, Steve Cordony, Annabel Crabb, Roger Crosthwaite, Sarah Ellison, Felix Forest, Martina Gemmola, Paula Goodyer, Nic Gossage, Harvey Grennan, Armelle Habib, Will Horner, Natalie Hunfalvay, Anna Johnson, Chyka Keebaugh, Elisabeth King, Perry Lane, Georgia Madden, Megan Morton, Heather Nette King, Jane Parbury, Toni Paterson, Chris Pearson, Kristina Soljo, Claire Takacs, Pablo Veiga, Chris Warnes, Kellie Woodward, Roz Wyatt

ADVERTISING & PRODUCTION Homes commercial manager Rhonda Maunder (02) 9282 8687 Homes manager Kimberly Anderson (02) 9338 6103 Advertising production manager Kate Orsborn (02) 9282 8364 Brand executive Jennifer Burke (02) 9288 9145 Victoria, SA & WA sales director Jaclyn Clements (03) 9823 6341 NSW head of agency sales Karen Holmes (02) 9282 8733 Victoria head of direct sales Will Jamison (03) 9823 6301 Queensland head of sales Judy Taylor (07) 3101 6636 New Zealand enquiries +61 2 9282 8505 General manager – production services Ian McHutchison Production controller Sally Jefferys Advertising production controller Dominic Roy (02) 9282 8691 Senior event manager Cate Gazal (02) 8226 9342

MARKETING & CIRCULATION Marketing director Louise Cankett Senior marketing manager Jillian Hogan Circulation manager Nicole Pearson Subscriptions campaign manager Lauren Flinn Assistant brand manager Nicole Pearson Marketing enquiries homes@bauer-media.com.au

SUBSCRIPTION SALES & ENQUIRIES Magshop, GPO Box 5252, Sydney NSW 2000, Australia Phone 136 116 (Mon-Fri, 8am-6pm AEDST) Web magshop.com.au All other Australian House & Garden enquiries: (02) 9282 8456

BAUER MEDIA CORPORATE Chief executive officer Paul Dykzeul Chief financial officer Andrew Stedwell Chief marketing officer Paul Weaving Commercial director Paul Gardiner Acting head retail & circulation Andrew Cohn General manager – subscriptions & e-commerce Sean McLintock Commercial analyst Georgina Bromfield Syndications syndication@bauer-media.com.au

Published by Bauer Media Pty Limited (ABN 053 273 546), 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000. The trademark AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN is the property of Bauer Media Pty Ltd and is used under licence. © 2018. All rights reserved. Printed by PMP Moorebank, 31-37 Heathcote Road, Moorebank, NSW 2170. National distribution by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd. 1300 650 666. ISSN 0004-931X. No material may be reproduced in part or in whole without written consent from the copyright holders. Bauer Media Pty Ltd does not accept responsibility for damage to or loss of freelance material submitted for publication. Allow several weeks for acceptance or return. For enquiries regarding subscriptions, call 136 116 Monday-Friday 8am-6pm AEDST, email magshop@magshop.com.au or mail letters to: Australian House & Garden, Reply Paid 3508, Sydney, NSW 2001 or subscribe online at magshop.com.au/hg. Subscription rate*: Australia $79.99 (one year, 12 issues); NZ A$120 (one year, 12 issues); other countries A$180 (one year, 12 issues). All overseas subscriptions sent air speed. *Recommended price, Australian House & Garden.


H G AT HOME WITH

Woodland

WONDER

Consummate entertainers Chyka and Bruce Keebaugh are discovering the simple pleasures of a leafy weekender an hour from Melbourne, where they can kick back and unwind in style. STO RY Deborah Grant | ST Y L I N G Chyka Keebaugh | P H OTO GR A PH Y Martina Gemmola

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN


GARDEN this page and opposite Chyka (pictured) and Bruce spent two years renovating their Mornington Peninsula property, adding areas such as the pool and stone-walled entertaining zone, which can even accommodate a marquee. The home is clad in low-maintenance Colorbond steel. “It’s literally a tin shed that’s fantastic in summer and winter. The Woodland Grey colour blends into the garden and doesn’t jump out,” says Chyka, who asked Paul Bangay to design the garden. “It’s still very new but coming to life before my eyes,” she says. ‘Provence’ outdoor furniture, Restoration Hardware (US). >


KITCHEN this page and opposite Chyka and Otto the family’s cavoodle in one of the home’s busiest rooms. “People often congregate here, but we are very good at moving people around,” she says. The new vegetable gardens supplement many of the wonderful meals prepared here. Benchtops, Stone Italiana ‘Basic Grain’. Flooring, Royal Oak Floors. In the foreground are stacks of All Fired Up Pottery plates Chyka bought through Instagram. Accessories from House of Orange and Rose St Trading Co.


AT HOME WITH H G

T

wo years ago, Chyka and Bruce Keebaugh were scrolling through Instagram when they discovered a property with promise on the Mornington Peninsula. “It was the Saturday nightofDerbyDayandBrucerang the agent for us to see the place on the Monday, then we bought it atauctionthefollowingSaturday,” says Chyka, who runs a catering and events company called The Big Group with Bruce, as well as her own lifestyle brand. The time was right for the couple. Their careers were ticking along and both their children were grown and living overseas, which meant no more Saturday sport to attend. Only an hour out of their base in Melbourne, the propertyofferedalifestylewheretheycoulddecampforweekends and comfortably entertain or just suit themselves. Wedged between Red Hill and Flinders, it’s surrounded by dairy farms and vineyards yet is only eight minutes’ drive to the beach. Fresh produce, gourmet restaurants and nearby activities such as horseridingandwinetastingsealedthedeal.“Thereareincredible vineyards and olive groves all around here,” says Chyka. While they loved the look and feel of the house, both Chyka and Bruce wanted more space, and more light in some areas at certain points of the day. Bruce actually drew up the plans – “he’s a frustrated architect” says Chyka – and a draftsperson finessed them. Within the year they had doubled the size of the home to include a beautiful new main bedroom with a dressing room and sitting area, a bar adjacent to the family room and a large mudroomconnectingthehouseandgarage.“Weusedthebuilder who did the original renovation so he matched the style and materials perfectly. In fact, it’s hard to tell where old meets new.” The expanded design suits them to a T. There are now four bedrooms in the main house, all with ensuites and dressing

rooms, plus a cottage with its own sitting room. “We wanted the property to be somewhere Bruce and I can enjoy together, but that would also work if we had four other couples staying for the weekend,” says Chyka. Everywhere you look, the decor is pure Chyka: functional and elegant, in a well-considered neutral palette. She chose oak for the floors and opted for cathedral ceilings where possible. Another of her masterstrokes was the blackinternaldoors,whichmatch the external windows and doors. Behind one set, the library has a cosy European-lodge feel. It contains2600blackbookstomatchthedesignscheme.“Ibought them at op shops in Melbourne,” Chyka explains. “They are all hardbacks that had to be black under the dust jackets. I love the impact they have when people see them for the first time.” Outside, a large outdoor entertaining area and swimming pool were amust, enhancedby PaulBangay’sbeautifulgarden design. “This place was designed around entertaining as that’s our business. With plenty of areas to socialise, people are here throughout the year. That might be a long, lazy lunch, drinks at the bar or a barbecue around the pool. We have a lot of friends in the area and are constantly catching up here.” Chykaand Bruce recentlysold their familyhome in Melbourne and are downsizing to an apartment they’re in the middle of building while renting elsewhere, so time out of the city is more important than ever. The couple have also just decided to call their country home Green Acre. “It sits on only one acre, which is a rare thing in this area,” says Chyka. “We love this house > and wouldn’t want any more than we have.” Bryan Myers Builder, Balnarring, Victoria; 0418 144 229. Paul Bangay Garden Design, Cremorne, Victoria; (03) 9427 9545 or paulbangay.com. AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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‘Bruce knows how to make spaces work and I’m all about the detail – the colours, the tiles, the tapware, et cetera – so we’re a great team.’ Chyka Keebaugh, owner


AT HOME WITH H G

MAIN BEDROOM “I wanted a bath in here so I could look out at the view,” says Chyka. ‘Level 45’ freestanding Ceramilux bath from Rogerseller. Bedside tables and dresser, Restoration Hardware (US). Linen by Hale Mercantile Co. MAIN ENSUITE Signorino tiles complement the vanity top made by a local craftsman. Lights and tilt mirrors, Restoration Hardware (US). Baskets, Pottery Barn. FOYER Between the guest quarters and family room is this transitional area leading out to the garden. Round table, Restoration Hardware (US). Artwork by Joshua Yeldham. SITTING ROOM An intimate space off the kitchen, with an open fire. Sofas and rug, Restoration Hardware (US). Coffee table, Provincial Home Living. ‘Hektar’ floor lamps, Ikea. >

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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H G AT HOME WITH

For Where to Buy, see page 187.

COURTYARD A sunny area outside the guest cottage with crunchy-gravel charm. Table and chairs, Cafe Culture+Insitu. Pots and foxglove plants from Julian Ronchi Garden Design & Nursery. MUD ROOM This is the nexus point between garage and library, with an adjacent laundry. Bluestone pavers, Signorino. Table, Restoration Hardware (US). LIBRARY Matt-black paint on most of the walls and ceiling keeps this room cosy. The fireplace is clad in the same oak as the floor. Antler chandeliers and grandfather clock, Restoration Hardware (US). Sofas covered in linen fabric from Westbury Textiles. Rug, Carpet World. SHED A garden tool/wood store nestled into the trees. FRONT DECK “This is where we have coffee in the morning,� Chyka explains. >

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN


‘We try to come down every weekend as we sleep better here. This is the first time I’ve had a place where I can just switch off the world and do nothing, guilt-free.’ Chyka


LIFE & STYLE

Chyka shares her memories, passions and wish list. FIRST HOME When Bruce and I moved our catering company from Mum’s kitchen to our own, we found a gorgeous building that we called “a slice of cake”. It was triangular in shape and had a kitchen and very, very small apartment upstairs. It always makes me smile to think about all the fun we had there. FIRST CAR A red Ford Laser. DREAM CAR I’m driving it now – a Range Rover. FAVOURITE BOOK A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry. LAST MEAL Chicken schnitzel and an avocado salad with goat’s cheese, basil and cherry tomatoes. DOG OR CAT? Dog. GAS OR INDUCTION? Gas. I LOVE A VASEFUL OF... Peonies – they are my favourite, with ‘Coral Charm’ the perfect colour. NEXT HOME PURCHASE An antique Chinoiserie lacquered desk for our new apartment in Melbourne – we are just starting to collect! FAVOURITE SCENT I love anything with amber and oud. I like things to smell dark and mysterious. NEXT HOLIDAY DESTINATION We are off to Hong Kong for a friend’s 50th birthday. WHAT INSPIRES YOU? Travelling to interesting countries that are full of history, colour and treasures. PLEASURABLE PASTIMES My new hobby is gardening and I love botanical drawing and colouring in. FAVOURITE ARTISTS Nicholas Harding [work pictured top centre], Todd Hunter and Joshua Yeldham. MUSIC I love all the great female artists and especially Lady Gaga’s new album from A Star Is Born. NEXT HOME OR GARDEN PROJECT We have just finished renovating Main Ridgge, so can concentrate on our new apartment beingg built in Richmond. GOALS FOR 2019 A new boook out in September / A summer shoe collaboration w with Walnut shoes / Moving into our new apartmennt / Spending more time in the US with my kids / Getting better at my circus training / Having time to stop and enjoy everything we have worked so hard for. #

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

2019 goals? ‘Having time to stop and enjoy everything we have worked so hard for.’

Photograph of Magnolia and Vine artwork by Nicholas Harding from OLSEN, Sydney; olsengallery.com.

H G AT HOME WITH


DECORATING

Styling by Kayla Gex. Photograph by Kristina Soljo.

WE’VE FALLEN FOR A MODERN ECHO OF ART DECO

‘Ancromati’ print in timber frame, $1475, Contents International Design. Harto ‘Cesar’ MDF sideboard in Natural Oak, $3240, Clickon Furniture. Nood Co ‘Momo Single’ concrete stool with upholstery in Blush Pink/Musk, $539, Own World. ‘Rattan’ wool and bamboo silk rug (240x300cm), $5490, Designer Rugs. ‘Texline Essence’ PVC flooring in Sherwood Clear, from $75/m² (installed), Gerflor. Wall painted Endure Interior in Blue Shamrock (darker shade) and Tullah Belle, both $72/4L, Taubmans. ON SIDEBOARD from left ‘Drop’ metal and glass table lamp, $795, Fanuli. ‘Float’ blown-glass vases, $350 (small) and $690 (medium), Natuzzi. ‘Taj’ bone-inlay box, $290, GlobeWest. Morgan & Finch ‘Shimmer Paisley’ wood and metal trinket box (top) in Natural/Gold, $30, Bed Bath N’ Table. Glass vase, $12, Kmart. ‘Simba’ ceramic vessel in Ivory, $24, Freedom. >


Pastel

POWER Art Deco themes and a South Beach Miami palette usher in a fresh and pretty decorating wave. ST YL I NG Kayla Gex | PH OTO GR AP H Y Kristina Soljo


DECORATING H G

Stylist’s assistants: Natalie Farmer, Aisha Hillary, Charlotte Smith.

SHELF HELP To see how we made this wall feature, go to page 188.

For similar shelving, try Bunnings. Faux yukka, $98, Florabelle. Clay planter in White, $450, Fanuli. Bernabeifreeman ‘Checkered’ wool rug (200x300cm), $5460, Designer Rugs. Wall painted Blue Shamrock and Tullah Belle (as before). ON TOP SHELF ‘Form’ aluminium and glass lamp, $129, Milligram. Harto ‘Jacques’ timber candleholders in Pastel Green and Warm Wood, $62/four modules, Clickon Furniture. ON MIDDLE SHELF Terrazzo eco-resin vases in White, $79 (squat) and $109 (tall), By Living. ‘Oyoy’ brass-plated bookends, $48/set of two, Top3 by Design. ON BOTTOM SHELF Terracotta vase in White, $18, French Bazaar. Morgan & Finch ceramic bud vase in Aqua Blue, $4, Bed Bath N’ Table. Oly resin sea urchin, from $395, Coco Republic. ‘Taj’ bone inlay box (as before). ‘Mr Potts’ bone-china vase, $82, and ‘Baby Potts’ bone china vase (at end), $49, both Jones & Co. Marble vase, $55, Contents International Design. OPPOSITE ‘Mochi’ ash and wool armchair, POA, Design By Them. ‘Clay Mini’ polyurethane table, $2481, Own World. ‘Pumpkin’ oak and wool ottoman in Mainline Flax, $510, Curious Grace. Faux palm tree, $238, Florabelle. Zeitraum ‘APU1’ ceramic pot in White/Salmon, $1152, Cafe Culture+Insitu. Wall painted Endure Interior in Lazy Lilac, $72/4L, Taubmans. ‘Lilac Moon’ print (38x56cm), $260, Ellie Malin. A2 wooden frame, $50, Officeworks. Bernabeifreeman ‘Ocean’ wool rug (200x300cm), $4500, Designer Rugs. ON TABLE ‘Mrs Potts’ bone china vase, $90, Jones & Co. ‘Arancini Jr’ brass and glass table lamp, $1190, Fanuli. >

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GLASS AND METAL HIGHLIGHTS RECALL THE GLAMOUR AND SPIRIT OF THE JAZZ AGE.

CLOCKWISE from top left Morgan & Finch ‘Weave’ acrylic tumbler in Aqua, $7, Bed Bath N’ Table. ‘Selina’ glass tumbler in Mint, $7, and highball glass in Mint, $8, both Freedom. Fferrone ‘Margot’ glass Champagne coupe, $322/set of two, Hub Furniture. ‘Harmony’ glass Champagne coupe, $60/set of six, Krosno. Terrazzo eco-resin coasters, $40/set of two, By Living. Jardin stackable glass tumbler, $81/set of six, and decanter, $69, both French Bazaar. Aino Aalto pressed-glass tumbler in Water Green, $25/set of two, Iittala. Fishs Eddy brass and mirror tray, $99, West Elm. ON TRAY Fferrone ‘Dearborn’ glass tumbler, $198/set of two, and ‘Margot’ glass decanter, $545, both Hub Furniture. Pasabahce ‘Timeless’ glass Champagne coupe, $19/set of four, Freedom. OPPOSITE Kristalia ‘TNP’ iron and aluminium table, $1540, Fanuli. For Panton chair, try Space. Home Design ‘Zucca’ glass pendant lights in Amber, $94 (small) and $209 (large), Bunnings. Backrest in Caryn Cramer striped linen, POA, Motivo Textiles. Bench cushion in linen in Lilac, $14/m, Floral Fanatics Fabric. ON TABLE Morgan & Finch ‘Milano’ linen napkin, $40/set of four, Bed Bath N’ Table. Nkuku glass bottle in Green, $25, Milligram. ‘Selina’ glass tumbler, $7, Freedom. ON BENCH ‘Rossi’ velvet cushions in Yellow and Blue, $320 each, Fanuli. Wall painted Endure Interior in Lazy Lilac and bench in Innocent Smile, $72/4L, Taubmans. BEHIND WALL Small faux agaves (in pots, not shown), $160 each, and faux agave bushes, $98 each, Florabelle. >

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REVIVE THE SENSES WITH PASTELS FROM THE COOLER END OF THE SPECTRUM.


H G DECORATING

CURVES AND OTHER GEOMETRIC SHAPES MIMIC THE DYNAMIC ARCHITECTURE OF THE DECO ERA.


STYLE TIP Streamlined pieces in fresh white keep things modern and balanced.

‘Miami’ ceramic tiles (75x300mm) in Pastel Ice Gloss, $91/m², Skheme. Home Design hanging bathroom mirror, $69, and Mondella ‘Resonance’ brass tap set, $105, both Bunnings. Ledlux ‘Disk’ wooden LED wall lights in Warm White, $129 each, Beacon Lighting. ON SHELF ‘The Bowl’ concrete basin in Mint, $854, Nood Co. ‘Travertine’ polyresin canister, $15, Freedom. Bamboo toothbrush, $4, Biome. ‘Totem’ limestone candleholders, from $140 each, Fenton & Fenton. ‘White Folia’ bone-china vase, $129, Wedgwood. ‘Bauhaus Blue’ cotton hand towel, $35, Fenton & Fenton. Wall and shelf in Innocent Smile (as before). OPPOSITE ‘Melange Elongated’ alabaster and brass sconce, $979, The Montauk Lighting Co. ‘Gemini’ walnut-veneer bedside table, $349, West Elm. ON BEDSIDE TABLE ‘White Folia’ bone-china vase, $129, Wedgwood. AYTM iron jewellery tray in Rose, $148, Top3 by Design. ‘Geo’ marble and soapstone box, $29, West Elm. King-single bedhead in ‘Stella’ fabric in Polka Dot Aqua, $1350, Heatherly Design Bedheads. ON BED from top Velvet cushion in Purple, $1050, Fanuli. ‘Heather’ linen European pillowcase, $55, Kip & Co. ‘Rossi’ velvet cushion in Blue, $320, Fanuli. Linen fabric (made into cushion), POA, Motivo Textiles. Australian House & Garden ‘Sandy Cape’ linen sheet set in Mineral Grey, $260/single (including standard pillowcase). ‘Heather’ linen queen-size quilt cover, $299, Kip & Co. ‘Moroccan’ wool throw in White, $595, Contents International Design. ON FLOOR ‘Rossi’ velvet cushion in Yellow (as before). ‘Steele’ rug in Ice (200x300cm), from $1295, Coco Republic. Wall painted Lazy Lilac (as before). > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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REPEAT MOTIFS AND DRAMATIC FORMS TO CLOSE THE DECORATIVE CIRCLE.

‘Noosa’ powdercoated decorative screen in Pale Eucalypt, $1390, Adam Robinson Design. ‘Platform 2’ powdercoated table/stand in White Gloss, $340, Idle Hands. Miniforms ‘Cigales Freestanding 2’ metal stand, $824, Café Culture+Insitu. ON TABLE ‘Pomander’ resin planter, $129, Freedom. Faux agaves (in pots, not shown), $160 each, and ‘Exotic Multi Pod’ faux flowering-agave stem, $23, all Florabelle. ON STANDS For similar pot, try Bunnings. Devil’s ivy plant (Scindapsus aureum) in hanging pot (not shown), $28, Bunnings. ‘Z’ faux kentia palm with bark base, $278, Florabelle. ON FLOOR Faux palm tree, $238, Florabelle. Large ‘Aztec’ concrete planter in White, $450, Contents International Design. Faux yucca head, $192 (includes pot, not shown), Florabelle. Small ‘Aztec’ concrete planter in White, $180, Contents International Design. Faux yucca, $190 (includes pot, not shown), Florabelle. Zeitraum ‘APU1’ ceramic pot in White/Salmon, $1152, Cafe Culture+Insitu. Wall in Innocent Smile (as before). For Where to Buy, see page 187. #

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THE

There’s no deck that creates an outdoor room quite like HardieDeck™ decking. Providing a clean look with smooth, wide gap-free boards, it also gives you freedom of colour choice. Made from premium fibre cement, it’s perfect for bushfire zones, backyard barbies and fire pits. It won’t rot, warp or splinter, so sit back and relax. If you want to make sure your deck makes an impression this summer, rethink traditional decking options and ask for HardieDeck™ decking by name. ©2018 Copyright James Hardie Australia Pty Ltd ABN 12 084 635 558 ™ and ® denotes trademarks and registered marks owned by James Hardie Technology Ltd. Additional installation information, warranties & warnings are available at hardiedeck.com.au

DECK

DISCOVER MORE AT HARDIEDECK. COM. AU


2018 Style AWARDS From dynamic prints and paints to accomplished furniture and accessory ranges, these local designs turned our heads and won our hearts. P R OD U C ED BY John McDonald

SPONSORED BY

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2018 Style AWARDS

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We’ve seen strong blue hues from table to bedroom.

7 8 1 ‘Big Smoke Buddy’ vase (19cm) by Marble Basics has a blown-glass globe that can be rotated to display flowers in the direction of your choice. The base is ‘Blanc’ marble. $95; marblebasics.com.au. 2 Designer Julia Denes of Woodfolk creates lovely ceramics and jewellery at her studio in Bondi, NSW, and also works with artisans in Nepal. Shown here is her stunning ‘Imperfect’ stoneware bowl in Midnight Blue (13cm), $40; woodfolk.com.au. 3 The Australian House & Garden ‘Wollombi’ fine bone-china side plate (20cm), $13, bears a hand-drawn design. Available from Myer; myer.com.au. 4 Adam Goodrum has expanded his ‘Trace’ range of outdoor furniture with this superb sunlounger for Tait. The frame is available in several powdercoated Colorbond shades and many premium upholstery options. It’s also super-comfortable. $5225; madebytait.com.au. 5 ‘Jolly’ pendant light by Kate Stokes for NAU is a balancing act of form and function. POA, Cult; cultdesign.com.au. 6 Julie Ramsay of Bedtonic designs beautiful linen bedding from her Perth base. Bespoke circle stitched


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This Japanese-inspired ‘Hoshi’ rug (3x3m) by Canberra designer Tom Skeehan for Stylecraft Home, shown here in Shida, is made from sumptuous New Zealand wool that comes in two colourways. $5841; stylecrafthome.com.au.

13 Navy velvet with feather inner (50cm), $155, Alex W Living; alexwliving.com.au.

6 14 ‘Sanctuary’ linenpolyester in Indigo (50cm), $55, Madras Link; madraslinkonline.com.au.

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The chic ‘Agent 86’ sofa by Grazia & Co starts at $6020, depending on your fabric selection (pictured is luxe Alpaca velvet from Mokum in Ivy). It can also be ordered as a modular setting, and the base can be upholstered in a contrasting fabric if desired; graziaandco.com.au. 15 ‘Flores’ linen in Moss (50cm), $139, Walter G; walter-g.com.au.

blanket in Fog (180x210cm), $248; queen-size quilt-cover set in Oxford Blue & Pindan (reverse), $340; queen-size sheet set in Marine Ticking Stripe, $350; and European pillowcases in Venice Blue, $69/pair; bedtonic.com. 7 The latest offerings from Utopia Goods include this ‘Native Meadow’ upholstery linen, a celebration of native flora, including kangaroo paw and grevilleas. $209/m; utopiagoods.com. 8 Georgie Avis of Littlecrow Design in Sydney lovingly crafts her textile wares by hand. These are her ‘Coorabell Hinterland’ screenprinted-linen wallhangings, $129 each; littlecrowdesign. com.au. 9 ‘Summer Melon’ indoor/outdoor fabric (shown here in Denim), designed by Chrissie Jeffery of No Chintz, is made from a mix of new and recycled polyester. $125/m; nochintz.com. 10 Designed by Shelley Simpson, Mud Australia’s ‘Flared’ bowls are handmade in Sydney using French Limoges porcelain clay. Available in 20 colours, from $294. The one shown here, extra large (32x16cm) in Ink, is $353; mudaustralia.com. > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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2018 Style AWARDS

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16 In designer shades and textures, glass has been in the limelight.

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Print and colour proved a popular bedtime story.

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16 Helen Kontouris for LEN ‘Softscape 04’ pendant lights feature smoked or transparent blown-glass shades, $1171 each (or opt for powdercoated aluminium, $738), Stylecraft Home; stylecrafthome.com.au. 17 Kip & Co to the rescue for a colourful bedroom! ‘Checking Out’ quilted bedspread (254x274cm), $349, and pillowcase, $59; a velvet ‘Pea’ cushion in Smoky Pink, $89; and linen pillowcase, $89/pair, and queen-size fitted sheet, $179, both in Bellini; kipandco.com.au. 18 Designed and made in Victoria, the recycled-polypropylene ‘Stay Tray’ drinks holder was conceived to “reduce waste by encouraging good habits”. It’s stackable and dishwasher-safe. $25; staytray.com.au. 19 Members of several indigenous arts centres in the Northern Territory create splendid fabric and wallpaper designs for Willie Weston, a venture launched by Melbourne art curators Jessica Booth and Laetitia Prunetti. Pictured: Singing Bush Medicine (Dusk) fabric by Colleen Ngwarraye Morton, a member of the Artists of Ampilatwatja centre, 300km north-east of Alice Springs. From $155/m printed on natural linen; willieweston.com. 21 Pete Cromer, an artist working out of Torquay, Victoria, specialises in colourful Australian bird and animal


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Perth-born, Melbournebased Marcel Sigel designed the ‘Grille’ indoor/outdoor table, $695, and stackable chairs, $395 each (shown in Matt Black) for Go Home; gohome.com.au.

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27 ‘Honestly Artisan’ bricks in Hessian, Chalk and Bespattered, $3 each, PGH Bricks; pghbricks.com.au.

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28 The Beach Club ‘Cinque Terre’ concrete tile by Sarah Ellison (15cm), $189/m², Teranova; teranova.com.au.

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29 Laminex ‘Landscape’ laminates in Matte Rose Gold (on top), $121/m² and Korten (both sides), $199/m²; laminex.com.au.

themes. He’s contributed a raft of works for Maxwell & Williams’ porcelain mugs and trivets, $10 each, and coasters, $3; maxwellandwilliams.com.au. 22 The ‘Posie’ cushion by Trudie Cox for Eadie Lifestyle, from $130, is digitally printed and part of a range that includes a tote, throw and kimono; eadielifestyle.com.au. 23 Made in Melbourne, the Molmic ‘Rydell’ sofa references 1970s seating and is a delight to sink into. $6750; molmic.com.au. 24 Cindy-Lee Davies of Lightly has us swooning over her powdercoated-metal Grace collection. Here are new-release ‘Tone’ planters in Orchid & Sand ($150, left) and Bark & Mustard ($145); lightly.com.au. 25 ‘Form’ table lamp in powdercoated cast-aluminium and glass is a collaboration between Melbourne’s Milligram Studio and One Design Office. The base can be Triangle, Rectangle or Cylinder (pictured) and the colour options are Pink, Black, White or Teal. $129; milligram.studio. 26 By Henry collection ‘Henry’ chair by Henry Sgourakis has an American-oak frame. The one pictured is painted Dulux Pink Dust and has a soft, shaggy mohair seat pad. Other frame and upholstery options are available. $1290, Arthur G; arthurg.com.au. > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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2018 Style AWARDS Woven forms in myriad materials made their presence felt.

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Australian-designed woven cotton goodies from Weave, with products made ethically in India, Pakistan and Nepal. FROM LEFT ‘Devonport’, ‘Sausalito’ and ‘Miramar’ cushions (all 50x50cm), $60 each, and ‘Monterey’ throw, $160; weavehome.com.au.

44 30 ‘Pegasi M 30696-11’ kitchen mixer, from $710, Faucet Strommen; faucetstrommen.com.au.

42 31 ‘Halo Marble’ wall tap set in Chrome, $923, Brodware; brodware.com.

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32 Sussex’s Design Studio app allows bespoke tap creation; sussextaps.com.au.

