Page 1

VOLUME 2 ISSUE 46

FREE

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE VILLAGE OF ELLICOTTVILLE AND THE TOWNS OF ELLICOTTVILLE, GREAT VALLEY AND MANSFIELD, NEW YORK

www.EllicottvilleTimes.com facebook/theEllicottvilleTimes

JANUARY 24 - 30, 2014

Calendar of Events

Harley-Day Valley Back for Second Year

January 1-31 National Learn a Snowsport Month January 25 Harley-Day Valley Holiday Valley January 25-26 Greater Olean Sports & Outdoor Recreation Show

Bikes Rev into Town Saturday, Jan. 25

By Alicia Dziak

February 7-8 AMSOIL Seneca Allegany Snocross

The biggest winter biker party is back for the second year in a row. Holiday Valley and Gowanda HarleyDavidson are teaming up to bring back Harley-Day Valley on Saturday, Jan. 25, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., featuring a variety of all things Harley! “This is just a fun day at Holiday Valley that has out-ofthe-ordinary activities like the Jumpstart, lots of motorcycles on display, people dressed in Harley clothing and a fun band!” said Jane Eshbaugh, marketing director at Holiday Valley. Last year, hundreds of Harley lovers came out to take part in this fun-filled day, with activities centered on the second floor of the Holiday Valley Lodge. Visitors will be able to test the Jumpstart motorcycle simulator on the deck of the lodge by going through the gears and making a lot of noise. It’s a great opportunity to sit on a real bike that’s running, but stationery, and learn how to shift through the gears. Bikes will be on display throughout the resort, including all-new 2014 Harleys. Guests can also purchase Harley-Day Valley merchandise, and enjoy food and drink specials, and the Motorcycle Safety School will be on hand from noon to2 p.m. In addition, the HarleyDay Valley party runs from 3–7 p.m., also in the Holiday Valley Lodge, featuring live music by The Strangers, and

February 8 Phoenix “Rise to the Challenge” Race HoliMont February 9 Aspire’s Ski the Valley Holiday Valley February 10-11 Your Turn Women’s Ski Clinic - Holiday Valley February 14 Rotary Ski Day HoliMont

© 2014 Keystone Designers Inc.

February 15 Boarding for Breast Cancer Holiday Valley February 15 Moonlight Snowshoe Tour Griffis Sculpture Park February 16 Art Roscoe Loppet Allegany State Park February 22 Penguin Paddle Holiday Valley March 6 Ski Day for United Way HoliMont March 7 Celtic Thunder Fundraiser Ellicottville Town Center March 8-9 Mardi Gras & Winter Carnival Ellicottville • Holiday Valley

See Harley-Day Valley page 3

SCA’s Renovation, Expansion Projects on Schedule By Jeff Martin

Coming Up: Chili Fundraiser, Performances, Classes, Artist Residences, Exhibitions and More The upcoming year looks like another successful one for the Springville Center for the

Arts (SCA). Fast becoming one of the most successful beacons in the Western New York area, the organization has a calendar full of events for 2014. Looming the largest is the current renovation and expansion project using approximately $830,000 in grant money from the Regional Economic Development Council, which was awarded last year to great surprise and celebration. Seth Wochensky, executive director for SCA, said this week that the organization is “pretty much” on schedule regarding its two major projects. “There’s so much work involved in the projects,” he said. “I can’t believe how much we’ve had to work on to get through this. Then See SCA Projects page 8

Area Athlete Looks Back on Time with Skeleton Olympic Development Team

By Alicia Dziak

Over the years, Western New York has produced many athletes chasing the Olympic dream. One of those athletes is Thomas (Tom) Abbey,

Thomas Abbey at the U.S. Team Trials for the 2009 season.

a graduate of Pioneer Central, who grew up in East Arcade, not far from Ellicottville. Abbey’s sport was the skeleton, a speed-infused sport that involves a descent on a special ice track in a sled with steel runners and a weighted frame. In this Olympic discipline, the athlete lays face down and head first, controlling the sled using special spikes on their shoes. “Skeleton is a great sport,” said Abbey. “It requires speed, power and skill. But best of all, it’s a dream come true for a kid who grew up sledding in Western New York!” Abbey, a college athlete, had moved to northern Virginia to become a personal trainer, where he learned about the skeleton. “I’d taken a course for my personal training career with the NSPA (National Strength Professionals Association), an organization created and run by a former bobsledder,” explained Abbey. “I had to submit an athletic history, which detailed my career as a Division See Olympic Team page 11

Mansfield Welcomes New Board Members Organizes for 2014

By Jann Wiswall

The Town of Mansfield welcomed two new board members to its ranks — Greg Meyer and Larry Johnson — who were elected in November. As is customary during the first meeting of the year, this was the board’s official

organizational meeting. The board approved the reappointment of positions and reestablished official designations of service and business partners. At Town Supervisor Bob Keis’ request, the board approved his appointment

of Nancy Meeder as deputy town supervisor. The board also reappointed the following individuals to their posts: Brad Hurley, Highway Superintendent; Dale Baldwin and Leonard Horning, Deputy Town Clerks; Betty Jane See Mansfield Board page 11

STW Improving Access to Locally Grown Foods BY JANN WISWALL

People interested in purchasing locally produced food soon will have a new resource available to help them quickly find growers and producers in Allegany, Cattaraugus and Chautauqua counties. Southern Tier West (STW) is in the process of producing

a comprehensive, web-based guide for consumers to help them find farmers markets, roadside stands, CSAs, producers and farm businesses in the tri-county region as part of its Local Foods Program. “A lot of people are committed to eating food that is locally grown and at the peak See STW page 11

Local Equestrian Gail Pearles to Present at WNY EquiFest Event at Fairgrounds in Hamburg March 16 By Jennie Acklin

Gail Pearles was born with a love of horses, like so many young girls. The only difference is that she hasn’t outgrown it. In fact, she’s getting more and more immersed in the human/

horse connection each year. Pearles and her husband Bernie (both of the Blue Mule Band fame) live on a farm in Cattaraugus, which they share with several horses and a few other barn companion animals. She is a member of the WNY Horse Council and gives riding lessons at her farm, or your stable, and teaches clinics around the region. See Equifest page 11


Ellicottville Times

Page 2 (716) 699.4062

The Edge Hair Salon

Amy L DeTine Licensed R.E. Salesperson

ERA Team VP Cell: (716) 583-3769 OfďŹ ce: (716) 699-4800 Fax: (716) 699-8048 e-mail: amy@ellicottvillehomes.com www.ellicottvillehomes.com

www.EllicottvilleTimes.com

January 24-30, 2014

Put This Mother/Son Team to Work for You! Whether you are a buyer or seller, we are committed to successfully serving your real estate needs!

Manicures & Pedicures

Bridal Parties • Updos Make Up Application

Ellicottville Pharmacy

Andree McRae

Rick Jackson

Associate Broker 716-699-4800 x115 716-499-8839 wnyhomes@roadrunner.com

Licensed Agent 716-801-0967 cell wnyhomes2@gmail.com

Call for appointments:

6133 Route 219 South, Ellicottville, NY Computerized Pharmacy Service

(716) 699-2226

Easy Parking

12 Washington St., Ellicottville, NY

13 Monroe Street, Ellicottville

Phone: (716) 699-2384 Fax: (716) 699-5508 Pharmacy Hours: Mon-Fri 9-6/Sat 9-3 Internet Refills visit www.refillrx.com

facebook.com/ theedgehairsalon

ERA

Real Estate

$QQM;QWT5VC[CV6JG+NGZ

THE

25% off Gibson Greeting Cards Everyday

$GF$TGCMHCUV

, 11 ,11

(QMR\WKHSOHDVXUHRIEHLQJDSDPSHUHGJXHVWDV \RXH[SORUHWKHPDJLFWKDWKDVPDGH(OOLFRWWYLOOH DSRSXODU&DQDGLDQ$PHULFDQGHVWLQDWLRQ \\HDUV IRUPDQ\\HDUV

TINA DILLON, GRI Licensed Real Estate Agent

716-474-5646 Cell

716-699-4800 Ext 122 Work

13 Washington St Ellicottville Open Sun-Mon-Tue 10-5 Wed-Thurs-Fri-Sat 10-6

3ULYDF\  FRPIRUWMXVW OLNHKRPH

716-699-4620

4QWVG'CUV'NNKEQVVXKNNG

Gifts for every reason and every season!



YYYKNGZKPPEQO

tdillon@ellicottville.com tinadillon.net

ERA

Real Estate

:HGGLQJV‡)HVWLYDOV‡&RUSRUDWH(YHQWV‡7HQWV‡7DEOHV‡&KDLUV 0RUH

Liquor & Wines

10 Monroe St.,, Ellicottville 716-699-4474

...where party is priority!

www.CayasCanopies.com (DVW6WDWH6WUHHWÂ&#x2021;2OHDQ1<Â&#x2021;

WE DELIVER! Mon-Thurs 10-8pm, Fri-Sat 10-10pm â&#x20AC;˘ Sun 12-6pm

Thank You! A huge â&#x20AC;&#x153;thank youâ&#x20AC;? to the loyal and generous advertisers, readers and supporters of the Ellicottville Times. Your support allows our staff of writers, designers, photographers and delivery specialists to bring you more original stories and photos and fewer press releases. ISSUE 40 VOLUME 2

HoliMont Opens Sat. Dec. 14

OF ELLICOTTVILLE , NEW YORK OF THE VILLAGE AND MANSFIELD THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER LE, GREAT VALLEY OF ELLICOTTVIL AND THE TOWNS .com

www.EllicottvilleTimes

DECEMBER

13 - 19, 2013

Outpost ets Ride at the Learn toRiglet 21 â&#x20AC;˘ Great for Gromm Park Opens Dec.

Holiday Valley Burton

Calendar of Events

Everything Ellicot

GUIDE

tville

2014 PHON

E DIRECTORY Business & Reside ntial Numbers

December 14 HoliMont Scheduled to Open December 21 Day Holiday Valley Demo

By Jon Barlow

Jan. 3-4 Winter Blues Festival

Ellicottville

Jan. 3 Jump

Holiday Valley Bag

Jan. 25 Harley-Day Valley

Inc.

Holiday Valley

Jan. 25-26 & Greater Olean Sports Show Outdoor Recreation

Times/Keystone Designers,

and have Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 3 feet tall plank of never strapped a your feet. wood to either of that you is The reason for this Secondly, are also very young. KDYH WKLVLVWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWWLPH\RXworlda been introduced to imagine, class ski area. Now PDJLFDO D Ă&#x20AC;QGLQJ ZLOO \RX LI down log house that â&#x20AC;&#x153;slidâ&#x20AC;? landed at the mountain and can play its base where you basics in while learning the snow. the on your newest sport Holiday This is the basis for to Ride Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Burton Learn Center and Riglet Park.Holiday The Outpost, d learning Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s terrain-base the base area, located at winter of Schoolhaus (itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s by a location), was inspiredâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; the similar, cool structure3DUN LQ Ă&#x20AC;UVW %XUWRQ 5LJOHW Vt. The Smugglerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Notch, the local, Smugglerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s park has playhouse rustic feel and a adornments appeal. Colorful to warm make it easy for kids WRĂ DW XSWREXWWKHSUR[LPLW\ to the ground leads simply mock A aspect of learning. for kids chairlift is set in place challenge to jump into the hill, too. of getting up the Essentially, an exaggerated a focal is it drop-in ramp, that is point of safe learning away a â&#x20AC;&#x153;distinct communityâ&#x20AC;? advanced from the open, skiing areas. have the And your kids can the Burton same experience at Valley. Holiday Riglet Park at park was Holiday Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s l

The Source for

2014 VISITORSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Free!

Feb. 7-8 Allegany AMSOIL Seneca Snocross Feb. 15 Holiday Valley Cancer

Š 2013 Ellicottville

FREE

Boarding for Breast

Feb. 22 Penguin Paddle

Holiday Valley

March 6 Way

Ski Day for United

HoliMont

March 8-9 er Carnival Mardi Gras/Wint Valley Ellicottville â&#x20AC;˘ Holiday

Ellicottville Events Schedul Email Addresses, e, Local Attractions, Address Fax Numbers, Emergen es, P.O. Boxes, Web Sites, cy Contacts, Village Map

Tubing Park t i

Find digital issues at www.EllicottvilleTimes.com and on facebook.com/theEllicottvilleTimes

Ellicottville Times

Weekly Newspaper & Annual Visitors Guide and Directory (716) 699-4062 â&#x20AC;˘ jennie@ellicottvilletimes.com PO Box 1622, Ellicottville NY 14731

Riglet Park Scenes Photos by Tim Alianello

Winter Olympics 101: Figure Skating, Speed Skating and Short Track

by Alicia Dziak

On Feb. 6, the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes will be on Sochi, Russia, marking the beginning of the Opening Ceremonies of the XXII Olympic Winter Games! Several of the events include athletes gliding on ice, aiming for speed, grace and the gold medal. Figure Skating Figure skating is the oldest discipline in the Olympic Winter Games, making the first appearance in 1908. Currently, the program includes various events: individual menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, pairs, ice dancing, and teams. Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s single skating consists of a short program, which includes seven elements, and a free program, that includes jumps, spins and steps. Mixed pairs skaters first perform a short program, which also includes seven elements, and then a free program, which includes lifts, spirals, throws and synchronized jumps. In mixed pairs, skaters are judged on the degree to which a pairsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; movements mirror one another. Ice dancing is the only discipline that allows the use of music with vocals, and athletes are judged on how closely they adhere to the rhythm of the music and how they express the character of the music with

appropriate emotion. Team events entail representatives of the singles and pairs skating performing a short and free program, and in ice dancing, completion of a short and free dance. Figure skating events are scheduled for Feb. 6, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19 and 20. Speed Skating Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s speed skating has been part of the Winter Games since 1924, with womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s speed skating introduced in 1960, and team speed skating not making its debut until 2006. The term â&#x20AC;&#x153;speed skatingâ&#x20AC;? explains the sport â&#x20AC;&#x201D; athletes travel a specific distance as fast as possible. Twelve sets of medals are awarded in speed skating: 10 individual distance events and two team races. Both men and women compete in the 500-, 1,000and 1,500-meter events. Men compete in the 5,000- and 10,000-meter events, and women compete in the 3,000and 5,000-meter events. In the individual events, skaters race in pairs on separate tracks (the inner and outer lanes). Athletes switch lanes at every lap in order to skate an equal distance. Team events include three

members per team. The menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team event covers eight laps, and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team event covers six laps. Speed skating events are scheduled for Feb. 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 18, 19, 21 and 22. Short Track Short track, a type of speed skating in which the athletes compete to cover a 111.12-meter oval ice track as quickly as possible, became an official Olympic sport in 1992. Short track athletes utilize skates that are higher than traditional racing skates and stiff gloves to protect the hands from being cut by the blades. Short track skaters compete on an elimination basis, in heats of four at a time. After a group start, skaters race to be the first to the finish line. The winner is the one who gets there first and time is not a deciding factor. Eight sets of medals are awarded: 500-, 1,000-, and 1,500-meter races (for both men and women), and relay races involving four-person teams at distances of 3,000 meters for women, and 5,000 meters for men. Short track events are scheduled for Feb. 10, 13, 15, 18 and 21. Sources: www.nbcolympics. com and www.sochi2014.com.


