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DESIGN PORTFOLIO ARCHITECTURAL ASSISTANT PART 1 UNIVERSITY OF KENT BACHELORS OF ARCHITECTURE FIRST CLASS WITH HONOURS


RÉSUMÉ W W W. E L L I O T T B I S H O P. C O M


L A B I E N NA L E D I V E N E Z IA 2 0 1 5 - 5 6 T H I N T E R NAT I O NA L A RT E X H I B I T I O N


2015

London United Kingdom

JOB POSITION: PART 1 ARCHITECTURAL ASSISTANT Dear Sirs, My name is Elliott Bishop, I am a third year architecture student graduating from the Kent School of Architecture with a First Class and I wish to apply for the position of a Part I Architectural Assistant. I am seeking an environment which will develop my design process in a direction different from any other firm. I have a interest in urban master planning and Parametricism which can be seen in final year project and was cemented by the stimulating discussion I had with the company director of the Zaha Hadid practice, Patrik Schumacher. This transpired from the lecture I organised with him on the 31st of March through my role as an Open Lecture Chairman for the Kent Architectural Student Association, which entails event management skills and organising lectures with many high profile architects ranging from Jason Speechly-Dick (Head of Architecture Atkins) to Heatherwick Studios. Over the past two years I have worked part-time as an Architectural Assistant under the head architect Tom Wright of Atkins for paid placements in 2013 and again in 2015 under Paul Medhurst. What differentiates myself from the many other students applying for this role is my hands-on experience in this field and knowledge of the working environment of an architect which was explored through my dissertation. What are the architect’s ethical considerations when working abroad? This took me to many different cities such as Amman, Dubai and Sydney. Interviewing staff and construction workers over a six week period which was part of my primary investigation. This and other opportunities have provided me with the means to travel and experience different cultures and visit art exhibits, most recently the 2015 Milan Architecture Expo and Venice Biennale, which is a demonstration of my interest in current architectural affairs. I was also nominated in 2014 for the International Biennial of Landscape Architecture in Barcelona for my work on a therapeutic mental health centre based in Canterbury, Kent. For that project and many others I have used software’s such as Revit, Auto CAD, Sketch Up, Photoshop and have recently begun using Rhino to design with more fluid forms. In my spare time I row for the university men’s crew, this is an avid passion of mine which also demands dedication and hard work demonstrating both my self-discipline and team working skills. I am highly adaptable in office with the ability to switch between projects quickly. I would appreciate your consideration of my application and look forward to further discussing this opportunity with you in person. I hope you see that I have potential to contribute and learn within your company. Yours sincerely


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CANTERBURY A RCH A EOLOGICA L EX H I BI T ION CE N T R E

A N ISOL AT ED ST RUC T U R A L SYST EM

The city of Canterbury is famous for its archaeological remains from many time periods in particular that remains seen today are mainly Tudor and Roman structures. The objective was enhance the presence of the Canterbury Archaeological Trust within the urban tissue of the city by producing a new ‘front window’ to the public, an Archaeological Exhibition Centre on a corner site by North Gate Road. The project’s aims were to adapt and extend an existing Edwardian building in a mock Tudor style to our own scheme. The key theme to my design

is the strategic movement of people through the building as part of a much larger route from the River Stour in the West through the site to the dense housing estate in the East. Therefore the open free plan of the Modernist period was the most suitable choice of layout. The free plan best serves for the flow of movement due to its minimal obstructions which also offers spatial flexibility to the continually changing exhibition display in the public galleries, while also providing adaptability to the private living accommodation.

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URBAN SHEER NESS-ON-SEA PA R A M E T R I C F L O W O F M O V E M E N T

Sheerness-On-Sea is a former royal dockyard town with several important architectural monuments – including the boat store of 1858, described by Pevsner as one of the first modern buildings in Europe – but it has suffered from the withdrawal of the military over recent decades. This masterplanning design provides a collection of community based facilities centred on music, dance and food in Sheerness‐on‐Sea. Which is symbolically sinking in to the London clay drawing natural marsh land paths towards a center point attracting the flow and movement of people. Replacing the void space of present with a connecting centre point linking together the two parts of the town, old blue town to the more modern mile town.

In urban terms: The aim was to foster a greater sense of community; collective endeavour and mutual support; a sense of identity and purpose; top‐down and bottom‐up regeneration, combining outside benevolence with the engagement and energy the existing inhabitants. In architectural terms:  The aim was to provide an urban catalyst: a relatively small intervention that can build momentum to attracts more people to choose to live there, filling gaps and enabling regenerations. Specifically, it will: Provide a focus for activities, for Sheppey Islanders and from visitors from all over England, relating to the architectural heritage of the dockyard providing urban context for a range of activities to encourage visitors and social interaction.

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LANDSCAPE

T H E R A P E U T I C M E N TA L H E A LT H C E N T E R BIENNIAL OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE BARCELONA 2014 NOMINATION

DISORGA N ISED TO ORGA N ISED FOR MS T H E PH YSICA L E X PR E S SION OF T H E P S YC HOL O GICA L H E A L I NG PRO C E S S

The physical expression of the psychological healing process in the transmission of disorganised to organised forms. The scheme is centred around the gardeners’ hall, a hall-like space, with a high ceiling and dynamic lighting from above. The hall has a nucleated plan from the fireplace with smaller spaces to the sides, where people can sit alone or in pairs. At the hall, people with minor emotional and mental issues can meet and carry out gardening activities, as part of their therapy. Also as part of a greater regeneration project of the neighbouring crab & winkle railway line built in 1830 is to be converted into a cycle route, it was the first railway in the world to regularly take passengers, and the first in the world to offer season tickets. It has been disused since 1952. A series of gardens will be

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located adjacent to the hall and open to the general public, but are also places for people to garden. Therefore, flowers, herbs, vegetables and other produce will be raised for sale to the public, to help fund the organisation while the interior is to be a private area. The project’s masteplan shows how all of these different elements and facilities were to be connected across the site and integrate with the adjacent University of Kent campus along a route known as the Garden Path which ends with a view towards the cathedral unifying these isolated elements as a whole. A connecting narrative of disorganised to organised forms unites the site to the campus as part of a physical expression of the physiological healing process shown in the medium of architecture and landscaping.


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ATKINS H E AT H ROW A I R P ORT PROF ESSIONA L R E N DER S AT K I NS R EGE N ER AT ION PROJ EC T

To the right of this text are example renders I have produced while working for Atkins, Epsom. These pictures indicate two new boilers located at Heathrow Airport. Also located in this chapter is my scheme for the regeneration and relocation of the reception area for the Atkins headquarter office in woodcote grove. The concept of the scheme is the extension, stretching motion of the original structure in an act to welcome in visitors and give the building a presence representing the company worldwide. The new reception area has

been located in the new connection zone between Block B and C creating the shortest route between each building on site. The form of the building is in tune with the existing structure accentuating the horizontal levels. The requirements of the of the reception area was in response to the company staff who required an open light void space with better connectivity to the rest of the site. The design enables accessibility from every approach becoming centre point the woodcote site while integrating the working space into a welcoming client area.

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S T A G E T H R E E D I S S E R T AT I O N W O R D C O U N T 8 0 0 0

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Profile for Elliott Bishop

Design Portfolio  

Architecture

Design Portfolio  

Architecture

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