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34 The Pampa team, helmed by Victoria Aguirre and Carl Wilson, design their distinctive homewares (rugs, art, decorative items, apparel) from their Byron Bay studio and have them handsomely crafted in Argentina. ‘Monte #15’ wool cushion in Natural White, $185; pampa.com.au. 35 Natio’s Orange, Clove & Cedarwood scented candle (pictured) was a new addition to the company’s divine candle range for 2018, as was Pear, Jasmine & Vanilla. $27 each; natio. com.au. 36 Alex Fitzpatrick pays homage to the robustness of handcrafted glass and metal forms, especially in a maritime context, in his ‘Greenway Crackle’ pendants for ADesign Studio, located in Sydney’s Matraville. From $1020 each; adesignstudio.com.au. 37 The Society Inc’s ‘The Shack’ pendant by Sibella Court is made of cane and a sheer gauze. $150; thesocietyinc.com.au. 38 Heavenly is the only word for the ‘Gradient Cloud’ digitally printed wallpaper, shot by H&G regular Jody D’Arcy for Scandinavian Wallpaper & Décor. $99/m²; wallpaperdecor.com.au. 39 Queensland ceramicist Liz Sofield crafts incredibly intricate porcelain pieces, including these ‘crochet porcelain’ vessels: ‘Interwoven I’ (left), $350, and ‘Lace Edge’, $250; lizsofield.com. 40 The King Living


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40 ‘Delta III’ sofa is a 2018 redesign of the classic ‘Delta’. Pictured is the ‘Package 3’ outdoor setting, $3990; kingliving.com.au. 41 Rina Bernabei and Kelly Freeman of Bernabeifreeman created a range of ceramic vessels and lamps by experimenting with 3D digital-fabrication techniques. ‘Hybrid Vessel – Double Loop’, $450; bernabeifreeman.com.au. 42 Top Sydney design firm Hare+Klein adds to the stellar line-up at Designer Rugs. Here we present the ‘Refraction’ Tibetan wool and silk rug (2.4x3m), a perfect neutral backdrop for almost any interior. $7272; designerrugs.com.au. 43 Tom Fereday dreamt up the futuristic ‘ETO’ desk for King Living. It has integrated power and lighting, wireless charging and is crafted of aluminium and FSC timber veneers in a black japan finish. POA; kingliving.com.au. 44 Essastone’s seven new engineered-stone surfaces are a textural feast. Pictured is ‘Luna Concrete’, a study in moonlike magic. $434/m²; essastone.com.au. 45 Ceramic artist Angela Thomas of Angie Talleyrand creates homewares that are made to last. We just love these vases. At front, ‘Talulah’ (left) and ‘Blue Moon’, $195 each; at rear, ‘Lit’, $175 (small) and $225 (large); angietalleyrand.com. > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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Israeli-born designer Ilan El creates the most amazing luminaires at his base in Melbourne. The gorgeous ‘Stella F’ lamp, $1180, is crafted in glass, brass and aluminium and casts an orb-like celestial glow; ilanel.com. ilanel com

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46 ‘Chips’ chair by Jonathan Ben-Tovim of Ben-Tovim Design was created for use in a maker space at Melbourne University’s School of Design. It’s an honest form in powdercoated steel and moulded plywood. $515; b-td.com. 47 In her Clovelly, NSW, studio, Kate Swinson of Native Swinson renders fine drawings in pen and then screenprints them onto sustainable papers and fabrics. To wit, ‘Paddock Flowers And Their Bees’ wallpaper in Autumn Leaf Brown on Graphite (also in three other colourways), $520/10m roll; nativeswinson.com.au. 48 Haymes Artisan Collection ‘Metal Trace Smooth’ is a textured metallic interior paint, shown here in Gold Grit. $75/L; haymespaint.com.au. 49 Gavin Harris of design practice Futurespace has devised the ‘Bulbo’ collection of modular tables and stools for NAU. Shown is the high table, $361. Available through Cult; cultdesign.com.au. 50 The cute ‘Kenya’ side table from Oz Design Furniture is easy to move from room to room and, with a height of 53cm, great for serving drinks. $329; ozdesignfurniture.com.au. 52 Jon Goulder, creative director of Adelaide’s JamFactory, has produced a stellar range of furniture called Innate for Spence & Lyda, using pickled Tasmanian timbers, leather and laser-cut metal. ‘Night’ credenza, $13,655; spenceandlyda.com.au. 53 Jamie Durie has designed a range of flamboyant plantation-style furniture for US brand McGuire. ‘191 Sunflower’ cocktail table, a vision in rattan, cane and glass, $6289 through Studio Cavit; studiocavit.com. #

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GARDEN PARTIES

FAB FOUR

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Outdoor entertaining is one of summer’s great pleasures. Kate Nixon gets her soirée on.

4 1 Solar cage string lights (3.8m), $15, Kmart; kmart. com.au. 2 ‘Daintree Green’ linen tablecloth, from $215/145x250cm, Bonnie and Neil; bonnieandneil. com.au. 3 Australian House & Garden ‘Lord’ crystalline-glass Champagne flutes, $40/set of four, Myer; myer.com.au. 4 ‘Ellison’ oval metal ice bucket, $140, Living By Design; livingbydesign.net.au.

Fresh ideas and easy updates

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ith the holiday season upon us, there’s no better time to channel your inner entertainer and gather friends and family for a garden party. It’s surprisingly simple and inexpensive. Define a central spot for food and drinks with hanging features; these can be as simple as string and paint-dipped feathers, pretty floral paper lanterns or little glass bottles filled with fresh flowers. Attach these to trees, a pergola or even an outdoor umbrella. Consider enhancing the space by moving indoor features, such as rugs and occasional furniture, outside for the occasion. And don’t be afraid to mix and match elements: keep to a consistent colour palette and it’ll be a picnic! #

Send decor questions (with name and address) to H&G Advice, GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028 or email H&G@bauer-media.com.au.

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✚ Lighting is the easiest way to add atmosphere and ambience. Try hanging lanterns, tall floor lanterns or a classic string of festoon party lights. ✚ A welcome drink gets everyone settled. Make up your own signature tipple and have everything at the ready so guests can help themselves. ✚ Keep the food simple and cook whatever you can in advance so you can enjoy your party. ✚ It’s hard to beat a classic pavlova and big bowl of fresh berries for dessert. Homemade lemon curd and passionfruit will add a delicious zing to the occasion.

Styling by Kate Nixon. Photography by Maree Homer (top) & Chris Court (bottom).

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Soft furnishings from Weave Home (weavehome.com.au). Styling by Bek Sheppard. Photograph by Marc Buckner.

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FORECAST

With an eye on international design fairs and an ear tuned to the predictions of leading experts, we offer up the style and colour directions set to make an impact in 2019.

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There was plenty to admire at the Ma aison&Objet design fair in Paris, where the focus ffor many was on homewares with a polished yet handcrafted feel.

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Treasures from the Middle East Marc Dibeh was one of the young Lebanese designers hailed as a rising talent. He showed products like this ‘Camille’ cakestand and furniture pieces made from extreme stone. The cakestand is from a range of everyday products inspired by memories (marcdibeh.com). Colourful weaves There were lots of vibrant, rustic textiles at the fair and a plethora of makers, including Faye Toogood with her new ‘Criss-Cross 1’ blanket designs for Spanish textile company Teixidors. With their natural-hued finish and coloured stitching, the blankets are made from wool that’s been washed to achieve a soft, felt-like finish (fayetoogood.com; teixidors.com). Metal as anything The metallic trend has calmed down a bit but still featured in everything from lighting to bar trolleys and outdoor furniture. Alvar Aalto’s A330S ‘Golden Bell’(3A) wall light in Brass by Artek is a timeless piece that injects just the right shot of bling (anibou.com.au). The durability of metal makes it a clear winner for outdoor furniture. These Studio Brichet Ziegler-designed ‘Week-End’ pieces for Petite Friture (3B) showcase refined forms with a rugged sensibility (petitefriture.com). Time-honoured style The overarching feel of the fair was handcrafted, bespoke and artistic. Dutch designers Stefan Scholten and Carole Baijings showed this serene retro-inspired collection of porcelain vessels and plates in organic shapes (scholtenbaijings.com; livingedge.com.au). La dolce vita Understated luxury was the theme at exclusive Italian homewares marque Giobagnara, where exquisitely crafted pieces – including trays, drinks trolleys, bowls, small boxes and baskets – were displayed. Each is fashioned from leather in a beautiful colour palette by the house’s creative director, Stéphane Parmentier, who formerly worked for Karl Lagerfeld (giobagnara.com). Child’s play Gorgeous pieces for junior style-setters were in abundance at EO, a Danish contemporary design house that had a line-up of designer pieces, among them The Zoo collection featuring ‘Whale’ (6A), designed as an homage to textile house Kvadrat’s bestselling fabric Hallingdal 65; and the whimsical yet sturdy Takeshi Sawada-designed ‘Bambi’ stool in faux fur (6B; eo.dk; top3.com.au).

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LONDON DESIGN FESTIVAL

Text by & Tanya Buchanan (Paris) & Jane Parbury (London). For more, go to londondesignfestival.com and maison-objet.com/en.

This influential design expo was held at various locations across the UK capital, celebrating cutting-edge technologies and new products from leaders in the field.

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Collector’s dream Quite a few companies have been dipping into the archives to reinvent wallcoverings and fabrics. A great example is Blackpop’s Collector’s Collection, produced in collaboration with Sir John Soane’s museum. Works from the 18th-century architect’s collection have been digitally deconstructed and punked up to create vibrant wallpapers and lush upholstery velvets (blackpop.co.uk). New tech tales Technological advances have allowed design to push the boundaries, beautifully demonstrated in the carbon-fibre lighting by Sebastiaan Vandeputte for Artelier C. The ready-made range includes wall lights, standing lamps and table lamps (artelierc.com; beyondbespoke.agency). Old is new again The traditional craft of bentwood is enjoying a revival. This ancient process of shaping wood by wetting or steaming it, popularised by Thonet in the 19th century, has been having a moment in rattan furniture. One of the coolest examples at Design Junction was the ‘Chips’ chair by Czech designer Lucie Koldová for TON (ton.eu; jamesrichardsonfurniture.com.au). Clever walls New off the block at the fair were two wallcoverings: the first was Italian firm Glamora’s Glamfusion range of prefinished waterproof wallpaper (4A), which can even be used for shower walls (glamora.it); the other was an OLED-embedded wallpaper called ‘Ribbon Prism’ (4B) from Meystyle (meystyle.com), which echoes the current trend for geometrics. Log on The ongoing yen for wood finishes and timber products has engaged with the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi to produce homewares that celebrate thhe unique grains of different woods. Tamasine Osher’s ‘Spider’ tables and hand-turned ‘Cupola’ pendants (5A; tamasineosher.com); and Sebastian Cox’s w woven-timber ‘Bayleaf’ settle and ‘Crown’ candelabra (5B), crafted from coppiced hazel (sebastiancox.co.uk), were among the vast range of pieces. Good to be green Rich peacock-green shone in all its decadent beauty in some of the wallpaper collections. Our picks: ‘Thea’ in Palm Green from the C Casbah Collection by Surfacephilia (surfacephilia.co.uk); ‘Gramercy’ in Emerald by Mind The Gap (mindtheg.com); and ‘Garden of Serica’ in Malachite (pictured above right) from The Silk Route collection by Anna Glover (annaglover.co.uk). >

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From sophisticated surface materials to the paints and fabrics about to make their mark, here’s a line-up to take note of.

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In the shades As colour expert and trend forecaster for Dulux, Andrea Lucena-Orr senses the mood and scours trade fairs to land on hues that will shape the seasons. For 2019, Dulux presents four key paint palettes. Repair (3) is a collection of earthy neutrals and rich greens, with spicy cinnamon and sienna notes. “I love its muted tonal combinations and slightly offbeat, vintage feel,” says Andrea. Wholeself (1) draws together shades of mauve-grey, powdery pinks and touches of gold to create serene, calming interiors. Legacy (2) presents intense saturated hues, such as deep purple, russet and aqua, offset by brown-based pinks. The Identity palette is for rule-breakers, with clashing patterns and brights bringing optimism and cheer (dulux.com.au). Textile thrills It’s an exciting time to explore colour, texture and pattern, says Luciana Wallis from Warwick Fabrics’ design studio. She nominates shades of electric blue, scarlet red and yellow as strong directions for 2019. Coral tones foster playfulness, she says, while greens are evolving into pared-back shades like those found in our backyards (4). Meanwhile, rich brown is making a comeback (5), influenced by Mid-century design. Finding the right balance between aesthetic factors and performance in fabrics is the key to success, advises Luciana (warwick.com.au). Surface attention New-look colours and textures for Laminex fall into groupings of easy-to-use neutrals or accents. At a recent forum hosted by the Design Institute of Australia, Laminex’s Catherine Valente presented a range of exciting palettes that create a variety of decor moods. Smoked Birchply (6A), a sophisticated woodgrain from the Landscape series, is teamed with Oyster Grey (6B) from the Absolute Matte range, along with Essastone Perla Venato (6C), which is also from Laminex. “Ethereal smoked tones, soft veining and delicate grains represent honesty and an organic sensibility,” says Catherine (laminex.com.au). #

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Text by Lisa Green. Styling by Bree Leech (Dulux). Photography by Lisa Cohen (Dulux).

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Take a walk on the wild side and exploore the unique charms of flora and fauna in a home setting. 133

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Produced by Saarah Maloney & Sara Åkesson.

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1 ‘Monkeyy Lamp’ p resin hanging g g wall light, g , $595,, Seletti. 2 ‘Dragonfly’ g y brass b hook, $55, St Barts. 3 Decorative dragonfly and bee in Gold (both 15cm), $35 each, French Country Collections. 4 ‘Butterfly’ glass vase (12cm), $60, Zara Home. 5 ‘Australian Flora’ soy wax candle, $36, Lazy Bones. 6 Metallic bee in brass, $8, Target. 7 Barloga Studios ‘Seafan 2’ art print (50x70cm), $165, Saarde. 8 Salt&Pepper ‘Shark’ glass ornament, $99, Myer. 9 ‘Nectar’ linen cushion (60cm), $110, Few and Far. 10 HK Living ‘Botanical’ printed cotton school chart, $60, House of Orange. 11 ‘Grayson’ armchair with Zoology Savanna upholstery, $1549, Oz Design Furniture. 12 ‘Lion’ aged-brass lock, $90, The Society Inc. 13 ‘Scarlet Jezebel’ porcelain bowl, $75, Corban & Blair. 14 Marini Ferlazzo ‘Kookaburra’ china plate (20cm), Maxwell & Williams. 15 Cole & Son ‘Forest’ wallpaper, $755/10m, Radford. For Where to Buy, see page 187. # AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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H G DECORATING 3 2 1 4

Trend 14 1

EEvoking pools, lagoons and tropical holidays, there’s no colour qquite as refreshing as cyan. Dive D on o in…

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9 8 1 ‘Mexican’ 3.8m cotton hammock, from $89, Hammock Heaven. 2 Havanah Ray tassel earrings, $25, Table Tonic. 3 ‘Coast’ stainless-steel cheese knife with bone handle, $16, Few and Far. 4 Hyde Park Home ‘Misty Blue Vase’ glass table lamp, $169, $169 Temple T l & Webster. Wb ‘Blue ‘Bl Palm’ P l ’ glass l tumblers, bl $13 each, The Boathouse. 6 Unico ‘Placement’ dining chair with teal upholstery, $209, RJ Living. 7 ‘Little Hills Blue’ limited-edition art print by Antoinette Ferwerda, $550, Clickon Furniture. 8 Habitat ‘Herringbone’ seagrass belly basket, $25, Pillow Talk. 9 ‘Vasaio’ melamine salad bowl, $9, Freedom. 10 ‘Spiral’ earthenware 20cm plate, $7, Zara Home. 11 ‘Loops & Tassels’ wool-cotton cushion (60x60cm), $125, Ruby Star Traders. 12 ‘Willshire’ queen-size pine bed with ‘Monroe’ polyester upholstery in Airforce, $2199, Sheridan. 13 The Decor Store wire and rattan bar stool, $70, Temple & Webster. 14 Fujifilm Instax ‘Mini 9’ instant camera in Ice Blue, $99, Domayne. For Where to Buy, see page 187. #

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

Produced by Saraa Åkesson & Natalie Farmer.

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THE

I still pinch mylf LOOK

A STORY OF PLANNING TO PERFECTION


Planning to Perfection “We fell in love with the bones of this house straight away, but when we decided to do an extension, we needed something practical that would suit our lives. We have lots of kids and friends coming over and do plenty of entertaining. Our architect recommended MatrixTM and StriaTM cladding from James Hardie’s Scyon range which gave us the clean, dramatic lines around the back and side of the house. Our builder loved it too because it’s durable and simple to construct but nothing too precious. Every morning when I walk out the back I smile and pinch myself.” Our renovation was built by Truform Construction and designed by de atelier Architects. Visit scyon.com.au to see more beautiful homes and advice on how to transform your home.

Copyright © 2018 James Hardie Australia Pty Ltd ABN 12 084 635 558. ™ and ® denotes a trade mark or registered mark owned by James Hardie Technology Ltd.


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PEOPLE H G

ESCAPE PLANS

It’s time to clock off and ease into holiday mode. Here, six creatives reveal their summer-break essentials. P RO D U C E D BY Elizabeth Wilson

Rachel Castle

Photography by John-Paul Urizar (Rachel Castle portrait) & Rob Palmer (brioche buns) from Special Guest ($39.99, Murdoch Books).

This Sydney-based artist and designer is a selfdescribed ‘fun enthusiast’ who unites her love of colour and ’80s pop culture in paintings, embroideries, screenprints and homewares. Her joyful designs and summer-on-a-canvas palette have won her fans across the globe. Every summer we have a quintessential Aussie summer holiday and spend a

fortnight at Mollymook Beach [pictured above] on the NSW South Coast. We love it because a lot of our friends go at the same time, so it’s one big

happy holiday for everyone. Our children have all grown up together on these holidays. We decide what to eat for dinner while we sit on the beach with a drink at 6pm. It’s the only time of the year that I really do feel free. Our dining options are varied. One night we’ll eat at Rick Stein at Bannisters, the next it’s Mollymook Golf Club, and the next it’ll be fish and chips on the beach as the sun sets. My ideal summer’s day involves reading in bed until midday. I know that’s the best time of the day to be outside, but I just need to be horizontal, poring over the books I’ve dreamt of reading all year. I love reading prizewinning novels and take a suitcase full of them on holiday.

‘ O N O U R B E AC H H O L I DAYS E V E RYO N E I S H A P PY. T H E R E ’ S N O F I G H T I N G OV E R W H O WA N TS TO D O W H AT, O R W H E R E W E E AT. E V E RYO N E J U ST D O E S E X AC T LY A S T H E Y P L E A S E .’ Rachel Castle My summer playlist will include all my faves: Fleetwood Mac, The Cure, The

Smiths, The Bee Gees, Crowded House and newer stuff like Rufus, The War on Drugs and London Grammar. I’m giving my family a record player for Christmas and am excited about buying albums. I’m totally getting Rumours, Fleetwood Mac’s 1977 album, as my first one. My favourite summer meal would have to be Champagne and oysters, first, second and for all time. After our time away, my daughter and I always go to the Australian Open [tennis] in Melbourne at the end of January. castleandthings.com.au

Annabel Crabb Walkley-winning journalist, author, presenter of ABC TV shows Kitchen Cabinet and Tomorrow Tonight, and co-host of podcast Chat 10 Looks 3, Annabel has produced a new cookbook with her best friend, Wendy Sharpe. Special Guest is a collection of dishes that put the guest experience first. (See page 139 for some of the recipes.) This summer we’re going to Singapore

to see my brother-in-law and his family, who moved there last year. My ideal summer day would begin and end on a shady lounge somewhere, > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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with a book. Periodically, people would bring me delicious things to eat and frosty, frosty drinks. I know I’m relaxed when I fall asleep with a finger marking my page. To wind down, I cook. A free day spent batch-cooking or making jam with the kids buzzing around is the most happy and relaxing prospect I can conjure. My holiday playlist will be whatever’s playing on Double J and Classic FM – I don’t like making decisions on holidays. A favourite summer meal is brioche buns filled with nasturtiums and the crab and green-apple remoulade from our new book [pictured previous page]. And a favourite sunset drink is a South Australian riesling, if you’d be so kind. I mightn’t even wait for sunset… A summer cultural event on my mustsee list is the Sydney Festival [January

9-27]. Closely followed by the Adelaide Festival and Fringe [March 1-17]. My big plans for 2019? I’m writing a book about politics. For kids. Special Guest ($39.99, Murdoch Books), co-authored by Annabel Crabb and Wendy Sharpe, is out now. Leila Jeffreys Sydney-based photographer Leila is renowned for her classical portraiture of birds, including budgerigars, cockatoos and birds of prey. She has exhibited internationally, her work attracting high-profile h h fil collectors ll including actress Brooke Shields. Every summer, my family and friends f

rent a different house at Bawley Point, on the South Coast C of NSW.

‘MY HUSBAND JAMES AND S O N V I N C E N T [ A B OV E ] A R E B OT H S O M E K I N D O F F I S H S P EC I E S – T H E Y ’ V E TAU G H T M E TO LOV E T H E O C E A N .’ Leila Jeffreys

We love it there because of its laidback

old-school beachside feel; it’s no fuss. The residents are lovely, the beaches are great for kids, the waves are good and I enjoy going on walks and checking out the birds. My ideal summer’s day starts by being with family and friends. We’ll have breakfast together, then hit the beach and come home for lunch. The afternoon is either the beach again, jumping off the Bawley Point gantry [above], reading a book, going for a walk or simply catching up on sleep. I know I’m relaxed when I feel sleepy in the afternoon! That beautiful combination of sun and adventure. I’m looking forward to reading

Australian Geographic, Australian Birdlife magazine and novels. My summer playlist will be a little bit country and a little bit rock’n’roll: Gillian Welch, Neil Young, Townes Van Zandt, The Faces, Jonathan Richman,

NWA, The Scientists. I used to work in record shops, so I like all the genres. My favourite summer food is salad. Lots of crunchy, fresh but filling salads. I’m not a big drinker, but I do love Grey Goose vodka with ice and fresh lime. My favourite scent of summer is jasmine [top left]. And I have a favourite sound, too: cicadas! I love their names, like ‘green grocer’ [bottom left] and ‘black prince’. A cultural event I’m looking forward to is Twilight at Taronga [the summer

concert series at Taronga Zoo, Sydney]. This is a big year for me. In October I’ll hold my first major Australian exhibition in five years, at Olsen Gallery in Sydney, then I travel to exhibit it in New York. I’ll be very busy working on that show. leilajeffreys.com


PEOPLE H G FAVOURITE

I also love simple outdoor eating, be it fish and chips on Brighton Beach or picnics in Belair National Park, near my home. If we eat out, a long lunch at Coriole in McLaren Vale or Fino at Seppeltsfield [left] in the Barossa is hard to beat. For a sunset drink, I love an Aperol spritz or any Clare Valley riesling. My favourite scent of summer is the smell of the Australian bush. ‘MY MOST PLEASURABLE SUMMER DAYS ARE SPENT IN THE GARDEN, UNTIL THE HEAT FORCES ME INTO THE P OOL .’ Brian Parkes

Photography by Leila Jeffreys (Bawley Point gantry), Bo Wong (Leila Jeffreys portrait) & Getty Images (jasmine).

Brian Parkes CEO of Adelaide’s famed JamFactory, Brian has worked in leading design organisations for more than 20 years. JamFactory showcases contemporary Australian design and craftsmanship and is recognised as a centre for excellence. This summer I’ll be heading to Tasmania with my family, to spend

some time with my parents on the northwest coast. We’ll also spend a week travelling – walking in tall, dense forests, swimming on pristine beaches and enjoying some stunning scenic drives. My most pleasurable summer days are spent at home. I’m a homebody and truly love the home I live in. It’s a Modernist house [inset, top] built in 1960, with a plunge pool and big native garden. I love working in the garden until the heat of the day forces me into the pool with the kids. Followed by a refreshing drink or two on the deck, looking out over the Adelaide Plains. In summer I like listening to jazz and ’70s funk, but I’m increasingly guilty of indulging in ’80s Aussie pub rock! My favourite summer food would be anything cooked on the barbecue.

books

Craig Brown’s book on the life of Princess Margaret, Ma’am Darling, is on Neale Whitaker’s reading list, along with A Very English Scandal by John Preston and Garrard Conley’s Boy Erased.

Plans for this year include finishing the

treehouse I’ve started building with my kids. And launching some of the most ambitious exhibitions yet at JamFactory. jamfactory.com.au Amy Barrett-Lennard

Since 2006, Amy has been director of the Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts (PICA), a centre for visual and performance art known for showcasing groundbreaking works. She also sits on the curatorial panel for Sculpture by the Sea Cottesloe. This summer I’ll be escaping to

Annabelle Crabb will be reading The Arsonist by Chloe Hooper, plus The Lost Man by Jane Harper, Too Much Lip by Melissa Lucashenko and No Spin, Shane Warne’s memoir.

Santiago in Chile and Buenos Aires in Argentina. Buenos Aires [eg, Palermo neighbourhood, opposite centre] is my home away from home, where I enjoy glorious food, design, music, art, >

“I was given a copy of Bruce Springsteen’s autobiography last Christmas,” says Brian Parkes. “I’ve read a few chapters and am determined to finish it this summer!” AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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H G PEOPLE FAVOURITE

albums

architecture and the ‘good airs’ or ‘fair winds’ the city is named for. A side trip to Montevideo, Uruguay, is a must, for old-world charm and the best flea market in the world [previous page], where you can buy everything from antiques to live birds and tarantulas. My ideal summer’s day starts with a swim, followed by a lazy breakfast, then shopping and visits to galleries and museums, and a relaxed lunch. Books on my summer reading list

The music of Canadian folk musician Neil Young is on Leila Jeffreys’ eclectic playlist, which she dubs “a little bit country and a little bit rock’n’roll”.

include Labyrinths by Jorge Luis Borges, Memoirs by Pablo Neruda and A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan. A favourite eatery in Buenos Aires is El Trapiche, a wonderful old-style parrilla [steakhouse] close to where we stay. My go-to sunset drink is a gin and tonic. A favourite scent of summer is jasmine. When I return home, I’m really looking forward to the Perth Festival [February

Tango music by Argentinian harmonicist Hugo Díaz will form a soulf ul soundtrack to Amy Barrett-Lennard’s travels through South Amercia.

Go Your Own Way and other hits from Fleetwood Mac’s classic 1977 album, Rumours, will be blaring from Rachel Castle’s new record player.

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

On holidays, our days start with a

coffee in Berry [above], followed by a walk along our favourite dog-friendly stretch of beach and a dip in the ocean. Then it’s back to the house to prepare a long lunch if friends are visiting. The rest of the day is dictated by the ratio of good food and conversation to good wine! I know I’m relaxed when I stop shaving. I leave all my smart clothes in Sydney – deliberately – and live in shorts.

8 to March 3]. I’ll be out every night! PICA turns 30 in 2019, so we’re planning Music-wise, depending on our mood, an amazing year of celebratory events. we lurch from baroque to Swedish pica.org.au dance music, ’70s soul and disco, Brazilian bossa nova, Barbra Streisand, Neale Whitaker Troye Sivan and Charlie Puth. And Design aficionado, TV that’s just one afternoon! personality, columnist David’s an amazing cook. We’ll be and all-round style eating lots of delicious salads made maven, Neale is a judge with different grains and pulses. on Channel Nine’s My favourite sunset drink is a gutsy renovating series The Block, and co-host Aussie rosé or Kiwi pinot gris. of Foxtel’s Love It or List It Australia. My favourite summer scents would Over summer, I’ll be spending as much have to be jasmine and, strange as it time as possible with my partner David might sound, Aerogard. and our dogs, Ollie and Otis, at our new Looking ahead, I’ll be working on my home near Berry, on the South Coast of 13th season of The Block and the third NSW. There’s nowhere I’d rather be. season of Love It or List It Australia. #

‘ I N B E R RY W E H AV E T H E B E ST O F B OT H WO R L D S ; W E ’ R E S U R R O U N D E D BY B E AU T I F U L R O L L I N G C O U N T RYS I D E , W I T H T H E B E AC H O N O U R D O O R ST E P.’ Neale Whitaker


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INSIDER

Text by Elizabeth Wilson. Photograph courtesy Studio-gram.

INDUSTRY NEWS + PEOPLE + DESIGN + UPDATES + EVENTS

NEW CO ECTAB E

The Party Wall by Studio-gram Spotted at the recent Adelaide Modern exhibition at JamFactory, ‘The Party Wall’ had us in a spin. A room-divider, sideboard and shelving unit in one, with an inbuilt record player, it exudes a cool mid-century vibe. Created by SA design practice Studio-gram, which was founded by architecture graduates Dave Bickmore and Graham Charbonneau, this freestanding statement piece was constructed by Taku Kamikawa in Tasmanian oak. “It’s designed as a response to the iconic Modernist Macrob divider,” explains Graham. Destined to stop design lovers in their tracks. studio-gram.com.au >


H G INSIDER

BOB CADRY

Managing director, Cadrys Overseeing a three-generation family business in antique and contemporary rugs, Bob shares an apartment on Sydney’s eastern beaches with his partner, Gaye Weeden, Bob’s son Jared and Gaye’s son Charlie. Their home is replete with great rugs, artwork and artefacts collected over a lifetime of travel to fascinating locations.

THINGS I LOVE

MY HOME IS… A true reflection of my personality. The pieces that fill it are personal reminders of great memories, stories and traditions. They imbue my home with a sense of comfort and interest. WHAT ‘HOME’ MEANS TO ME It’s where you feel nurtured and comfortable, a place that’s full of happy memories. WHAT I LOVE ABOUT MY SUBURB As a keen surfer, the location is unsurpassed. I always feel like I’m on holiday here. Plus the cafes and restaurants are some of the best in Sydney. FAVOURITE LOCAL HAUNTS For eating out, I’d say the classic Sean’s Panaroma, then North Bondi Fish and Lox Stock & Barrel. For clothes, Jac+Jack. cadrys.com.au

Text by Elizabeth Wilson. Styling by Sarah Åkesson (this page). Photograph byWill Horner (this page).