January 24-30, 2014

Ellicottville Times

www.EllicottvilleTimes.com w.EllicottvilleTimes.com

(716) 699.4062 Page 3

At Holiday Valley with Gowanda Harley

Holiday Valley

Boarding for Breast Cancer

Harley-Day Valley Jan. 25

Feb. 15

Biggest Biker Party of the Winter!. FRIDAY JAN. 24

SATURDAY JAN. 25

Gin Mill, 9 p.m.

Holiday Valley Main Lodge, 3 p.m.

Gin Mill, 9 p.m.

2 Guys Drinkin Beer

TUESDAY JAN. 28

3 Easy Pieces

The Strangers

Rock â&#x20AC;˘ Country

Classic Rock â&#x20AC;˘ Party Hits

Classic Rock Balloons, 5 p.m.

Balloons, 7 p.m.

Midlife Crisis

Aqueous

WEDNESDAY JAN. 29

THURSDAY JAN. 30

Gin Mill, 8 p.m. Gin Mill, 7 p.m.

Fred & Tuck

Gin Mill, 8 p.m.

The Twobadours

Wagner & Friends

Down-home & laid back

Acoustic

Rock â&#x20AC;˘ Reggae Madiganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 9:30 p.m.

Madiganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 8 p.m.

Party Squad

Never Ben

Party Hits

Danceable Classic Rock

Rock

Groove/Rock

Home of the

716-699-2136

Original Pesto Pizza Seafood â&#x20AC;˘ Pasta â&#x20AC;˘ Veal Steaks â&#x20AC;˘ BBQ Ribs Lighter Entrees Daily Specials

Restaurant & Bar

OPEN FOR LUNCH

Super bowl sunday specials

Saturday & Sunday 12PM-4PM

$2.50 Bud Lt Pints $3.50 Sam Adams, Yuengling & Stella Pints

SERVING DINNER

$10.00 Bud Lt Pitchers

Banquet Room Available All Legal Beverages

OPEN 7 NIGHTS A WEEK Lounge Opens at 4:00pm Dinners Served from 4:30pm

32 Washington St., Ellicottville NY â&#x20AC;˘ www.TipsUpCafe.com â&#x20AC;˘ TAKE-OUTS

4PM-10PM Mon-Sat 4PM-9PM Sun

$18.00 Pitcher Bud Lt & 10 Wings

699-4600

716-699-2136

.POSPFTUSFFUĹ­FMMJDPUUWJMMFĹ­XXXUIFCBSOFWMDPN

Bear Mountain Resort Fri - Sat- Sun: Open at Noon, Kitchen Open â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;til 10pm

380 Parkway Dr., Salamanca NY â&#x20AC;˘ 716-945-2083

$1 Domestic Drafts $14 Bucket of Bud, Bud Light, Miller Light Bottles $3 Well Drinks

Appetizer Sampler Platter $11.99 Pizza logs, Mozzarella sticks, Chicken tenders, Quesadilla, French fries

Carrots, Celery, Ranch or Blue Cheese

Kevin Costner Among Upcoming Entertainment at Seneca Allegany Casino This spring, Seneca Allegany will be home to star-studded entertainment. Bold, emotional country ballads will fill the Seneca Allegany Events Center in Salamanca when singersongwriter Gary Allan takes the stage for a 7 p.m. show on Saturday, March 29. Allanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Set You Free,â&#x20AC;? reached No. 1 on both the country and overall U.S. Billboard charts, with the smash single â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every Storm (Runs Out of Rain)â&#x20AC;? achieving Platinum sales status. Kevin Costner & Modern West will perform at Seneca Allegany Events Center for the first time ever on Saturday, Apr. 12 at 7 p.m. While Kevin Costner is best known as an actor, director and producer for memorable films such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bodyguard,â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dances with Wolves,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Untouchablesâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Field of Dreams,â&#x20AC;? he performed as a musician prior to his movie career. Together with friends in late 2007, he formed the country/rock band Kevin Costner & Modern West. The group has released four albums; the latest â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Famous for Killing Each Other: Music

from and Inspired by Hatfields & McCoysâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is the most successful yet, reaching No. 14 on the U.S. Country Billboard charts. To kick off 2014, the band released a new single, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alive in the City.â&#x20AC;? Tickets for both shows start at $35 and go on sale Monday, Jan. 20 at noon. Other upcoming events at the Seneca Allegany Events Center include: â&#x20AC;˘ Grand Funk Railroad, Sunday, Jan. 26 at 5 p.m. â&#x20AC;˘ The Machine, Sunday, Feb. 17 at 7 p.m. â&#x20AC;˘ Travis Tritt, Saturday, March 8 at 7 p.m. Tickets for all shows are available at Seneca Casino box offices, Ticketmaster.com, all Ticketmaster locations or by phone at 800-745-3000.

Harley-Day Valley Continued from Front Page

loads of prizes and giveaways. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the biggest cabin fever party in the area, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no better place than Holiday Valley and the partnership with the biggest brand in the world, Harley-Davidson,â&#x20AC;? said Tim McKeever, marketing manager

at Gowanda Harley-Davidson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over 800-plus people came out last year, and we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait for another great event! While at Holiday Valley, visitors can also take advantage of the Learn to Ski or Ride packages at the Creekside Lodge, and save 20 percent off

the regular rate during National Learn a Snowsport Month. Special lodging packages for this action-packed weekend are available by calling (716) 6992345. For more information, visit www.gowandaharley.com.

NO Cover Charge! EVER!

/DVWRIWKH *RRGWLPHEDUV

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24

Featuring Ellicottvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Largest Selection of Draught Beer with

*8<6'5,1.,1ÂĽ%((5Â&#x2020;SP SATURDAY, JANUARY 25

Daily Specials

($6<3,(&(6Â&#x2020;SP

MONDAY 6SDJKHWWL 0HDWEDOOV

TUESDAY, JANUARY 28

7+(7:2%$'2856Â&#x2020;SP WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29

:$*1(5 )5,(1'6Â&#x2020;SP THURSDAY, JANUARY 30

)5('1ÂĽ78&.Â&#x2020;SP

TUESDAY *HUPDQ)DUH WEDNESDAY :LQJ1LJKW THURSDAY &KLFNHQ %LVFXLWV FRIDAY )LVK)U\

20 Washington St. Ellicottville, NY (716) 699-2530 EllicottvilleGinMill.com

Available for private parties, festivals, weddings, and special events.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mulegrass Musicâ&#x20AC;? A blend of Folk, Bluegrass and Americana. Listen to a sample of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mulegrassâ&#x20AC;? www.thebluemuleband.us

- click on the YouTube link

Contact The Blue Mule Band at (716) 982-5180 or TheBlueMuleBand@gmail.com

Bear Mountain Resort Fri - Sat- Sun: Open at Noon, Kitchen Open â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;til 10pm

s 380 Parkway Dr., Salamanca NY â&#x20AC;˘ 716-945-2083 s

Comedy Night Headliner: Mark Walton Featuring: Jamie Travale Special Guest: Clayton Williams MC: Chris Gullo Show starts at 7pm $25

Served over linguini,with Ser garlic bread and salad ga

Harley-Day Valley 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ Ellicottville Times photos

24 Unique Taps

6oz. Strip Steak & 6oz. Lobster Tail, served with your choice of potato, vegetable and salad

Served with your choice of potato and salad


Ellicottville Times

Page 4 (716) 699-4062

www.EllicottvilleTimes.com

January 24-30, 2014

Try Your Hand(s) at This â&#x20AC;Ś By Dan Balkin, HoliMont SnowSports School

I want to give you the upper hand on the ski slope. Indeed, your ski turns will not get out of hand if you accept this hands-on advice. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll admit I have probably spent an inordinate amount of time reading books about ski technique. One night, while reading and savoring a Scottish beverage, I had an epiphany. I asked myself, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What is the one great constant that ski coaches have always returned to?â&#x20AC;? In the thirty-odd years I have been reading these books, one answer played right into my hands. To paraphrase James Carville, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the hands, stupid.â&#x20AC;? One of my favorite ski books was published in the 1970s by a Frenchman named Georges Joubert. Joubert was a skiing visionary. His influential book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Skiing: An Artâ&#x20AC;Ś A Technique,â&#x20AC;? was light years ahead of its time. To this day, many of the technical terms ski coaches employ were coined by Joubert. Most intriguing for me, however, was a paragraph from this book that forever became imprinted in my mind. In short, Joubert said that 50 percent of all errors in ski

technique can be traced to poor hand position. Really? Really. Some skiers might reject this notion out of hand â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Study the best skiers at HoliMont and you will note differences in their styles. Some stand taller, others prefer a more compact stance; some like to rip short turns, others like powerful giant slalominspired turns; some skiers use more edging, others prefer to purposefully allow their skis to be looser and freer under their feet. Despite these differences, there will always be one constant that marks an expert skier: Their hands are in front of them, and their hands are steady and â&#x20AC;&#x153;quiet.â&#x20AC;? In other words, they do not allow their hands (and arms) to flail around while they ski and they do not allow their hands to drop to their side. I am quite certain that if we took a show of hands among ski coaches, they would all agree that good hand position is vitally important. Many skiers think it is natural to keep their hands in front of them while they ski â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it is not. Part of the problem is the action of planting our poles, which can cause our hands to move in inefficient patterns. It is easy to plant our ski pole and then let our hand drop to our side. This creates two problems: Once our hands drop to our sides, we tend to get back on our skis and our upper body can rotate up the

hill (in all phases of a ski turn, the upper body should always be orientated down the hill â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for that is the direction we are headed). In Ron LeMasterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ultimate Skiing,â&#x20AC;? (LeMaster is widely considered to be one of the foremost authorities on ski technique today), he often mentions how great skiers constantly work on keeping their hands in front of them and quiet. These are skiers skiing at the highest levels of the World Cup circuit. Even these skiers admit to letting their hands drift out of place if they do not train them to be quiet, steady, and in front of them. So, if the greatest skiers in the world work at this â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we should too. I have a few simple suggestions that may help you take this matter in hand: Before you start a ski run, drop your hands to your sides and look straight ahead. Then raise your hands until they appear at the bottom of your field of vision. This is where your hands should be when you ski â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in front of you and just barely visible. Try to plant your poles using by gently flicking your wrists, not by making large motions with your arms. In other words, your arms should not move up or down or flail about as you plant your ski pole.

Take a 5-foot-long section of yarn and tie it into a circle. Place the circle of yarn over your wrists (it will now look like an oval) and go skiing. To do this exercise properly, you need to maintain gentle pressure against both ends of your yarn oval. If you feel the oval is sagging or dropping, your hands are moving out of position. Done properly, the

yarn will remain in a taught oval that remains in your field of vision. Why use yarn? It can easily be snapped if you need to extricate your hands for any reason, such as forking a $20 bill over to one of your

children. Remember, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t throw up your hands or wring your hands when practicing better hand position. With a little practice, you will become an old hand at making great ski turns.

By William Thomas

My Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Two-Word Turkey Recipe

January 25 & 26, 2014 /WWL<QUM[WN7TMIVÂ&#x152; :-I[\;\I\M;\ZMM\Â&#x152;7TMIV6A

5RQÂśV*XQ6KRSÂ&#x2021;/HLVXUH7LPH3RZHU6SRUWV &RXQWU\6TXLUUHO2XWILWWHUV &XWFR&XWOHU\Â&#x2021;.D%DU.QLYHV 0LFURWHO,QQ2OHDQÂ&#x2021;:3,*)0

6KDZQ/XFKWHO

2XWGRRU&KDQQHOÂśV+HDUWODQG%RZKXQWHU

6QRZPRELOHVÂ&#x2021;+XQWLQJÂ&#x2021;)LVKLQJÂ&#x2021;+LNLQJ &DPSLQJÂ&#x2021;6QRZVKRH'HPRVÂ&#x2021;.D\DNV 2SHQ)LUH&RRNLQJÂ&#x2021;:KLWHWDLO3ORWV6HPLQDU -LP%HYHUO\5HWULHYHU7UDLQLQJ 9HQGRUV $GPLVVLRQ

DGXOWVÂ&#x2021;VWXGHQWVVHQLRUV )RU0RUH,QIR /ZMI\MZ7TMIV)ZMI+PIUJMZWN+WUUMZKM Ě&#x2030;Ě&#x2030;Â&#x152;___WTMIVVaKWUÂ&#x152; Ě&#x2030;Â&#x152;MVKPIV\MLUW]V\IQV[QVNW

Slope Scenes by Tim Alianello

It was only after the turkey season was behind us that I remembered my motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s twoword recipe for not cooking this big, dumb bird. My mother was a woman of very few words, mainly because my sisters never gave her a chance to talk. But when my mother spoke, particularly in a crisis situation, the message was clear and concise while the meaning carried weight well beyond its words. I will never forget the Thanksgiving Day in Dain City near Welland, Ontario when, for no apparent reason, my father decided he would take an axe and slaughter the turkey himself, as the Pilgrims used to do. Since he was not a history buff, I could only assume the Pilgrims were a Welsh rugby team that killed and cooked their mascot after home games. No fan of B. J. Bird or the San Diego Chicken, I think my father might have been onto something back then. Like all my fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best ideas, this one was bad, conceived with a bottle of Hudsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay Rye Whiskey. Yet somehow this particular brain-fart survived the hangover and managed to surface the next afternoon. My mother was dead against this plan, but it happened before she could stop it. Given some warning my mother could almost always derail my fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bad ideas by subtly planting other bad ideas in his mind - ones that did not involve an axe. I was six, standing with my mother and my dog, Penny, on the side porch of the house on Forkes Road as my father removed this squawking fowl from the trunk of his car and walked past us to a spot behind the garage where he had strategically placed an axe and a chopping block stump topped with kernels of corn. From where we stood, we could not

see the sacrifice. For this my mother added: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thank God!â&#x20AC;? Then she crossed herself. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when the seriousness of the situation dawned o me. My mother was no idle genuflector. When my mother crossed herself it was either a respectful salute of gratitude or a sober signal to God that if He wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t too busy He ought to have a look down here, right now. Penny was a friendly, midsized, reddish blond mutt, a male with a female name, which is why young boys should never entrust their older sisters to name the family dog. We stood still, the three of us, listening intently for a very long time. I was holding Penny by the collar; he was agitated and whining. When the turkey let loose a particularly piercing screech, the dog bolted free. I moved to follow him, but my motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grip was unrelenting on my shoulders. Growling, Penny ran full-tilt towards the back of the garage and then all at once we heard a thud, a scream, a yelp, and a man yell: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goddammit!â&#x20AC;? My motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hands flinched and tightened around my neck and I had to pull at them in order to breathe. Still she never said a word. We waited, stiffened by tension and silenced by fear. Suddenly Penny appeared around the far corner of the garage. He fell to his knees, his face and chest soaked with blood. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good God, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s killed the dog!â&#x20AC;? my mother wailed, shoving me into the kitchen through a door that wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite open. That was a mouthful for my mother. By this point both of us believed there were very few irrational acts my father was incapable of committing - but murdering the family pet with an axe broke new ground. I climbed up onto the kitchen sink where I watched the drama unfold through the window.