MY FAVOURITE THINGS Sofa A Walter Knoll piece from Living Edge. Cushions (on sofa) These are antique Caucasian soumak-weave kilim cushions. Table An old Turkish tea table with mother-of-pearl inlay. Chair French Provincial antique. Framed artwork A vintage French poster. Ottoman (far right) Originally a Persian tribal storage bag. Floor cushion I bought this old Kurdish rug from the eastern Turkish town of Malatya in the 1980s and had it made into a cushion. Rugs The base rug is a piece from Cadrys Persian Aleph collection, a flatwoven kilim of handspun wool, goat’s hair and cotton. Layered on top is an antique Khotan rug which came from the famous oasis stop on the Silk Road.

NEST


RETAIL NEWS HATC H E S , MATC H E S…

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Textile company Maharam has delved into 20th-century archives and released five designs created half a century ago by illustrious US designer Alexander Girard as textiles and rugs. The striking ‘Plus’ rug pictured here, from $5500, is available in three colourways. kvadratmaharam.com

SPOTLIGHT

Studio Onethirty

A

rtist and fabric designer Sarah Kalidis (below) spent 10 years working in interior design and the natural-stone industry before returning to her first loves: drawing and painting. After the birth of her daughter Anthea in 2015, she took the opportunity to step away from office environments and get creative. With her little muse by her side, she began with pencil drawings on paper and oils on canvas, producing bold, contemporary botanical designs inspired by both Australian flora and Modernist design. Before long, Sarah tried applying her works to fabric. “I set out to create a range that was not only designed in Australia but printed here, too,” she says. “My textile collection is digitally pprinted onto cloth of different weights, from linen drapperyy through to

blends suitable for upholstery, as well as a recycled polyester suitable for outdoor use.” Working from her home studio, Sarah launched Studio Onethirtyy (after her house nu Since then, her irrep i of her own energy has led to the opening store in Sydney’s Carss Park. It showcases the full range of her design applications, from the fabrics, soft furnishings, framed art and upholstered furniture shown here to a line of made-to-order terrazzo furniture. Everything in the store is handcrafted and Australian-made. Apart from her own branded products, Sarah stocks planters by Robert Plumb and ceramics by Batch Ceramics and Hayden Youlley Design. She has also collaborated with highprofile creative firms, including Sydney’s So Watt on a range of bench seating, and Melbourne’s Voolker Haug on lighting. “The ethhos of my business is to support loccal artisans and focus on Auustralian-made components andd raw materials where possible.” studioonethirty.com

Interior designer Shaynna Blaze has launched a capsule collection of homewares for Harris Scarfe, including bedding, cushions, towels, bathroom and kitchen accessories, and white tableware for summer entertaining. harrisscarfe.com.au

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Memories of a beloved childhood pony informed the design of this ‘Stirrup’ outdoor table, $2640, by Russel Koskela, co-founder of furniture and lifestyle emporium Koskela. The design consists of steel ‘stirrups’ for the base and a solid spotted-gum surface with chamfered corners. Its steel frame can be powdercoated in a range of colours. A matching bench, $2310, is available. koskela.com.au

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With its gently curving back, whitewashed finish and fine rattan mesh, this ‘Skye’ occasional chair, $499, adds rich texture to a room, along with functional, supportive seating. It comes with a linen-upholstered seat cushion and can be pulled up to the table, bl too. ozdesignfurnit d f tur uree.c . om.au. >

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H G INSIDER FROM TOP Transitions Series 1 textile paper art, Gourd Baskets crochet porcelain, Imprinted Earth and Folded Waves origami porcelain.

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Tigmi Trading, purveyor of vintage and contempoora rary hom mewares, has opened a new showr om at Habitat Byron Bay, showcasing its llllectitioon of unique, artisan-made ru , textiles,, design objects, lighting an art from far-flung places. tigmitradin .

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It’s chenille, but not as you know it. We love the retro reverberations of this Linen House ‘Palm Springs’ quilt cover set, $280 (queen), made from soft tufted cotton chenille with an ogee-shaped pattern. Layer the look with the matching cushions, $60 each, and Euro pillowcases, $50 each. linenhouse.com

Design aficionados should head to new store The Architect’s Bookshop in Sydney’s Surry Hills. The brainchild of architect Adam Haddow, it’s run by Anne Proudfoot of the city’s much-missed Architext bookshop. thearchitectsbookshop.com.au

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

Liz Sofield, ceramic, textile and paper artist L extiles and making have always been im mportant threads in the life of Liz SSofield (top). Growing up in New Zealand, she wore clothes sewn by her mother and always had a craft project off her h own on the go. Sewing, crochet and knitting were all part of her skill set. After studying at Wellington Polytechnic, she worked in Auckland as a textile designer before moving to Brisbane with her husband Martin in 2004. For his job as a civil engineer, the couple later moved to Kalgoorlie, WA, with their young twins in tow. Art materials were in short supply there, so Liz turned to items at hand – paper and thread – and started producing delicate artworks of textured paper patterned with stitching. At the same time, her son Liam became obsessed with paper planes. Liz would sit with him for hours, folding paper. To make sure her daughter Rosabella didn’t feel left out, she began folding paper flowers as well. “This sparked a fascination with origami, and I began combining it with my hand stitching,” says Liz. What started as a family craft activity soon became

a serious artistic pursuit. Her portfolio now includes paper works that feature gentle geometric folds covered in fine networks of thread. The work requires precision and patience, and Liz is devoted to it. “I love the rhythm and symmetry. With these works, I’m exploring the boundaries where art and craft meet.” Back in Brisbane, Liz decided to explore the world of ceramics. She began applying her origami skills to works of clay, rolling and folding the material and pressing patterns into it to replicate the folds of origami. The result is her expanding range of fine porcelain vessels. Most recently, she has married clay techniques with her childhood love of crochet. Drawing on skills taught by her mother, she crochets delicate forms from natural fibres before covering them with porcelain clay and firing in a kiln. Working from a space in her home, Liz dedicates several hours a day to her ceramics and textiles, relishing the comforting rhythms and satisfying outcomes of her work: “Making is such a tactile and meditative process. I hope that joy translates into my work.” # Liz’s work will be on sale through her website from early 2019; lizsofield.com.

Text by Elizabeth Wilson. Photography by Jodie Cheetham (Liz Sofield and ceramics).

In an industry first, fi Outdoor Design ner Store’s new onlline directory conneects consumers with h landscape designers and suppliers of o luxury outdoor produccts. outdoordesignerstore.com.au

MEET THE MAKER


RETREAT

Combining contemporary design with La-Z-Boy comfort, the Renzo makes it easy to relax at the end of the day. Features include the ability to recline inches from the wall, power recline and options of fabric or leather.

la-z-boy.com.au

Featured: Renzo Suite - Leather: Classic Montana - Oregano

Urban


INSIDER H G

G GRAZIA MATERIA Women in design

A passion for local creativity and production is a driving force for this furniture designer and manufacturer.

STORY Elizabeth Wilson | PH OTO GR A P H Y Martina Gemmola

rowing up, Grazia Materia spent her after-school hours and holidays split between the back of her dad’s fruit shop and her mum’s hair salon. “It meant I had a lot of time to draw and colour in,” says the Melbourne furniture designer. She also learned about the impact of curating a space: her mum’s salon had a walk-in window display that Grazia proudly and constantly rearranged. After studying interior design at Melbourne’s RMIT University, she worked briefly as an interior designer and for a furniture retailer before spending a decade at Gordon Mather Industries, the manufacturer of Grant Featherston furniture. This was a formative experience, sparking her zeal for “manufacturing well-made, locally produced pieces and dealing directly with architects, designers and decorators”. In 2015 she launched the Grazia & Co brand with her husband, Steve Parry – Grazia steering the design process and Steve looking after production. Devoted to manufacturing top-quality Australianmade designs, the company now also handles the marketing and distribution of Featherston furniture. Grazia is passionate about collaborating with other designers and architects to create product ranges and customised pieces. “We’re all about appreciating, encouraging and supporting Australian design and manufacturing, rather than just selling furniture.” >

Grazia Materia with her Australian-made ‘Diiva’ and ‘Diiva Junior’ stools in a selection of finishes. AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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8.20am SCHOOL RUN, SOUTH-EAST MELBOURNE

After rising at 6.30am, Grazia makes lunches and squeezes in a few work emails before walking seven-year-old son Orlando to school, accompanied by Jimmy, the family’s labrador retriever-cross. Their home is a restored Mid-century gem with a Palm Springs-style garden and interiors Grazia describes as “a fusion of styles”. The table below is a ‘Finnigan’ design, with Featherston ‘Scape’ chairs, all Grazia & Co.

3pm VICTORIAN RACING CLUB, FLEMINGTON RACECOURSE All the tables and bar stools at the new, $128-million Club Stand at Flemington Racecourse were created by Grazia & Co, working closely with designer Jan Eastwood of Bates Smart. Christening the range, Grazia is joined at the rooftop bar by (from left) Jan Eastwood and VRC project managers Carmel Ferrigno and Esin de Oliveira.

6pm ETTA, BRUNSWICK EAST

Grazia & Co was recently recognised in the international Restaurant & Bar Product Design Awards for its ‘Iva’ stool, a gorgeous tall and low-backed design installed at Etta restaurant, the interiors of which were designed by architect Iva Foschia of IF Architecture. Here, Grazia celebrates with Etta co-owner Hannah Green (left) and the design’s namesake, Iva Foschia, while perching on the prize-winning stools. graziaandco.com.au

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INSIDER H G

9am-1pm GRAZIA & CO HQ, HIGHETT ‘The design process is a team effort, involving fabricators, too. Feedback from clients and industry helps refine and define our products.’ Grazia

2pm GRAZIA & CO WAREHOUSE, HIGHETT

Grazia and her husband, Steve Parry (far right), with their ‘Ronnie’ sideboard. “Steve controls the financials and production. It’s my name on the door, but he makes me shine. He’s the key player in the quality of what we produce,” says Grazia. “We don’t get involved in each other’s areas. We both respect what the other is capable of.” Above, they inspect the assembly of ‘Dita’ stools in the warehouse.

While she chats with individual team members daily, Grazia holds monthly meetings to bring together staff from design, production and sales. She’s pictured at left talking with (from left) designer Leanne Millar, head of marketing and commercial sales Emma Barnett, and designer Dita Beluli. “We discuss the status of projects, items in production, orders coming in and new designs in the pipeline,” says Grazia. “It’s a collective process. The designers will come up with a concept, but there are so many practicalities to consider.” Below, assessing samples of materials and finishes.


H G INSIDER

Design moment

DINOSAUR DESIGNS

They’re an Australian design powerhouse and there’s good resin for their success, writes Chris Pearson.

T

hree art-school students began selling jewellery made from modelling clay at Sydney’s Paddington Markets in 1985. They had just launched their label, Dinosaur Designs, but this beast was not exactly making the earth move. One day, they earned just $10, blown on hot chocolates as they commiserated in a cafe. Then the students – Louise Olsen, Stephen Ormandy and Liane Rossler – began eyeing what another stallholder was selling: resin sculptures. All three had worked with the material in their studies and realised that its moulding properties were similar to the clay they’d been using. So they began experimenting with polyester-resin jewellery. The results proved a hit with the public, and soon celebrities such as Kylie Minogue and Michael Hutchence were wearing it. Four years later, the trio opened their first store in Sydney’s Strand Arcade. Direct contact with a new customer base prompted them to try exciting things. Why not extend resin to vases and bowls? The material’s 74 |

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

hand-textured feel and lolly-like, translucent colours would be ideal, they reasoned. Booming sales proved them right. Another defining moment came in 1993, when supermodel Christy Turlington appeared in the pages of British Vogue with both arms decked out in Dinosaur Designs bangles. “We bridge the boundaries between art, design and fashion,” says Louise (pictured above with Stephen, her business partner and husband). “Our pieces have an organic quality, juxtaposed with a modern material.” Where did the Dinosaur Designs name come from? “We were influenced by the Dadaists [a European art movement that flouted convention with nonsensical works] and wanted a name that was distinctive, that people would remember, but also didn’t really mean anything.” Over the years, their range has grown to include furniture designs, too. Today, the firm’s headquarters in Sydney’s Strawberry Hills has the ambience of an atelier, with craftspeople drafting, moulding, grinding,

polishing and refining pieces by hand. “Our studio is like a lab and we’re always trying out new techniques,” says Louise. “It doesn’t always work, but accidents can lead to new products or casting techniques. We’re still finding new possibilities from the material.” While Liane Rossler left the company in 2010, Louise and Stephen continue with the commitment and vision begun 34 years ago. Eryca Green, owner of Melbourne designer store Smith Street Bazaar, has been collecting Dinosaur Designs for 15 years. Her interest was stirred when she was browsing through a home magazine. “There was a picture of a shelf filled with Dinosaur Designs resin vases,” she says. “It was so textured and artistic, and the colours were almost visceral. That was it for me.” Eryca’s interest grew into a passion and now she has “quite the collection”, including homewares and side tables.

WHAT IT MEANS TO US As well as Australia, Dinosaur Designs has dedicated outlets in London and New York, and sells in stores across 16 countries, from Canada to Saudi Arabia. Salad bowls and servers are its bestselling items. “They’re a great way to make a statement on a dinner table, but also work as sculptures when not being used,” says Louise. “They are artworks that are practical,” adds Eryca. “And you can put them with all kinds of furniture. Their warmth and integrity, as well as the unique nature of each piece, means they will endure and become collectables of the future.” #

Photography by Christopher Morris/bauersyndication.com.au (portrait) & Dinosaur Designs; dinosaurdesigns.com.au.

LEFT Deeply coloured tablewares from Dinosaur Designs’ Modern Tribal collection, launched in 2013. BELOW Stephen Ormandy’s one-of-a-kind side table from the 2013 Collage collection.


ESPRESSO COFFEE MAKERS* * Independent research institute, value sales leader from Jan to Dec 2017 in 47 countries


WHAT’S

COOKING S U QA R

BOUND TO PLEASE

Dessert plays a role in fulfilling the human need for joy, says chef Greg Malouf. He and his former wife Lucy Malouf present a feast of Middle Eastern sweet treats, including pastries, fruit-centric desserts, confectionery and drinks. ($55, Hardie Grant)

F R O M T H E E A RT H

FLOUR AND STONE

We’ve pored over the latest book releases – covering cookery, design, travel and gardening – to arm you with inspiration, escape and hours of reading pleasure throughout the summer.

Nadine Ingram believes many of the world’s problems can be solved with cake. This book, named after her Sydney bakery, pairs gorgeous recipes with personal anecdotes that exude her ethos of baking for love, life and, ultimately, happiness. ($55, Simon & Schuster)

Supremo Australian chef and enthusiastic vegetable-grower Peter Gilmore celebrates a vast array of rare and almostforgotten vegetables – from country gentleman corn to sacred lotus – and offers an exquisite recipe for each, championing flavour and sustainability in equal measure. ($80, Hardie Grant)

Love, Laugh, Bake! If you have a bent for baking, this is the title for you. Silvia Colloca’s collection of 120 recipes for bread, tarts, cakes and biscuits radiates generosity. The instructions are highly accessible and Silvia’s passion for baking is irresistible. ($39.99, Plum)

CELLAR BAR

Melbourne’s Cellar Bar has been a beloved institution since the 1950s, offering a relaxed pasta-centric menu. Current owner/chef Guy Grossi presents 80 authentic and delicious dishes from the restaurant’s repertoire. ($49.99, Penguin Random House)

Super Natural “Add some plant power to your diet,” urges chef Tobie Puttock. Dedicated to plant-based cooking, Tobie says his fifth cookbook is the one closest to his heart. Flavourfilled dishes from salads to sweets provide a fab repertoire for the working week and special occasions. ($39.99, Lantern)

The Cook’s Apprentice Stephanie Alexander is passionate about educating students via her kitchengarden program. This book is an extension of that mission, aimed at helping young foodies to become confident cooks of fresh food. ($45, Penguin Random House)


LIFE &

INSIDER H G

STYLE

A PA I N T E D L A N D S C A P E

Expertly curated, this book covers 50 influential Australian artists and their works. “These artists paint a vivid image of the diversity of landscapes that make up this continent,” says art curator and author Amber Creswell Bell. And it’s not all beach and bush. ($59.99, Thames & Hudson)

MODERNIST DESIGN COMPLETE

Many of today’s design icons come from the Modernist movement of the early 20th century. Dominic Bradbury’s hardback is a survey of the objects and masters of the era, covering architecture, furniture, product design, lighting, ceramics and textiles. A must-have volume for designers, enthusiasts and anyone who’s ever admired a Barcelona chair or an Anglepoise lamp. ($120, Thames & Hudson)

J OY F U L

Designer and author Ingrid Fetell Lee, founder of The Aesthetics of Joy blog, explains how our physical surroundings can have powerful effects on our moods, and shows how small changes can help you to achieve a healthier, more joyful life and home. ($35, Rider)

D R AW I N G ARCHITECTURE

Text by Elizabeth Wilson.

This hefty publication gives you the privilege of perusing 250 architectural drawings dating from antiquity to the present day, including the handiwork of Michelangelo, Frank Gehry and Zaha Hadid. It’s a beautiful and fascinating insight into the creative process. ($120, Phaidon)

Mid-Century Modern Architecture Travel Guide A palm-size survey of classic Modernist buildings – from homes to hotels and city halls – along the US East Coast. ($49.95, Phaidon)

U R B A N S A N C T UA RY

The premise of this book by Anna Johnson and Richard Black is that an oasis can be created in even the smallest of spaces. Filled with ideas for indoor/outdoor connection, it focuses on a range of zones that encourage engagement with nature. ($70, Thames & Hudson) >

Design for Children This delightful book follows the evolution of children’s furniture and product design, spotlighting clever concepts by designers such as Marc Newson and Marcel Wanders. ($79.95, Phaidon)

Destination Art Covering 500 artworks in 300 cities, this gem is a roadmap to must-see permanent art installations, in settings from big-city streetscapes to nature parks. ($49.95, Phaidon) AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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GARDENING

GALORE

YAT E S T O P 5 0 I N D O O R P L A N T S – A N D H O W N OT T O K I L L T H E M The indoor-plant revolution is filling

our houses with greenery and contributing to cleaner, healthier interiors. Horticulturist Angie Thomas and the knowledgeable folks at Yates have put together invaluable planting tips and troubleshooting information to nurture your own o green inner sanctuary. ($35, Harper Collins)

GREEN NOMADS, W I L D P L AC E S

Root, Nurture, Grow Keen to enjoy the art and adventure of growing potted plants? This book aims to teach all the little things that our green-thumbed grandmothers used to know about cultivating: how to take cuttings, cultivate runners and offshoots, divide plants at the roots and even grow new root systems in the air. ($29.99, Quadrille)

Former senator Bob Brown and his partner Paul Thomas spent three months travelling along the remote coastlines of south and western Australia, resulting in this engaging written and photographic record. ($45, Hardie Grant)

Just the thing for anyone who dreams of creating an indoor jungle. Irene Schampaert and Judith Baehner, both design bloggers, outline the latest trends in indoor gardening, suggest the best plants for different locations and provide tips on maintaining a beautiful display. (About $59*, Lannoo)

T O M AT O : K N O W, S O W, G R O W, F E A S T

Vegie-growing legend Peter Cundall praises this title as “the ultimate book on tomatoes” in the foreword. Authors/ publishers Penny Woodward, Janice Sutton and Karen Sutherland cover everything from the history of heirloom varieties in Australia to selecting, sowing, growing, preparing, preserving and cooking them. ($60, Penny Woodward) 78 |

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

Habitat Horticulturist AB Bishop believes gardens should be created to support wildlife as well as for human enjoyment. Here, she offers practical advice on how to encourage insects, birds, reptiles and frogs into the garden, explaining how to design, plant and maintain your own thriving backyard ecosystem. ($39.99, Murdoch Books) #

* Currency conversion correct at time of printing.

WONDER PLANTS 2


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HOUSES

Styling by Megan Morton. Photograph by Pablo Veiga.

FIVE FABULOUS HOMES WITH THAT HOLIDAY FEELING

Plenty of room to roam means that Olive and her pal Gilbert the boxer are always content to hang out at home. Turn the page for more...


One OF A KIND

A creative couple thought they’d found their forever home – until they met this characterfilled ‘old soul’ on the NSW Central Coast. ST Y L I N G Megan Morton | P HOTOG R A P HY Pablo Veiga


HOUSES H G

ENTRY Emily Berlach and her daughter Elke love welcoming guests. The pretty floor tiles from Jatana Interiors are cool in summer while underfloor heating keeps toes toasty in winter. Bench from Grazia & Co. Cushion by Edit. Artworks by Helen McCullagh. Emily wears Johanna Ortiz top and Bohemian Traders linen pants. EXTERIOR Each of the multi-paned timber windows was made by a local joiner. A thriving creeping fig (Ficus pumila) frames them beautifully. The new roof is Lysaght Custom Orb. >

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BREAKFAST NOOK This setting adjacent to the kitchen catches the morning light. Emily bought the giant key on the wall from stylist Megan Morton. “I saw it years ago in Megan’s home and when she offered it to me I was beside myself,” she says. “It’s a dream piece.” Stool by Arnall Artisan Services. Cushion, Kip & Co. Urns, LuMu Interiors. Artworks by Emma Gale. KITCHEN/DINING The dining zone at the centre of this barn-style space features a farmhouse table from MCM House, teamed with naturalleather chairs. Pendant light, The Society Inc. Beeswax candles by Tony Assness. Local heroes: ‘Zee’ dining chairs, $479 each, Sarah Ellison.


A

sweet little cottage bought before their children arrived had been home to Emily and Dave Berlach for eight years. “We were truly content,” recalls Emily. “We had the world’s best neighbours and really loved the area. We always said we would never move… unless we found our dream home.” Fate stepped in. The couple, along with Joseph, nine, Olive, seven,five-year-oldElkeandboxerhoundsRosemaryandGilbert, are now relishing the space and lifestyle options that came with their new home. It’s a character-filled 1980s-built charmer on a 1.5ha property in the hinterland not far from Terrigal – just around the corner from their old place. “We stumbled across the real-estate listing by chance three years ago and did all we could to secure the property before it went to auction,” says Emily. “Everything about this home appealed to us. We really saw a future here for our family.” With its whitewashed textured walls and terracotta tiles, the home has a distinctly European air. Built by a local artist and his architect brother, it had changed hands twice before the Berlachs swooped. A cornerstone positioned in the upper loft of the home is inscribed with ‘1982’ and the couple suppose that’s when the house was completed. Each owner has gently and considerately updated the property during their tenure. Emily and Dave have done the same, upgrading the kitchen and plumbing and adding built-in wardrobes, as well as refurbishing the gardens around the original pool – all driven by practicality. “She’s an old soul, this house,” says Emily. “While we didn’t need to make aesthetic improvements per se, we did need to make it work for our family.”

The floor plan of the two-storey home is extremely familyfriendly, with separate sleeping and living wings giving everyone ample breathing space. Both living and bedroom zones open to private courtyards and the pool lies just beyond the dining-room windows. It’s a wonderful summer house that’s also a dream in winter, when the fireplaces in the living and dining rooms draw the family together, snug and warm. When the Berlachs moved in, they treated the interiors to a coat of white paint, soft linen curtains and a kitchen refresh. Emily studied fine arts at uni and was a visual-arts teacher before she and Dave founded their fashion business, Bohemian Traders,sothehomeisfilledwithinterestingartandfurnishings sourced through their store. Emily also had a couple of expert friends in her reno team – stylist Megan “magical” Morton and carpenterBenWickertofUnique Urban Spaces – who both helped the project run smoothly. Two years on, the family is in seventh heaven and, as summer swings in, so do the friends. The doors and windows are flung open and the pool is used daily. Weekends generally involve a long lunch with friends in the northern courtyard, with a gaggle of kids playing in the pool or running around the back paddock. “I love that we have space for friends to stay, room for raucous parties and greenery outside every window,” says Emily. “We are so very fortunate and genuinely don’t take it for granted. Our home has such character. We don’t really want to make it ‘ours’. We think of it like Cloudstreet in Tim Winton’s novel – it’s > a house with a personality all of its own.” Megan Morton Stylist, Rosebery, NSW; meganmorton.com. Unique Urban Spaces, Forresters Beach, NSW; 0423 190 341. AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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This is the life

The home’s ample grounds were one of its drawcards and the family make the most of them. “We dine outdoors all year round – dripping wet from the pool in summer or warmed by a blaze in the fire pit in winter,” says Emily. “We have land for animals; as well as our enormous dogs, we raise pigs and keep chooks for eggs. And there’s plenty of room for the kids to spread out as they grow and want their own space.”

DINING AREA this page and opposite, bottom left With a pool and garden outlook, this is a zone to linger in. The deep bay window is a favourite perch before or after meals. A potted Pittosporum ‘Silver Sheen’ loves this light and airy room with reclaimed blackbutt floorboards. Artwork by Bobbi Clarke. Sculpture (in niche) by Basic Curate. Smart buy: Elm mini stool, $65, Imprint House. KITCHEN opposite, top left and right Emily and Dave’s most dramatic improvement is the new kitchen. Joinery by Seaside Joinery. Tap, Brodware. White stool from Grazia & Co; wooden stool from Piccolo Pear. Ceramics throughout, Bohemian Traders. Vintage artwork. LIVING ZONE Linen slipcovers on the ‘Joe’ sofas from MCM House add to the room’s relaxed feel. Bespoke joinery. Vintage ottoman. Custom pendant lights and rug. >

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HOUSES H G


THE PALETTE Hexagon mosaics (bathroom)

Encaustic tiles (entrance)

Reclaimed blackbutt (flooring)

‘SHE’S AN OLD SOUL, THIS HOUSE… WE D O N ’ T R E A L LY WA N T TO M A K E I T “ O U R S ” – I T H A S A P E R S O N A L I T Y A L L O F I T S O W N .’ E M ILY, OW N ER

MAIN BEDROOM above and right Emily and Dave added a wall of wardrobes, which were built by John Lappas of Seaside Joinery. In the corner of their space is a stone fireplace constructed by the original owner/builder. Side tables from Amara. Bedding by In The Sac. ‘New York Standard’ mirror, MCM House. The curtains are made from fabric imported by Bohemian Traders. Floor tiles sourced overseas. Smart buy: Crochet pendant lights, $325 each, Ruby Star Traders. CHILDREN’S BATHROOM The same hexagonal mosaics run along the vanity, up the walls and around the bath; for similar, try Perini. Terracotta floor tiles installed by the original owner. Bath refurbished with new enamel. Perrin & Rowe basins and taps, The English Tapware Company. Mirror sourced in Italy. Bath mat from Ikea. >

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THE LAYOUT GROUND FLOOR Bed Study

Bed

Courtyard TV room

Lawn

LOFT Dining

Bath Kitchen Main bed Garage

Laundry

Living Breakfast nook

Bath

Entry Bath

Courtyard

Pool

Courtyard Bed


‘ O U R H O M E C O M E S I N TO I T S O W N W H E N S U M M E R H I T S . T H E R E ’ S G R E E N E RY O U T E V E RY W I N D O W, R O O M F O R R AU C O U S PA RT I E S A N D W E S P E N D T H E DAYS J U M P I N G I N A N D O U T O F T H E P O O L .’ E MI LY

GUESTHOUSE When not in use by friends or family, the rustic cottage on the property is rented out for photographic shoots. OUTDOOR FIREPLACE Custom-built by the original builder, this stone beauty is well-used by the family. SWIMMING POOL The turquoise-tiled pool is at the heart of the action in summer. Folding chair, MCM House. GARDEN Sisters Olive and Elke love roaming the grounds and the lush gardens afford all sorts of adventures. For Where to Buy, see page 187.


HOUSES H G FEATURE TREES & PLANTS TREES

Giant bird of paradise (Strelitzia nicolai) London plane tree (Platanus x acerifolia) Native cypress (Callitris columellaris) Cabbage tree palm (Livistona australis) PLANTS

Creeping fig (Ficus pumila) Gymea lily (Doryanthes excelsa) Bougainvillea

Great escape

“The house has a way of relaxing us,” says Emily. “It has a distinctly European feel with its whitewashed walls and cool terracotta tiles, so much so that when the sparkle of reality is wearing thin I like to pretend we’re on summer holidays in Italy! Our high ceilings and french doors let in so much light and the flow between indoors and out is just wonderful. Thanks to the fireplaces, it’s super cosy in winter, too.” #

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BAY OF PLENTY

Decked out with year-round comfort in mind, this Sydney home holds all the cards in summer. STO RY Rosa Senese | ST YL IN G Steve Cordony P HOTOG RA PH Y Felix Forest


HOUSES H G

This is the life

A lively social hub, this home is thoughtfully appointed, indoors and out. Interior designer Juliette Arent and her team came up with a design that considered the courtyards and terraces as carefully as the internal living spaces. “We wanted the outdoor spaces to feel equally soft and furnished,” Juliette says. “The owners are great entertainers and they have plenty of options for large and small groups.”