My father came to the porch proudly holding a headless, limp turkey in his right hand, blood splattered up both sleeves and the front of his white shirt. Never an easy thing to do, my mother ignored my father and walked towards Penny, bloody and hunkered down on the lawn. As she got closer to the dog, he barked and growled, his way of protecting the prize head of a turkey he held between his teeth. My motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoulders fell in relief. Nobody who wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t supposed to die, did. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clean it!â&#x20AC;? my father said, smiling as he offered her the turkey. Standing there dripping with blood and grinning, he looked like the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worst butcher. My mother walked by my father and the turkey, passing with any icy stare that froze them both in place. She walked slowly up the porch and on the top step she turned and offered up her recipe for fresh-killed turkey. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stuff it!â&#x20AC;? she said. Then she entered the house and locked all the grief and gore outside with a flick of a deadbolt. Ah, yes, brevity, the soul of wit, and nobody comes by it more honestly than the Irish. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a beating, which is how I know my father did not hear me laughing on the other side of the door. He never killed a Thanksgiving turkey again, of course. Like the rest of us, he was dumbfounded that he had managed to do it even once without incurring heavy neighbourhood casualties. This is an excerpt from the bestseller Margaret And Me. For a copy or a comment go to www.williamthomas.ca.


January 24-30, 2014

Ellicottville Times

www.EllicottvilleTimes.com

Mager Mountain Alpacas

ONE COMPANY.

So Soft Gift Shop

ONE AGENT.

Open Friday thru Sunday 10am-5pm

Sweaters, Ponchos, Capes Scarves, Socks, Yarn Fur Hats, Rugs, Teddy Bears A

Ki s o f s of tn es s

(716) 699.4062 Page 5

S

MANY WAYS TO SAVE.

The Area’s Largest o Y u y r u C x Alpaca Store! a n Feel LuA Unique Shopping Experience ... Watch the Alpacas Watch You Shop!

69 Mountain View Dr., Little Valley, NY 14755 • (716) 938-9077

Let me help you save time and money. Protecting more of your world with Allstate makes your life easier. And it can put more money in your pocket. Bundle your policies and you can save even more. Why wait? Call me today.

Serving Locally For Over 20 Years

Peters & Moriarty

Gary Ross (716) 699 2388 Weed Ross Agency 22 MONROE ST ELLICOTTVILLE

Attorneys and Counselors at Law

Subject to terms, conditions and availability. Savings vary. Allstate Property and Casualty Insurance Company, Allstate Indemnity Company, Allstate Fire and Casualty Insurance Company: Northbrook, Illinois © 2011 Allstate Insurance Company.

REAL ESTATE LAW

Residential And Commercial Real Estate Closings

WILLS and ESTATES Kathleen G. Moriarty, Esq. www.petersandmoriarty.com

(716) 699-2355 • Fax (716) 699-4248 12 Monroe Street • Ellicottville

The most competitive rates in your target markets.

Bring this ad for a 10% savings in the store!

Ellicottville Times

680 Broad St., Salamanca NY 14779 • (716) 945-1360

716-699-4062 jennie@EllicottvilleTimes. com

Dyed To Match

6840 Transit Road, Williamsville NY 14221 716 633 5218 • www.dyedtomatch.com Mon Tues Thurs 1-8, Wed Sat 10-4

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9 from 12-6PM PRESENTED BY

^eb_ZWolWbb[oh[iehj©j^[cW_dbeZ][ 6557 HOLIDAY VALLEY ROAD, ELLICOTTVILLE, NY 14731 11am RegistrwŠ…„e†{„‰„j~{cw„b…z}{ \ˆ{‡‹{„Š‰~‹ŠŠ‚{x{Š{{„j~{cw„b…z}{<j‹x„}Wˆ{w 58 slopes with 13 lifts

A Sunday Funday at Holiday Valley to benefit children and adults with disabilities

c{w‚fˆ…Œz{zH¤J†ƒ„fˆŒwŠ{h……ƒwŠj~{cw„b…z}{ Basket Raffle mw„ŠŠ…cw{_Šwm{{{„zU Z‰y…‹„Šh……ƒ‰WŒw‚wx‚{wŠ^…‚zwlw‚‚{_„„<jwƒwˆwyb…z}{ Yw‚‚Š…ƒw{h{‰{ˆŒwŠ…„‰\ˆzw<iwŠ‹ˆzwd}~Š (Must book both nights) …ˆi‹„zwd}~Še„‚©c{„Š…„W‰†ˆ{…|mdoŠ…ˆ{y{Œ{…‹ˆz‰y…‹„ŠD

LIFT TICKET OPTIONS

TUBING OPTION

(Includes a meal) Lift ticket allows you Š…‰‹„Š‚N†ƒ7 Lift Ticket $60 b|Šjy{Š<h{„Šw‚:MF Optional free lesson with both packages

(Includes a meal) Y~‚zˆ{„w}{M<‹†…ˆ…Œ{ˆJH8 žbŠŠ‚{j‹x{ˆ‰¬wŒw‚wx‚{|…ˆ y~‚zˆ{„w}{M<‹„z{ˆ All Day Tubing Pass $35 Your Tubing Pass allows you

MEAL ONLY OPTION _Šw‚w„Z„„{ˆ:HK7

Š…Š‹x{‹„Š‚O†ƒ7

INFO: MGLCKFKCKKGJ…ˆDw‰†ˆ{„D…ˆ}EVENT DAY HOTLINE: MGLCMMMCGHMG

Slope Scenes by Tim Alianello


Ellicottville Times

Page 6 (716) 699.4062

www.EllicottvilleTimes.com

January 24-30, 2014

HOLIDAY VALLEY - So Much To Do - So Much Fun!

Yodeler Lodge features a retail shop, the Marketplace CafĂŠ and two bars. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s located in the heart of the Valley, right at the base of the Yodeler Quad chair.

Holiday Valley Lodge, new in 2012, is the location of the Mountainside Grille, McCarty CafĂŠ, two bars, Snowsports School desk, the Equipment Rental Shop and the High Performance Demo and Repair shop.

Tannenbaum Lodge

is where families love to picnic, but it also houses the 7 Headwalls CafĂŠ. Tannenbaum m is at the base of the Tannenbaum High Speed Quad and Spruce Lake Quad that serve the Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gentlest terrain.

Feb. 15 Boarding for Breast Cancer Together with The Boardroom, the sixth annual B4BC board-a-thon will be held on Feb. 15. Activities in the name of breast cancer awareness will include special riding and park clinics for women, a park contest open to men and women snowboarders and skiers, local shop demos, a cancer awareness outreach booth, silent and Chinese auctions and an awards reception party. Proceeds from Holiday Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s B4BC event will go to the Buffalo areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oncology Program at Camp Good Days and Boarding for Breast Cancer Awareness Programs.

Snowsports lessons for skiers and

www.holidayvalley.com 716-699-2345 â&#x20AC;˘ 800-323-0020

snowboarders are available daily for children (ages 3â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11) and adults (age 12 and up). Holiday Valley Snowsports is a PSIA/AASI Certified school with lessons for all ability levels.

Densmoreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clinic Feb. 10-11

To experience the camaraderie of women skiers on the slopes is truly something unique and a chance to do just that is coming up at Holiday Valley. Championship ski racer, ski coach, writer, commentator and consultant, Lisa Densmore, will be holding the Your Turn Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ski Clinic at Holiday Valley Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 10 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11. The program will be led by Densmore and assisted by Holiday Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest women instructors. The clinic price is $290 per person and includes coaching, video analysis, demo equipment, breakfast and lunch each day and dinner on Monday, plus indoor clinics on boot fitting, and Densmoreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s special presentation about

climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro. Densmore has been involved in many aspects of the ski world. A member of the U.S. Ski Team in the late 1970s and a six-year veteran of the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pro Ski Tour in the 1980s, she has competed in ski racing for most of her life. Today, she is a standout on the Masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Circuit, with four world titles and 76 national titles across all alpine disciplines. She has been the No. 1 ranked skier in her age group and a member of the U.S. Alpine Masters Ski Team since she joined the masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s circuit in 1991. In addition to competition, Densmore has been a highly regarded ski instructor and coach for over 20 years. During the 1990s, she was the

instruction editor for Snow Country and then Mountain Sports & Living magazines, introducing and refining ski technique on shaped skis in the United States. Densmore was director of the Snow Country Ski Schools and later the RSN Alpine Excellence training centers in conjunction with the PSIA Alpine Demo Team. At the same time, she founded the Head-Subaru Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ski Clinics, which have now become the Your Turn Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ski events. Over 6,000 women have had breakthroughs in their skiing while taking Densmoreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clinics. She has also coached numerous junior and adult race programs over her long career and is currently director of the masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program and a coach for FIS-level racers at her home mountain in Red Lodge, Mont. In addition to helping people improve on-snow, Densmore has written hundreds of articles and produced and hosted numerous television shows on skiing. She has covered the sport for networks such as ESPN, Fox Sports, ABC, NBC, CBS,

A&E, The Weather Channel, The Travel Channel, PBS, and Outside TV. She has served as a consultant to many ski gear manufacturers and ski resorts on their womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s products and programs, and she periodically speaks on womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skiing topics at national ski trade events. She has written seven books, including â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ski Faster!â&#x20AC;? (McGraw-Hill), a top-selling ski instructional book. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really hope that anybody who is interested in improving their skiing or just having a fun day on the hill will join me. It is really girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; day out,â&#x20AC;? she said. Preregistration for the Your Turn Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ski Clinic is advised as attendance is limited. For information or to register, stop at or call the Snowsports School Desk at (716) 699-2345, ext. 4422, or the Creekside Lodge Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Desk at (716) 699-2345, ext.4424. Specially priced lift tickets will be available. Lodging specials at the Inn at Holiday Valley for Sunday and Monday nights are also offered by calling 1-800-323-0020.

Negative Five Degrees! So, I Guess It Must Be Winter! By Ron Kubicki, Director of Holiday Valley Snowsports School From printed and video educational material of Professional Snowsports Instructors of America/ American Association of Snowboard instructors

Welcome to Western New York and the Southern Tier! If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve lived here, or spent winters on the slopes of Holiday Valley, then you know these are not unusual temperatures for us. Add a brisk breeze to this and negative 20, or even negative 40, is not an unusual wind-chill to deal with when on the slopes. No matter how cold it is, you will see many people out in the snow and cold enjoying themselves. They have learned the correct way to dress for these conditions. If you want to get away from the window at Yodeler, follow a couple simple rules, so you can join the fun. First, cover your extremities: â&#x20AC;˘ Feet â&#x20AC;&#x201C; modern ski and

snowboard boots are designed for the cold, so stick with one pair of light to medium weight socks, and spend a little on some hi-tech wicking and insulating ski/snowboard socks. Cotton socks = cold feet, guaranteed. Even in these temps, your feet will likely sweat, and cotton holds moisture and robs your feet of heat. â&#x20AC;˘ Hands â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a good pair of gloves with light liners are very effective, but if you prefer mittens, they will be warmer. Just be sure that your hands do not sweat. Wet = cold. â&#x20AC;˘ Head â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wear a hat or helmet! Claims differ from 20 to 40 percent of your body heat is lost through an uncovered head. Hats and helmets also cover your ears, which are very prone to frostbite. â&#x20AC;˘ Face â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Technically, your face is part of your head, but it should be addressed specifically as nose and cheeks are very vulnerable to frostbite. Goggles will keep your face warmer than just sunglasses, See Negative Five next page

2SHQWRWKH3XEOLF 'DLO\DWDP

  + (  , .  ' "  ( #   +  (  0  + "- 

Grab your friends & family and head over to the Holiday Valley Tubing Co. Tubing is fun for all ages. New this year! Double the lanes for double the fun with over 20 lanes to slip, slide and yeeee ha! Ě&#x2020; Over 20 groomed lanes Ě&#x2020; Two Tows to carry you to the top

/RFDWHGRQWKHVNLVORSHV /RFDWHGRQWKHVNLVORSHV / RFDWHGR RQWWKHV VNLV VORSHV R RI + +ROLGD\9 9DOOH\LLQVLGH RI+ROLGD\9DOOH\LQVLGH W WKH7 7DPDUDFN& &OXE WKH7DPDUDFN&OXE WKH7DPDUDFN&OXE

24 Brews On Tap 5 Large Screen TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Daily Chefsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Features and Specials

Ě&#x2020; Cozy Warming Hut Ě&#x2020;0VUEPPS#POĂ&#x203A;SF1JU Ě&#x2020; Snack Bar Ě&#x2020; Free Shuttle to & from Holiday Valley

!(',-((L +%+L

Ě&#x2020;1SJDFTTUBSUBU Ě&#x2020;(SPVQ3BUFTTUBSUBU GPSBHSPVQPGPSNPSFĂ&#x;

716.699.5350 Pizza â&#x20AC;˘ Great Entrees â&#x20AC;˘ Brew House Beer

56#&Ě&#x2020; Route 242 & Bryant Hill Road Ě&#x2020;&MMJDPUUWJMMF/:


January 24-30, 2014

www.EllicottvilleTimes.com

Ellicottville Times

A

(716) 699.4062 Page 7

AA

Your

A

A

A

To Ellicottville

A

6604 PLUM CREEK Completely renovated 4 BR/2 BTH home on 5 ac close to both ski resorts in Ellicottville. B399293 $449,700

1 MORANDA LN. Custom contemporary furnished 4 BR home across from HoliMont. Rec. rm w/wet bar. Lots of amenities! B410466 $795,000

COMMERCIAL

Sales Direct 716-699-2000 7739 CROSS RD. Hillside chalet on 10 ac. Plus 2 BR/2 BTH A-frame cottage. Great views of the surrounding hills B433235 $299,700

6449 ZETWICK RD. Contemporary hillside chalet next to State land. Custom furniture stays. Large stocked pond. B440865 $259,000

31 E. WASHINGTON Updated Village Victorian on extra large lot. A great mix of new & vintage.4 BR/, 1.5 BTH. Close to everything. B428181 $229,500

Negative Five Degrees! Continued from previous page

and face masks in the most extreme temps will keep you very well protected. Ask friends, lift attendants or chair-mates to check for white patches of skin on your face, and do likewise for them. If some are discovered, immediately go inside. This is, typically, the first indication of frostbite. Do not rub to warm, just sit indoors, maybe cover the area with your hand and let your body reestablish circulation to this area; if the white area has a red discoloration in the center; go immediately to ski patrol and seek assistance. This is a more severe level of frostbite and needs specific attention. Now that your extremities are prepared, you need to dress to keep your core warm. Skiing, snowboarding and snowshoeing all have levels of exertion that cause your body to sweat. Keep your core warm and dry through layering; wear a hi-tech first layer against your skin, something that wicks moisture away from you; again, wear a cotton T-shirt or undergarment and you will be wet. Add another lightly insulated layer, then an exterior layer that has layers of air trapped

in it, which will retain your body heat. Down is excellent, but there are many other extremely effective types of filler in all quality garments. These multiple layers trap layers of air, which captures and retains the heat your body is dissipating. You do not need a lot of layers to achieve a level of comfort. As your activity increases or the day warms, you are able to shed layers and retain a comfortable temperature to continue skiing and riding throughout the day. Take frequent breaks and hydrate yourself. You expel a lot of moisture in the cold. The fact that you can “see” your breath is testimony to that. Eat small nourishing snacks to keep your metabolism up. Remove layers when indoors so you do not overheat and sweat. Undo your boots, or better yet, change socks midway through the day. These are all common sense guidelines that you have probably heard before, but it never hurts to revisit and remind yourself and others that you need to dress for conditions if you want to enjoy your day. Remember, the first ride up Mardi Gras in the morning

may be the coldest part of day for you, but if you are dressed right, even that will be an enjoyable and scenic ride. On another note, these temperatures are when you will be around snow making. Throughout the day, you will be skiing or riding through or around snow making towers, or some snow is likely to blow on you on your lift ride. These are also conditions you need to expect. People ask; “Why are they making snow now?” The answer is; “Because they can!” These temperatures allowing us to make snow are what give us great March and April conditions. If you see the guys in the heavy outdoor gear and hardhats, hauling hoses and moving guns, give them a “thumbs up.” These guys and the crews work around the clock at Holiday Valley, and are out in the all the weather, all hours of the day and night, to give us the great conditions we all expect from the professional team at Holiday Valley Have a great day on snow, and stop and say “hello” if we cross each other’s tracks!

Riglet Park Grand Opening Last Weekend

Photos by Tim Alianello

www.holidayvalleyrealestate.com Route 219 at Wildflower Ellicottville, NY

More listings!

3653 COOPER HILL RD. Newer 5 BR/2.5 BTH custom built home on approx.. 100 wooded acres w/pond. Fieldstone fireplace. B371201 $325,000

5034 RTE 219 S Commercial bldg. on 219 in the heart of Great Valley. 2 BR 2 BTH income apt upstairs & sep. storage bldg. B424172 $295,000

6214 DUBLIN HILLS New home in secluded setting close to the slopes. 4BR/2.5 BTH; granite; A/C; att. garage. B422922 $279,000

6970 POVERTY HILL RD. Hillside wooded location just 2 mi. from E’ville. Furnished 3 BR; lg. deck & hot tub. Priced to move. B441596 $157,500

15 ROCKWELL 2 family home in the Village. Totally renovated 4+ yrs ago. Driveways on each side. Owners’ unit can be sold furnished. B425366 $214,900

NEW!

NEW!

NEW PRICE!

5249 HOWE HILL Private country location on 7 beautiful ac. Just 8 min. to slopes or casino. Huge WBFP, sauna, new kitchen. Furnished. B444060 $147,500

4965 RTE. 219 THE PUB Turn key operation. Many improvements & updates inc. new well, plumbing, roof, ansel system and more. B444231 $124,900

66 WILDFLOWER Studio loft. Best price, fully furnished. Fresh paint job. Quiet rear location. B422437 $109,900

AA

Rental Properties

699-2345 Ext. 4600 • lodging@holidayvalley.com

WILDFLOWER Enjoy 4 seasons of fun; across from HV Resort. Studios, 1 & 2 BR available for RENT or PURCHASE from $69,900

SUGAR PINE LODGE Charming Bavarian B & B upscale suites w/private entrances, fireplace, walk to Village.

SNOWPINE VILLAGE For rent or purchase 1-3 BR condos from $93,500; townhomes from $389,000. Ski in/Ski out! Close to golf course and lifts.

Holiday Valley Thrill Ride Mountain Coaster the Ultimate Winter Rush By Alicia Yeager

The Mountain Coaster, located at Holiday Valley near Tannenbaum Lodge, is a ride that’s really a once- ina-lifetime thrill. The 4,805foot coaster ride lasts about 6 minutes, includes 1,865 feet of uphill track, which automatically takes you to the top of the ride, and a downhill track grade of 2,940 feet. The “car” that you ride in zips you down the spiraling mountain path at a fun and speedy pace that will have you laughing and screaming all the way. The thrilling ride through the woods allows riders to see beautiful sites, be among the trees, and have amusement park p fun all year long — even in the wonderful winter months! The park, which opened up again for winter season on Dec. 20, is open 2-8 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays and 1-8 p.m. on Saturdays, Sundays p and holidays. Tickets for the coaster can be purchased at any ticket window or lodging company. And then you’re on your way to a fun and uplifting time. Tickets are only $8 a ride or $42 for the entire day. However, if you go out for a day of group fun, tickets are only $7 each if your group consists of 15 people or more. And, if purchased along with a lift ticket, the mountain coaster only costs $6 a ride or $20 for the whole day — a great deal for any skier or snowboarder looking to have even more excitement throughout their

A downhill view of the Mountain Coaster ride.

day at Holiday Valley. The Mountain Coaster is a wonderful activity for families or for groups of friends because it is a very high energy and fulfilling ride that anyone could enjoy. Even I am nervous about riding other roller coasters, but the Mountain Coaster is one I really love. I’ve ridden the ride with friends, with children I worked with at a summer camp, and with my grandmother — yes, even my grandmother! It’s really a wonderful activity for everyone. You only have to be 3 years old and 36 inches to ride with an adult, and at only 8 years old and 42 inches, you can ride alone! All of my experiences on the Mountain Coaster have been great. The ride has seat belts and sturdy seats, and makes you feel very safe while you are riding. The coaster makes even “scaredy-cats” like me look like adventurous daredevils. The ride automatically takes you up to the top of the coaster, which is especially great in the winter when the cold makes you sluggish. The staff is also very kind, and they make you

feel welcome and really inform you before you take off on your mountain adventure. The ride itself is some of the most fun you will ever have. You feel almost as if you are flying through the trees on a loose train car! The track is full of twists and turns and tons of curves. The person who sits in the back of the car also gets to control the break, which not only makes you feel secure, but also gives you the freedom to decide just how fast you’d like to go. Personally, I say “go as fast as possible,” because it really makes and zigzagging ride that much more daring. Even my grandmother loved the fast paced, spiraled action. She was cackling all the way down the hill. I can’t wait to go back to Holiday Valley and ride the Mountain Coaster again. I’ve ridden it in both the summer and the winter, and both times were equally special. I would recommend the Mountain Coaster to anyone and everyone — and don’t forget to bring your friends!


Ellicottville Times

Page 8 (716) 699-4062

Nature’s Remedy natural market & holistic center • organic foods •herbs & vitamins • homeopathics • bath & body • teas & more • weight loss • ionic detox foot baths • whole body cleansing • reflexology, massage •craniosacral therapy • bio-scans • naturopathic consults

www.EllicottvilleTimes.com

Firewood Seasoned Mixed Hardwoods GOOD Split Logs

(//,&2779,//(

January 24-30, 2014

Est. 1870

&28175< 6725( $17,48(6 Old Fashioned General Store & Diner Wonderful Food • Daily Specials

$80.00 Delivered 4’ x 8’ x 18”

new location! 26 monroe st 699-4372 ellicottville

Cherry Available

Call Joe at: 716-337-0150 home 716-207-5802 cell

Like us on facebook • Follow us on twitter @ Natures_Remedy • txt natures remedy to 22828 to join our mailing list

natures-remedy.net • holistic-wellness-center.com

Quality goods, fair prices & old fashioned service

This is not Slab Wood!!!

,Q+LVWRULF$VKIRUG-XQFWLRQ&RUQHURI5WH ‡2SHQ:HG6XQGD\‡716-699-6100

Health & Fitness: DEADLIFTS 101

Bertrand Chaffee Hospital Primary Care Center Welcomes Patients from Springville Primary Care! Lisette D’Eon, MD Timothy Siepel, MD Edwin Heidelberger, MD, PhD Laurie Brown-Croyts, NP Tina Vandermeer-Gatti, NP James Urgo, NP all are accepting new patients For Appointments (716) 592-8140

By Kim Duke neta & afaa Certified Trainer

The way you project yourself upon entering a room has a lot to do with how good your posture is. Rounded shoulders that are pulled forward from weak spinal muscles will convey a less-than-ideal image, even for the most confident person. However, building a solid back easily solves this. By strengthening your spinal and middle back muscles, your shoulders will be pulled back and this will project better lines in your upper body, while at the same time making your waist appear slimmer. The stiff-legged deadlift is an effective, basic exercise that

has superior effects for firming the erector muscles of the spine. The deadlift is mechanically simple, but it requires a strong effort and careful attention to exercise form. It can be both a blessing and a curse. If you do the exercise correctly, the back will become strong and straight, and even the hamstrings will benefit from each repetition. However, if you do it sloppily, it can induce an injury that never had to happen. Like anything else in life, doing things correctly is better than doing them quickly or without much thought, as the latter choice will almost always come back in the form of a pain in the butt. How to do stiff-leg deadlifts correctly: Warm up muscles prior to doing any exercise. Place a light barbell on the floor. Your feet should automatically be shoulder width apart, knees slightly bent, and back flat and tight. Look slightly upward so that

your neck and back are in line. With knees slightly bent, slowly lift the bar from the floor by extending the trunk and the knees. Hold the core tight, pulling your belly inward. Your knees straighten as you come to an upright position. Keep your head up and eyes forward as you lower the weight toward the floor. Never look at the floor during the lift, otherwise the middle of your back will become rounded and this invites injury. Do not hold your breathe. Breathing is also essential to proper form. Remember to exhale on exertion. In general, deadlifts can develop strong and balanced back extensor muscles, which will reduce the chance for injury, while at the same time developing outstanding posture. Nevertheless, you must stay very alert when you are lifting. Be strong and be safe with your deadlifts, as this strategy will build you outstanding back strength and posture.

Simply Food: ROASTED BEEF STOCK By Liz Bares

The BCH Laboratory Department is open for outpatients Monday - Friday 7:00am to 7:00pm Saturdays 8:00am - 12pm

Soup, by nature, is easy but takes a certain amount of finesse to make it delicious. The very best way to make soup tasty is to make your own stock. In culinary school, the first three weeks of class are dedicated to making stock. Broth and stock are seemingly interchangeable, but the biggest difference is that stock is typically made with bones (chicken, beef, fish) and broth is usually made with more meat. I use the terms interchangeably. What you buy in the store is basically broth. You can flavor it up a bit by adding onions, peppercorns, parsley, carrots, celery, bay leaf and garlic. Then let it simmer a bit and your soup will have more flavor. Homemade stock usually has a more gelatinous texture when cooled because of the gelatin released from the bones. I try hard to have homemade stock in the freezer for soup making. However, when in a pinch, store-bought low-sodium varieties are just fine. I have been experimenting with making a roasted beef stock for a few months now and I think this one is the best. You will make this entire stock in your oven — no pan on the stove. You need beef bones, and I’ll admit they are difficult to find. You get about two quarts of stock out of this recipe. You can freeze stock for up to four months.

Roasted Beef Stock keeping healthcare local !

SCA’s Projects Continued from Front Page

again, I’ve learned so much.” About half of the money, or $434,310, will be used to repair and expand the center’s headquarters at a former Baptist church just off Main Street, while the remaining funds will be used to repair and convert a building on Main Street into a mixed-use arts center. The center will include artist residences, exhibitions, a café and performance spaces. Workshops will also be part of the SCA’s overall mission, though one thing at a time. Wochensky anticipates the café space opening in the summer, but the church work is, by far, the most intensive and complicated. He said both projects are on schedule. Until the projects are complete, there are still the traditional events — and some new — throughout the village, including Art Crawl, the organization’s largest event. It is scheduled for May 3 this year and features dozens of

local and national artists. “It was a huge success last year,” Wochensky said. Upcoming events include a performance by the band Harpeth Rising, described as a “convergence of a classical education and a passion for folk music, Americana, blues, bluegrass and all things acoustic.” The show is scheduled for Feb. 7 at both 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. at the Mongerson Theatre in Springville. Tickets can be purchased in advance for $12 at www. SpringvilleArts.org or by calling (716) 592-9038. Tickets at the door are $15. During the summer months, the SCA will continue its jazz and classical series concerts. This year, however, there will be an emphasis on percussion, Wochensky said. “There’s an interest in it,” he said. “We’ve wanted to bring this kind of music into our program for a long time.”