ENTRY HALL The open design provides tantalising viewpoints from and through the home. Apparatus ‘Match’ hall tree/umbrella stand, Criteria. Custom console designed by Arent&Pyke. Brass platter, Ondene. White sculpture on plinth, Becker Minty. Vase, The Vault Sydney. Rug, Cadrys. ‘New Pearl’ honed limestone flooring from Marble Plus. BOATSHED Accessed via an inclinator, a new shed holds kayaks and other sporting equipment. ‘Basket’ outdoor chair, Kettal. Maison de Vacances throw, Tigger Hall. Local hero: ‘Pyramids’ cushion in Saffron, $139, Walter G. > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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F

or a well-travelled couple keen on architecture and ready to create their forever home, a clifftop site for sale on Sydney’s lower north shore presented all the answers. Utterly seduced by its harbour views, the couple – who both have backgrounds in technology – snapped up the property in 2013 and set about planning something special. The result, by Sydney-based architectural firm Walter Barda Design, is a beautifully considered, smartly appointedhomecompletedin 2017.Underagentlycurving roof and sitting lightly on its rocky base, the house is built over four levels in steel and off-form concrete, with large expanses of floor-to-ceiling glass. “It’s designed as a series of excavated terraces stepping down the slope,” explains director Walter Barda. The terraces and courtyards flow organically into the interiors and natural outcrops of sandstone have been woven

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skilfully into the structure, ensuring the home rests comfortably in its setting, despite the extensive floor plan. Charged with layering up the interiors, design practice Arent&Pyke took inspiration from the landscape and the rawmaterials usedinthe build.“The ownersreallywanted an inviting, comfortable home,” says co-principal Juliette Arent. “We were able to create warmth and intimacy through the selection of furniture and accessories, lighting, rugs and artwork.” Juliette, in conjunction with co-founderSarah-Jane Pyke and associate Genevieve Hromas, came up with a sophisticated scheme featuring statement pieces sourced from around the world, together with custom designs they commissioned. Their calming colour palette is full of richness and depth, referencing the eucalyptus trees and stone prevalent in the local landscape as well as the soft grey of the concrete walls. >


LIVING ROOM top left, bottom right and opposite Details such as the plush textiles and hand-knotted rug soften the timber and tiles. Minotti ‘Collar’ sofa (opposite), Dedece. Ligne Roset ‘Ploum’ sofa (above), Domo. Cassina coffee table and side tables. Carl Hansen & Son bench, Cult. ‘Circle’ chairs, Great Dane. Kelly Wearstler striped vase, Becker Minty. ‘Mobile Chandelier 7’ pendant light, Hub Furniture. Rug, Robyn Cosgrove. Gas fireplace by Escea. Artwork by Nicholas Harding. DINING ROOM top right and bottom left A ‘Branching Bubble’ chandelier from Lindsey Adelman keeps the look organic. Riva 1920 dining table and chairs, Fanuli. Artwork by David Larwill. Designer buy: Rina Menardi ‘Lagoon’ platter, from $810, Ondene.


Great escape

This home offers plenty of relaxation options that embrace the captivating views. The owners regularly head down to the boatshed on the property, where they pick up kayaks and hit the water. Or catch up with friends in one of the home’s many sunny spots. “Each outdoor deck is a wonderful suntrap at some point in the day,” says Juliette Arent. A well-stocked library and art studio have indoor pursuits more than covered.

FEATURE TREES Champak (Michelia champaca) Bay trees (Laurus nobilis)

OUTDOOR DINING A slatted teak table offers a more casual dining experience. Roda ‘Pier’ table and ‘Harp’ dining chairs, Domo. Ceramic bowls, Ondene. Vase, Garden Life. Rug, Cadrys. Local heroes: ‘Veneziano’ carafe, $130, and tumblers, $234/six, Jardan. COURTYARD An intimate setting off the lower-ground floor, sheltered by the sandstone cliff. Paola Lenti ‘Wabi’ swing seat, Dedece. Kettal chairs and tables. Walter G cushions, Ascraft. Vase, Water Tiger. Rug, Cadrys.


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The high degree of personalisation begins at the front door, which is crafted from jarrah in a nod to the owners’ roots in Western Australia. Once past the practical boot room and media room, a long corridor takes you to an open-plan kitchen, living and dining area. Upstairs is the main bedroom, along with a bathroom, office, library and landscaped terrace. The lowergroundfloorhasthreebedrooms,allwithensuites,andalaundry. On the bottom level is an art studio (the owners have a great love of art and a passion for painting and printmaking), an alfresco entertainingarea,aswimmingpoolandchange room. Connecting all the levels is a lift of glass and steel. Standout elements include the bespoke blackbutt joinery throughout, a television concealed behind a motorised artwork in the living room, and the commercial-grade kitchen, which features a three-dimensional design based on abstracted boats.

The shipping reference was well considered; given the waterside location, the notion of the building as a habitable vessel arose earlyintheprojectanditcametobeknownastheSlipwayHouse. After a successful two-year build, the owners moved in with their two adult children in the middle of2017. Thrilled with every element of their new home, they hosted a celebratory dinner for all the designers, consultants and builders involved – the equivalent of christening a new ship with Champagne. “They truly feel every inch of their home is what they had dreamt about and more,” says Juliette Arent. “It’s so rewarding for us to be a small part of the joy that a wonderful home can > create for a family.” Walter Barda Design, Sydney, NSW; (02) 9264 4240 or walterbardadesign.com.au. Arent&Pyke, Surry Hills, NSW; (02) 9331 2802 or arentpyke.com. AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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H G HOUSES THE LAYOUT

Lift Changing room

Garage

Storage

Boot room Entry Art studio/ Courtyard workshop Bath

Outdoor entertaining Deck

Lift

Gallery Courtyard

Pool Kitchen Living Dining

Bath Office

Bed Bath

Bath

Media room Lift

LOWER GROUND FLOOR

Roof terrace

Bath

Laundry

Bed

Bed

Library

Lift Bath

Main bed

COURTYARD LEVEL Roof terrace

Terrace

TOP FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR

‘ THE GUESTROOM HAS A C O O L , S U B T L E M AT E R I A L PA L E T T E , B U T T H E S PA R K L I N G WAT E R V I E W I S T H E R E A L H E R O.’ Juliette Arent, interior designer


THE PALETTE Off-form concrete (throughout)

Blackbutt joinery (living)

For Where to Buy, see page 187.

Honed limestone flooring (foyer)

ENSUITE The elegant simplicity of this bathroom belies its technical sophistication, which includes remote-controlled Japanese sanitaryware by Toto. Vase, Water Tiger. Loom towel, Hub Furniture. Santa Maria Novella toiletries, Ondene. GUESTROOM above and opposite David Larwill’s Dismissed artwork brings a measure of drama to this relaxed space. Arent&Pyke customised the oak bedside tables by Zuster. Bedhead upholstered in Christopher Farr Cloth fabric from Ascraft. Bedlinen and blanket, Ondene. Curtains in C&C Milano ‘Sgarzolino Mache Unito’ linen in Bianco from South Pacific Fabrics. Samba wool carpet, Whitecliffe Imports. Designer buy: Oluce ‘Atollo’ table lamp, $1643, Euroluce. # AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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Back to

NATURE

A Victorian family has created the perfect antidote to city life – a sustainable haven where the land meets the sea. STORY John McDonald | STY LIN G Heather Nette King P HOTO GR APHY Armelle Habib

MAIN DECK Owners Simone and David and daughter Mariella with their pugs, Molly (left) and Fu Manchu. In the distance is Corner Inlet, near Wilsons Promontory. Steel-framed eaves and awnings shield the home’s interior from harsh summer sun. The deck and awning are silvertop ash. Freedom dining table and benches, bought through Gumtree. ‘Junto’ terracotta carafe by Simon Legald for Normann Copenhagen and ‘Infinity’ bowl in Ochre, both Lightly. LIVING The bush surroundings have even inspired the artwork. Freedom leather sofa, bought secondhand. ‘Dane’ wool cushion in Sage and ‘Ryder’ leather cushion in Tan, both Abode Living. Local hero: ‘Kangaroo Close-Up’ photographic print by Kara Rosenlund, from $290 (unframed). >


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usy Melburnians Simone and David Kelly craved a place to escape to regularly. David runs a commercial law firm and Simone was a lawyer for 15 years until she took a breakthatturnedouttobeongoing.Shewantedtospend more time with her two stepchildren – Alexi, now 14, and Mariella, 11 – and “concentrate on other things”. Simone was looking for balance. “Family life is incredibly difficult with two full-time lawyers in the house,” she says. They purchased the perfect property in February 2016, a 1.2ha plot near Fish Creek, just north of Wilsons Promontory, the southernmost point of the Australian mainland. Two thirds of the land was old-growth bush; the remaining third cleared except for a large metal shed with a shower and toilet. It was in the shed that they lived when they came down from Melbourne on weekends.“Alongwithspidersandratsandothercreepy crawlies,” says David. “Plus it was freezing in winter.” From the outset, the couple’s aim was to have modular-pod design firm Archiblox create a chic, comfortable dwelling for their weekend and holiday escapes. Simone admired the company’s work and David knew the director, Bill McCorkell,

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“so there was already a level of trust”, he says. The contract was signed in May 2017 and the design worked out in close consultation with Simone and David. The home had to be built according to BAL29 specifications, the stringent building regulations for new homes in bushfireprone areas, introduced after the devastating Black Saturday bushfires that ravaged Victoria in 2009. All the external walls neededtobeanon-combustiblematerial,socorrugatedColorbond was chosen for the cladding. Silvertop ash – one of only seven hardwood species deemed suitable for homes in bushfire-prone areas – was picked out for the decking and eaves. Meanwhile, blackbutt, another fire-retardant timber, was ordered for the internal flooring throughout. Work began onsite on October 2017, when the two completed residential pods were delivered. It took a full day to unload the pods – in dismal weather – and another month to join them together. That involved connecting the stumping and installing the plumbing, electricals, gutters, downpipes, flyscreens and solar panels, as well as rectifying some minor damage that had occurred during transportation. >


This is the life

“We feel far more creative at Fish Creek, and part of that is being strict with devices and not having TV,” says Simone. “We do have the internet, but our time is mostly spent reading or outside.” There’s a trampoline and plenty of outdoor games and indoor boardgames to play, and in summer the family swims at a number of deserted beaches nearby. “Sometimes we go searching for pippies and have a feast,” she says.

KITCHEN “I love a bit of bling,” says Simone, standing in front of her gold splashback featuring glossy ‘Chrysos’ tiles from Perini. Her collection of vintage Australian pottery is arranged on the shelves. The benchtops are Tasmanian oak; the joinery is Laminex Black. Stools bought on Gumtree from a man who had them made in the 1970s. LIVING AREA A mid-century coffee table, solid as a rock and also found on Gumtree, is where the family play boardgames. The armchair is a vintage Australian piece by Fred Lowen for Tessa Furniture. ‘Horama’ cast-iron firebox by Cheminées Philippe. ‘Futura’ fan, Beacon Lighting.


THE PALETTE Dulux Army Fatigues (interior walls)

Colorbond in Woodland Grey (exterior)

Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

Laminex Black (kitchen joinery)


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BATHROOM The vanity is a custom design by Archiblox. The front is finished in Laminex Sublime Teak, and the top and sides in Fossil. American Standard ‘Heron’ basin and Mizu ‘Drift’ mixer, both from Reece. KIDS’ ROOM These Ikea bunk beds were bought secondhand on Gumtree. Rug from Urban Outfitters (US). Vintage lamp. Smart buy: ‘Mydal’ pine bunk frames, $249 each, Ikea. MAIN BEDROOM Simone and David bought an inexpensive Ikea ‘Tarva’ pine bedframe and replaced the bedhead with one from Naturally Cane. ‘Coral’ stoneware pot (with succulents), Kmart. Vintage bedside tables. PADDOCK Bordering the property is a dairy farm; when the family is away, the neighbours sometimes water their vegies. ENTRANCE A striking work by Baden Croft turns heads at the door. For similar chair, try The Family Love Tree. >

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One module is for living, the other for sleeping. The living modulehasasizeabledeckandfeatureslarge-formatwindowsand glass doors that draw in natural light, provide cross-ventilation and frame the views of the paddocks and Corner Inlet. Raked ceilings add architectural flair. The sleeping module contains three bedrooms (one kept for guests), a laundry and bathroom. Off the laundry is another small deck that looks out to the forest; its stone bath is the perfect place to watch the sun set. The bush-inspired weekender is quite a contrast to Simone and David’s inner-city Melbourne home – a Federation house with a largely neutral colour scheme. “This home is all about cocooning and richness,” says Simone, who chose an earthy green colour – almost khaki – for the walls. “When David went to see the pods being built he was a bit shocked! But it’s a really comforting colour and relates to the landscape.”

Sustainability is at the core of the modular-home movement, and in this case also extends to the furnishings and decor. Simone set herself the challenge of sourcing as much as she could secondhand. “Almost everything in the house is preloved – even the fridge,” she says. “I spent ages trawling through op shops, Gumtree and eBay. The process was fun because you have to be a lot more inventive and creative; I thoroughly enjoyed it.” Simone and David are also passionate organic gardeners (see a review of Simone’s new book, Family Harvest, on page 191), at their Melbourne home and at Fish Creek, where they grow capsicums, coriander, basil, broccolini, tomatoes, radishes, springonions,thyme,turnips,pumpkin,zucchiniandwatermelon. There are two water tanks and the rainfall’s been good... Next up for Simone is making and bottling her own passata. # Archiblox, Burnley, Victoria; 1300 773 122 or archiblox.com.au.

MAIN DECK/LAWN “The kitchen splashback looks amazing when you’re outside at sunrise and the light’s reflecting off it,” says Simone. To the left of the deck are a number of old carrot-planting boxes filled with premium topsoil for growing vegetables. Native grasses planted around the decks attract birdlife. A large mob of kangaroos visit at dawn and again at dusk to eat the grass, and there is a wombat happily in residence under the house. The ‘Zen’ steel fire pit (in the foreground) from Remarkable Outdoor Living sees plenty of use. It rusted to the orange-red colour over time. REAR DECK Simone loves relaxing in her beautiful stone bath, built into the deck. “It weighs about 300kg!” she says. Designer buy: ‘Castello’ bath, $3462, Natural Stone Bath Factory. Milli ‘Inox’ outdoor shower in marine-grade stainless steel, Reece. The deck’s periphery is lined with fire-retardant James Hardie fibre-cement cladding.

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THE LAYOUT

Great escape Deck Dining Living Kitchen

Laundry

Bed

Deck

FEATURE TREES & PLANTS TREES

Yellow box (Eucalyptus melliodora) Blackbutt (Eucalyptus pilularis) SHRUBS & GRASSES

For Where to Buy, see page 187.

Lomandra Rosemary Coastal rosemary (Westringia fruticosa)

Bed Bath

Bed

The sense of release from city life is palpable at Fish Creek. “When we’re here, or on the drive from Melbourne, everything that’s bugging us melts away,” says Simone. “Even when we were camping in the shed it was great. We loved being connected to the land and sea and tried to maintain that: just to be free and outdoors as much as possible, even when the weather is rubbish. This place is amazing – a true haven.”


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FAMILY VIEWING

Elegant yet robust enough for a clan of six, this new cliffside home in Sydney’s north revels in its generous spaces and glorious ocean outlooks. STORY Chris Pearson | STY LI NG Kayla Gex | P H OTO G R A P H Y Chris Warnes


ENTRANCE Rachel Defina enters her newly built northern beaches home. ‘Twiggy Egg’ pendant light, Spence & Lyda. Granite floor tiles, Surface Gallery. Artwork by Sophia Szilagyi. LIVING AREA Floor-to-ceiling windows take in a large chunk of the coast. Custom cabinetry in Eveneer Chinchilla timber veneer. ‘Frankie’ modular sofa, Fanuli. Gervasoni coffee table, Space. Basket (on coffee table), Ondene. Tray, Fred International. Vase (on cabinetry), Dinosaur Designs. Stucco wall finish by Hermosa Painting Finishes. Designer buy: ‘Laguna’ abaca-fibre wall-hanging, $295, Marmoset Found. >

FEATURE TREES & PLANT Kentia palm (Howea forsteriana) Cabbage tree palm (Livistona australis) False cardamom (Alpinia nutans)

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KITCHEN Light bounces off the handmade tiles of the splashback, drawing attention to the work zone. An open shelf and island base in Eveneer Chinchilla breaks up all the white joinery. Hansgrohe ‘Focus 240’ mixer, Winning Appliances. ‘Casa’ ceramic splashback tiles in Carrara White, Onsite Supply+Design. Granite island benchtop, Worldstone. Rina Menardi platter (on island), Ondene. Canisters (on shelf), Haven & Space. ‘Drop’ pendant light (left), Hub Furniture. ‘Pipeline’ lights (top), Tovo Lighting. European oak tongue-and-groove floor, Precision Flooring. Designer buy: Muuto ‘Nerd’ bar stools, $810 each, Living Edge. BALCONY Rachel chills out with Will and Sarah. LouvreTec operable roof with aluminium louvres, installed by Louvreland. MDF Italia ‘Rock’ dining table, Hub Furniture. Feelgood Designs ‘C603’ chair, Stylecraft. Gervasoni ‘Ghost Out’ sofa and ‘InOut’ side tables, Anibou. Decking in tallowwood from Coach House Timbers.


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Great escape

The family spends a lot of time on the balcony extending from the living room, gathering there for breakfast or to chill out whenever the moment strikes. “With its louvred roof and comfy couch, we just love it,” says Rachel. “There’s always plenty going on down at the beach to look at.” And when the adults, teen and younger children want some ‘me’ time, they have their own living zones to retreat to.

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or the first time, Rachel Defina has a coffee table in her living room. “Before, with three young sons and Lego everywhere, there just wasn’t room,” she says, a sweep of her arm taking in the new open-plan dwelling on Sydney’s northern beaches. With several sitting areas, including a rumpus room for the kids, plus five bedrooms across three levels, space is clearly in abundance here. When Rachel and her husband Andrew chanced upon the property in 2011, they’d just renovated and settled into what they imagined would be their home for many years, in a nearby suburb. But they had a special affection for this particular area, where they’d both grown up, and loved the aspect of this block. “We were blown away,” says Rachel. “We’d always dreamt of a view like that.” Sitting on the site was a weatherboard bungalow, which the Definas rented out until 2015 – right around the time they approached architect Mark Korgul of Watershed Design and interior designer Sarah Marriott of Sarah Jayne Studios to create a new home. “We wanted a laidback family home with rugged surfaces for our active children, and spaces where they could relax with friends as they grew older,” says Rachel. Peter Best Constructions razed the bungalow and excavated the rock to create a home with three levels where there had > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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This is the life

Having people over is easy here as many areas can expand and contract according to the family’s needs. In the living room, wall-to-wall sliding glass doors open up completely so the large balcony can become a continuation of the space. Meanwhile, guests who need to be accommodated are welcome in the parents’ retreat, where the study (with its sliding fourth wall) can be quickly converted to a bedroom.

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HOUSES H G been two. As a result, the couple and their (now) four children – Will, 14; Lachie, 12; Sam, nine; and five-year-old Sarah – have all the space they need, now and into the future. “The levels effectively create three zones: open-plan living spaces on the middle level; a parents’ retreat with sitting area and a study on top;andthechildren’szoneonthelowerlevel,withtheirbedrooms and media space all enjoying the northern aspect,” says Mark. Vastwallsofglassallowthefamilytoconnectwiththeoutdoors even when they’re inside, while the cantilevered outdoor space adjacent to the living room appears to hover over the breakers. Its slatted roof and louvres keep the sun exposure under control. New stone walls built in a freeform, dry-stacked style feature inside and out. They connect the house firmly to the site and its heritage sandstone walls and steps, which were retained in the redevelopment. Meanwhile, horizontal strip windows and judicious screening ensure privacy from neighbouring houses sitting right on the boundary. Interior designer Sarah says her brief was not to cut corners in the finishes and detailing. “Rachel and Andrew wanted the

spaces to feel warm, liveable, friendly and relaxed, not Hamptons beach-house style but a little more bespoke and Scandi in style.” A palette of light oak flooring and stone throughout reflects the coastal location, with expanses of white and cooling greys to temper the prevailing warm, sandy hues. “It’s a neutral, paredback look, with pops of blue and green,” says Sarah. Texture also plays a huge part, with clever choices such as the woven pendant lights and accessories. Setting it apart from other beach homes are some more sophisticated elements: marble-like stucco on select walls in the living and sleeping quarters, and pearlescent mosaics in the main ensuite. Luxury finishes aside, this is very much a family home, with a relaxed northern-beaches feel. The Definas love it – and their close-up view of the rolling waves. “It’s so unusual taking them > in from that angle,” says Rachel. “We know it’s special.” Watershed Design, Manly, NSW; watersheddesign.com.au. Peter Best Constructions, Roseville, NSW; peterbestconstructions.com. Sarah Jayne Studios, Woolloomoloo, NSW; sarahjaynestudios.design.

LIVING AREA An abstract artwork by Mark Elliot-Rankin has pride of place. Custom cabinetry in Eveneer Chinchilla. ‘Delta vase’ (on cabinet), Papaya. ‘Twiggy Egg’ table lamp (next to window), Spence & Lyda. NAU ‘Nest’ side table, Cult. Australian House & Garden throw, Myer. MAIN ENSUITE Indulgent soaking is easy in the Apaiser ‘Sublime’ tub, with the views filtered through automated aluminium louvres. Bath filler, Brodware. Faucet Strommen ‘Doccinox’ ceiling shower and Hansgrohe ‘Raindance’ rail shower, both Just Bathroomware. Tiles, Di Lorenzo Tiles. Pendant lights, Marz Designs. DINING The American ash table from Beachwood Designs is a great match for the ‘C170’ oak chairs from Stylecraft. Paris au Mois d’Août pendant lights, Hub Furniture.


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THE PALETTE Dulux Natural White (kitchen joinery and living)

Grey Marmorino stucco wall finish (hallway)

Dry-stacked granite cladding (main bedroom)

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THE LAYOUT Gym

Cellar

Bar

Store Bed

Bath

Living

Bed

Terrace

Bed Bed Bath

Entry

Garage

Laundry Study

Pantry

Kitchen Living

WIR

Study Main bed Retreat

Bath Balcony

Dining

FIRST FLOOR

Deck Pool

Balcony GROUND FLOOR

LOWER GROUND FLOOR

POOL Sarah and Lachie take a dip. For similar towel, try Myer. PARENTS’ RETREAT ‘Snug’ chair and ‘Soft Triangle’ side table, Stylecraft. Moller bench #63, Great Dane. Throw, Orson & Blake. ‘Lisburn’ carpet, Cavalier Bremworth. Artwork by Gabi Lee, Otomys. MAIN BEDROOM A blackbutt recess in the stacked-stone walling creates a space for storage and display. Candlesticks, H&M. Muuto mirror, Living Edge. Riva ‘Clessidra’ stool, Fanuli. ‘Bronte’ granite cladding, Surface Gallery. Smart buy: ‘Polished Cylinder’ brass vase, $54, Zakkia. DECK Rachel and Sarah cuddle up in a circular day bed with retractable canopy. B&B Italia ‘Canasta’ day bed, table and cushions, all Space. SARAH’S ROOM A sweet space for the youngest of the family. Artwork, Castle & Things. Beanbag and throw, Koskela. Muuto ‘Restore’ basket, Living Edge. Rug, Temple & Webster. Custom ottoman. For Where to Buy, see page 187. #


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VALLEY HIGH

Prioritising wellness and moving out of Brisbane delivered a beautiful eco-friendly home in the bush and a more relaxed lifestyle to boot. STORY Rachael Bernstone | ST Y LI N G Sarah Ellison | P H OTOGRA PH Y Mindi Cooke

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This is the life

The Stevens family have heartily embraced rural living. They love being intimately connected to nature and the nuances of the changing seasons, and still marvel at the abundant wildlife around them. Regular visitors include wallabies, many different kinds of birds and lizards, even the occasional echidna. Sometimes they spot non-venomous diamond pythons sunbaking, but are careful to leave them alone!

FRONT WALKWAY Homeowners Lee and Lee-Anne Stevens with their daughters Violet (left) and Poppy, and Lillee the pug. BATHROOM Sustainable and serene, the main ensuite is everything Lee-Anne dreamed of. Bath, Apaiser. Arcisan ‘Axus’ tapware, Harvey Norman. Mirrors, Satchells. Spotted-gum vanity with marble top. Pendant light, Creative Cables. Ironbark weatherboards wrap around the house. >


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or much of the year, Lee and Lee-Anne Stevens have all the doors and windows of their Moreton Bay hinterland home open, making the most of its connection to the surrounding bush. Living here in the valley is pure bliss, says Lee-Anne, and a far cry from their previous pressure-cooker lifestyle in Brisbane. In 2014, Lee-Anne was suffering poor health, which she attributed to her high-stress job and coming into contact with toxic materials while renovating a number of old properties over the years. In order to live a ‘cleaner’ lifestyle and hopefully restore Lee-Anne’s health, the couple decided to make a tree-change in 2016, securing a vacant 2.4ha block just 20km north-west of the city. The Stevens briefed architect Shaun Lockyer to design a “modern farmhouse” that prioritised healthy spaces and natural materials. “Lee and Lee-Anne have had an interest in all things ‘green’ for a long time,” says Shaun. “They wanted to build a sustainable family home, but it had to be practical in terms of incorporating the eco elements. They wanted to be sensible and get value from their investment.” With a floor area of 189m2, the three-bedroom house is quite modest by today’s standards. But the spaces feel open and generous, thanks to the elevated ceilings and connections to the outdoors on two sides. The floor plan is arranged around a grassed courtyard: garage, entry and home office at one end; main living areas and bedrooms in the long part; and alfresco entertaining zone – including a covered outdoor room >

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TOP 5 INDOOR PLANTS (TO HELP WITH AIR PURIFICATION) Peace lily Devil’s ivy Aloe vera Snake plant English ivy

OUTDOOR PLANTS Seaside daisy Dwarf fringed wattle (Acacia fimbriata ‘Nana’) Philodendron ‘Congo’ Climbing fig (Ficus pumila)

DINING The weather is a bit cooler here than in Brisbane so the double-sided Seguin fireplace, from Sculpt Fireplace Collection, sees plenty of use in winter. Surrounding it are recycled bricks from The Brick Pit. Antique French dining table, Wallrocks. Vintage dining chairs. Louvres, Breezway. Local hero: ‘Dreamweaver’ woven pendant light, $890, Pop & Scott.


DINING The main living areas connect to the garden on two sides. “Poppy can run in and out as she pleases,” says Lee-Anne. Bench seat designed by Shaun Lockyer, made by Healthy Abode. Throw, Pampa. Ironbark flooring, Queensland Timber Flooring. KITCHEN With an organic vegie garden just steps away, fresh produce is always on the menu. Custom stools by JD Lee Furniture. Ovens, Siemens. Benchtops in stainless steel (at right) and spotted gum (island). The joinery is made from spotted gum and E0 VJ panels. Honed-concrete flooring. Designer buy: Armando Vicario ‘Luz’ gooseneck mixer tap, $600, Abey. LIVING A restrained materials palette contributes to the homely feel of this space. “It’s so cosy and comfortable, I never want to leave,” says Lee-Anne. Custom armchair by Healthy Abode and The Purc-Shop. Ottoman, Pop & Scott. Basket, The Dharma Door. Rug, Armadillo & Co.

THE PALETTE

Recycled brick

Spotted gum (joinery throughout)

Slate (bathroom walls)

Great escape

The decision to move to a rural area initially raised a few eyebrows, says Lee-Anne. “When we first told our friends about our plans, they told us they’d need a picnic lunch to come and visit,” she says, laughing. “But now people ring us and ask if they can come out for a barbecue. They love it here as much as we do – they visibly relax from the second they arrive and start heading up our long driveway.”


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and chemical-free pool – opposite. “The outdoor room is one of our favourite spaces,” says Lee-Anne. “Perched on the built-in day bed, taking in the house and the landscape as one, you really appreciate the greatness of Shaun’s design.” LeeandLee-Anneareseasonedrenovators(theyhaverenovated, built or project-managed 150 properties for their consultancy business, Healthy Abode), so overseeing the interiors themselves was a natural step. In line with their clean-living ethos, they specified low- or non-toxic finishes and furnishings throughout. The home feels especially welcoming, thanks to the use of rustic materials – solid timber trusses, spotted-gum floors and recycled bricks internally; and ironbark weatherboards andtexturaltyroleanrenderoutside.Inside,thematerialspalette isdeliberatelyrestrainedsothegreenviewscantakecentrestage. “Waking up to greenery every morning is a feast for the eyes and helps reduce stress; it also improves your health longevity, sleep and immune function,” says Lee-Anne. Another bonus for the Stevens is that they’re entirely selfsufficient in terms of electricity, water storage and waste management. Their power is generated by a 10kW solar system,

with its inverter located in a shed well away from the house to minimise the impact of electromagnetic fields. Water from their four rainwater tanks is delivered to the home via BPA-free pipes, and waste is naturally processed with a BioCycle aerobic wastewater treatment system. The family – now including five-year-old Poppy and baby Violet – also maintain an organic vegetable garden and keep bees for honey. “Poppy spends hours at the fence line patting and feeding our neighbours’ horses or generally exploring, climbing trees and getting dirty. It’s wonderful,” says Lee-Anne. As dusk falls, they put the chooks to bed, then take an “adventure walk” around the property, gathering bits and pieces for Poppy’s treasure collection. Later, Lee-Anne will sit in the hanging chair on the deck and read to Poppy or rock Violet to sleep. While Lee and Lee-Anne began this journey to improve Lee-Anne’s health, the move has benefited the whole family. “We can’t imagine living any other way now,” she says. > Shaun Lockyer Architects, Newstead, Queensland; (07) 3257 7288 or lockyerarchitects.com.au. Healthy Abode, Brisbane, Queensland; 0433 501 345 or healthyabode.com.au. AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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MAIN BEDROOM “We installed retractable fly screens so we can open up the whole house and let fresh air in but keep the bugs out,” says Lee-Anne. Bed and side table, d-Bodhi. Bed linen, Elkie & Ark. Jute mandala wall art, The Dharma Door. Outside, the gardens are by Dan Young Landscape Architect and Lush Landscape Solutions. ENSUITE below left and opposite “Shaun thought about every detail, right down to where you hang your towel when you shower,” says Lee-Anne. Marble benchtop. Arcisan ‘Axus’ tapware, Harvey Norman. Bath, Apaiser. Towels, Loom Towels. Stool, The Purc-Shop. ‘Black Petal on White Background’ encaustic floor tiles, Teranova. Smart buy: ‘Abyss’ slate wall tiles, from $94/m², Eco Outdoor. GUESTROOM There are plants in every room to help ‘clean’ the air. Bench, JD Lee Furniture. Peg rail, Imprint House. Baskets, The Leisa Tree. For Where to Buy, see page 187. #


THE LAYOUT Entry OfďŹ ce

Garage

Bath Outdoor room

Vegie garden Laundry Kitchen Dining Pool Lawn

Living Playroom Bath Bed Bed

Main bed

WIR Bath

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GARDENS GREEN SPACES THAT DELIGHT AND INVITE

Photograph by Claire Takacs.