Slope Scenes Photos by Tim Alianello

Children’s classes and activities will also be peppered throughout the spring and summer seasons, and Wochensky urges those who are interested to call SCA. On Saturday, Jan. 25, the SCA will hold its first chili benefit event, aptly named Beating the Winter Cabin Fever Blues Fundraiser, 5–7 p.m. For $5, customers can choose from a myriad of chilis, delicious breads and an assortment of beverages. There will be a 50/50 raffle, karaoke and other forms of entertainment. Held at the Springville Center for the Arts on Buffalo Street, Wochensky said he’s hoping the event becomes annual. “It’s a great idea for many reasons — if for no other reason than to just get out of the house and meet people,” he said. “It’s also a great way to raise funds for SCA projects. It’s going to be a fantastic year for us.”

4-6 pounds of beef bones 1 bay leaf (if using 6 pounds of bones, use two leaves) 1 head garlic (keep the paper on, just separate the cloves) 4-6 yellow onions, quartered (you can keep the paper on if you wish) 4 large carrots, peeled and cut into large chunks 4-5 stalks celery, trimmed and chunked A handful parsley (stems included) 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1-2 teaspoons peppercorns Heat oven to 400 degrees. Place the bones into a large roasting pan. Roast them for about 40 minutes. Then take the pan out, shut the oven door, and turn the bones. To the pan, add onions, garlic, celery, carrots and tomato paste. Stir everything together. Place back in oven and roast another 40 minutes. Your veggies and bones should be a pretty brown by now. Roast a bit longer if not brown. Once you are satisfied with the color, remove the pan from the oven and turn down the heat to 350 degrees. Add about 1 quart of water per pound of bones. So, 6 pounds would yield 6 quarts of water. Place your aromatics (parsley, peppercorns, bay leaf) in the pan now. Then place pan back into oven carefully. Roast for 4-5 hours. Gently stir everything together about every hour. You do not want the tips of bone to burn. Add water if necessary, you want to keep the water level pretty much the same throughout the cooking process. Once the water is a golden color and the stock smells terrific, take it out of the oven. Gently ladle the stock into a heatproof bowl or pan. Place the entire bowl or pan in an ice water bath to bring the temperature down quickly. Once the temperature has cooled to lukewarm, place the bowl of stock, covered, into the fridge for several hours. You will have a thin layer of fat on the top of the stock. Take that off. Place the chilled stock into containers and freeze, or use within 3 days.

Annual Moonlight Snowshoe Tour at Griffis Sculpture Park Feb. 15 Mark your calendar for Feb. 15, 2014, when Griffis Sculpture Park opens its grounds for the annual Moonlight Snowshoe Tour. With snowshoes from The City Garage, you and your friends will trek through the winter wonderland at Griffis while you view the park’s many unique sculptures, lit up

for the first time in the event’s history during this magical evening. After the hike, enjoy chili by Balloons Restaurant while listening to live music. Cost for the event is $50 and includes snowshoes, live music, chili and beer! Reservations are required and must be made in advance by

calling (716) 667-2808. The event runs from 5–8 p.m. and proceeds benefit the Arts & Education Program of Buffalo. The park is located at 6902 Mill Valley Rd., in East Otto, N.Y. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/ pages/Griffis-Sculpture-Park.


January 24-30, 2014

Ellicottville Times

www.EllicottvilleTimes.com

Holiday Valley Word Search The Wall Falcon Fiddlers Elbow Explorer Tannenbaum Maple Leaf Racoon Run

Yodeler Morning Star Firecracker School Haus Holiday Run Mardi Gras

Eagle Crystal Hoot Owl Edelweiss Champagne Sugar Plum

Please join us in welcoming the newest provider in our Women’s Health & Wellness Center.

Chute Bobsled Raven Independance Foxfire Glades

B

C

L

Y

E

H

T

L

L

A

W

X

A

O

W

J

L

O

F

P

G

Z

P

E

D

Q

E

B

O

Q

Q

Z

S

M

B

O

I

M

O

T

R

S

E

L

A

T

S

Y

R

C

Y

S

Y

A

D

O

J

X

X

T

H

F

V

G

J

O

H

M

L

C

F

J

D

R

P

A

X

K

J

C

M

O

T

O

H

E

P

I

G

C

L

N

F

O

X

F

I

R

E

R

O

P

D

L

V

N

O

E

E

I

N

I

K

L

Q

Z

O

L

T

M

N

D

R

F

K

G

R

N

T

I

T

Z

T

X

H

U

V

U

E

F

A

P

U

E

S

G

U

B

O

G

S

A

W

X

R

P

H

E

O

T

C

X

E

S

W

I

W

S

U

Z

X

O

E

A

L

R

O

R

M

O

L

T

C

R

T

S

Z

T

A

N

N

E

N

B

A

U

M

R

B

A

P

A

R

G

L

C

D

G

L

U

M

C

O

E

G

H

O

R

M

A

G

N

R

E

P

P

A

O

K

D

P

O

I

A

W

A

C

E

Y

T

N

M

A

A

T

E

O

L

C

V

T

S

R

C

L

O

J

C

E

M

X

L

R

I

U

E

V

E

W

D

O

G

D

Y

E

O

T

W

I

D

C

N

Y

D

Z

X

I

O

A

E

L

Y

Q

E

B

A

V

C

H

A

M

P

A

G

N

E

L

N

F

I

L

Y

U

R

A

L

P

O

O

C

R

R

Y

E

A

S

L

R

U

C

T

G

B

U

U

X

M

A

U

T

R

S

P

U

O

C

M

U

L

P

R

A

G

U

S

N

M

X

Z

N

O

C

L

A

F

T

C

H

U

T

E

T

T

G

Wild Spirit Returning to Audubon Snowflake Festival Jamestown, NY – With winter fully upon us, it’s time to look forward to the Audubon Center & Sanctuary’s annual Snowflake Festival, always a highlight of the winter season. Planners at Audubon are excited to announce that Paul Fehringer, the licensed wildlife rehabilitator who founded Wild Spirit Education, will be returning this year to the Saturday, Feb. 1 event. “Paul’s presentations of his rehabilitated birds, including owls and other raptors, have been a highlight of previous Snowflake Festivals,” said Audubon Senior Naturalist and Festival Coordinator, Sarah Hatfield. “We are thrilled that he will be able to be with us again this year!” The day-long event, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., also features horse-drawn sleigh rides, kicksled demonstrations by Tails of the Tundra Siberian Husky Rescue, crafts, a Chinese auction, naturalist-led winter nature walks, alpacas and other live animals, door prizes, kids crafts, behindthe-scenes tours of Audubon’s resident bald eagle, and more. A variety of vendors will have hand-made items like winter wear, pottery, jewelry and greeting cards. Demonstrations of outdoor cooking, spinning, snowshoeing, and crosscountry skiing will add to the

A Snowy Owl is one of the live birds of prey that Fehringer brought to a previous festival. (Photo by Dave Cooney)

fun. Chili and hot dogs will be among the food options, and brownies, kettle corn and cotton candy will be among the treats. Cub Scouts and Girl Scouts of any age group can earn a Winter Fun patch by completing certain activities at the Festival. For more information and to sign up their groups, Scout Leaders can call Audubon at (716) 569-2345 or go on-line http:// snowflakefestival.wordpress. com/scouts/. Snowflake Festival sponsors are United Refining Company, Herbs R 4 U, James M. Smith, Courier Capital Corporation,

Gary’s CARSTAR, Kniti Griti Works, Shults of Warren, and Tractor Supply of Warren. Admission to the Snowflake Festival is $6, children 3-12 are $2, and free for those two and under. Extra fees apply for horse-drawn wagon rides, bluebird house building, Chinese auction, raffles, and food. The Audubon Center and Sanctuary is located at 1600 Riverside Road, one-quarter mile east of Route 62, between Jamestown, New York, and Warren, Pennsylvania. To learn more, call (716) 569-2345 or visit jamestownaudubon.org.

FromRecommended the Bookshelf Reading from the Ellicottville Memorial Library

“The God’s of Guilt” by Michael Connelly

D Defense attorney Mickey Haller returns in this sequel to “A Lincoln Lawyer” with a hau haunting case in the gripping new thriller by Michael Connelly. M Mickey Haller gets the text, “Call me ASAP - 187,” and the California penal code for mu murder immediately gets his attention. Murder cases have the highest stakes and the big biggest paydays, and they always mean Haller has to be at the top of his game. When Mickey learns that the victim was his own former client, a prostitute he th thought he had rescued and put on the straight and narrow path, he knows he is on th hook for this one. Far from saving her, Mickey may have been the one who put her the in danger. Haunted by the ghosts of his past, Mickey must work tirelessly and bring al his skill to bear on a case that could mean his ultimate redemption or proof of his all u ultimate guilt. Thiis book b k is i currently available in book format at the Ellicottville Memorial Library. It is also Th available in large print, audio book and eBook formats using our interlibrary loan program.

ECS Basketball vs Salamanca • Photos by Deb Golley

(716) 699.4062 Page 9

Say hello to Renee Hansen, CNM, Olean Medical Group.

Renee Hansen, Certified Nurse Midwife, is committed to having open and honest conversations with her patients. Renee began her career in healthcare at Olean Medical Group as a registered nurse in the OB/GYN Department. Her desire to do more in her field, led her to pursue a midwife program and she recently earned her Masters in Nurse Midwifery from the Midwifery Institute at Philadelphia University. For Renee, good obstetrical care is a very important part of her practice but she is also dedicated to providing treatment options at every stage of a woman’s life. She is seeing patients in Olean Medical Group offices in Ellicottville, Franklinville, and Olean. To schedule an appointment, call 716-376-2348 or toll free at 800-577-7767.

STW Board Looks at Building Grant Writing Capabilities By Jann Wiswall

The Southern Tier West (STW) Board of Directors met on Thursday, Jan. 16, to discuss a number of issues important to its tri-county region this year. The board spent a significant amount of time both before and during the meeting discussing how STW can build up its grant writing capabilities. Board members and Executive Director Richard Zink agreed that having grant writing services available would allow STW to help its member municipalities and organizations apply for grants for “main street” and economic development projects. They also felt that if STW secured a grant, STW might also be able to administer it for the organization. Grant administration could be an additional revenue stream for STW. Several board members suggested that Zink and staff take some time to look at the pros and cons of hiring a fulltime, part-time or contract grant writer and building its grant writing capabilities either over time or more aggressively. Board Chair Robert Keis formally asked the board to endorse the staff’s effort to that end, which it did. During his Director’s Report, Zink briefed the board on federal legislative action that impacts STW. An increase in federal funding for the Appalachian Regional Commission’s (ARC) nonhighway work was on Congress’ docket that day. According to ARC, on Jan. 17, “President Barack Obama signed an omnibus appropriations bill providing funding for government agencies for fiscal year (FY) 2014, including $80.3 million for ARC’s non-highway programs. This figure is $15.4 million more than the Commission’s FY 2013 postsequester funding level of $64.9 million. The legislation specifies that $10 million of that amount is for a program of high-speed broadband deployment in economically distressed counties in Central Appalachia that have been most negatively impacted by the downturn in the coal industry, to diversify and enhance regional business development.” ARC is the primary funding agency for STW. Zink also reported that funding for the Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration is up 11 percent from 2013, to $246.5 million. A $70,000 grant to STW from the EDA

currently funds economic development technical assistance activities. Grants Workshop: Zink said that 31 people have already registered for the March 1819 Essential Grant Skills Workshop sponsored by The Grantsmanship Center. Three STW employees are among the registrants. The training will take place in the BOCES technology room at the Center for Regional Excellence in Salamanca. Local Government Training: Zink also said that STW is prepared for its Feb. 12 training on the Public Employer Workplace Violence Prevention Program law, which will be presented by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). This session will be held at the STW offices in Salamanca. Preparations for the May 7 Local Governments Training conference are under way. Local Foods: Zink and Local Foods Program Manager Kim LaMendola briefed the board on the recent workshop that was held for farmers’ market stakeholders such as farmers, growers, vendors, managers, board members, volunteers and market host organizations. The workshop was a follow-up to a summit held in November to bring these groups together for a day of networking, assessment and shared planning for the future. The workshop held on Jan. 15 brought together 15 participants to work with Diane Eggert, executive director of the Farmers Market Federation of NY, to address some of the issues that came up at the previous event. LaMendola said that discussion centered on communication, collaboration, sharing resources, branding and marketing. All participants went home with homework — coming up with action steps — that will be shared at the next workshop scheduled for Feb. 21. “Farmers and market managers are beginning to understand the importance of coordination,” said LaMendola. Board member Stephanie Kiyak, who serves on the Common Council of the City of Dunkirk, added that governments often “understate” the importance of farmers markets and “what they can do for the local economy.” LaMendola also shared a draft of a consumer-oriented local food guide being produced by STW (see related story, page x). STEDO: Zink noted that

STW is working with its affiliate, the Southern Tier Enterprise Development Organization (STEDO), to build on its ability to pursue, obtain and administer small business loans for “main street” projects throughout the region. According to Zink, STEDO has been struggling with its current mission and loan activity has been declining. Board member Kier Dirlam, a member of the Allegany County Planning Board, commented, “There’s an opportunity here to fill a real need. Some of STEDO’s programs have been eliminated or been reduced to nothing.” DDAA Board: The Development District Association of Appalachia, a membership organization of the 73 Local Development Districts that serve 420 counties in the Appalachian region served by ARC, has asked Zink to serve on its board of directors. Zink will begin the five-year term as secretary of the board, a position that leads to chairmanship. The STW board approved Zink’s request to serve in this capacity. New Business: Zink and STW’s Senior Regional Development Coordinator Ginger Malak announced that STW will be establishing a permanent stormwater demonstration training site at the Cattaraugus County Department of Public Works campus in Little Valley. The training center will showcase best management practices, equipment and materials demonstrations, green infrastructure best practices and more. Construction of demonstration areas will be gradual and should begin in the spring, pending approvals. This site, donated for use by the county, will enhance STW’s ability to provide stormwater training to municipal leaders, highway supervisors and others in a hands-on setting, Malak explained. STW Project Coordinator Courtney Waters announced that she had just received word from the State Department of Transportation regarding Transportation Enhancement Program grant awards. In Cattaraugus County, the City of Olean received $535,516 for its Olean Creek Bicycle and Pedestrian Crossing, and the Seneca Nation of Indians received $482,206 for The Pennsy Trail. The proposed Ellicottville/Great Valley Recreational Trail was not awarded a grant. The next meeting of the STW board is scheduled for 1 p.m. on March 20 in the STW offices in Salamanca.

Random Facts: Did You Know?

The United States has hosted the Winter Olympics four times; 1932 in Lake Placid, 1960 in Squaw Valley, 1980 in Lake Placid, and 2000 in Salt Lake City.


Ellicottville Times

Page 10 (716) 699-4062

www.EllicottvilleTimes.com

January 24-30, 2014

FREE Enrollment Help – Affordable Health Care Act Ellicottville Library Serving as Meeting Site Frustrated and confused by all the new health insurance regulations? Don’t have computer access to sign up through Affordable Health Care Act? Need help in exploring options and signing up? Well, FREE help is available!! The Ellicottville Memorial Library at 499 Maples Rd. is one of the convenient sites you can visit to get personalized help from a certified navigator who will guide you through the new health care maze. To make a FREE appointment, call (716) 532-1010, ext. 204, and ask for Lynda Chudy, a certified navigator with New York State. She will gladly meet with you at the Ellicottville Library. Other locations are available as well.

MEETING NOTICE

TOWN PLANNING BOARD TO MEET JAN. 27 The Town of Ellicottville Planning Board will meet Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, at 6 p.m. at the Town Hall at 1 West Washington St.

GROUP FITNESS CLASSES New Saturday Classes! 10 am AB Lab - Mila 11am Beginner Strength Training - Kim Watt

January Class Schedule: • Power & Strength: Wed 5pm • AB Lab: Mon 5pm • Yoga: Mon & Wed 6pm, Thurs & Sat 8:30am • Crack of Dawn: Tue & Thurs 6am • STOTT Pilates: Tue 8am, Fri 9:30am

Moderate Couples Class Thursdays at 6:15 pm NEW & Bigger location at 33 Bristol Lane, Ellicottville • NETA & AFAA Certified

Kim Duke’s Core

• Personal Trainer • Nutritional Advisor

Performance Fitness & Training Studio

Classes Include: Power & Strength Training, AB Lab, Pilates, Yoga

716-698-1198

• kduke65@gmail.com • All Fitness Levels Welcome!

ECS Sports SCHEDULE Friday, January 24 5:00PM Boys Modified Basketball vs. West Valley 6:00PM Boys JV Basketball @ Franklinville 7:30PM Boys Varsity Basketball @ Franklinville Monday, January 27 5:00PM Boys Modified Basketball vs. Franklinville Tuesday, January 28 6:00PM Girls JV Basketball vs. North Collins 7:30PM Girls Varsity Basketball vs. North Collins Wednesday, January 29 5:00PM Boys Modified Basketball vs. Olean Friday, January 31 4:30PM Boys Modified Basketball vs. Salamanca 6:00PM Girls JV Basketball @ North Collins 7:30PM GirlsVarsity Basketball @ North Collins

Home Show Set for Mid-April OLEAN – Nothing beats a face-to-face chat with a professional. The Greater Olean Area Home Show, presented by Greater Olean Area Chamber of Commerce (GOACC) and its 48 corporate sponsors, is your all-access pass to home specialists offering all the expert advice, solutions and inspiration for whatever home project you have planned this year. The show will be held April 11-13. Vendor booths are now available for the annual home show, held at the William O. Smith Recreation Center in Olean. At least 80 of the area’s leading businesses are expected to exhibit their wares

and services at the upcoming show. The Home Show is a unique marketplace to shop, compare and save on a total selection of home-related products and services for building, remodeling, gardening and decorating. The show gives you more experts, vendors, and companies in one place at one time than any other opportunity in our area. It’s time to improve the livability and value of your home, and the home show is here to help! The show dates and times are April 11, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., April 12, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday, April 13, 10 a.m. to 4

E.A.R.S. Pet of the Week:

Meet Lyla

ECS JV Basketball vs Catt/LV • Photos by Deb Golley

p.m.. Nancy Morgan, the Chamber’s membership coordinator, said, “The Greater Olean Home Show is three days with home improvement, leisure and lifestyle vendors on hand.” Area businesses are encouraged to make booth reservations as soon as possible. GOACC members will receive discounted booth space. For more information on the Olean Home & Garden Show or other GOACC events and activities, please call GOACC at (716) 372-4433 or email member@oleanny.com.

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

To allow us to properly remove the snow please park accordingly. Overnight parking is only allowed in designated areas in the Village and Town of Ellicottville. Please abide by the local ordinances so everyone can travel safely and have room to park. Snow storms require immediate snow removal, please move your vehicles daily so the areas can be plowed. Please don’t block sidewalks when parking in driveways. Any questions please inquire at the Police Department located at One West Washington. Local Police Department, Village and Town DPW Department, Supervisor Burrell and Mayor Coolidge.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

VILLAGE OF ELLICOTTVILLE, NEW YORK: The Village of Ellicottville Board will hold a public hearing on Monday February 10th at 6:00pm at the Town & Village Hall, located at One West Washington Street, Ellicottville, New York re: 20142015 Budget. Copies of the budget are available in the Village Clerks office.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

VILLAGE OF ELLICOTTVILLE, NEW YORK: The Village of Ellicottville Board will hold a public hearing on Monday February 10th at 6:00 pm at the Town & Village Hall, located at One West Washington Street, Ellicottville, New York re: Local Law No. 4 to amend local law number four of the year nineteen hundred seventy-nine. One Way Street of Alleys of Article VI. January 15th, 2014, Mary J. Klahn, Village Clerk

PUBLIC NOTICE

TOWN OF ELLICOTTVILLE Please take notice that a Special meeting of the Ellicottville Town Board will be held on Monday, January 27, 2014 at 4:00 pm in the Town Hall at 1 W. Washington St., Ellicottville, New York to consider the Utility Work Agreement with NYS DOT for the Route 219/242 sidewalk project. BY ORDER OF THE TOWN BOARD OF THE TOWN OF ELLICOTTVILLE

St. Bonaventure Professor Mackowski Edits New Book in Emerging Civil War Series ST. BONAVENTURE, N.Y., Jan. 21, 2014 — A new Civil War book edited by St. Bonaventure University journalism professor Chris Mackowski was released this week. “Bloody Autumn: The Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864” by Daniel T. Davis and Phillip S. Greenwalt is part of the Emerging Civil War Series published by Savas Beatie, the largest commercial publisher of Civil War books. Mackowski serves as editor of the series. Davis has worked as a historian at both Appomattox Court House National Historic Site and at the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. Greenwalt is a historian for the National Park Service at George

Washington Birthplace National Monument. Both are frequent contributors to the blog Emerging Civil War: www.emergingcivilwar.com. Their book traces the misfortunes of the Confederate Seconds Corps, commanded by Lt. Gen. Jubal Early, during the early fall of 1864, as they tried to secure the Shenandoah Valley, known then as “the breadbasket of the Confederacy.” Federal commander Maj. Gen. Phil Sheridan, tasked with clearing the valley once and for all, rose to national prominence as he undertook his assignment with gusto. Along with a narrative of events, “Bloody Autumn” features driving tours of the Shenandoah Valley battlefields at Third Winchester, Fisher’s

Hill, Tom’s Brook, and Cedar Creek. The book also includes an introduction by Scott C. Patchan, author of “The Last Battle of Winchester,” maps by cartographer Hal Jespersen, and an appendix on “Preservation in the Valley” by National Park Service Historian Eric Campbell. Mackowski also contributed an appendix, “The Valley Campaign for Memory,” which examines the long-term legacy of the campaign and why history remembers — and misremembers — it the way it does. Mackowski, a professor of journalism and mass communication, has taught at St. Bonaventure University since the fall of 2000.

Looking for sweet? You found it. My name is Lyla and I’m full of puppy energy, but I’m shy and sweet and can cuddle with the best, as long as I get to know you a little bit first. I’ve led a sheltered life at only 6 months old, without a lot of one on one attention, so everything is new to me. I’m a southern girl, a Black Mouth Cur, and take my time feeling comfortable with everything from going up and down the stairs to hopping up on a bed. I just want to make sure it’s okay and it won’t hurt me before I do it. I’ve got a girlish figure, and I’m pretty sure I won’t get too big, just a nice medium size. I’m working on my house training skills, and I play really well with five of my foster siblings. The cats… well… I like to chase them especially if they like to run. I bet if we met we could the best of forever friends. Email empirerescue@gmail.com if you are interested in being my new best friend and let’s get this thing started!


January 24-30, 2014

Ellicottville Times

www.EllicottvilleTimes.com

(716) 699.4062 Page 11

Mansfield Board Continued from Front Page

Horning, Registrar of Vital Statistics; Dale Baldwin, Deputy Tax Collector; Anne Adams, Youth Director; Mary Dankert, Dog Control Officer; and Gil Wiswall, Code Enforcement Officer and Building Inspector. The board retained its banking relationships with the Bank of Cattaraugus County, Cattaraugus County Bank and M&T Bank. Board meetings will continue to be held on the third Monday of the month, employee paid holidays and sick leave policies will remain the same, and other administrative assignments and policies will continue as previously established. The Ellicottville Times will remain as the town’s official newspaper. Changes to the employee health plan (impacting the four full-time highway department employees and Highway Supervisor Brad Hurley) were explained. A new plan from Blue Cross/Blue Shield provides coverage that meets the requirements of the federal Affordable Care Act. As negotiated in 2010, the Town of Mansfield will pay the first $1,250 of employees’ deductibles. Keis asked the board for authorization to rehire the same individual to mow and maintain the town’s four cemeteries and the grounds of its three municipal buildings. He expects the cost to be slightly higher than last year with the addition of the town highway garage grounds to the scope of work. Meyer said he thought that the town should give preference to Mansfield residents who can do the same job. Keis agreed and said one Mansfield resident had the contract in the past but that the work was unsatisfactory. The current contractor does an excellent job, he added. Meyer and the rest of the board agreed to rehire the contractor for this year and to look at the contract again next year. Keis also asked the board to adopt the county’s multi-jurisdictional Hazard

Mitigation Plan for 2014, which was developed by the county and its municipalities in 2009. Each municipality must pass a resolution each year to adopt the plan in order to ensure eligibility for FEMA aid in the case of a natural disaster. The board approved the resolution. Meyer abstained on the vote. Keis provided some background for the new board members on some ongoing issues. One issue is the petition from 10 residents of the Hamlet of Eddyville asking the board to install two streetlights to improve visibility and safety in the community. Keis has talked with the town attorney about the matter and discovered that in order to install lights, Mansfield would have to establish a “street lighting district” for the hamlet, hire an engineer to determine where lights would have to be placed and hold a public hearing on the proposed district. Keis said an engineer likely would require four to five lights. At a cost of $117.64 per year per light, as quoted by National Grid, the annual cost would total $470-$588 per year. There also would be upfront costs for engineering and legal fees and costs associated with holding a public hearing. All costs would be shared by the residents of the district as a percentage based on their property assessments and charged as a separate line item on their annual county tax bills. Keis plans to continue to talk with petitioners to determine if they want to go forward with the idea. The matter was tabled until that informal survey can be completed. Another matter the board will need to address this year relates to a new highway department truck that has been ordered and will be delivered this spring. The truck is a replacement vehicle for one lost in the 2012 fire. Insurance will cover $68,000 of the estimated $270,000 cost for the 2015 Mack GU 712 single axle, AWD chassis with plow equipment — $100,000 will come out of the highway

department budget approved by the board in October. Keis explained that the board will work to pay off as much of the balance of about $102,000 as possible over the course of the year through careful spending and budgeting. If, at the end of the year, there is still a balance, the board may need to obtain a loan. Meyer did not specifically object to this strategy, but did say that he felt that Mansfield is overtaxed and “has been taken to the cleaners for years.” He said that, while he thinks Keis has been doing a good job, “every mayor and supervisor needs to be watched.” Keis replied that he and the board have worked hard to reduce the effective tax rate over several years to where it is now (4.75 percent) and he does not expect to increase it any time soon. However, he also noted that it is going to take Mansfield several more years to recover from the highway barn fire, so he doesn’t expect to be able to reduce the rate any further this year. At the end of the meeting, Keis asked Mansfield resident Don Telaak, who attended the meeting for informational purposes, if he had any questions. Telaak said that he believed everyone involved with Mansfield government works hard at their jobs and has the town’s best interests in mind. He then asked several questions of Highway Superintendent Brad Hurley regarding costs for road repairs and resurfacing. Hurley cited some estimated figures and went on to explain some of the department’s processes and budget limitations. Hurley commented that the “fire’s going to hurt the town for a long while,” and until there is more funding for the department, he will have to do the best he can with what he has. The next meeting of the Mansfield Board has been moved up a week to Monday, Feb. 10. Beginning in March, meetings will go back to their normal schedule of the third Monday of the month.

Olympic Team Continued from Front Page

1 track and field athlete for the University at Buffalo. I guess they liked what they saw, because I was invited for a tryout. It was sprints and jumps, two things that I’ve always excelled at, so I did really well. I was then invited to Lake Placid, where there were more tests and they actually had us slide on the track. After that week, I was extended the offer to become a developmental athlete, which I gladly accepted.” Abbey spent three years with the Olympic Development Team starting in 2007, culminating with an appearance at Olympic Trials for the 2010 Winter Games. “Although three years seems like a long time, the Olympians you’ll see in Sochi have been sliding for over a decade,” Abbey said. He also pointed out that two of the athletes making an appearance in the Olympics were his one-time roommates. This period involved a demanding schedule for Abbey and included a lot of travel. “During this time, I spent two- to three-week stints living at the Olympic Training Center in Lake Placid. I’d routinely have to travel back to Virginia to throw fundraisers and train (personal training) clients as skeleton was costing me $12-$15,000 a year,” Abbey explained. “As Americans, we love the Olympics, but I think we often fail to realize the

Tom Abbey, originally from East Arcade, now lives in northern Virginia with his wife and son.

monetary toll it takes on those who are truly giving everything to represent their country.” Abbey urges fans to support local Olympians. “Money is the biggest reason we end up retiring,” he said. “If you have local athletes with big dreams, please reach out to them. Whether it is a tax deductible donation or a sandwich, they will be very grateful!” These days, Abbey has traded in his life as a skeleton competitor for growing his personal training business and family life. “I didn’t race after the Olympic Trials for the Vancouver Games in 2010,” Abbey said. “I’d progressed quite fast over my first threeplus years in the sport, but I

ECS Basketball vs. Catt/LV • photos by Deb Golley

was feeling torn. My girlfriend and I had recently purchased a home and I’d starting working on the creation of my current business, Functional Fitness VA. I spent the rest of that season watching my teammates compete and trying to see if I’d miss it.” He didn’t, and he hasn’t regretted his decision to leave the sport in pursuit of his other dreams. “Skeleton is a wonderful sport, which I will love forever. But, I left at the right time. I am completely in love with my growing family and my business is thriving,” he said. Tune in to the Olympic skeleton events scheduled for Feb. 12, 14 and 15. The fastpaced action won’t disappoint!