Enjoy the authentic charm of a naturalistic country garden.

Early morning sunshine glows on the edges of this garden in central Victoria. Designed to take in views of the wider landscape, it is also shaped in part by the plants beyond its borders. For more on this intriguing approach, see over the page...


MEMORY LANE

A childhood experience inspired plantsman Perry Lane to blur the lines between cultivated and untamed in his wild Victorian garden. STO RY Perry Lane | P HOTOG R A P H Y Claire Takacs

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GARDENS H G Pretty native and exotic perennials line a path up to the house. They include white-flowering love-in-a-mist (Nigella damascena), grey germander (Teucrium racemosum), sea holly (Eryngium x zabelii), flowering tobacco (Nicotiana), globe thistle (Echinops ritro ‘Veitch’s Blue’) and tall-spired white moth mullein (Verbascum blattaria f. albiflorum), their delicate forms gleaming at first light. >


H G GARDENS

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hen I was a kid, I remember passing a building site in Melbourne where terrace houses had been demolished and the land cleared, ready for a new development. The site was covered in flowering ‘weeds’ and it impressed on me a sense of how beautiful nature could be in the city, and how it knew what to do to repair itself. That experience set the tone for the kind of beauty I’ve been pursuing in my gardens ever since. Seeing pictures of the High Line in New York years later affirmed exactly that aesthetic – of the disturbed site with its colonising weeds – made into a beautiful and site-appropriate contemporary garden. I have always been attracted to the atmosphere of neglected sites, railway lines, cemeteries, vacant lots and abandoned farmhouses, and intrigued by the opportunistic plants that colonise them. These semi-wild places are incredibly inspiring and instructive to me. They provide a model and inspiration for my garden designs. I find more and more that I’m closest to capturing and interpreting the essence of that wildness when I embrace the beauty of each distinct season and resist the temptation to civilise the garden too much. Kooroocheang is 20 minutes outside Daylesford, in central Victoria, and was once a bustling community on the Cobb & Co coach route through the goldfields. Now it’s a quiet farming

community. The land is very flat, with no obstructions from horizon to horizon and a 180-degree view of the sky. Time passes attuned to the natural rhythm of the day, the season and the year. My property is 8ha, mostly cleared, and on fairly heavy loam. It has been organic for at least 40 years. I have always gardened organically and feel passionately about the benefits. A shelterbelt of mature trees to the south, east and west embraces the house and makes a strong backdrop. I have designed axes and sightlines, framing views of Lalgambook (Mount Franklin) to the east, Mount Kooroocheang to the west and Lanjanuc (Mount Alexander) 60km to the north, past the Yandoit hills, bringing the landscape into the garden so the planting is experienced in relation to the wider countryside. I’ve balanced the need for shelter with openness and integration with the landscape, being careful not to obstruct views or impede winter sunlight – in Kooroocheang, the landscape is part of the garden. In this sort of environment, where everything bleaches to straw in the heat of summer, an emerald-green lawn and a riot of colour from lush plants, all fattened up with irrigation, looks and feels jarringly artificial. When I drive the gravel roads around here, I feel inspired by the roadside plants and uncontrived combinations: self-sown fruit trees, wild roses and huge swathes of escaped weeds such as Echium vulgare and alliums, as if >

THIS PAGE Perry has composed a symphony of purple and mauve in this pocket of the garden, which includes the tall purple spires of Pride of Madeira (Echium candicans) with sea holly (Eryngium x zabelii), globe thistle (Echinops ritro ‘Veitch’s Blue’) and borage (Borago officinalis). OPPOSITE clockwise from top left A white love-in-a-mist (Nigella damascena) flower. Dainty, upright rows of white-flowered moth mullein (Verbascum blattaria f. albiflorum). Perry in his garden. “I see gardening as an art,” he says. “And I love exploring the balance between cultivated and wild here.” Rough spear grass (Austrostipa scabra). Yellow-flowering fragrant evening primrose (Oenothera stricta ssp.stricta). An outdoor dining room with a view. Beautiful yet hardy borage flower.

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FEATURE TREES & PLANTS Oak (Quercus sp) Quince (Cydonia) Persian witch hazel (Parrotia persica) Shadbush (Amelanchier) Pride of Madeira (Echium candicans) Sea holly (Eryngium x zabelii) Globe thistle (Echinops ritro ‘Veitch’s Blue) Penstemon ‘Blackbird’ Fragrant evening primrose (Oenothera stricta ssp. stricta)


mass-planted. Against a backdrop of blackwood and eucalyptus trees grows a sweep of native grasses: broad strips of reddish Themeda merging with paler Poa and Austrodanthonia, punctuated by the dark stems of emergent herbs and forbs. Illuminated by low afternoon light, it’s a raw, epic landscape. My approach to planting is experimental, improvisational and intuitive. My garden is an opportunity to observe, learn, engage and co-create with nature. The planting is extremely dynamic year to year. Allowing self-seeding is fundamental to my approach, contributing around 60 per cent of the plants in the garden each year. I’ve become adept at identifying seedlings, and when volunteer plants emerge I appraise their usefulness and consider whether I’ll leave them in situ or transplant elsewhere. The garden is planted with perennials, grasses, bulbs, biennial and annual plants, and there’s a long-term succession in place,

where small trees will eventually grow up to provide more shade and shelter and, in turn, provide opportunities for more diverse plantings. The natural weather cycles are harsh here, with very distinct seasons – at the end of summer, without rain or irrigation, growth pretty much stops, and exuberant spring and early summer growth is all in seed. Early autumn colours are bleached, muted and diffuse: straw, silvery-green, blue-green, black, brown, burnt orange and off-white. This faded palette harmonises with the landscape beautifully: the bleached and blackened growth forms a protective layer for strongly sprouting new shoots and provides habitat for wildlife. Some years I don’t deadhead, water or prune anything. This hands-off approach is all about holding my nerve and appreciating the beauty in the natural cycle. It has given me moments of # feeling an absolutely immersive and tangible magic.

Yellow flowers of fragrant evening primrose (Oenothera stricta ssp. stricta) are joyfully sprinkled around Perry’s home. The sun bursts through between a Monterey cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa) and river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). This feature is an edited extract from Australian Dreamscapes ($60, Hardie Grant), the latest book by Claire Takacs. A regular contributor to H&G, Claire is an acclaimed Australian photographer famous for capturing gardens bathed in beautiful light. She travels the globe recording the world’s finest.


GARDENS H G

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How to

GO COASTAL

A clever mix of native, tropical and exotic plants helped conjure a relaxed outdoor space for the owners of this eastern Sydney garden.

Tropical blend The plant mix includes tropical and dry-climate species, such as giant white bird of paradise (Strelitzia nicolai), blueberry ash (Elaeocarpus reticulatus) and this fine-leafed South African species, Podocarpus henkelii.

STO RY Elizabeth Wilson | PH OTO G R A P HY Natalie Hunfalvay

Ceiling the deal The 6x4m pergola has a clear polycarbonate roof with a slatted timber ‘ceiling’ to help diffuse the light. Outdoor sofa and chairs, Harbour 1976. Coffee table, Robert Plumb.

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GARDENING H G Poolside beauties

Tone and texture

A red-flowering New Zealand Christmas tree (Metrosideros excelsa) and white-blooming Indian hawthorn (Rhaphiolepis ‘Snow Maiden’) add pops of colour in summer, joined by yellow-flowering groundcovers.

Adam planted strappy-leafed plants next to round-leafed species, and darker greens alongside grey-greens such as this silver-toned Kalanchoe ‘Silver Spoons’. The textured scheme helps to disguise the triangular shape of the site, which is roughly 20x10m in the main section.

ADAM ROBINSON Horticulturist and designer, Adam Robinson Design

The project In its former life, this Sydney backyard was a very pragmatic space. Backing onto a laneway, the triangular site near the beach was dominated by a concrete driveway, with a strip of lawn and a Hills Hoist clothesline. The owners knew it had much more potential, and asked garden designer Adam Robinson to transform it into an enticing, habitable extension of their home. Their brief was for a relaxed, family-friendly garden featuring a pool, areas of lawn and an entertaining zone for dining and lounging. In terms of plants, they wanted a contemporary coastal feel. The solution Adam’s overhaul started with the removal of the seldom-used driveway. This made way for the 7x3.5m pool, now the sparkling hero feature. He selected a mix of tropical and native plants to form thick garden beds, and maximised the greenery by designing a lawn border rather than paving around the pool. A white-painted pergola with bluestone flooring has added a spacious outdoor room, while new paint colours for the home’s exterior have strengthened the indoor/outdoor connection and made the scheme a harmonious whole. Designer statement “I love that we managed to fit so many elements into this tight space, yet still created the sense of a relaxed haven.” >


CORNER LOCATION

The tall, sword-like leaves of Mauritius hemp (Furcraea foetida) form a focal point in this corner patch near the pool (left). “All the other planting is quite soft, so this architectural plant provides a contrasting plant form and helps anchor the corner plantings,” says Adam. The lower plantings include Carex and clipped balls of Westringia and Buxus. “Having a few clipped plants alongside the looser, softer plants helps to create structure in the garden.”

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Hue harmony

In step

The makeover extended to a fresh colour scheme for the exterior. The main colour is Grey Pebble, with dark accents in Western Myall and trim in Vivid White, all Dulux. Copper outdoor shower, Robert Plumb.

Adam planted strips of Buxus along the length of the steps, forming two long green ‘risers’. “It brings greenery into the entertaining area and helps to blur the line between the soft and hard surfaces,” he says.

Beachy keen

Cool colour

Disappearing act

“I’ve used a mix of plants to replicate the types you would expect to see by the beach, to play up the relaxed coastal feel,” says Adam. “All these plants are lush-looking yet hardy and resilient.”

Adam selected glass mosaics in pale blue for the interior pool tiles, to give the water a dreamy tropical hue. Bluestone pavers surrounding the pool are from Eco Outdoor, as are the pergola pavers.

A glass safety fence runs through the lawn, effectively disappearing. The lawn is Sapphire soft-leaf buffalo, chosen for its fine-textured, dark-green blades and ability to withstand traffic.

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN


GARDENING H G WATER WISDOM

Adam’s tips for success with poolside plants:

✚ Choose species that can tolerate pool water splash. For examples, see page 136. ✚ Make the plantings childfriendly by selecting soft, strappy species rather than spiky architectural plants. ✚ Improve the soil mix if needed. In this case, the soils were sandy, with no water-holding capacity, so we added soil conditioners, manures and nutrients to help it retain moisture. A Carex ‘Frosted Curls’ and yellowflowering Xerochrysum viscosum. B A new clothesline made from recycled sleepers and steel wire. The path leading to it is laid with organic bluestone steppers sourced from Eco Outdoor. C Buxus plantings create striking green strips in the steps leading to the barbecue and dining zone. The potted plants here are Kalanchoe ‘Silver Spoons’, frangipani and jade plant (Crassula ovata). D The dining zone is screened from neighbours by a row of slender weavers bamboo (Bambusa textilis ‘Gracilis’), a fast-growing, upright plant that forms a lush, green wall.

A

B

D

C

Illustration by Natalie Davis.

‘Mixing different plant textures and tones adds a depth to the planting palette and allows each plant to stand out. Walking in here, you want to explore and touch every plant.’ Adam Robinson 1 Front garden 2 House 3 Pergola 4 Paved entertaining area 5 Lawn 6 Giant white bird of paradise (Strelitzia nicolai)

4 3

2

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11

1 10

6

9 8

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7 Mauritius hemp (Furcraea foetida) 8 Kalanchoe ‘Silver Spoons’ 9 Pool 10 Bluestone stepping stones 11 Steps with strips of Buxus #

Adam Robinson Design Paddington, NSW; (02) 8354 1077 or adamrobinsondesign.com.


POOLSIDE PERFECTION When landscaping around a pool, be sure to select plants that not only look good but are robust and practical too, writes Helen Young.

Easy care Avoid plants that will regularly shed leaves into the pool, especially lots of tiny ones. It may be counterintuitive, but deciduous trees that drop their leaves over just a few weeks are usually tidier than evergreens that can drop all year. Gum trees drop leaves, flowers, bark and fruit capsules, and cause staining from tannins in their leaves. Tree ferns and she-oaks (Casuarina) cast off copious amounts of spores and pollen respectively, leaving a film on the water. Bamboo is also surprisingly messy in terms of leaf litter. Plants to rule out for invasive roots include fig and poplar trees, the umbrella plant (Schefflera) and fruit salad plant (Monstera deliciosa). Splash factor Chlorine and salt pools make life difficult for plants in the splash zone. Go for plants with thick, waxy or shiny leaves with inbuilt protection, such as Dianella ‘Little Jess’, Correa alba, New Zealand Christmas bush

(Metrosideros), banksias, New Zealand flax (Phormium), coastal rosemary (Westringia), Indian hawthorn (Rhaphiolepis), dwarf sacred bamboo (Nandina) and Pittosporum tobira. Hibiscus, hebes, gazanias, olives, mirror bush (Coprosma) and succulents such as Crassula also work. Having raised beds next to your pool will help minimise the amount of pool water soaking into, and damaging, the soil.

Smart selection As well as the splash-tolerant plants listed here, many lush, tropical-style plants suit poolside conditions and are conveniently low maintenance. You could consider clumping palms, frangipani, cordylines, bird of paradise, tropical rhododendrons, gingers, ixoras, cannas, aralia, liriopes, soft-leaf yucca (Y. recurvifolia) and gardenias. Safety first There’s a lot of exposed skin in pool areas, so try to avoid plantings with thorns and sharp edges. Also not recommended are plants that cause rashes on contact, such as many grevilleas and euphorbias. The slime factor rules out a number of others; you don’t want sappy agapanthus leaves underfoot or a slippery carpet of petals from camellias or jacaranda trees. Compliance For safety reasons, plants next to pool-safe fences must not be able to aid children in climbing. They should have soft stems or foliage rather than strong branches. #

PLANNING TIPS ✚ Poolside garden beds should be wide enough for screening plants if required. A tall hedge needs a width of 600mm; add 300mm for a low edging plant in front. If the bed’s narrow, consider covering the fence behind it with a climber. ✚ Allow for wide coping or paving between a hedge and the pool so you have room for pruning. Make sure there’s enough space to place a ladder, and to avoid clippings falling straight into the water. ✚ Ensure poolside beds are a little lower than the coping or paving so that mulch and soil won’t spill into the water. Or install raised beds to prevent pool water contaminating the surrounding soil.

Photograph by Natalie Hunfalvay. Landscaping by Adam Robinson Design.

Fine form In poolside beds that are narrow, choose plants that will grow upright rather than overhang the water. Fast-growing plants will need constant cutting back, so look for slower growers. Select plants suited to the amount of sun or shade in the location and the climate so they stay happy and healthy. Keep weeds down with groundcover plants or mulch. Mass plantings will require less maintenance than having lots of different plants; they will look more effective, too.


GARDENING H G

CLIPPINGS NEWS

B OO KS

3 OF A KIND

Watering cans

PRODUCTS

Sophie Conran’s 1.7L powdercoated-steel watering can in Buttermilk Cream, $44, is designed for greenhouse and indoor use. botanex.com.au

WATERCOLOUR WORKSHOP F R I E N D S O F T H E WATER

R OYA L B OTA N I C G A R D E N S M E L B O U R N E W I L L H O L D A T H R E E - DAY B OTA N I C A L A RT WO R K S H O P F R O M J A N UA R RY 2 - 4 L E D BY H E L E N B U R R OW S , W H O S E WO R K A P P E A R S A B OV E . T H E F O C U S I S O N C O L O U R E X P L O RAT R ION AND DESIGN ELEMENTS, AND THE C O S T I S $ 4 4 0 . R B G F R I E N D S M E L B O U R N E .O R G

Peerfect for summer entertaining, this 39cm tray, $79, is available in marri gum (right), eucalyptus and banksia designs. Each is moulded by hand using FSCapproved birch, with a food-safe melamine surface. bellart.com.au Text by Elizabeth Wilson.

Sort of wonderful Painted in delicious colours, earthenware ‘Licorice All Sorts’ hanging planters, from $65 each, are thrown, painted and etched by Sydney ceramicist Christina McLean. Check out her ever-evolving work at Trade the Mark; tradethemark.com.

MOROCCO IN BLOOM GIUPPI PIETROMARCHI

FOREWORD BY MADISON COX

PHOTOGRAPHS GIULIO PIETROMARCHI

A lovely object in its own right, this Haws 1L indoor watering can, can $134, $134 is made from copper and has a removable brass rose. petersofkensington.com.au

Moroccan magic For many garden aficionados, the Jardin Majorelle in Marrakech, established by a French artist in the 1920s and restored by Yves Saint Laurent in the 1980s, is a bucket-list destination. This and other Moroccan gardens are celebrated in Morocco in Bloom (ACC Art Books) by Giuppi Pietromarchi, whose passion is the beauty and richness of that country’s flora. Available on Amazon for $158.

Simple and stylish in black, this Australian-designed watering can in powdercoated metal, $59, features curvy lines and a 1.2L capacity. zakkia.com.au

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Froze Maca SERVES 12 COOK TIM 100g butt ¹/³ cup (45 20g butte 3 medium 2 tablesp 1 ½ cups ( 395g can NESTLÉ Sweetened Condensed Milk Mango slices, macadamias, extra, toasted coconut flakes and lime zest, to serve

1 Grease a 14cm x 22cm loaf pan (7 cup capacity). Line base and sides with 2 layers of baking paper, extending paper 10cm over the edges. 2 Process mango and half the juice until smooth. 3 Beat the cream in a bowl with an electric mixer until softly whipped. Gradually add NESTLÉ Sweetened Condensed Milk and remaining juice; beat until thickened. 4 Drop alternate spoonfuls of mango mixture and cream mixture over the base in pan. Gently swirl the mixtures with a butter knife. Repeat, alternating spoonfuls in layers and swirling each layer. Cover; freeze overnight or until firm. 5 Process cookies and nuts until finely chopped. Add butter; process until combined. Press biscuit mixture over frozen ice cream. Freeze 1 hour. 6 Turn out onto a board crumb-side down; remove paper. Decorate with extra mango slices, chopped macadamias, shaved coconut and lime zest.

NESTLÉ Sweetened Condensed Milk is the secret to this incredibly easy homemade ice-cream.

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NESTLÉ Sweetened Condensed Milk is made from fresh Australian milk and over 100 years of know-how, helping to make your baking a sweet success.

Conditions apply, see www.womensweeklyfood.com.au/christmastastesbetter. Start date 15th October 2018. Ends 11:59pm AEDT on 27th December 2018. AU and NZ residents 18+. Multiple entries permitted per person. Drawn at Greeneagle Distribution and Fulfillment, Unit 5/9 Fitzpatrick street Revesby NSW 2212 at 15:00pm AEDT on 10th January 2019. An unclaimed prize draw will be held on 11th April 2019 at the same time and place as the original draws. The winner will be notified by telephone and in writing within 7 business days of the draw using the contact details provided in their entry. The winner’s name will be published in www.bauer-media.com.au/competitions on 17th January 2019. Prizes: 1 x Food Studio Session valued at up to AUD $7,548.75 each and 50 x 12 Month Subscriptions of a Bauer magazine valued at up to AUD $131.88 each. Total prize pool in Australia is valued at up to AUD $15,642.75. The food studio session will be held at the Bauer Food Studio at 54 Park St Sydney NSW 2000 within 6 months of receiving the prize at the availability of the winner. The Promoter is Bauer Media Pty Limited ABN 18 053 273 546 of 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000. Authorised under permit numbers: NSW: LTPS/18/28323, SA: T18/1698, ACT TP 18/01862.


LIVING

RECIPES FOR LIFE AND HOW TO ENJOY IT ‘The essential ingredient [for entertaining] is not, paradoxically, the food, nor the perfect house to host in, but the sentiment you convey when you open the door.’

Styling by Vanessa Austin. Photograph by Rob Palmer.

Annabel Crabb, media personality and enthusiastic home cook. Turn the page for six of her most inviting recipes…


Citrus mascarpone layer cake

Pudding club Annabel Crabb is a dab hand at cooking and hosting what she describes as ‘happily imperfect’ meals. Here, she shares six of her favourite afternoon tea and dessert recipes, all designed to incite maximum delight for minimum effort. REC I PES Annabel Crabb & Wendy Sharpe | ST Y LI N G Vanessa Austin | PH OTOGR A PHY Rob Palmer


ENTERTAINING H G

Mandarin & honey madeleines >

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This is an edited extract from Special Guest: Recipes for the Happily Imperfect Host by Annabel Crabb & Wendy Sharpe, with photographs by Rob Palmer ($39.99, Murdoch Books).

Pistachio Louise cake

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN


ENTERTAINING H G

Moroccan chocolate & almond surprise biscuits

Gingernut ice-cream sandwiches Salted caramel ‘crack’

‘How about inviting people over for dessert? Just because 9pm is the best time to catch up. Think of it as book club, but without the lastminute cramming.’ Annabel Crabb

>


H G ENTERTAINING

MANDARIN & HONEY MADELEINES

225g unsalted butter, softened 150g caster sugar 50g soft brown sugar 4 large eggs Finely grated zest of 2 citrus fruit (lemon and/or orange) 225g (1½ cups) self-raising flour 1 tsp baking powder Pinch of salt 50ml citrus syrup (from tinned mandarins) or reduced sweetened orange juice Lemon mascarpone filling 150-200ml thickened (whipping) cream 1 tbsp icing sugar 150g mascarpone 5 tbsp lemon curd*

100g unsalted butter 3 tbsp strong-flavoured runny honey 200g (1⅓ cups) plain flour 1 tsp baking powder 75g caster sugar 2 eggs 30ml full-fat milk Finely grated zest of 1 well-washed mandarin (or 1 lemon or ½ orange) Icing sugar, for dusting

Serves 12

1 Preheat oven to 180˚C (160˚C fan). Grease and line two 20cm-diameter cake tins. 2 Using an electric mixer, cream butter and sugars until light and fluffy. Add eggs one by one, beating well each time; mix in citrus zest. Sift in flour, baking powder and salt, then fold into batter until incorporated. 3 Divide batter evenly between the two tins. Smooth surface and bake 20-25 mins, or until cakes have a golden hue and inserted skewer comes out clean. Cool on wire rack. 4 To make filling, whip 150ml cream with icing sugar until it thickens slightly, stopping well short of soft peaks. Fold in mascarpone and 2 tbsp lemon curd* until smooth. 5 To assemble cake, dab some citrus syrup on first layer, concentrating on dry edges. Using a spatula, spread a thin layer of remaining 3 tbsp lemon curd over sponge, followed by a layer of lemon cream. Gently sit next layer of cake on top and spread with syrup, curd and cream. Keep going until all layers are used. Spread a final layer of lemon mascarpone cream over top of cake and decorate. Or don’t. It’s your party. 144 |

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

Makes 12

1 Melt butter (keep 1 tbsp for greasing tin later) in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Let it bubble until showing signs of turning brown, then remove from heat. The residual heat should take butter to just the right side of nut-brown. Stir in honey. 2 Sift flour into a large mixing bowl, then stir in baking powder and sugar. In a small bowl, whisk together eggs and milk; add to flour mixture. Mix until it’s a thick batter without any clumps of flour and pour in warm melted butter and honey. Add a dash more milk if mixture seems too thick. Mix in mandarin zest, then chill batter in fridge: a few hours is good, overnight is even better. 3 When almost ready to bake – preheat oven to 200˚C (180˚C fan) – melt reserved butter and use a pastry brush to well grease a 12-berth classic madeleine tin or pattypan tin with hemispherical cups. Include a decent perimeter around each depression to cater for any overflowing batter. 4 Using a spoon (or a disposable piping bag containing the batter, with the corner snipped off), drop the madeleine mix into the shells until each is three-quarters full. Bake cakes 6-10 mins, depending on their size, until they’re a golden colour with crispy-looking edges. Remove from oven, turn over to show the pretty corrugated side and dust with icing sugar.

PISTACHIO LOUISE CAKE Serves 12

300g good-quality deep-red raspberry jam Pistachio cake 125g unsalted butter, softened 50g caster sugar 2 eggs 100g marzipan 30g pistachio paste (optional) 110g (¾ cup) plain flour 1 tsp baking powder 125g unsalted pistachios, finely ground Coconut meringue 4 eggwhites 220g (1 cup) caster sugar 90g (1 cup) desiccated coconut 1 Preheat oven to 180˚C (160˚C fan). Grease and line a 30x20cm traybake tin. 2 For pistachio cake, use an electric mixer to cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs one by one, beating well each time. Add marzipan and pistachio paste and beat well. Combine flour, baking powder and ground pistachios; fold into batter until thoroughly incorporated. 3 Spread batter evenly over base of tin. Bake 15 mins, or until firm and slightly golden. Leave to cool in tin while you make coconut meringue. 4 Whisk egg whites to soft peaks. Add caster sugar gradually and keep whisking until sugar is dissolved. Fold coconut through gently and evenly, being careful not to lose too much air out of meringue. 5 Spread jam in an even layer over cake, taking it right to the edges. Top with meringue, spreading evenly and smoothing the surface. Return to the oven and bake another 30 mins or until meringue is nicely golden. Allow to cool in the tin, then cut into squares for serving.

* Lemon curd is available from supermarkets but is easy to make; see Special Guest for recipe.

CITRUS MASCARPONE LAYER CAKE


MOROCCAN CHOCOLATE & ALMOND SURPRISE BISCUITS

GINGERNUT ICE-CREAM SANDWICHES

50g unsalted butter 150g dark chocolate (70% cocoa), chopped or grated 100g caster sugar 2 eggs Few drops of orange flower water (the strength can vary widely, so go easy) 125g almond meal 100g (⅔ cup) plain flour 1 tsp baking powder Icing sugar, for dusting Suggested fillings Crystallised ginger Tart dried apricots Dates Dried peaches or pears Crystallised orange peel Dried barberries

225g (1½ cups) plain flour 1 tsp ground ginger ½ tsp ground allspice ½ tsp ground cinnamon 125g salted butter 100g (½ cup) soft brown sugar 175g (½ cup) golden syrup 1 tsp finely grated ginger 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda 1 egg, beaten Vanilla ice-cream, to serve Caramel sauce 220g (1 cup) caster sugar 125ml (½ cup) thick (double) cream 25g butter 2 tbsp orange juice (or bourbon if catering for adults)

Makes about 24

1 Melt butter in a heavy-based saucepan; remove from heat and sprinkle in chocolate (the residual heat should melt it). 2 Whisk sugar and eggs until light and fluffy. Stir in orange flower water, then add almond meal, flour, baking powder and melted butter and chocolate and combine into a firm dough. Gather into a ball, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1-2 hrs. 3 Meanwhile, choose fillings and cut all except barberries into chunks a bit smaller than 1 cm. Preheat oven to 200˚C (180˚C fan) and line baking tray with baking paper. 4 Take dough from fridge and roll into balls about 3-4 cm in diameter. Sneak a chunk of filling (or 2-3 barberries) into each ball of dough, re-rolling so filling is hidden in middle. Gently roll in icing sugar; lay out on baking tray. Use the palm of your hand to gently squash each ball from round to slightly flat. Bake 10 mins, or until biscuits are crackled on top. Transfer to wire rack to cool.

Makes about 24

1 First, make gingernuts. Sift flour, ground ginger, allspice and cinnamon into a mixing bowl. In a small heavy-based saucepan over low-medium heat, melt butter, sugar, syrup and grated ginger until it bubbles; remove from heat and sprinkle in bicarb of soda. Pour foamy liquid into dry ingredients and stir, adding egg to bind. When dough is smooth, cool to room temperature. 2 Preheat oven to 200˚C (180˚C fan). Line two baking trays with baking paper. 3 Take teaspoonfuls of dough and roll into balls; space evenly on trays. Bake each batch for 8-10 mins or until dark goldenbrown. Remove and cool on wire rack. 4 Place sugar in heavy-based saucepan over medium heat. Heat until melted and deep caramel in colour; pour in cream and keep stirring. When smooth, add butter and juice. Cool; pour into jar and refrigerate. 5 To serve, squish a good scoop of ice-cream on a gingernut and drizzle with caramel sauce before applying its gingernut lid.

SALTED CARAMEL ‘CRACK’ Serves 10

1 x 250g pack Salada biscuits 200g butter 185g (1 cup) soft brown sugar 1 tsp vanilla extract Generous pinch of salt 200g dark chocolate, chopped 50g slivered pistachios 15g dried raspberries 1 Rummage through your baking trays to find one that will fit three Salada crackers in one direction and four in the other. You can of course snap them to fit if you can’t find quite the right tray, but this is the sort of surface area you’re after. Line your chosen tray with foil and then baking paper, and lay out Saladas in a single layer. 2 In a saucepan, melt butter and sugar together over medium heat, then cook, stirring occasionally, for about 5 mins (caramel should be thick and gloopy, and bubbling away sullenly). Stir in vanilla and salt. Take caramel off heat and pour over Saladas. Smooth with a palette knife or spatula if you have one (if you don’t, get one immediately – for real, it will change your life). Also, this would be an awesome time to remember that you forgot to preheat the oven. All is not lost: jack it up quickly – 180˚C (160˚C fan). 3 Now, into the oven with the lot for 15 mins, or until the caramel has darkened to a deep gold. Keep an eye on it, as the caramel can quickly turn. When it’s a good dark colour, remove from oven and allow to cool for a few minutes, then sprinkle chocolate over toffee. As chocolate melts, use spatula to spread it out evenly – this is extremely satisfying. While chocolate is still soft, sprinkle over pistachios and raspberries. 4 Allow salted caramel ‘crack’ to cool (not in the fridge, please), then snap into pieces and store in an airtight container. #


H G LIVING

UNIQUE TIPPLES

Drinks

SINGLE MINDED

Showcasing top-notch wines creates a unique opportunity for us to enjoy specific plots and seasons, writes Toni Paterson. Hill of Grace, produced from a single 4ha plot of land in South Australia’s Eden Valley. There, the old, gnarly dry-grown vines produce a very concentrated and characteristic shiraz. Hill of Grace is a rare and incredibly expensive wine because the quality is high and the volume is limited. It has a special character, and its taste is a snapshot in time, reflective of the season in which it was grown. That’s what makes single-vineyard wines so fascinating. Sometimes, particularly in poor vintages, they’re not the most seamless, complete or flawless wines (which explains why they’re not produced every year). But in great vintages, they can be all of the above and more. This variability makes them so absorbing, and their personalities so captivating. These wines stimulate the mind as well as the tastebuds, so they’re all the more satisfying to drink. #

Try these 2016 BROKENWOOD FOREST EDGE VINEYARD CHARDONNAY, $55 A modern wine with restrained fruit, bright acidity, grapefruit flavours and nuances of nuts and oatmeal. Will evolve over time. 2015 WYNNS COONAWARRA ESTATE MESSENGER CABERNET SAUVIGNON, $80 Has highly perfumed aromatics of blackcurrant and violet. Excellent intensity, with silky tannins. 2017 GIANT STEPS SEXTON VINEYARD PINOT NOIR, $60 A sophisticated pinot with dark fruit and great acidity. Wonderful fruit flavour. 2012 PEWSEY VALE THE CONTOURS RIESLING, $38 Incredible depth, intensity and length, with fresh lime and lemon-curd flavours. The 2013 is also excellent.

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

Wynn-makers Wynns Coonawarra Estate, in the cool Coonawarra wine region of South Australia, takes the single-vineyard concept to a new level. Because of the variability that can occur in single-vineyard wines, each year the Wynns winemakers select a top-performing vineyard of the vintage to showcase, and the wine produced is bottled separately. Wynns has extensive vineyard resources to draw on and wine aficionados are the lucky recipients of their cherry-picking. Wine from the Messenger vineyard, the company’s most southerly site, was first bottled as a singlevineyard wine in 2005 and again in 2010. The current release is 2015. It’s a vineyard that suits warm seasons, otherwise the final product can taste too leafy. When the weather is right, the grapes display a mesmerising perfume of violets and cassis. Other Wynns vineyards showcased over the years include Harold, Johnson’s Block, Childs, Alex 88, Glengyle and Davis.

Styling by Sophie Wilson. Photograph by Will Horner.

S

ingle-vineyard wines, as the term implies, are made from a specific patch of land. The volumes are limited, so they are often in short supply. When a winery produces a wine under a single-vineyard label, the grapes will come from the same single plot each time the wine is bottled under that name. This is quite a different process to a small winery making a wine from select parcels of grapes sourced from different parts of its estate. Single-vineyard wines generally arise because a particular vineyard shows itself to have a high-quality, unique flavour profile and a balance that negates the need to blend with another parcel of wine. Sometimes this is because of the age of the vines, the particular clones planted, the unique microclimate or soil of the vineyard, or the sum of all those factors. Australia’s most famous singlevineyard wine is arguably Henschke’s


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H G LIVING THE GOOD OIL?

BITTER PILL

It may be nice to think that swallowing a tablet can boost your health but it’s not that simple, writes Paula Goodyer.

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‘Single foods can contain hundreds of protective chemicals, and different nutrients can work together to help keep us in good health.’ Dr Tim Crowe, research scientist and dietitian

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healthier lifestyle is a common New Year’s resolution, but should that include taking nutritional supplements? Well, there are a few things to consider before you pop a pill – including history. Using vitamin and mineral supplements to prevent disease looked promising last century, but recent studies suggest single nutrients taken as supplements aren’t as useful as the nutrients in real food. They may, in fact, even do harm. In the 1990s, the hope was that vitamin E and selenium might help prevent prostate cancer, but further research found that they may increase the risk in some men. The latest cancer-prevention advice from the World Cancer Research Fund is that nutrients are best obtained from food, not supplements. What does the research say? Last year, a review of research reported in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that the four most common supplements (multivitamins, vitamin D, calcium and vitamin C) did not reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke or premature death, says research scientist and dietitian

Dr Tim Crowe. Folic acid showed a small decrease in risk, but with antioxidant supplements there was a slightly increased risk of premature death. Does anyone benefit from supplements? “They’re important in pregnancy and for anyone with conditions that make it difficult to absorb nutrients, such as Crohn’s or coeliac disease,” says Crowe. “Vegetarians may require extra iron and vegans will need a B12 supplement. People with darker skin and those with little sun exposure have a higher risk of vitamin D deficiency.” But ask your GP to check if you are actually deficient before laying out any cash, he advises. Who should take vitamins? “We know we need a healthy diet, but that’s not the reality for some people,” says Crowe. “If that’s the case, a multivitamin every day or every other day might help. Older people – who don’t absorb nutrients as well – may benefit from a multivitamin, too. But whole, minimally processed food is so much better than pills. Single foods can contain hundreds of protective chemicals, and different nutrients can work together to help keep us in good health.” #

Illustration by Domenic Bahmann.

Health

A high fish intake is linked to a lower risk of stroke and heart disease, says the Heart Foundation, but if you don’t eat much fish, fish-oil supplements can provide some protective omega-3s. Fish-oil supplements with a higher proportion of the fatty acids EPA and DHA have also been shown to benefit people diagnosed with depression, says Professor Felice Jacka, director of Deakin University’s Food and Mood Centre.


Beauty

TOP NOTES

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New and freshly reformulated fragrances in exquisite bottles are breaking new ground this summer. Elisabeth King is hot on the scent.

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eading into the warmest months, many designer and luxury brands have launched new and reinvented fragrances, eminently suitable for gifting or treating yourself. These gorgeous concoctions combine creativity in packaging design – a key element of any prestige fragrance – with premium ingredients to stand out from the crowd:

1 Styling by Sophie Wilson. Photograph by Will Horner. For Where to Buy, see page 187.

L’Artisan Parfumeur Mont de Narcisse eau de parfum ($209/100ml) Cult brand L’Artisan

Parfumeur specialises in reinterpreting the heritage of classic French perfumery. Narcissus notes add an austere yet rich complexity to this unisex fragrance, suitable for wearing day or night. It starts fresh and cool with bergamot, before the cardamom and pepper notes add spice and warmth to deliver an intriguing, green-tinged trail of scent.

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Tiffany & Co Intense Holiday Edition eau de parfum ($175/50ml) The American luxury

jewellery icon re-entered the fine fragrance scene in 2017 with a signature scent that became a global favourite. This limited edition showcases a more grown-up version, with a deeper iris note and smooth, powdery effect. The mirrored flacon mimics Tiffany’s trademark diamond cuts, topped with a reflective glass stopper and detailing in the famed duck-egg blue. A memorable gift choice or indulgence.

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My Burberry Black Elixir de Parfum eau de parfum ($190/30ml) Tenacious notes of

jasmine and rose absolute make this limited edition from the British fashion brand one of the most sensual releases of the season. Master perfumer Francis Kurkdjian has created a heart of sugared almonds and vanilla with a distinctive base of sandalwood and preserved

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lemon. Although this fragrance is a rejig of My Burberry Black, it has a unique character of its own. The horn-like stopper subtly references the buttons of a classic Burberry trenchcoat.

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Estée Lauder Beautiful Belle eau de parfum ($130/50ml)

Beautiful has been a definitive bridal scent for more than 30 years. The chypre-style scent has been compared to “a bouquet of 1000 flowers” and remains a local bestseller. Beautiful Belle picks up the baton with a floriental twist. Its lush blend of tuberose, pear blossom, gardenia and mimosa is perfectly pitched for today’s less traditional bride and all lovers of romantic florals.

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Tory Burch Nuit Azur eau de parfum ($200/100ml) Designer

Tory Burch owns one of the most glamorous homes in the Hamptons, but she took her inspiration from the Mediterranean for this floral/woody musk fragrance, which bottles the smell of a summer’s night. A great after-dark spritz, it opens with a fresh blast of violet leaf, fig and Sicilian mandarin. Cedarwood in the drydown lingers close to the skin long after the peony, freesia and Jasminum sambac (Arabian jasmine) notes develop their floral aura.

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Chanel No.5 L’Eau Red Edition eau de toilette ($278/100ml)

The rectangular Chanel No.5 bottle has undergone only minimal changes since its 1921 launch. Now, for the first time, it has been given a major makeover just before Christmas. For the special editions of both the original scent and this lighter, fresher No.5 L’Eau, the flacon is tinted deep scarlet. Coco Chanel described red as “the colour of life”, and this hue is used extensively in the fashion house’s clothing and accessories as well as make-up. #

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ON SALE DECEMBER 1 From the pages of Australian House & Garden, 70 years of architecture, interiors, gardens and people. AVAILABLE FOR $59.99 AT MAGSHOP.COM.AU AND WHERE ALL GOOD BOOKS ARE SOLD


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Short hop, big reward When time’s not on your side and you need a break, a spot close to home is the answer. Check out our ‘short’ list and get packing!

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Photograph from Getty Images. Currency conversions correct at time of printing.

ooking long-haul flights and holidays to far-flung destinations is an exciting but big undertaking – best planned well in advance so you can make the most of every dollar and skerrick of time. Less travel time relieves the pressure no end, so we’ve found 10 fun options for quick trips from every part of the country.

Auckland and Waiheke Island, New Zealand It’s just over three hours’ flight time from Sydney or Melbourne to New Zealand’s largest city and well worth the hop over the Tasman. When the weather is good, Auckland is a delight to walk around. Or to explore on wheels: jump on a local bus to a neighbourhood you’re interested in and stroll about for a few hours, admiring the gardens and diverse architectural styles. The suburbs of Parnell, Ponsonby and Newmarket are popular people magnets. You’ll find good cafes in them and any other shopping district, with lovely wine bars to boot. If you’re up for a memorable experience, climb Mount Eden, an extinct volcano that lies just south of the CBD. It’s quite an easy walk to the top and the panoramic view from the central crater is breathtaking. Accommodation options are plentiful in Auckland, but if you want to treat yourself, book into the Auckland Hilton on the harbour’s Princes Wharf; it has blissfully comfy beds. Also well worth doing is a day trip on a Fullers ferry to Waiheke Island (pictured). The 40-minute boat ride is lovely, and once there you can use the public buses to reach beautiful beaches and wineries (alternatively, bring your own car on a SeaLink ferry). Recommended is Fenice cafe in Oneroa, a short walk from the ferry stop, which serves pretty decent woodfired pizzas and antipasto. Look out for regular airline deals to snap up a bargain. waiheke.co.nz Great for… making the most of a four-day weekend. John McDonald >

Waiheke Island, a short ferry ride from Auckland Harbour, is packed with fun things to do. Visit wineries, stroll along scenic beaches or embark on a guided tour with Walking By Nature (walkingbynature.nz). The Vineyards & Bush Walk (about $113 per person), Double Headland Walk ($130) and Art Walk ($150) are all excellent ways to discover this very special place. AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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H G TRAVEL

A well-earned rest on the Arkaba Walk.

Arkaba Walk, SA Few things can be more invigorating than an extended walk through some of our most spectacular landscapes. Case in point is the Arkaba Walk in South Australia’s Flinders Ranges, a four-day, three-night trek that takes you through majestic scenery and varied terrains. It feels so liberating to be disconnected from technology and traffic. The journey is rated moderate to challenging – you’ll be travelling 12-14km per day – so be sure to prepare by walking as much as possible beforehand. Along the way, you’ll stay in private luxury camps and be treated to plenty of delicious and nutritious food. Cost is $2900 per person (twin share) from Adelaide. arkabawalk.com Great for… health and wellbeing. JMc Sanctuary, Mount Cotton, Qld A 40-minute drive from Brisbane, Sirromet winery recently introduced glamping stays on its grounds. Sited for maximum privacy, the tented pavilions are wonderful – the only thing that feels tent-like is their roll-up canvas blinds, which admit the light and sounds and smells of the bush. You’ll be woken with a chorus of kookaburras and a delicious breakfast hamper. The winery also boasts one of the state’s best eateries, Restaurant Lurleen’s, so fine dining is right on your doorstep. From $380 per day for two adults, with a minimum two-night stay. sanctuarybysirromet.com Great for… reconnecting with nature in comfort and style. Deborah Grant 152 |

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Glamping at Mount Cotton.

Ubud, Bali It’s so familiar to Australians, we sometimes need to be reminded that Bali is one of the most fun short hops you can have. Though no more than six hours’ flight time from any mainland capital, it couldn’t be more different to Australia. First-time visitors may be struck by the pure chaos of the traffic, but if you head inland to Ubud (pictured above right) it’s all serenity and relaxation. There you’ll find accommodation for every budget, great yoga retreats and the unmissable sacred Monkey Forest. Great for… simple R&R. JMc Jenolan Caves, NSW A three-hour drive west from Sydney takes you to this world-class system of limestone caves, which offers various levels of exploration. Most tours involve 1-2 hours of easy-to-moderate walking through amazing chambers with stunning formations. You might opt for, say, the River Cave tour and discover the mystical underground lake, or take a night tour by torchlight. Follow the day’s exploring with a stay at historic Caves House. And while you’re in the area, visit

The green paths of Ubud. Arkaba Walk camp

Mayfield Garden (mayfieldgarden.com.au), Australia’s largest private garden. It’s designed for leisurely strolling, with extraordinary plantings to admire all year round. A cafe and nursery make it easy to spend a day there. jenolancaves.org.au Great for… wowing people of all ages. Elizabeth Wilson

New Norcia, WA Founded by the Benedictine order, Australia’s only monastic town, 132km north of Perth, is now renowned for its neoclassical architecture and delicious local food and wine. Retreat there for a short break with pals or check in solo for a spirituality workshop. Down the road is the European Space Agency’s Mars-tracking antenna, but there’s no need to leave town to learn more; discover its work, and the 170-year history of New Norcia, at the onsite education centre. newnorcia.wa.edu.au Great for… a journey into the past, present and space age. DG


Photography by James Geer/bauersyndication.com.au (Arkaba Walk) & Jason Loucas/bauersyndication.com.au (Lizard Island).

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Scenic luxury at Wolgan Valley Resort.

Lizard Island’s aquatic wonder world.

Lizard Island & Resort, Qld The flight to idyllic Lizard Island from Cairns, in a tiny plane over the Great Barrier Reef, is breathtaking, but the island itself is something else. For many, the big pull is the ocean experience. You can dive and snorkel to your heart’s content, seeing everything from reef sharks and giant cod to big, friendly eels, delicate corals, nudibranchs and vibrant giant clams. The resort is sublime, with fabulous accommodation. Try to book a stay of at least five nights to get the most out of this piece of paradise. Rates are from $1949 per room per night, inclusive of fine food, beverages and many of the activities. lizardisland.com.au Great for… a milestone anniversary treat. Roz Wyatt, Taylor & Turner Travel Associates Darwin and beyond, NT Planning a trip to the Top End? Darwin is a culturally diverse tropical city with natural wonders at its doorstep. Litchfield National Park, an easy hour’s drive from

Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley, NSW Located in the heart of the Blue Mountains, 190km north-west of Sydney East Alligator River in the Kakadu. and in a secluded location, this is a destination in itself. With spectacular views the CBD, offers gentle bushwalking and and a choice of luxurious villas, Wolgan swimming in brochure-perfect waterholes. Valley is the perfect place to relax and Wangi Falls is easily accessible and, if you’re unwind or explore the local area and prepared for steep stairs, Florence Falls surrounding bushland at your own pace. – where two waterfalls plunge into a clear, If you’re after something more vigorous, deep pool – offers rich rewards. Further horseriding, mountain biking and tennis are afield, Kakadu National Park (three hours’ also available. Meals and beverages are drive on a sealed road from Darwin) is a included, so it keeps the cost wonderfully World Heritage-listed wonderland. Spend under control. oneandonlyresorts.com at least two nights (choose from campsites, Great for… bonding in a bush setting. Kellie hotels or architect-designed bungalows) Woodward, Reis & James Travel Associates and take a Guluyambi Cultural Cruise of the Murray River houseboat trip, SA East Alligator River with Kakadu Cultural For a relaxing holiday with friends, hire a Tours (kakaduculturaltours.com.au). boat from Kia Marina Houseboat Hire in You’ll see prolific birdlife (and plenty of Mannum and travel 50km up the Murray crocodiles) as you learn about the to Big Bend. The boats are surprisingly landscape and indigenous culture. For easy to drive, considering their size, and all a cultural journey you’ll never forget, take you need is on board. As you pass the small the Arnhemlander full-day 4WD tour of towns and charming shacks lining the river, Western Arnhem Land, visiting the the landscape changes constantly – from community of Kunbarlanja and the Injalak arid farmland to rocky cliffs to stands of Arts centre (dry season only, Maygumtrees and wetlands teeming with November). APT also has an eight-day birdlife. From $1500 for three nights over Arnhem Land Expedition Cruise departing from Darwin (aptouring.com.au). a weekend (plus bond). kiamarina.com.au Great for… a take-it-easy tour where Great for… a once-in-a-lifetime family nature comes to you. Adelaide Bragg # adventure and cultural experience. EW


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ADVICE

Photograph by Villa Styling.

PRACTICAL WAYS TO UPGRADE INSIDE AND OUT

At this Queensland property, walking a few metres from the main dwelling to the self-contained poolhouse is as good as a holiday. Carefully considered light, ventilation and design create a carefree vibe the owners can access at any time. Turn the page for five outstanding examples of at-home escapism‌


In focus

SERENE RETREATS

Find design inspiration in a space that allows you to exhale and unwind, writes Sarah Pickette.

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iberation is the sensation we all seek over summer. Whether you find yours in a corner of your own home or further afield, that elusive feeling of escape is truly soothing. In overhauling this Sydney boathouse, interior designer Sarah Davison has created a relaxed sanctuary that feels cosy when the owners are enjoying sunset drinks by themselves, but is generous enough to house overnight guests. A queen-size bed, kitchen and bathroom facilities have been tucked into the space. “The owners use the boathouse to unplug from technology and connect with nature and family,” says Sarah. “They say it’s where they have their best conversations.” sarahdavison.com.au


Photography by Villa Styling (this page, top) & Anson Smart (this page, bottom and opposite).

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INTO THE BLUE The owners of this Brisbane home (above) took an elementary approach to creating a place of escape on their property. They craved a comfortable spot to sit, where they could feel connected to the water and breezes beyond. Smith Architects delivered that with a poolhouse that’s separate from, yet visually aligned with, the family’s renovated Queenslander. “Here, beauty is created through symmetry, proportion and light,” says architect Stewart Smith. A kitchenette, barbecue, living and dining areas and a bathroom have been included – everything the homeowners could want. smitharchitects.com.au WA S H AWAY YO U R C A R E S R E L A X AT I O N F LOWS O N TA P I N T H E SY D N E Y H O M E AT R I G H T, D E S I G N E D BY LO C KY E R A R C H I T EC T S . “ T H E OW N E R S A S K E D F O R A N O P E N -A I R B AT H R O O M W I T H A L A I D B AC K S E N S E O F LU X U RY,” S AYS P R I N C I PA L S H AU N LO C KY E R . “ T H E STO N E B AT H I S PA I R E D W I T H C L E A N L I N E D TA P WA R E A N D P O S I T I O N E D I N T H E M I D D L E O F A C A R E F U L LY F RA M E D V I E W.” B L I S S . LO C KY ERA RC H I TEC TS .COM.AU > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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A breezy connection to a private garden provides a point of departure.

QUIET CONTEMPLATION Sometimes deliberate separation is the secret to escape. In this beautifully conceived Brisbane home, the owners decided against an open-plan layout in favour of defined spaces, such as this serene sitting room. The thoughtfully crafted timber floor and opening glass ‘walls’ create a timeless impression and encourage a slow, contemplative pace. “The house was intended as a second residence for a retired couple who divide their time between the city and coast,” says architect Sandy Cavill, director of Cavill Architects. “The owners now spend the majority of their time here, because it offers them the sanctuary they sought.” cavillarchitects.com


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Photography by Rob Maver (this page) & David Chatfield (opposite).

PERFECTION IN MINIATURE What do you need in a place of escape? Just the basics, says the owner of this delightful little cabin on Bruny Island, off the south-eastern coast of Tasmania. Designed by Hobart’s Maguire+Devine Architects, it features a simple Japanese-inspired timber interior that includes a sleeping area, day bed and kitchen. A bath has been sunk into the deck and solar panels line the roof, powering this off-the-grid holiday home. The client briefed the architects to build in as much as possible; the only pieces brought in were a low Japanese-style table and mattress. Zincalume and bushfire-resistant timber clad the cabin’s exterior, while a metal awning provides weather protection for its sliding glass doors. maguiredevine.com.au #

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Special report

POOLS

Today’s swimming pools have world-leading technology built in, yet are simple in form and easier to maintain, writes Sarah Pickette.

Sydney architect Eva-Marie Prineas designed this tiled-concrete pool as part of a whole-home project. It was constructed by Focusbuild. OPPOSITE Natural Swimming Pools Australia developed and built this circular pool to complement a Melbourne home designed by architects Kennedy Nolan.


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Let the design of your home inform the style, shape and finish of your pool.

Photography by Derek Swalwell (this page) & Chris Warnes/ bauersyndication.com.au. (opposite).

WHEN IT COMES NATURALLY

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ver the past decade, swimming pools have changed a lot. But while new technology has improved pool maintenance, durability and design, Australians are increasingly drawn to uncomplicated forms, says John Storch, director of Sydney-based firm A Total Concept Landscape Architects & Swimming Pool Designers. “Simplicity in home design is reflected in people’s desire for a simple pool shape,” he says. “It’s about taking a holistic approach and linking the home, pool and exterior.” The contemporary pool has clean, elegant lines without the busy curves of the kidney-shaped pool of earlier decades, says Sean Lynch, managing director of Poolfab on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast and

Ecozen in Brisbane. “There’s nothing like a crisp infinity edge to create a holiday feel,” he says, adding that a tiled-in lounge bench within the pool is often requested. “Tiling the pool bench in matching waterline tiles creates a sense of impact and opulence.” Splash decks – shallow areas worked into the edge, where you can sit in a deckchair and dangle your feet in the water – are also included in many designs, says Peter Baily, chief operating officer of Narellan Pools. Manufacturers have been savvy to the fact that Australian backyards are shrinking, Baily notes, and have responded by adding smaller pools, lap pools and plunge pools to their ranges. “You don’t have to let a small yard prevent you from having a pool anymore. These days, plunge designs >

There’s been a surge of interest in pools that are chemical-free and take their design cues from wild swimming holes, says Wayne Zwar, owner of Natural Swimming Pools Australia. The firm designs and builds in-ground billabong-style pools, such as the one shown above. This type of pool requires no chlorine, instead using aquatic plants to oxygenate the water and filter it (in tandem with a sophisticated submerged pump system). “Natural swimming pools are more expensive,” says Zwar, “but the sensation of swimming in ‘living water’ really can’t be beaten.” AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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can even incorporate swim jets, enabling you to have the same health benefits as a much larger pool.” One significant change that has expanded the scope of pool ownership for people with steep blocks is an expansion in the range of above-ground fibreglass pools. “These new shells slot into sloping backyards with ease,” says Baily. “Previously, you might have spent $50,000 on excavation and a retaining wall, but this style of pool does away with that extra expense. Put a beautiful deck around them and they look sensational.” Today’s pools are more eco-friendly than you might expect, with variable-speed pumps and efficient cleaning systems to help keep your energy costs in check. Both Poolfab 162 |

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and Ecozen integrate eco-smart materials and operating systems into their projects as a matter of course, says Lynch. “Thinking globally starts in your backyard.” When it comes to the pool’s finish, your options are broader than ever. “In the past, fibreglass pools tended to come in blue, but the colour palette has widened hugely to take in whites, greys and blacks,” says Baily. “A white pool will give your water a sparkling Whitsundays look, while black creates water that reflects its surrounds.” Whatever style you favour, there’s a good chance your new pool will be world-leading. “I often go to pool expos overseas,” says Baily, “and it’s Australian companies delivering the most exciting innovations.” #


Kieron Gait Architects designed this pool in conjunction with a garden pavilion for a Brisbane home. The small cantilivered platform makes the perfect launchpad for little swimmers. OPPOSITE TOP Good Manors in Sydney took a sloping yard and created a multilevel pool and entertaining space with lush borrowed landscape behind it – a great example of the ‘overgrown’ aesthetic. OPPOSITE BOTTOM A ‘Madeira’ fibreglass design from Narellan Pools fitted easily into this sloping Queensland garden.

Photograph by Christopher Frederick Jones (this page).

EASY DOES IT Contemporary pools require surprisingly little maintenance, says John Storch, director of A Total Concept Landscape Architects & Swimming Pool Designers. “The shift to automated technology has meant greater ease of cleaning, balancing water pH and heating,” he explains. “Some systems allow you to control your pool’s filtration, lighting and water features remotely.” This kind of technology is becoming more affordable as smarthome automation continues to develop. WATER TESTING Regular testing of pool water is essential. Bunnings offers a free testing service that gives you a prescription for the exact chemicals you need to treat your pool. See bunnings.com.au/ our-services/in-store/ pool-water-testing


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Smart shopper

SHADE SOLUTIONS

External shading can prevent damaging rays, heat and glare from entering your home so you stay cool and comfortable all summer.


Text by Georgia Madden & Sarah Pickette. Photograph by Justin Alexander (Tobias) and Christopher Frederick Jones (Bark Design).

BROLLY GOOD

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s the season heats up, keeping your home cool becomes a top priority. Interior window coverings help greatly, but the real key to passive-cooling success is adequate external shading, says architect Stephen Guthrie, co-director at Bark Design Architects. “It’s better to tackle heat and glare before it hits your home,” he says. “By doing so, you prevent heat being transferred inside.” Exterior awnings, venetians, roller blinds and shutters all block heat and glare and allow you to choose the level of shading to suit your home and climate. External roller blinds offer good flexibility and performance, says Pino Alessi, managing director at architectural window furnishings firm Alessi Design Group. “External roller blinds will prevent 50 to 60 per cent of heat from entering your home, while exterior venetians can block up to 85 per cent. Venetians cost about 25 per cent more than roller blinds, but you will reap the savings in power bills down the track.”

Shutters are another option worth considering, says Bryce Hedditch, director at Sonnenschutz, which makes a range of shades and shutters that are suitable for bushfire-prone areas. “Traditional casement shutters are typically used where a heritage look is desired, but sliding shutters are becoming popular for their architectural aesthetic,” he says. An awning has the power to bring your home beautifully to life, says Tony Cassar, managing director for Victory Curtains and Blinds. “It will soften and add depth to the facade of your home. And Australian-made awnings are second to none because they’re manufactured specifically for our conditions.” Awnings are becoming smarter, too. “Sensor-enabled designs can extend out as the sun moves and retract when it’s cloudy,” says Cassar. “More importantly, in high winds they will retract automatically to avoid damage. The latest app technology also allows you to operate your awnings from anywhere.” >

Sydney husband-and-wife duo Mike Durante and Krista Huebner started Basil Bangs with friends back in 2010. “Between us, we couldn’t find a beautiful beach umbrella for a wedding present,” says Krista. So they set about developing their own line of vibrant beach umbrellas (above) under the Basil Bangs name. What they’ve learnt along the way is that Australians value quality finishes and fabric in an umbrella. “They also appreciate the joy that something cheerful brings to the everyday,” she says. Krista advises choosing an umbrella in a fabric rated UPF 50+, with UV blockers, weather treatments (anti-mould and waterproof coatings) and a high-grade weave.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT This cheerful awning is controlled by a Somfy Orea RTS motor with an Eolis RTS wind sensor. A Coolaroo shade sail in Charcoal weatherproof cloth from Bunnings. A Sydney home by Tobias Partners features custom shutters with a steel frame and staggered teak battens. A Markilux folding-arm awning provides flexible shading and retracts neatly into its wall-mounted cassette when not required. OPPOSITE Bark Design worked deep, protective eaves into the design of this Queensland beach house. AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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OUTSIDE INTERESTS Jenny Brown, national marketing manager of Luxaflex Window Fashions, offers these tips on what to consider when you’re oking at awnings: Match the style of your home “Contemporary awnings look fantastic on the modern home, but a more traditional style could work best if you have an older home.” Make colour work hard “Awnings tend to be coordinated to match the home’s exterior. Beyond fabrics, powdercoating ensures your awning hardware also blends seamlessly into the building’s facade.” How much space do you have? “Straight-drop awnings, which fall directly from the roofline to shield windows and doors, are a sleek, space-savvy solution for windows and doors that require shading. Folding-arm awnings are ideal for courtyards and terraces with an outdoor entertaining area.” ABOVE Solar-powered automation makes sense for awnings. Luxaflex’s Evo Cable awning is powered via the company’s companion Photon One solar-motorisation system. RIGHT eZIP blinds from Victory Curtains and Blinds feature side-welded zips that lock the blind fabric securely into the side tracks for complete protection from pesky flying insects and the elements. OPPOSITE Melbourne architect Will Harkness specified a fixed awning for this north-facing Victorian home. It has spottedgum battens on a steel frame. For Where to Buy, see page 187.