Sales Support/Receptionist Position Available at ERA Team VP Real Estate The sales support/receptionist is responsible for greeting clients in person and on the telephone, while providing general office and agent support. He or she is a first contact for clients and must convey a positive and professional attitude over the phone and in person. A focus on providing excellent service and follow through is essential. Must be available for scheduled evening and weekend hours. Apply in person with Todd VanDyke ERA Team VP Real Estate, 12 Washington Street, Ellicottville.

WNY Equifest Continued from Front Page

Last year, Pearles was invited by the WNY Horse Council to give a demonstration at their third annual WNY EquiFest 2014, held at The Fairgrounds in Hamburg, N.Y. EquiFest is a one-day event that covers just about everything horse related. This year’s event, on March 16, 2014, will include many local vendors and riders giving clinics on various topics. Everything from body clipping, colt starting, cowboy mounted shooting, dressage, equine massage, lower limb anatomy and hoof function, polo, and reining will be covered. Youth/interscholastic equestrian competitions will also be presented, along with many more topics. There is no charge to attend the event, held at the Showplex on the Hamburg Fairgrounds from 9 a.m.– 5 p.m. Pearles was invited back to EquiFest this year and will be giving a 50-minute talk on lateral flexion. For those who don’t ride horses, think of it as a type of aerobic/yoga/ stretching exercise that you might do before going for a walk, run, bicycle ride or a run down Mardi Gras or Yodeler. Pearles believes that learning to communicate with an equine partner “is a philosophy — not a quick judgment — and a learning process.” Having attended many clinics by some of the top horse people in the country, she feels she is on the path to learning. “Embrace the knowledge and share what you know,” are just some of her favorite “isms” from her mentors. “John Lyons, Pat Parelli,

Local equestrian Gail Pearles and her Percheron/ Thoroughbred horse Thunder will be presenting a demonstration at WNY Equifest on March 16, held at the Hamburg Fairgrounds.

Leslie Desmond, Tom Dorrance, Ray Hunt and Buck Brannaman all ‘encourage the learning path — to be informed,‘” said Pearles. Her hope is to convey a captivating and interesting 50 minutes at EquiFest with her horse, Thunder, an 11-yearold Percheron/Thoroughbred cross. The WNY EquiFest is an event of the NYS Horse Council, Western Chapter. Over 100 vendors are scheduled for the March 16 event, including everything “from trailers and trucks, to fine handmade chocolates, equine wear by The Harness Shop, Creekside Saddlery, Statecoach West, LaScala Originals, and So Vain Clothing.” According to Barb Cunningham, one of the three founders of EquiFest, “People

come from all over to attend this event, and it is growing every year. Last years’ attendance was over 5,000 people, and we expect more this year. We are even considering going to a two-day event in the future.” Cunningham said, “We have the Family Fun Corral again this year, for the younger audience to make stick horses, get their faces painted, and many other fun events.” Cunningham credits her co-founders Debbie Huckle and Mary Szarek, along with other members of the Horse Council board, for the success of EquiFest. For more information, check back often with the Ellicottville Times for updated articles, or follow the NYS Horse Council’s Facebook page (Western-Chapter-NewYork-State-Horse-Council).

STW Local Foods Continued from Front Page

of its nutritional performance,” said Kim LaMendola, the program’s manager. The guide, called “From the Ground Up: Local Food in Chautauqua, Cattaraugus and Allegany Counties,” is intended to help people find the freshest vegetables, fruits, herbs, meats, dairy, eggs, honey, etc., along with products made from these fresh items such as jams, pickles, smoked meats, cheeses, sauces, maple products and baked goods. The 17 recognized farmers markets in the region (defined as those with three or more producers on-site), along with an ever-growing list of individual farmers and producers (more than 200 to date) will be included, as will maps and a Trip Planner to help consumers plot their

shopping trips. Profiles of featured producers will provide background on individual farms. The new guide is part of the Local Foods Program’s effort to “demonstrate the nutritional, economical and environmental benefits of consuming locally grown produce and locally made goods.” It is supported by grants from the federal Appalachian Regional Commission, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the New York State Department of Agriculture & Markets and other sources. LaMendola notes that, based on findings of a consumer survey conducted last spring, people want to purchase from local suppliers and are willing to travel for it. As a result, she sees the project as a benefit not

just for local producers and consumers, but also for the entire region in relation to its role in increasing tourism and economic development. Thenew guide will go live in April and will be updated at least twice a year. Producers who would like to be included in the directory can go to www. freshlocalwny.org and click the link for Farmer/ Producer Directory Listing to add information about their business and food products at any time. LaMendola also can mail you a print version of the Farmer/Producer Directory Listing form if access to the online form is unavailable. For more information, contact her at (716) 9455301 or email klamendola@ southerntierwest.org.


Ellicottville Times

Page 12 (716) 699-4062

Classified Ads $7 for 30 words or less!

56 Waverly St Springville, NY www.SpringvilleDoorAndWindow.com

716-592-9803 Quality 1st!

Fax 716-592-5644 Sales • Service • Professional Installation

Interior Finishing

Tom Clauss • 716-949-9155 PO Box 1788 • Ellicottville

Painting

Drywall & Plaster Small Damage Repairs

Over 15 years working in Ellicottville

Classified Ads

For Sale Beach front year round Lake Erie vacation home. Port Colborne, ON (+ - 1 hr GTA). Main house 3 BR with2BR guest house. Well maintained, private road, many updates. Details search Craigslist “Niagara--housing” or call 716-694-4574 or 873-9406. For Rent One Bedroom plus sitting room, great room w/ fireplace, all new appliances & cabinets. $625 per month, 2 miles from Holiday Valley. Call 675-3000.

For Rent Large remodeled cabin, two fireplaces, fully equipped kitchen, 1 1/2 baths, 3 bedrooms, sleeps 17. Five minutes to Eville. Call Paul 716445-6875 or Stan 716-597-6330. Baked Goods Every Friday, Saturday & Sunday. Home made pies, cinnamon rolls, sticky buns, breads, cookies & more. Di’s Pies and Bake Shop. Stop at the Red Farm Shop next to Pumpkinville. To order ahead, call 699-2994. Open 7AM - 9PM daily. 4830 Sugartown Rd., Great Valley, NY. For Sale at The Edge Salon Mirabella offers premium mineral cosmetics, now found locally at The Edge Salon, 13 Monroe St., Ellicottville. Skin tint creme, conceal, pure press powder, gel mascara, over 40 eye colours, eye definer, lip color, and more. Call 699-2226.

59 W. Main Street, Allegany NY

716-373-2328 716-373-2328

Commercial • Residential Sales • Service • Installation •Home Theatre / Audio - Video •LCD - Projection TV Installation •DIRECTV TV •Dish Network - Bell Canada •Exede Satellite Internet •Networking •Commercial Sound & Video Systems •Surveillance Camera Systems •Car Stereo - Remote Car Starters •Television / Electronics Repair Dept.

Since 1975 - Benefit from Our Experience! If you have an event for our community calendar please email jennie@ ellicottvilletimes.com, or call 716-699-4062. Thank you.

January 25-26 Olean Area Sports and Outdoor Show 2014 Held at Good Times of Olean 800R East State Street, Olean. http://OleanNY.com/SportsShow

January 26 Tell a Friend Tour The Line Skis Traveling Circus comes to Holiday Valley featuring freeride skiers Andy Parry, Ian Compton and friends. www.holidayvalley.com January 28 ECS Board Meeting 7:30 pm - high school library February 7 Harpeth Rising at Springville Center for the Arts www.springvillearts.org February 7 Seneca Allegany Casino presents AMSOIL Championship Snocross Series 2014 www.senecaalleganycasino.com

Ellicottville Memorial Library

Open Daily 10 am – 5 pm • Tues. /Wed. until 8 pm Closed Sunday www.evml.org •

716-699-2842

February 8 Adaptive Ski Race at HoliMont www.holimont.com February 9 Aspire Ski the Valley Skiing, tubing, banquet and raffle to benefit children and adults with disabilities. www.holidayvalley.com February 10-11 Your Turn Women’s Ski Clinic at Holiday Valley Led by Lisa Densmore, a widely acclaimed coach, instructor and ski racer. www.holidayvalley.com February 15 Boarding for Breast Cancer at Holiday Valley 2014 A fun day in the parks to raise awareness of breast cancer. Special park clinic for women, pink ticket fundraiser, demos, rail jam and more. www.holidayvalley.com February 15 Moonlight Snowshoe Tour at Griffis Sculpture Park 5-8 p.m. Includes snowshoes, chili, live music and fun! Tickets $50. Call 667-2808. February 16 2014 Art Roscoe Loppet Classic Cross Country Skiing www.heartrateup.com

Movie Night – “Despicable Me 2” will be shown on the large projector screen in the Community Room of the library on Friday, Jan. 24 at 6:30 p.m. Come join us for a family-friendly evening where admission, popcorn and a drink are all free! This movie is rated PG. Book Club - meets

Call the Ellicottville Times at 716-699-4062 or email jennie@EllicottvilleTimes.com

Tom Chapman 716-699-2832 or 716-474-6848 cell

Chapman’s Electrical Service Residential • Commercial • Industrial Wiring Electrical Motor Service Bucket Truck Line Service

V

7113 Kent Road, Ellicottville NY

AIL HARDWARE Plumbing • Heating • Installation Repair • Hardware • Gifts

• • • • •

Canning Supplies Bird Feeders & Seed Large Smart-$-Section Color Match Paint Dept. Housewares

Unbeatable Prices • Locally Owned More Than 10,000 Sq.Yards in-Stock

Carpet & Vinyl Ceramic Tile Laminate Flooring Hardwood

611 W. State St., Olean NY www.carpetxpress.net 716.373.5391

Mon.-Thurs. 9a.m. - 5:30p.m. • Fri. 9a.m. - 8p.m. • Sat. 10a.m. - 3p.m.

Evl Tech Simplify Technology

699-2564 $75.00 a cord $25.00 delivery up to 15 miles from Ellicottville $1.00 per mile over 15 miles

February 17 ECS Sports Booster Meeting 7-8 pm - high school cafeteria February 20 Lend Me a Tenor at Springville Center for the Arts www.springvillearts.org February 22 Holiday Valley’s 2014 Penguin Paddle Participants slide down the slope on their belly “penguin style” in a stylish garbage bag. This event raises money for equipment for the Lounsbury Adaptive Ski Program www.holidayvalley.com February 22-23 Sportsman’s Show at Seneca Allegany Events Center www.yorkpennshows.com/ February 28 Holiday Valley’s Telestock Day 2014 Join with friends from the City Garage for telemark demo equipment, clinics and a cookout at the Champagne Sundeck. www.holidayvalley.com March 1-2 Trappers Special Dog Sled Races at Allegany State Park Sled dog teams fcompete on the parks snow covered trails. Quaker Area, Camp Turner.

March 6 Ski Day for United Way at HoliMont www.uwcattco.org March 7 Celtic Thunder Fundraiser Ellicottville Town Center 7pm Call 716-699-8758 for details and tickets March 8-9 Mardi Gras Weekend March 16 WNY EquiFest Western New York’s premier equine expo and equestrian gathering. www.wnyequifest.com March 20-23 Plantasia WNYs Premier Garden and Landscape Show www.plantasiany.com March 22 Holiday Valley’s Spring Pond Skimming Party 2014 Who wouldn’t want to race down a ski slope into an icy pond? Whether you get wet or just watch, it is FUN ! www.holidayvalley.com April 11-13 Greater Olean Area Home Show 716-372-4433

the 2nd Wednesday of the month at 1:30 p.m. The Feb. 12 book is “And the Mountains Echoed” by Khaled Hosseini. Contact Bev Webster at 945-4089 for more information. New members are always welcome to join this relaxed and informal group! Rare Book Sale – Looking for a special book for the reader in your family? Come check out our rare book sale. Books are priced $5.00 to $40.00 with values researched from $20.00 to $300.00!

Story time is every Wednesday at 11:15 a.m.

www.evml.org – check out our website for more information on new arrivals of books, coming events and classes, and browse the system catalog for books, eBooks and movies.

716.699.4065

kevin@evltech.com www.evltech.com

7684 Toad Hollow Road • Little Valley, NY

FIREWOOD Ideal Tool System LLC Larry Johnson

Kevin Whited Computer Services

Computer or Networking problems? PC / MAC & Networking Weekdays after 5 pm/Weekends

Registered HEAP vendor

24-Hour Emergency Heating & Plumbing Service 938-6681

Mon - Sat 8am - 5pm • Sun 10am - 2pm 104 Main Street, Little Valley • 938-6681

Help Wanted Tamarack Night Auditor Part Time 11pm to 7am, Job skills: organized, self motivated, reliable, trustworthy, computer savvy and good with money, independent worker. Apply at Tamarack at Holiday Valley, 716-699-7000.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR A Calendar of Events for Ellicottville and the Surrounding Communities January 25 Harley-Day Valley 2014 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Join in the fun at the biggest biker party of the winter with Gowanda Harley Davidson being held at Holiday Valley. www.gowandaharley.com

January 24-30, 2014

For Sale or Rent. 7262 Poverty Hill Rd, Ellicottville. 4 bedrooms, 2 bath house and 14 acres. Outrageous renovation with cathedral ceilings, cedar siding, natural wood. Large LR, DR, and kitchen. First floor laundry. Freshly painted, with new LR carpet. 229K. Will consider partial owner financing or cash discount. Rental includes entire house, less 1 bedroom/bath which has separate entrance. Easily sleeps 8. $350/night, minimum 2 nights, short-term rentals only. 716-574-3179 or brucefrombuffalo@aol.com.

For Rent Studio condo at Wildflower. Ground floor. Patio. WBF, stereo, cable TV. Free shuttle to the Valley. Sleeps 4. Dec--Apr. $3K + electric. Everything you need. Call Jack at 945-228 3 or jcluzier@ gmail.com.

The Sound Track

www.EllicottvilleTimes.com

The most competitive rates in your target markets.