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

If you’ve invested in good outdoor furniture it’s wise to protect it with an awning, retractable roof or shade sail. Retractable roofs are ideal for protecting large areas from sun and rain (Helioscreen’s All Seasons design provides coverage for up to 100m2), while awnings can be better suited to balconies and courtyards (Markilux’s cassette awnings can span up to 7m with a 4.3m projection; Luxaflex Window Fashion’s retractable awnings offer great flexibility with crank or motorised operation, integrated rain hoods, wind-protection systems and sun and wind sensors). When it comes to trends, sleek and fuss-free is the order of the day. Markilux’s slimline awnings disappear into a neat cassette when not in use. The Ventura terrace awning and Nisse folding-arm awning from Luxaflex are both perfect choices for narrow terraces

and balconies. If you want to create shade yet preserve your view, take a look at the eZIP mesh range from Victory Blinds. An alternative to traditional awnings, these products have a neat side retention system that helps keep insects out, too. Today’s blinds and awnings are designed with minimal maintenance in mind. Luxaflex offers a range of dirtdefying fabrics for both inside and out, so you can spend more time enjoying the shaded areas of your home and less time looking after them. Earlier this year, Markilux launched a colour-matching service that allows you to have your awnings the same colour as your home’s exterior. “We dye our fabrics in-house, which enables this level of colour precision,” says Kieran Keen, head of marketing for Markilux. “This means your awning has the potential to be a great feature of your home.” #

‘Good external shading can result in your home being several degrees cooler inside, and prolong the life of your furniture and flooring.’ Tony Cassar, Victory Curtains and Blinds

Photograph by Derek Swalwell (opposite).

H G ADVICE


Turn it on‌. Mosquitoes

Thermacell Repellers create a 21m2 zone of prote against mosquitoes - no messy lotions or sprays.


H G ADVICE

Green house

TREAD LIGHTLY

Visiting new territory is all the more enjoyable when you’re careful about the environmental footprints you leave, writes Sarah Pickette.

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ravel is a great motivator for environmental stewardship: who can swim in crystal-clear seas or gaze out at jagged mountains and not feel the need to preserve such beauty? Visiting unfamiliar places can indeed open your eyes to new landscapes and ways of thinking, but sometimes there is an environmental cost attached to this. As far-flung destinations become more accessible, the need for travel to be undertaken sustainably is greater than ever. “Globally, tourism is now a trillion-dollar industry… presenting challenges for the environment,” says Lina Cronin, communications and audit manager of Ecotourism Australia. “We’d encourage everyone to tread lightly when they travel, to help ensure tourism creates better places for people to live in and visit.” Travel can be a great force for positive change, says Cronin, and today’s travellers are increasingly eco-savvy. Recent research from Lonely Planet shows that 90 per cent of 19-29-year-olds consider a travel company’s commitment to ethical travel important when booking a trip. “There’s a growing awareness that travel should be done in a way that is beneficial to the places and people you visit,” says Cronin. Truly sustainable tourism operators and establishments may receive Ecotourism Australia’s ECO certification – the world’s first national ecotourism accreditation program and one of six such programs in the world with global recognition. To receive certification, a business must complete a stringent application process and be audited regularly.

‘ SUSTAINABLE TRAVEL MAKES FOR A RICH EXPERIENCE. YOU’LL ENJOY YOUR HOLIDAY KNOWING YOU ARE NOT CREATING A NEGATIVE IMPACT BUT HELPING TO MAKE THE WORLD A BETTER PLACE.’ Lina Cronin, Ecotourism Australia

If you’re planning to travel with an agent or tour operator, ask to see the company’s policy on sustainable travel. “The pressure you exert as a consumer trickles into business decisions and makes the industry as a whole more eco-conscious,” says Brett Mitchell, regional director for Intrepid. Group travel pools transport resources, lightening the eco burden, he says, while using boutique local hotels invests money into the community and makes travel more authentic. There are many simple ways to be mindful of the environment as we travel – for example, using our towels for more than one day and not leaving the aircon on all day, suggests Cronin. Travelling responsibly isn’t difficult, she adds, but it is rewarding. “Sustainable travel makes for a rich experience. You’ll enjoy your holiday knowing you are not having a negative impact but helping to make the world a better place.” #

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

3 SMART BUYS

Recycled bicycle inner tubes make the Alchemy Goods ‘Brooklyn’ backpack, $239, eco-friendly and extremely durable. upcyclestudio.com.au

Wotnot 30+ SPF natural sunscreen, $29, offers broad-spectrum protection free from titanium dioxide and petrochemicals. wotnot.com.au

Will’s Vegan Shoes hiking boots, $229, are produced through an eco-ethical, plastic-free and carbon-neutral supply chain. ecoture.com.au


RENOVATE + DECORATE

PAVE THE WAY

Austral Bricks has a range of six pavers in distinctive styles. ‘Hamlet’ in Blue, shown here, has dimensions (230x76x65mm) that lend it to a herringbone pattern; $122/m2. australbricks.com.au

The latest and greatest finishes and fabrics for beautiful home projects. Colour cue

Taubmans has named Night Watch – a deep jungle-green shade – its Colour of the Year for 2019. The rationale is that, with apartment living on the rise and people in developed countries spending so much time indoors, it’s more important than ever to incorporate aspects of nature into our homes. taubmans.com.au

SOMETIMES IT TAKES A TOUCH OF TEXTURE TO BRING A ROOM TO LIFE. UNDERSTANDING THIS, EARP BROS HAS RELEASED THE LARGE-FORMAT CAPRI RANGE OF DEEPLY TACTILE, STONE-LOOK CERAMIC TILES IN CALM NEUTRALS. PICTURED IS THE ‘CAPRI LINEAL’ TILE (45OX1200MM) IN BONE, $143/M². EARP.COM.AU

REGALLY BLONDE

Make light work of coordinating pale-toned interiors: Corinthian’s expanded Blonde Oak range of doors includes 11 designs, from traditional to contemporary, in solid, sustainable wood. corinthian.com.au

PATINA PLAY

Featuring a warm-hued grain and rough matt finish, Caesarstone’s new Excava surface showcases the power of patina. It pairs brilliantly with timber and iron. From $1100/m2 (installed). caesarstone.com.au

OUTDOOR REFRESHMENTS

Text by Sarah Pickette.

ON THE SURFACE

Inspired by the timeless colours of Australian landscapes, Laminex has unveiled 13 new surfaces that mimic the beauty of the natural world, in the form of wood grains, solid colours and metallic effects. From $81/m². laminex.com.au

Update your outdoor upholstery with (from left) Malindi, Mombasa and Mauritius fabrics, $73/m, from Warwick Fabrics. These subtle geometric prints are all UV-resistant and super-durable, and come in a range of on-trend summery shades. warwick.com.au #


H G ADVICE

Pets

TUFT LOVE

Look beyond its fancy ’do and you’ll discover an irresistibly smart, loving, lively pet, writes Roger Crosthwaite.

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

century when the smaller varieties began to be deliberately bred as companion dogs, a function they fulfil well due to their sociable, friendly nature. Poodles, especially standards, like to keep on the go and are gluttons for exercise, so your throwing arm will get a workout as a poodle owner. They are renowned for being calm, reliable, friendly dogs, although as you move down the size scale they tend to become a little more timid, which is only natural since a 26cm tall, 7kg toy would be much more easily injured than a standard. But all poodle variants are sociable, with a yen for company, so they fit well into family situations where there are people and a lot of action around. “Even the tiniest poodle is lionhearted, ready to do anything to defend home, master or mistress.” So says US author Louis Sabin, an electee of the New Jersey Literary Hall of Fame, no less. Religious cult indeed. #

3 OF A KIND: PET GIFTS

Ideal for anxious pooches, the Furbo dog camera amera allows you to see, see talk to and tr treat youur pup remotely. $359; shopau.furbo.ccom.

Have your fur baby’s name embossed on this leather dog collar (for small dogs) by The Daily Edited. $70; thedailyedited.com.

BREED ALL ABOUT IT

Standard poodles live for about 11 to 13 years, miniatures and toys for 14 to 15 years. A poodle pup from a reputable breeder can cost between $1500 and $2000. All poodles need a lot of excercise. Owing to their friendliness, intelligence and adaptability, seniors can often be rehomed successfully, so think about adopting an older poodle from a shelter.

Freshen up with the Bondi Wash Mini Dog Care Trio (dog wash, dog conditioner and kennel spray). $35; bondiwash.com.au.

Main photograph from Alamy.

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he poodle’s distinctive dog-show clip inspired US actor and comedian Rita Rudner to comment: “I wonder if other dogs think poodles are members of a weird religious cult.” Yes, this sort of coif can look a bit ridiculous when taken to extremes. But don’t judge all poodles by their haircut. Unless, of course you’re a judge in a dog show, in which case go right ahead. Despite its frou-frou reputation, the poodle cut isn’t as frivolous as it might seem. Poodles were originally hunting dogs, bred for retrieving game from the water, so those extra tufts of fluff around the joints were designed for protection and warmth around a poodle’s joints. In fact, a poodle’s coat isn’t technically fur, but a sort of wool. The woolly coat is non-shedding, which makes them far less allergenic than that of other breeds. That, and a lot of other useful characteristics, account for poodles’ popularity as source breeds for many of the so-called ‘designer’ dogs – cavoodles, labradoodles, groodles, cockerpoos and the like. The standard poodle – originator of the other variations, the miniature and the toy – is an energetic, easily trained dog that consistently rates very high on dog-intelligence tests. (Border collies, poodles and German shepherds make up the top three in Stanley Coren’s book The Intelligence of Dogs.) Standards usually run to about 38cm at the shoulder and around 30kg, so they’re not delicate beasts by any means. Their working-dog origins – in either France or Germany, depending on who you believe – took a different path after the late 18th


THE ENTERTAINER T H E S I D E - B Y- S I D E F R I D G E W I T H B U I LT- I N W I N E CA B I N E T I S T H E A L L- I N - O N E F R I D G E , F R E E Z E R , WINE CABINET AND CHILLER SBSES7165

Property

$10,999

AFTER THE FALL

Property pundits predict more price slides in 2019 but the numbers are anyone’s guess, writes Harvey Grennan.

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nalysts in the business of forecasting property prices have not been arguing about the direction of the market but, rather, how far it will drop and for how long. It’s no secret that housing values have been falling since the boom of 20122017, which saw Sydney house prices soar by 65%. According to research group CoreLogic, national dwelling values have been sinking for over a year, but there have been winners and losers among the capital cities. Sydney prices have suffered the biggest slide, with the value of houses and apartments declining 7.4% in the 12 months to the end of October, with Melbourne down 4.7%, according to CoreLogic. Hobart has been the major exception, with prices rising 9.7% from a low base. Poor affordability, tighter credit restrictions, high household debt, fewer Chinese buyers, rising unit supply and interest-rate hikes have taken their toll. Many investors have been hard hit as they are moved from interest-only to principal-and-interest loans. The report of the royal commission into banking and the Labor Party’s proposal to restrict negative gearing and the capital-gains discount if elected may further negatively impact house prices. Doomsayers predict a 40% crash in housing values. However, most experts have a more sober outlook, citing the healthy economy, strong immigration, low unemployment and still historically low interest rates. Ratings agency Standard & Poor’s sees a ‘soft landing’ ahead. SQM Research’s Louis Christopher says it’s

“the correction we had to have” in Sydney and Melbourne. Among the more pessimistic is AMP Capital’s Shane Oliver, who forecasts a 20% fall from the 2017 peak in Sydney and Melbourne, and a fall of nearly 10% nationally. The risk of a crash can’t be ignored but is unlikely, he says. Oliver believes Perth and Darwin are close to the bottom and that prices are likely to perform better in Adelaide, Brisbane, Canberra, Hobart and regional centres. Moody’s Analytics offers a more positive view for 2019 and an even better one for 2020. Its econometric model forecasts a tiny rise of 0.6% in house values for Sydney in 2019 (1.8% for units), but there will be variations across sub-regions. Values in Melbourne are expected to fall just 0.2% (+1.7%). Perth is another mixed bag, with overall house values set to fall 0.5% (-0.9%). In Brisbane it’s all good news, with values to rise 2.7% (6.2%) on average. Adelaide should do even better, with values forecast to rise 3.8% (2.3%). In Hobart, the 2018 boom comes to an end with a fall of 0.3% (+3.8%) while Canberra sees a predicted gain of 4.1% (9.8%). Darwin has the best prospects for houses in 2019, says Moody’s, with a price lift of 7.1%, though units will drop 4.7%. #

The longer view: 2018-2021 Projected median house/unit growth (%) Sydney -1.2/-3.1 Melbourne -2.5/-2.1 Brisbane 11.4/-5.2 Adelaide 12.4/6.3 Perth 5.0/3.7

Hobart 7.9/9.3 Canberra 10.4/5.9 Darwin 6.0/-4.5

Source: QBE Australian Housing Outlook

WHY YOU NEED IT A 41-bottle wine storage unit, an automatic ice-maker and an integrated bottle shelf are just a few of the reasons why the Liebherr Side-by-Side fridge is the ultimate all-in-one fridge and freezer for those who love to host. H A V E Y O U R W I N E B E A U T I F U L LY P R E S E N T E D A N D A LW AY S AT P E R F E C T D R I N K I N G T E M P E R AT U R E W I T H T H E D U A L- Z O N E W I N E C E L L A R T H AT C A N B E S E T B E T W E E N 5 ˚ C AND 20˚C. The smart BioFresh Plus allows for adjustable control of humidity levels so you can keep food fresh for longer. T H E U LT R A - G E N T L E S O F T S Y S T E M C L O S I N G MECHANISM CUSHIONS THE DOOR SO IT N E V E R S L A M S , E V E N W H E N F U L LY L O A D E D. SuperCool and SuperFrost functions can be activated to speed the cooling process when new food is introduced to the fridge or freezer.

SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE AT HARVEYNORMAN.COM.AU


W H AT ’ S T R E N D I N G

LIG HT & SHADE With over 30 years experience, Spotlight are Australia’s Curtain & Blind Specialists. With a huge range of ready-to-hang curtains & blinds plus DIY fabrics and custom made options – we have the perfect window treatment to finish your home no matter your style or budget.

Shop now at spotlightstores.com

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SHOPPING Styling by Sarah Maloney. Photograph by Nic Gossage. Wall painted Wash&Wear acrylic in Natural White, $91/4L, Dulux.

GREAT BUYS INSTORE AND ONLINE

Create a holiday haven with all the essentials for life outdoors.

Rattan bicycle with basket, $799, Alfresco Emporium. ‘Indio’ mahogany chair with polyester canvas cushion in Natural, $863, and ‘Lattice’ ceramic accent table, $264, both Pottery Barn. Caravane ‘Sonoma’ striped cotton cushion, $79, Canvas+Sasson. ‘Bairnsdale’ mangowood hooks, $70, Madras Link. ON HOOKS Summertime ‘Holiday’ woven-grass basket, $139, Canvas+Sasson. Sheker ‘Candy Stripes’ cotton Turkish towel, $45, Saardé. ‘Cabarita’ cotton Turkish towel in Aqua/Lime, $30, Madras Link. ‘Darley Fray’ straw hat, $120, Avenue The Label. IN BASKET Cotton House ‘Lisbon’ cotton beach towel, $70, Bed Bath N’ Table. ON TABLE Australian House & Garden ‘Firewheel’ melamine plate, $8, Myer. Morgan & Finch ‘Fleur de Lys’ acrylic goblet, $9, Bed Bath N’ Table. ON FLOOR Rogue ‘Areca’ faux palm, $229, Freedom. >


H G SHOPPING

SUMMER

50+ FAB finds under $150

As lazy days extend into languid nights, relax, renew and refresh among natural fibres and splashes of colour inspired by citrus and sea.

‘Sanctuary’ acacia day bed with foam and polyester back and seat cushions, $1290, Early Settler. ‘Tidal’ acacia coffee table, $200, Freedom. ‘Solig’ polyester canopy, $20, Ikea. Parker polypropylene rug (241x305cm), $474, Pottery Barn. ON DAY BED from left Australian House & Garden ‘Wongarra’ cotton-linen throw, $150, Myer. Home Republic linen cushion in Lemon, from $70, Adairs. ‘Retro Palm’ polyester cushion, $80, Frankie + Coco. Warwick ‘Lomani’ olefin cushion in Calippo, $59, Cushion House Australia. ‘Beatrice’ cotton cushion, $25, Freedom. Basque ‘Sander’ cotton cushion in Salmon and Coral, $99, Canvas+Sasson. ON COFFEE TABLE ‘Vasaio’ melamine platter, $18, Freedom. ‘On The Rocks’ acrylic jug, $34, Pottery Barn. Australian House & Garden ‘Texture’ acrylic wineglass (also on accent table), $8, Myer. Capi blood orange soda (250ml), $8/pack of four, Dan Murphy’s. Home Republic ‘Olinda’ mesh and bamboo food cover, from $17, Adairs. ‘Fairly Coral’ ceramic vase, from $35, Frankie + Coco. ON FLOOR from left Pavilion ‘Madura’ rattan lantern, $89, Canvas+Sasson. Northcote Pottery ‘Maxim Drum’ fibreclay planter, $62, Bunnings. Rogue ‘Areca’ faux palm (170cm), $229, Freedom. Timber and calico sailing boat, $38, Island Living Homewares. Lattice ceramic accent table, $264, Pottery Barn. Woven raffia slides, $149, Neue Blvd.

Stylist’s assistants: Nonci Nyoni & Michele Mandalinic.

ST Y L I N G Sarah Maloney | P HOTOG R A P HY Nic Gossage


‘Iris Fray’ straw sunhat, $110, Avenue The Label. Warwick Fabrics ‘Mallacoota’ olefin cushion, $59, Linen House.

Australian House & Garden ‘Texture’ acrylic tumbler, $8, Myer.

World Map ceramic and cork coasters, $20/four, Island Living Homewares.

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Home Republic ‘Macquarie’ seagrass and rattan tray, from $40, Adairs.

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Mud-bead and raffia garland in White, $75, Island Living Homewares.

Xenia Taler bamboo tray in Yellow/Amalfi, $69, West Elm.

‘Beach Collection’ espadrilles, $76, Zara Home.

Parker polypropylene rug, (241x305cm), $474, Pottery Barn.

Vintage ‘Palm Tree’ brass bottle opener, $40, Frankie + Coco.

Cane cheeseknife set, $55, Neue Blvd. >

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

175


Reversible palm and stripe cotton table runner in Aqua, $40, Alfresco Emporium.

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‘Molokai’ acrylic tumblers, $7 each, Freedom.

‘Havana’ metal bottle openers, $29 each, Neue Blvd.

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‘Tiny Palms’ linen napkins in Gold, $145/six, and ‘Island’ linen napkins in Multi, $125/six, both Bonnie and Neil.

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Australian House & Garden ‘Fish’ porcelain 32cm plate, $20, Myer.

H G SHOPPING

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‘Narooma’ rattan tray, $125, Madras Link.

‘Broome’ cake knife and slide with cane handles, $60/set, Madras Link.

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e s i d e p l a t e , $ 8, M yer .

Oceano ‘Shell’ ceramic bowl, from $15, Alfresco Emporium.

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Nautical Icon ‘Blue Starfish’ melamine salad plate, $10, Pottery Barn.

For Where to Buy, see page 187.

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‘Hancock’ mangowood board, $40, and ‘Pina’ stainless-steel and brass antipasto fork and paté knife, $45/set of four, Madras Link.

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Australian House & Garden ‘Porto’ terracotta fish plates, $20/set of two, Myer.

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Hemstitch cotton-linen napkin, $8, and ‘Palm’ brass napkin ring, $10, Alfresco Emporium.

Golden Galaxy brass coasters, $69/four, Ziporah Lifestyle.

Golden Galaxy brass and stainless-steel servers, $99/ pair, Ziporah Lifestyle.


‘Coast’ teak outdoor table, $999, and ‘Cera’ rattan chairs, $139 each, all Madras Link. ON CHAIRS Warwick Fabrics ‘Bondi’ olefin cushion in Sunshine, $59, Cushion House Australia. Striped polyester cushion in Coral Reef, Pottery Barn. ON TABLE clockwise from left ‘Arinda’ mangowood and steel lantern, $69, Freedom. For similar candle, try Ikea. ‘Lagoon’ cotton table runner, $40, L&M Home. Home Republic ‘Ripple’ melamine jug, $20, Adairs. Cane cake stand, $50, Neue Blvd. Roberta Jal cotton napkins in Aqua, $58/four, Pigott’s Store. Morgan & Finch bamboo fruit bowl, $30, Bed Bath N’ Table. Australian House & Garden ‘Hammer Base’ acrylic wineglasses, $8 each, Myer. Acrylic bowls, $10 each, and plates, $8 each, Zara Home. Morgan & Finch ‘Pineapple’ metal food cover, $15, Bed Bath N’ Table. ‘Dover’ bamboo placemat, $8, Freedom. Australian House & Garden ‘Porto’ terracotta platter, $50, Myer. Parrot-printed cotton napkins in Aqua, $58/four, Pigott’s Store. Stainless-steel and thermoplastic fork, knife and spoon, $7 each, Zara Home. Australian House & Garden ‘Porto’ terracotta bowl, $9, and ‘Firewheel’ melamine plate, $11, Myer. ‘Juarez’ flax placemat, $9, Frankie + Coco. Napkins (as before). Capiz shell and resin napkin ring, $16/set of four, Williams-Sonoma. Morgan & Finch ‘Florentino Paisley’ stoneware bowl, $15, Bed Bath N’ Table. ‘Swirl’ melamine plate, $12, Pottery Barn. Australian House & Garden ‘Thar’ rope placemat, $13, Myer. ‘Iceland’ glass tumblers, $9 each, Frankie + Coco. #

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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Styling by Sophie Wilson. Photograph by Will Horner. Currency conversion correct at time of printing. For Where to Buy, see page 187.

SHOPPING H G

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1 ‘Palm Springs’ cotton towel, $120, Fenton & Fenton. 2 ‘Bondi’ cotton towel in Navy, $50, Country Road. 3 Cotton towel in Clay, $70, Købn. 4 ‘Lagos’ cotton towel, about $111, Slowdown Studio. 5 Waffle cotton towel in Purple Patch, $49, Kip & Co. 6 ‘Crescent’ cotton towel in Black/White, $79, Mayde. 7 Sheker ‘Candy Stripes’ cotton towel in Indigo/Turquoise, $45, Saardé. 8 ‘Cabana’ large microfibre towel in Goa Grey, $32, Dock & Bay. 9 Cotton towel in Pink Stripe, $7, Kmart. Life fabric and metal beach chair, $15, Big W. Sansevieria trifasciata ‘Laurentii’ plants, $50 each, and ‘Apollo’ tall fibreglass/clay planters, $295 each, all Garden Life. Wall painted Eggshell Acrylic in Santorini and pool surround painted Eggshell Acrylic in Flamingo, both $47/L, Porter’s Paints. # AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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1 ‘French Stripe’ 1.75m poly-cottoon canvas be h umbrel with wooden pole, $180, The Salty Merchants. 2 ‘Tessuti’ 1.8m acrylic-canvas beach umbrella n Marine with ardwood pole, $450, Basil Bangs ‘Palms’ 1.55m poly-cotton ac umbrella with aluminium pole, $$150, Shady Co. ‘Black Sands’ 2m polyester ach umbrella with wooden pole, $249, Sunday Supply Co. 5 Solsmart 22m polyester beach brella with steel pole, $30, Bunnings Home Republic ‘Amazon’ 1.8m polyester beach umbrella w with steel pole, $100, ‘Azule’ 1.7m polyester ach umbrel with steel pole, $90, Sunnylife. 8 Vue ‘Aloha’ 1.8 8m polyester beach u el in Mixed Stripe with steel pole, $80, Mye ‘Carnivale’ 2.4m polyester beach umbrella with anodiseed-metal p $135, BeachKit. For Where to Buy, see page 187. #

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

Produced by Sophie Wilson. Dimensions refer to diameter of canopy.

2


WHAT DOES YOUR STREET SAY ABOUT YOU?

ARE YOU A LEADING LIFESTYLE, METROTECH OR HEARTH AND HOME? ASK ROY MORGAN. Discover the personality of your street right here: www.helixpersonas.com.au Helix Personas identifies and maps Australians down to street level by understanding the attitudes and values of people in your street and neighbourhood – Helix Personas reveal what people like you would love to do next. Roy Morgan understands Australians.

Source: Roy Morgan conducts in-depth face-to-face interviews with over 50,000 Australians each year in their homes across Australia.

Visit www.helixpersonas.com.au or call 1800 633 813 to find out how Helix Personas can help your business.


Buyer’s guide

BENCHTOP APPLIANCES

The latest high-tech kitchen gadgets will have you whizzing through food prep and serving up delicious fare in a flash, writes Georgia Madden.


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aving the right kitchen gadgets to hand can be a lifesaver when you’re cooking for a crowd, allowing you to power through time-consuming tasks such as chopping, slicing and mixing. But that’s not all they can do. Today, you’ll find small appliances that make it easy to achieve your daily dose of fruit and veg, cut your fat intake and even perform the jobs of several appliances in one. Multi-cookers are gaining in popularity, says Gary Brown, senior brand manager for home appliances at Harvey Norman. “They offer several different cooking methods, including steaming, pressure cooking, browning, slow cooking and simmering. They’re great for busy cooks as they allow you to prepare dishes with minimal effort. Many are also appcontrolled, which guides you through each step of the cooking process.” The trend towards multifunctionality is hitting other sectors, too; De’Longhi’s three-in-one digital MultiGrill, for example, transforms from a sandwich press to an open barbecue grill for meat, fish and vegetables. Tefal’s OptiGrill+ automatically adapts its cooking time to the thickness of the ingredients and indicates the precise cooking level, even when cooking food from frozen. Meanwhile, the classic stand mixer has been reimagined. “Stand mixers have advanced significantly in recent years,” says Brown. “You can buy a raft of different attachments to transform them from pasta maker, meat grinder, food processor and spiraliser to frozen-dessert maker and more.” Kenwood’s Cooking Chef includes an induction feature, so it cooks while it mixes, plus 23 preset programs to help you make everything from curries to sweet dishes. Appliances that make it easy to boost your nutrient intake are also on the rise, says Tania Grillinzoni, portable appliances buyer at The Good Guys. “Wellness is a big trend in benchtop appliances, and a lot of great personal blenders, juicers, air-fryers and health

grills have entered the market.” Brown concurs, adding, “Blenders are going high-tech and we’re seeing more commercial-quality models appearing in domestic kitchens.” Notable new blenders include the Vitamix Ascent Series, which has wireless connectivity and uses a self-detect function to read the size of the container and adjust the blending time to suit. And the app-connected NutriBullet Balance can weigh the ingredients for your smoothie or soup and give you a breakdown of the nutritional content. If a caffeine hit is more your style, you’ll find machines that offer sophisticated coffee-making functionality in compact bodies. “Home coffee machines are stepping into the premium end, with programmable steam wands offering milk-temperature control and texturing,” says Colin Jones, product expert at Appliances Online. The latest appliances aren’t just smart; they look good, too. The new styles come in pretty pastels, bold brights and sophisticated metallics, often with a vintage vibe. According to Brown, matt-finish plum and pale-blue shades are the key sellers this summer. “Benchtop appliances have become fashion accessories for the kitchen,” says Jim Kalotheos, managing director of Smeg Australia. “Use them to create a statement or focal point in an otherwise neutral kitchen, or to complement a major appliance, such as your oven.” Look out for Smeg’s recently released Sicily Is My Love collection of kettles, toasters, blenders and juicers, a striking range designed in collaboration with fashion supremos Dolce&Gabbana. To find an appliance that makes your life easier rather than just cluttering up your kitchen, consider the beverages or dishes you make and the numbers you cater for. Seek out sturdy machines that will go the distance. “If you want longevity, simply buy a brand you recognise,” advises Brown, “because premium brands perform.” >

SMART CHOPS

Here are the main things to look for in a quality food processor, according to Eleanor Moss, consumer marketing manager at De’Longhi Australia: ✚ Aim for at least 1000W of power so the machine can whizz through dense ingredients. ✚ Choose a model with the right attachments for your needs. You’ll find a vast range on offer, from ones that cut fries to juicers. ✚ Opt for rubber feet to ensure your processor doesn’t go walkabout on your bench while chopping. ✚ Ensure the bowl and goblet are BPA-free. If you’ll be blending hot soups or frozen smoothies, seek materials that can withstand both hot and cold temperatures. Look for a machine with ✚ a dedicated storage case to keep all your blades and attachments in one place.

FINE BREW

Having your own coffee machine is a small luxury. Start your search with these three new models: Nespresso VertuoPlus ($299) features a Centrifusion extraction system to gently and precisely brew coffee with a perfect crema, plus barcode technology that reads cup size, temperature and more. De’Longhi PrimaDonna Elite Experience ($3199) is an app-connected model that allows you to make personalised coffee recipes from your smartphone. Jura J6 fully automatic coffee machine ($2990), another app-connected model, offers 13 individual drink settings, adjustable coffee strengths and a speedy built-in grinder.

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Coffee & tea

Processors & mixers

Inspire kettle in Red, $80 A bold, eye-catching design, this 1.7L, 2400W kettle has a water-level indicator, washable anti-scale filter and drip-free spout. The energy-saving rapid-boil element will heat a single cup of water in less than a minute.

18115AU Le Micro Mini Chopper food processor, $185 A snazzy helper to chop, mix and blend small quantities, featuring a 0.8L bowl, 290W power and a pulse button for precise control. It also comes with a metal blade, blending tool and free recipes app.

Russell Hobbs; russellhobbs.com

KE9750 Maestro glass kettle, $100 This elegant, clean-lined glass kettle with a 1.7L capacity offers some clear advantages, including an easy-fill spout, a 2400W element for rapid water heating, quiet-boil operation and a contemporary stainless-steel finish. Add the matching toaster for a cohesive benchtop look. Sunbeam; sunbeam.com.au

Vertuo Plus coffee machine in Titan, $299 For convenience and flavour, this one-touch machine is hard to beat. Its extraction system gently and precisely brews a satisfying cup in less than 70 seconds. The coffee capsules come in 24 different flavours, so there’s also plenty of variety to look forward to.

Magimix; magimix.com.au

Breville BFP660SIL The Kitchen Wizz 11 food processor, $329 With its 1000W motor, this model slices and dices in no time. It boasts a big (11 cups dry, eight cups liquid) capacity and extra-wide chute, along with a micro-serrated S-blade, adjustable slicer, reversible shredder and dough blade. Appliances Online; appliancesonline.com.au

KQL6200V Kenwood Chef XL Sense Special Edition Kitchen Machine in Violet, $799 This stand mixer backs up its pretty looks with a 1400W motor and sturdy metal body. It comes with a 6.7L bowl, two beaters, a whisk, folding tool and dough hook. Add your choice of extras.

Nespresso; nespresso.com

Harvey Norman; harveynorman.com.au

ECAM55075MS PrimaDonna Class coffee machine, $1849 Sleek in stainless-steel, this machine delivers a barista-quality brew at the touch of a button. It has a built-in adjustable grinder for the beans of your choice, and allows you to create and save six different beverage recipes using the De’Longhi Coffee Link app.

KSM150 Artisan stand mixer in Empire Red, $879 A bold hue for this 300W classic, ready for action with wire whip, flat beater, dough hook and 4.7L stainless-steel bowl. There’s a wide range of other tools you can buy to use with it (including the glass bowl shown here). The body and tools are in durable die-cast metal.

De’Longhi; delonghi.com/en-au

KitchenAid; kitchenaid.com.au


SHOPPING H G Great gadgets ICE-30RA ice-cream maker in Rose Gold, $199 Making ice-cream, frozen yoghurt or sorbet takes just 25 minutes with this frozen-dessert maker. It boasts a 25W motor, an automatic mixing paddle and a double-insulated freezer bowl with 2L capacity. Cuisinart; cuisinart.com.au

CB651B Power Grill, $250 This compact, 2400W benchtop grill features a two-in-one cookplate (half flat plate, half grill) so you can sear meat and prepare vegetables at the same time. And when dinner’s over, it’s also easy to clean, thanks to the removable, dishwasher-safe non-stick plates and drip tray. Tefal; tefal.com.au .

N12S-0907 Balance blender, $279 Blending high performance and high tech, this 1200W appliance connects to an app that will track the ingredients in your smoothie and work out the nutritional data (as well as providing hundreds of smoothie recipes). It comes with two 900ml cups and two flip-top lids, so you can sip on the go. NutriBullet; bulletbrands.com.au

BFS800BSS The Steam Zone steam cooker, $300 This compact 2400W model makes healthy steam cooking a snap. You could prepare a whole fish or chicken on the 40cm tray, or steam separate foods in the two smaller baskets. The 15-minute keep-warm function is handy if you have to stall. Breville; breville.com.au

MU4000 Sunbeam Duos sous vide and slow cooker, $219 Use this two-in-one model as a sous-vide cooker (to lock in food flavours like a professional chef) or as a slow cooker. It has a family-friendly 5.5L capacity. Harvey Norman; harveynorman.com.au

HD9651 Philips Avance XXL digital air fryer, $449 Cook up fried favourites with minimal oil in this 2225W design. It has a 1.4kg basket capacity (big enough to fit a whole chicken), plus pre-set cooking times and auto shut-off for ease and safety. It’s also dishwasher-safe. Harvey Norman; harveynorman.com.au

SMF01 stand mixer in Pastel Green, $799, and SMPC01 set, $299 Apart from its obvious talents, you can turn this retro-look 800W stand mixer into a pasta maker with the three-piece attachment set (pasta roller and two cutters), which are purchased separately. Other optional extras include a food grinder and slicer/grater set. Smeg; smeg.com.au

Vitamix 2500i Ascent blender, $1195 Make soup, smoothies and more in this hardworking 1400W blender with 2L container. It boasts a digital timer, three program settings, variable speed and a pulse feature so you can finetune the texture of your blend. Smart Bluetooth connectivity means it can evolve with future innovations. # The Good Guys; thegoodguys.com.au

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Blum lift systems enable you to achieve a better workflow in your kitchen. Used in place of standard opening mechanisms for cabinetry doors, they enhance your kitchen’s efficiency. blum.com.

The new Waxworks ‘Tribal Traditions’ range keeps mosquitoes at bay in a stylish manner. The graphic designs suit a variety of outdoor settings and garrden themes. waxworksworks.com.au.

Thanks to the ‘Poho’ outdoor occasional chair from Coco Republic, your outdoor oasis awaits. Top-grade solid teak delivers contemporary outdoor style. $1795; cocorepublic.com.au.

H&G ESSENTIALS Honey from the world’s sole remaining pure strain of Ligurian bees, enlivened with the tangy scent of Italian blood orange, is the recipe for Maine Beach’s Hand & Body Wash. cocco.com.au.

Create a beautiful lifestyle and home with these must-have products.

Whether you prefer gas or induction, traditional or modern industrial, colourful or stainless steel, there’s a Falcon oven for every foodie’s taste. andico.com.au/falcon/home.

The portable Everdure ‘CUBE’ barbecue has been designed in collaboration with worldrenowned chef Heston Blumenthal and features integrated storage. harveynorman.com.au.

Unleash your home’s hidden potential and create true designer spaces with Easycraft’s decorative wall linings; with a diverse range of stunning products, it’s never been easier. easycraft.com.au.

King Living’s award-winning ‘Jasper’ has received a design update. ‘Jasper II’ has hidden storage, smart pockets, new accessories and is backed by King’s 25-year steel-frame warranty. kingliving.com.au.

The Zip ‘HydroTap All-in-One’ provides every water option you need from one multifunctional tap and is available in a wide range of stylish finishes. zipwater.com.au.

The Posh ‘Domaine’ rimless toilet suite pairs easy-clean modern technology with a soft-close, quick-release seat and a minimalist design. Plus, it break the budget. reece.com.au.

Combining the centuries-old heritage of Royal Copenhagen with striking modernity, ‘Blue Fluted Mega’ has already become a design classic thanks to its beautiful, bold graphics. royalcopenhagen.com.


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WHERE TO BUY

Locate your nearest stockist by contacting the following suppliers. A Aalto Colour 1800 009 600;

aaltocolour.com Abey 1800 809 143; abey.com.au Abode Living 1800 022 633; abodeliving.com Adairs 1300 783 005; adairs.com.au Adam Robinson Design (02) 8354 1077; adamrobinsondesign.com Alfresco Emporium (02) 9919 0601; alfrescoemporium.com.au All Fired Up Pottery 0416 040 901; @allfiredup.pottery Amara au.amara.com Apaiser (03) 9421 5722; apaiser.com.au Armadillo & Co (02) 9698 4043; armadillo-co.com Arnall Artisan Services arnallartisanservices.com.au Ascraft (02) 9360 2311; ascraft.com.au Avenue The Label avenuethelabel.com B Baden Croft art2muse.com.au Bark Design barkdesign.com.au Basic Curate basiccurate.bigcartel.com Basil Bangs (02) 9938 4759; basilbangs.com Bauwerk Colour (08) 9433 3860; bauwerk.com.au Beachkit 1300 388 011; beachkit.com.au Beachwood Designs (02) 9918 7162; beachwood.com.au Beacon Lighting 1300 232 266; beaconlighting.com.au Becker Minty (02) 8356 9999; beckerminty.com Bed Bath N’ Table (03) 8888 8100; bedbathntable.com.au Big W 1300 244 999; bigw.com.au Biome Eco Stores 1300 301 767; biome.com.au Bohemian Traders (02) 4367 0709; bohemiantraders.com Bonnie and Neil (03) 9384 2234; bonnieandneil.com.au Breezway 1800 777 758; breezway.com.au Bristol 131 686; bristol.com.au British Paints 132 525; britishpaints.com.au Brodware (02) 9421 8200; brodware.com.au Bunnings (03) 8831 9777; bunnings.com.au

Burberry (02) 9695 5678; au.burberry.com By Living byliving.com.au C Cabot’s 1800 011 006; cabots.com.au Cadrys (02) 9328 6144; cadrys.com.au Cafe Culture+Insitu (02) 9699 8577; cafecultureinsitu.com.au Canvas+Sasson (03) 9790 1266; canvasandsasson.com.au Carpet World carpetworld.com.au Cassina, available from Cult 1300 768 626; cultdesign.com.au Castle & Things 0410 705 253; castleandthings.com.au Cavalier Bremworth 1800 251 172; cavbrem.com.au Chanel 1300 242 635; chanel.com.au Cheminées Philippe (03) 9417 3315; chemphilaust.com.au Clickon Furniture clickonfurniture.com.au Coach House Timbers coachhousetimbers.com.au Coco Republic 1300 000 220; cocorepublic.com.au Colorbond 1800 022 999; colorbond.com Contents International Design (02) 9662 2443; contentsid.com.au Corban & Blair corbanblair.com.au Country Road 1800 801 911; countryroad.com.au Covered in Paint (02) 9519 0204; coveredinpaint.com.au Creative Cables creative-cables.com.au Criteria criteriacollection.com.au Cult 1300 768 626; cultdesign.com.au Curious Grace (03) 9687 6878; curiousgrace.com.au Cushion House Australia 1300 781 007; cushionhouse.com.au D Dan Young Landscape Architect 0405 571 598; danyounglandscape.com d-Bodhi d-bodhi.com Dedece (02) 9360 2722; dedece.com.au DesignByThem (02) 8005 4805; designbythem.com Designer Rugs 1300 802 561; designerrugs.com.au Dinosaur Designs (02) 9698 3500; dinosaurdesigns.com.au Dock & Bay dockandbay.com/au Domayne domayneonline.com.au Domo (03) 9277 8888; domo.com.au

Dulux 132 525; dulux.com.au E Early Settler earlysettler.com.au Eco Outdoor 1300 131 413; ecooutdoor.com.au Ecolour 1300 326 568; ecolour.com.au Edit (02) 9358 5806; shop.edit-group.com.au Elkie & Ark elkieark.com Ellie Malin 0401 562 406; elliemalin.com Escea escea.com/au Estée Lauder 1800 061 326; esteelauder.com.au Euroluce (02) 9356 9900; euroluce.com.au Eveneer 1300 133 481; eltongroup.com F Fanuli (02) 9908 2660; fanuli.com.au Feast Watson 1800 252 502; feastwatson.com.au Fenton & Fenton (03) 9533 2323; fentonandfenton.com.au Few and Far www.fewandfar.com.au Florabelle florabelle.com.au Floral Fanatics Fabric floralfanaticsfabric.com.au Frankie+Coco frankieandcoco.com Fred International (02) 9310 3263; fredinternational.com.au Freedom 1300 135 588; freedom.com.au French Bazaar (03) 9017 7892; frenchbazaar.com.au French Country Collections frenchcountrycollections.com.au G Garden Life (02) 9517 3633; gardenlife.com.au Gerflor 1800 060 785; exploregerflor.com.au GlobeWest 1800 722 366; globewest.com.au Great Dane (03) 9699 7677; greatdanefurniture.com Gumtree gumtree.com.au H H&M 1800 828 002; hm.com/au Hale Mercantile Co halemercantileco.com Hammock Heaven hammockheaven.com.au Harvey Norman 1300 464 278; harveynorman.com.au Haven & Space (02) 4464 2554; havenandspace.com.au Haymes Paint 1800 033 431; haymespaint.com.au Healthy Abode healthyabode.com.au

Heatherly Design Bedheads (03) 5772 2089; heatherlydesign.com.au Hermosa Painting Finishes hermosafinishes.com.au House of Orange (03) 9500 9991; houseoforange.com.au Hub Furniture (03) 9652 1222; hubfurniture.com.au I Idle Hands idlehands.design Iittala iittala.com.au Ikea (02) 8020 6641; ikea.com.au Imprint House imprinthouse.net In The Sac (02) 8323 5789; inthesac.com.au Inspirations Paint 1300 368 325; inspirationspaint.com.au Island Living Homewares islandlivingaustralia.com.au J James Hardie jameshardie.com.au Jardan (03) 8581 4988; jardan.com.au Jatana Interiors (02) 6688 4235; jatanainteriors.com.au JD Lee Furniture 0466 634 359; jdleefurniture.com Johanna Ortiz johannaortiz.co Jones & Co (02) 9310 7277; jonesandco.com.au Julian Ronchi Garden Design & Nursery julianronchi.com.au Just Bathroomware (02) 9719 3000; justbathroomware.com.au K Kara Rosenlund kararosenlund.com Kettal, available from Mobilia mobilia.com.au Kip & Co kipandco.net.au Kmart 1800 634 251; kmart.com.au Købn kobn.com.au Koskela (02) 9280 0999; koskela.com.au Krosno (03) 9318 0466; krosno.com.au L&M Home (03) 9419 6800; lmhome.com.au L L’Artisan Parfumeur, available from Agence de Parfum (02) 8002 4488; agencedeparfum.com.au Laminex 132 136; laminex.com.au Lazy Bones lazybones.com.au Lightly (03) 9417 2440; lightly.com.au Living Edge 1300 132 154; livingedge.com.au Loom Towels loomtowels.com Louvreland (02) 4324 2007; louvreland.com.au >

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H G STOCKISTS LuMu Interiors 0427 427 752; lumuinteriors.com Lush Landscape Solutions 0422 151 150 Luxaflex Window Fashions 135 892; luxaflex.com.au Lindsey Adelman lindseyadelman.com Lysaght lysaght.com M Madras Link (03) 9490 0600; madraslink.com Marble Plus (02) 9674 3100; marbleplus.com.au Markilux 1300 654 469; markilux.com.au Marmoset Found 0413 930 707; marmosetfound.com.au Marz Designs marzdesigns.com Matt Blatt 1300 628 825; mattblatt.com.au Maxwell & Williams maxwellandwilliams.com.au Mayde maydestore.com.au MCM House mcmhouse.com Milligram (03) 9314 4304; milligram.com Motivo Textiles 0477 110 076; motivo.net.au Murobond Paint 1800 199 299; murobond.com.au Myer 1800 811 611; myer.com.au N Natural Stone Bath Factory (02) 9542 7119; naturalstonebathfactory.com.au Naturally Cane naturallycane.com.au Natuzzi Italia natuzzi.com.au Neue Blvd (08) 8683 4033; neueblvd.com.au Nood Co 0401 487 654; noodco.com.au Normann Copenhagen normanncopenhagen.com O Officeworks officeworks.com.au Ondene (02) 9362 1734; ondene.com.au Onsite Supply+Design (02) 9360 3666; onsitesd.com.au Otomys otomys.com Own World (02) 9358 1155; ownworld.com.au Oz Design ozdesignfurniture.com.au P Paint Place 1800 008 007; paintplace.com.au

Pampa pampa.com.au Papaya (02) 9386 9980; papaya.com.au Perini (03) 9421 0550; perini.com.au Piccolo Pear piccolopear.com.au Pigott’s Store (02) 9362 8119; pigottsstore.com.au Pillow Talk pillowtalk.com.au Pop & Scott popandscott.com Porter’s Paints 1800 656 664; porterspaints.com Pottery Barn 1800 232 914; potterybarn.com.au Precision Flooring (02) 9690 0991; precisionflooring.com.au Provincial Home Living 1300 732 258; provincialhomeliving.com.au Q Queensland Timber Flooring (07) 5475 4110; queenslandtimberflooring.com R Radford Furnishings radfordfurnishings.com.au Reece 1800 032 566; reece.com.au Remarkable Outdoor Living (03) 9532 2270; remarkablefurniture.com.au Resene 1800 738 383; resene.com.au Restoration Hardware restorationhardware.com RJ Living rjliving.com.au Robyn Cosgrove (02) 9328 7692; robyncosgrove.com Rogerseller (03) 9429 8888; rogerseller.com.au Rose St Trading Co (03) 9822 9444; rosesttradingco.com.au Royal Oak Floors (03) 9826 3611; royaloakfloors.com.au Ruby Star Traders (02) 9518 7899; shoprubystar.com.au S Saardé saarde.com Sarah Ellison sarahellison.com.au Satchells (07) 5594 6788; satchells.com.au Sculpt Fireplace Collection 1300 181 351; sculptfireplaces.com.au Seaside Joinery (02) 4367 4403; seasidejoinery.com.au

Seletti seletti.com.au Shady Co shadyco.com.au Sheridan sheridan.com.au Siemens siemens-home.com.au Signorino (03) 9427 9100; signorino.com.au Sikkens 1300 745 536; tenaru.com.au Skheme (02) 8755 2300; skheme.com Slowdown Studio slowdownstudio.com Solver Paints (08) 8368 1200; solverpaints.com.au Somfy somfy.com.au South Pacific Fabrics (02) 9327 7222; southpacificfabrics.com Space (02) 8339 7588; spacefurniture.com.au Spence & Lyda (02) 9212 6747; spenceandlyda.com.au St Barts st-barts.com Stone Italiana 1800 244 993; stoneitaliana.com.au Stylecraft (02) 9355 0000; stylecraft.com.au Sunday Supply Co sundaysupply.co Sunnylife (02) 8755 1500; sunnylife.com.au Surface Gallery (02) 9866 2002; surfacegallery.com.au T Table Tonic tabletonic.com.au Target target.com.au Taubmans 131 686; taubmans.com.au Temple & Webster templeandwebster.com.au Teranova (02) 9386 0063; teranova.com.au Tessa Furniture (03) 9729 7233; tessafurniture.com The Boathouse theboathousegroupstore.com.au The Dharma Door (02) 6629 1114; thedharmadoor.com.au The English Tapware Company 1300 016 181; englishtapware.com.au The Family Love Tree (03) 9533 7648; thefamilylovetree.com.au The Leisa Tree 0428 335 153; theleisatree.com.au

The Montauk Lighting Co montauklightingco.com The Purc-Shop thepurcshop.com The Salty Merchants thesaltymerchants.com The Society Inc (02) 9331 1592; thesocietyinc.com.au The Vault Sydney thevaultsydney.com Three Birds Renovations threebirdsrenovations.com Tiffany & Co 1800 829 152; tiffany.com.au Tigger Hall Design (03) 9510 2255; tiggerhall.com Tobias Partners tobiaspartners.com Top3 by Design 1300 867 333; top3.com.au Tory Burch, available from David Jones 133 357; shop.davidjones.com.au Toto oceania.toto.com Tovo Lighting tovolighting.com.au U Urban Outfitters urbanoutfitters.com Victory Curtains and Blinds 131 399; victoryblinds.com.au W Wallrocks 0407 590 977; wallrocks.com.au Walter G walter-g.com.au Water Tiger 0420 855 886; watertiger.com.au Wattyl 132 101; wattyl.com.au West Elm 1800 239 516; westelm.com.au Westbury Textiles (02) 9380 6644; westburytextiles.com Whitecliffe Imports (02) 8595 1111; whitecliffe.com.au Will Harkness Architecture willharkness.com Williams-Sonoma 1800 231 380; williams-sonoma.com.au Winning Appliances (02) 8767 2301; winningappliances.com.au WorldStone (02) 9363 3513; worldstone.com.au Z Zakkia zakkia.com.au Zara Home 1800 121 095; zarahome.com/au Ziporah Lifestyle ziporahlifestyle.com.au Zuster (03) 9427 7188; zuster.com.au

DIY CIRCULAR SHELF UNIT (FROM PAGE

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What you’ll need

Method

1 x 150cm timber floating shelf 2 x 100cm timber floating shelves 1L paint in contrasting tone to the wall Standard paintbrush Nail or push pin String Pencil or chalk Easy cutter paintbrush (pointed tip)

1 Paint timber floating shelves desired colour, then allow to dry. 2 To draw circle, hammer a small nail or push pin into the wall and tie a length of string (ours was 75cm) to the head of the nail. Tie a pencil to the other end of the string. Pull string tight and draw a circle. 3 Paint circle same colour as shelves. Use paintbrush with pointed tip along perimeter of circle to ensure a crisp edge. 4 Hang longer floating shelf in the centre of the circle. The ends should match up with the edges of the circle. Hang the smaller shelves above and below the centre shelf (where their edges meet the sides of the circle; you can vary the heights of the shelves if you alter the widths of the shelves accordingly).


“Grill, then Chill” is the motto of Escea’s latest release, the ‘Outdoor Fireplace Kitchen’ combo. Take your flame grilling and party hosting to the next level. escea.com/ek-series.

Add a little luxury to your bedroom this summer with Private Collection by Legend Linen. The ‘Avoca’ range features textured fabrics crafted with exquisite detailing. legendlinen.com.

The IXL ‘Fresco Aurora’ is the ultimate appliance for outdoor entertaining, with a unique combination of infrared warmth, mood lighting and task lighting. $1499; ixloutdoorheating.com.au.

H&G ESSENTIALS Cuddly bears in The Kids’ Cancer Project collection are be donated to children in hospital to make their stay less scary. Proceeds go toward kids’ cancer research. thekidscancerproject.org.au/bears.

Create a beautiful lifestyle and home with more must-have products.

The new family-sized Fisher & Paykel ‘WH1060P1’ 10kg washer features SmartDrive technology and a unique, gentle cushioned drum that provides gentle, effective washing. fisherpaykel.com.

Available in a range of finishes, the Zip ‘HydroTap’ provides instant filtered boiling, chilled and sparkling water, plus regular hot and cold water all from a single tap. winningappliances.com.au.

Interlink your journeys, textures and interiors with graphically interesting, ethically produced embroidery-on-cotton ‘Konya’ cushions from Weave. $79.95. weavehome.com.au.

Deeply nourish and protect your skin with caring summer suncare products from Natio, including SPF 50+ sunscreens for face and body, and after-sun and gradual-tan lotions. natio.com.au.

Luxury reversible Biella pure linen bedding in Thyme & Olive is prewashed for softness, giving a beautiful relaxed quality with no need for pressing. designersguild.com/au.

The Swansea day bed from Provincial Home Living has a sense of old-world glamour. It has an oak frame and two long cushions upholstered in a soft seafoam green. provincialhomeliving.com.au.

Fisher & Paykel’s modular ‘Companion’ products are matching high-performance appliances: pyrolytic, steam and microwave ovens, a warming drawer and a coffee machine. fisherpaykel.com.


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DOME AWAY FROM HOME Drought has not defeated the entrepreneurial spirit of graziers Jamie and Belinda Munsie. They recently opened the state’s first private off-grid geodesic dome accommodation on their 3600ha working beef and sheep property near beautiful Warialda, on the north-west slopes of NSW. Luxuriously appointed, with a king-size bed, kitchen and an outdoor bath for soaking under the stars, the Faraway Dome accommodates two and offers sweeping farmland views and the opportunity to connect with nature. farawaydomes.com

We asked H&G readers to nominate their favourite projects from our 2018 Top 50 Rooms showcase – and the votes are in! Leading the People’s Choice by a stylish mile was the sun-filled, warmly layered Sydney living room designed by Meryl Hare and Dimity Chitty of Hare+Klein (above). In second place was the indoor-outdoor entertainment area created for a south-east Queensland home by Brisbane interior-design team Wrightson Stewart (below left). And in third place was the gently jungle-themed Sydney nursery by Belinda Nihill of Nest Design Studio, Spring Hill, Victoria (below right). Congratulations to the winner of the People’s Choice award, Sofronios Eglezos of Queensland, who receives a $3000 voucher from Warwick Fabrics, plus a $600 gift card redeemable at participating Mantra hotels and resorts in Australia. Thanks to our Top 50 Rooms partner Warwick Fabrics and sponsors Blum, Victory Curtains and Blinds, Parisi, Porter’s Paints, James Hardie, Maison&Objet Paris and Cathay Pacific.

Text by Elizabeth Wilson and Sarah Pickette. Photography by Jen Wilding (Hare+Klein), Kylie Wood (Wrightson Stewart) & Joyess Images (Nest Design).

And the winner is...


COMMUNITY H G

BOOK NOOK

PRESENTS OF MIND GIVE A GIFT FROM O OXFAM AND HELP SUPPORT THE ARTISANS WHO MAD DE IT. THIS TERRACOTTA OWL O PLANTER, $20, AND BIRD FEEDER, $25, ARE BY YA BANGLADESHI WOM EN'S CRAFT COLLECTIVE. SHOP.OXFAM.ORG.AU U

Thee ’Burbs is a whimsical andd nostalgic visual tour of suburrban Australia, as seen throuugh the expert lens of photoographer Kim Walvisch. With an eye for the quirky and quaint, q Kim has curated more than 300 images. ($19.999, Thames & Hudson)

W I L D AT H E A R T Melbourne florist Hattie Molloy is enamoured with ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arranging, and the influence is evident in her eye-catching and unique works that are simultaneously wild and refined. There is nothing predictable about Hattie’s work: she’ll often mix delicate romantic blooms with tropical or even carnivorous species (note the trumpet-shaped, flyattracting pitcher plant, left). Her eponymous shop in Collingwood (hattie molloy.com.au) is similarly intriguing, displaying orchids one day, bunches of bananas and fruiting branches the next. See her floral art @hattiemolloy.

rated by “family-friendly recipes that were bland and boring”, former lawyer and keen home cook Simone Kelly set herself the task of creating recipes to expand and excite her stepchildren’s tastes. She shares her repertoire in Family Harvest, a cookbook designed to give children a lifelong healthy relationship with food. ($35, familyharvest.com.au)

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Renowned Australian chef and intrepid traveller Christine Manfield continues to celebrate her love affair with India in this fully revised paperback version of Tasting India. It includes three new chapters on the Punjab, Gujarat and Hyderabad, plus Christine’s tips on where to stay, eat and shop. ($49.99, Simon & Schuster)

We love hearing from readers, so please share your news and views with us. Call (02) 9282 8456, email h&g@bauer-media. com.au or post a letter to Australian House & Garden, GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028. Subscribe to the digital edition of H&G at magshop.com. au/hgn. For weekly news and inspiration, subscribe to our e-newsletter at newsletter.houseandgardenmag.com.au. And head to homestolove.com.au/ahg for fab home tours, gardens and galleries.

Sta y in t ouc h

Fond memories Few households would be without an Australian Women’s Weekly cookbook on the shelf; indeed, children’s birthdays just wouldn’t be the same without at least one cake from the iconic AWW Children’s Birthday Cake Book. Pamela Clark steered AWW ’s test kitchen for 35 years and this book is her memoir of that period, interspersed with plenty of her famous triple-tested recipes. ($49.99, Bauer Books)

Share in our home and garden finds: Facebook facebook.com/australianhouseandgarden Instagram @houseandgarden Pinterest pinterest.com.au/houseandgardenau AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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INFLUENCER WIN $1,000 CASH Cosy country cottage or modern city pad? Metal or timber? Your opinion matters to us. From homewares to beauty, food to fashion, we want you to join the insiderscommnuity.com.au and share your thoughts with us for your chance to win $1,000 cash.

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Styling by Kayla Gex. Photograph by Maree Homer.

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H G DOMESTIC BLISS

FACE PAINTING

A

rtist Robyn Sweaney spent her childhood in suburban Melbourne during an upsurge in affordable Modernist architecture. “The small-house movement,” she says, “was ahead of its time. I always noticed that these homes held a proud self-possession, probably because they were so exposed to the street,” she says. “Subtle details gave signs of the lives lived within.” Influenced by pivotal painters of the Australian scene – such as Jeffrey Smart and Howard Arkley – Robyn has fused those memories of the early 1970s with her

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

current family life in Mullumbimby, NSW, and made houses her theme of choice. En route to her studio, she passes many of her subjects and revels in their compact beauty. The flat planes of their walls, windows and lawns catch the shifts in light that she seeks. Robyn has contemplated depicting more contemporary houses: the swollen fortresses behind roller-door garages and chunky columns. But they’re not this artist’s terrain. “Modern replica houses give no hint of the people who live inside them,” she explains. In the eyes of this artist, to have a soul, a house must also have a face. #

MASTERSTROKES Painting facades of houses beneath flat, cloudless skies, Robyn Sweaney sees the tidy dwellings of Mullumbimby as living heritage, not nostalgic relics. Her realist style balances painterly shadow play with exquisite detail. Robyn’s 14th solo show, Backwards Moving Forwards, pays homage to the dynamic qualities of Mid-century architecture and the potential of homes as intimate, compelling subjects. At Arthouse Gallery in Sydney until January 12. arthousegallery.com.au

Text by Anna Johnson.

Holding Pattern (acrylic on poly-cotton, 53x73cm), one of the intriguing works in Robyn Sweaney’s Backwards Moving Forwards solo show at Sydney’s Arthouse Gallery.


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