Ellicottville Times 716-699-4062 • jennie@EllicottvilleTimes.com

Religious Services Holy Name Of Mary RC Church, Ellicottville 20-22 Jefferson St., 699-2592 Sat. Vigil Mass 4pm & 5:30pm Sun. Holy Mass 8am &10:30am St. John’s Episcopal Church, Ellicottville Washington and Jefferson Sts. 945-1820 Services 5pm Sat St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Ellicottville 6360 Rt. 219 East, 699-2265 Worship Sat 5pm, Sun 10:30am Sun Sch. & Adult Bible Study 9am United Church, Ellicottville Elizabeth and Elk Sts. 699-4003 Sun Sch, begins in Sept Worship, 11am First Baptist Church, Great Valley 5049 Rt.219, 945-4629 Sun Sch. 9:30am Worship 10:45am & 6:30pm

Local Community Meetings All meetings are at 7:00 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Ashford (2nd Tuesday) February 11

Cattaraugus Village (2nd Monday) February 10

East Otto (2nd Tuesday) February 11

Ellicottville Town (3rd Wed) February 19, 6pm

United Methodist Church, Great Valley 5242 Rt. 219, 945-4375 Sun Sch. 10am, Worship 11am Solomon’s Porch Ministries, Mansfield 7705 Toad Hollow Rd, 257-9138 Sat 7pm, Sun 10am Grace Bible Baptist, Mansfield 7968 Reed Hill Rd 257-3645 Sun Sch 10am, Sun Worship 11:0am & 6pm Wed Bible study/prayer srv 7pm

Ellicottville Village (2nd Mon) February 10, 6pm

Great Valley (2nd Monday) February 10

Humphrey (2nd Monday) February 10

Little Valley Town (2nd Monday) February 10

Little Valley Village (2nd Tuesday) February 11

Mansfield February 10

A

B

C

THINK SNOW! A

B

C

Otto (3rd Tuesday) February 18

Salamanca City (2nd Wednesday) February 12

Salamanca Town (2nd Tuesday) February 11


January 24-30, 2014

Ellicottville Times

www.EllicottvilleTimes.com

JIM PIERCE, Licensed Agent

(716) 699.4062 Page 13

Lunch Specials:

“Buying or Selling? Need to Know... Call Jimmy Joe”

-Cooked Roast Beef -Smoked Pulled Pork

O ce 716.699.3954 Offi Cell 716.904.0394 jpierce@holidayvalley.com jp realestate@holidayvalley.com rea

38 Washington Street • Ellicottville NY

Toll-Free 877.699.6329 www.domsbutcherblock.com

Route 219 at Wildflower P.O. Box 1818, Ellicottville, NY 14731

Buy 10 bottles of olive oils or vinegars Get One FREE!

Olive Oils, Vinegars & More

Pick up our Famous Beef Jerky & Beef Sticks perfect for skiing, riding, and hiking snacks!

716-699-5847 • mollystravel@msn.com

699-6328

Personal Service Before, During and After Your Vacation that the Internet Doesn’t Provide.

30 Years Experience

Open Thurs - Sun Noon - 5pm

42 Mill Street Ellicottville

Barbara arbara Fox Studio • 716.6 716.699.4145 99.4145 Watercolors • Oil P Paintings, Trevor Brachman Jewelry Jewelry, Handspun & Natural Dyed Fiber, Weavings

We Sell Poulan PRO Snowblowers and Generators

By Jocelyn Williams, ’13

We service everything we sell and other small engine power equipment too!

SCOTT’S

Retail Sales & Services 2645 Route 16 North Olean, NY

716-372-6916

w www.scottslandscape.com

Girls on the Run Inspires Young Girls to be Their Best Sign Up by Feb. 1 to Start a Program By Alicia Dziak

Do you know a girl currently in third through eighth grade who would benefit from a program that aims to educate and prepare girls for a lifetime of self-respect and healthy living? If so, starting a Girls on the Run (GOTR) program may be a decision that will create lifelong memories and positive habits for her and for you! GOTR is a program for girls in grades 3–8 that combines training for a 5K running event with healthy living education. The program is broken down into Girls on the Run (grades 3–5) and Girls on Track (grades 6–8). The mission of GOTR is to instill self-esteem through health education, life skills development, mentoring relationships, and physical training — all of which are accomplished through an active collaboration with girls and their parents, schools, volunteers, staff and the community. The Buffalo Council was started in 2010 by Katie Joyce and her “running buddy” Meghan Cavanaugh, who had heard about the success of Girls on the Run from friends and family living in other states around the country. “I wanted to start a program at my daughter’s school, but since there was no council yet in Western New York, we had to start that first,” Joyce said. The two friends went through the lengthy process of establishing the Buffalo Girls on the Run Council and started with only three schools. Today,

it has expanded to well over 50 schools in Western New York. “Word is starting to spread about this wonderful program, and we would love to expand to more schools in Cattaraugus County!” she said. New schools already signed up to participate this spring are Cattaraugus-Little Valley Middle School, Springville Middle School and Olean City School District. It’s not too late to start a program at your school! Feb. 1 is the deadline for a new site. “You don’t need to be a runner to coach, just need a willingness to work with young girls,” Joyce emphasized. To prepare coaches, they are also required to attend special training in March. Coaches can be teachers, parents or community members. The days you offer the program are flexible as well. “Coaches can choose any two days for their program as

St. Bonaventure Alumna to Appear on ‘Ellen DeGeneres Show’ This Month

long as they are not two days in a row to allow the girls a day between running,” explained Joyce. “This spring, the season begins on March 24 and ends with the 5K on June 8 at UB’s North Campus.” The 5K event is not a competition among runners, but emphasizes each girl doing the best that they can do personally. Each girl receives a medal as she crosses the finish line, and the overwhelming look of pride and accomplishment on each girl’s face is very apparent. “I had a great experience in Girls on the Run, because it gave me a good workout and I had fun,” said Marie Emerling, 10, of Springville, who participated in GOTR in the fall. “It taught me a lot, too, like how to deal with bullying and how to be a good friend.” For more information on starting a GOTR program, visit www.gotrbuffalo.org.

A playful post on Facebook has earned Liz D’Onofrio, a 2010 alumna of St. Bonaventure University, a trip to Los Angeles next week to appear on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show.” D’Onofrio was in a stairwell at her internship last fall when DeGeneres, host of the popular daytime talk show, called D’Onofrio’s cell phone and asked her to visit. The conversation took place live on the show in front of a studio audience. “I was at my internship at The Children’s Room, which is a nonprofit that offers support groups to grieving children and their families,” D’Onofrio said. “I had just finished with a group of parents. I turned my phone on and saw that I had missed a call from L.A. I figured that it was the producer calling but they didn’t leave a voicemail, which made me wonder if it was actually Ellen.” Two minutes after she had turned her phone back on, a call came again from the same number. “I had a feeling that this was something big, so I sort of backed myself into a stairwell and answered the phone tentatively. I heard Ellen say, ‘Liz?’ “I said, ‘Yes?’ “She said, ‘Hey, do you know who this is?’ “At that point, I sort of knew because her voice is really unmistakable. But I was in total shock, so I said I didn’t know. When she said it was Ellen DeGeneres, I heard an audience laughing and clapping in the background, and that’s when I realized that she was calling me live from a taping of the show.” D’Onofrio elaborated, explaining how it all began. “Back in July, I was sitting in the school library when I received a call from an unknown number,” she said. “For some reason, it made me think about how Ellen sometimes ‘cold calls’ people who are fans of the show. I knew it wasn’t her, but I updated my Facebook status to say that I really wished she would call me. One of my friends suggested that I send my status to the show, just for kicks – so I did! The show’s

Liz D’Onofrio, a St. Bonaventure University alumna, to appear on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show”.

website has a page where you can submit funny Facebook statuses or comments that people make, so I sent in my status and just kind of forgot about it.” On Oct. 27, D’Onofrio saw that she had a missed call from Los Angeles. “I didn’t answer it because I don’t know anyone from LA, but I realized that they had been calling me for three or four days,” she said. “This time, they left a voicemail. It was a woman named Carrie who worked for the show. She wanted me to call her back, and when I did, she said that they received my submission and thought it was sort of unique and funny. They wanted to follow up with me. “For the next few weeks, I got a few phone calls from Carrie. She basically just interviewed me, learned about what I was doing, where I was living and what I was studying, etc. Then, in November, I got patched through to a producer who asked me some similar questions. They never told me that Ellen would call, only that they would be in touch if they wanted to pursue it further.” D’Onofrio started contacting her parents, siblings, and friends after receiving the call from DeGeneres. “It was a very manic and crazy couple of hours because I also put it on Facebook and

people were just going nuts,” she said. D’Onofrio was scheduled to fly to Los Angeles with her friend, Bri — the first person she called about this — on Wednesday, Jan. 22. and attend the taping on Thursday, Jan. 23. She said the show will most likely air three or four days afterwards. D’Onofrio shared her thoughts on how this event has impacted her and what might happen as a result of her appearance on the show. “I think that I’m happy enough just to have this opportunity to fly out and meet her. If she decides to make a donation to The Children’s Room, it will be an even bigger blessing,” she said. D’Onofrio can’t say enough good things about DeGeneres. “I just think it’s cool that someone normal can get the attention of such a major celebrity,” she said. “The great thing about Ellen is that she celebrates the things that normal people do and she affirms people for just being who they are. She’s just so warm, uplifting and encouraging. She shares a message of love and kindness that we don’t get to see that much on TV, so I’m just thrilled to be a part of that message.” D’Onofrio earned a bachelor’s degree in theology and was a resident assistant while attending the university. D’Onofrio is originally from Montrose, N.Y., but now lives outside Boston while attending graduate school at Boston College in pursuit of a dual master’s degree in pastoral ministry and social work. You can view the video clip of Liz’s phone call with DeGeneres at http:// www.youtube.com/ watch?v=pz2g3tzGZIA.

Random Facts: Did You Know?

Girls on the Run participants dress up for the season-ending 5k and cheer each other on before the race.

Riglet Park Scenes Photos by Tim Alianello

The 2014 Winter Olympics officially begin at the opening ceremonies on Friday, Feb. 7, 2014, in Sochi, Russia, with winter sports competitions taking place for two weeks thereafter. The games wrap up with the evening closing ceremonies scheduled for Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014.


Ellicottville Times

Page 14 (716) 699.4062

Shop LOCAL!

Joany Klopp Bund, GRI Associate Broker Sales Manager

Notary

Office: 716-699-3945 Cell: 716-969-2156 Email:

Ellicottville is full of boutique and sporting good shops, charming restaurants and cafe’s, cozy places to stay, and professional real estate experts to help you find that perfect place!

jkbund@holidayvalley.com jkb

www.EllicottvilleTimes.com

January 24-30, 2014

THE DILLON TEAM

CHRISTY WISER

TINA DILLON, GRI

Licensed Real Estate Agent

Licensed Real Estate Agent

716-474-7862 Cell

716-474-5646 Cell

christy.wiser@era.com

716-699-4800 Ext 122 Work tdillon@ellicottville.com tinadillon.net

MLS#B433991

MLS#B430707

Route 219 at Wildflower PO Box 1818, Ellicottville, NY 14731 visit: holidayvalleyrealestate.com

NOW Open! with over 225 Gourmet Cheeses

Christy Wiser

ERA

NEW PRICE! Move right in to this furnished 3 bedroom, 2 bath townhouse at the base of the slopes. Corner fireplace, ski room, deck.

Customized Cheese Tray Service available

EVL EV L Ch Chee Cheese eese ee se C Company ompa om pany pa ny N NOW OW O OPEN! PEN! PE N! 5 Washington St. - next to Kwik Fill - in Ellicottville Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Daily • 716-699-1065

Chilled Wine

Real Estate

MLS#B424527

MLS#B423441

END UNIT! Spectacular slope views in this totally remodeled 3+ bedroom, 3 bath end unit. Family features 2nd fireplace. Call Today! .

6 Greer Hill, Ellicottville $1,200,000 CUSTOM BUILT! Mere steps to the slopes from this custom built 5+ bedroom, 4-1/2 bath log home. Rear patio w/ hot tub. Attached garage.

NEW PRICE! Enjoy the slope views in this remodeled & furnished 3 bedroom, 2 bath end unit. Corner fireplace, 2 decks, family room.

6884 Stone Road, Great Valley $229,900 2+ ACRES! Scenic wooded setting in this furnished 4+ bedroom, 2 bath chalet on 2+ acres. More land available. Near State land.

Where Do You Want To Be In the NEW YEAR?

Express your soft side this season in cozy winter accessories 25-50% Off

Sale

14 Monroe Street Ellicottville

Open Daily Sun-Thurs 10 am to 6 pm Fri-Sat 10 AM to 8 PM

699-1055 Stop in for Wine by the Glass

Sample select wines paired with gourmet chocolate bark

24 Stone Ridge, Ellicottville $309,900

MLS#B423797

101 Fox Ridge, Ellicottville $279,900

Wine & Chocolate Pairings and Wine Tastings Daily OPEN DAILY

Tina Dillon

13 Creekside, Ellicottville $239,900

Wine makes a Great Gift! www.WineryOfEllicottville.com

Help Build the EllicottvilleGreat Valley Trail

26 Monroe St. Ellicottville 716-699-2128

Ellicottville and Great Valley will have a new off-road, multiuse trail in the next few years, creating an easy way to access local businesses, schools, the library, government offices, parks, area resorts and other destinations.

EV

GV TRAIL

g g Elli

cottv

©

g NY ille - Great Valley ‡

Please consider making a tax-deductible donation! Donations can be made online at: www.cattfoundation.org, or mail your check payable to: Community Foundation/ Ellicottville-Great Valley Trail Fund c/o Catt. Region Community Foundation 120 N. Union St., Olean NY 14760

MERCHANDISE AVAILABLE! available at:

25 Bristol Lane 699-4062

30 Washington St 699-BIKE

5 Monroe St 699-2054

For more information: Visit and “like” the trail’s Facebook page (Facebook.com/EVLTrail) Call Jennie Acklin at (716) 699-4062 • Call Trail Chairman Ken Hinman at (716) 474-8214

“We’ve got gas!”

Propane Delivery Guradian Home Stand-by Generators • Tankless Water Heaters • Space Heaters • Air Conditioners • Heat Pumps • Outdoor Grilling • Fireplaces Gas Firepits • Patio Heaters

Cathy Pritchard & Melanie Pritchard

Lic. Assoc. R.E. Brokers ERA Team VP Real Estate 12 Washington St., Ellicottville, NY Cathy: (716) 983-4234 Melanie: (716) 480-8409 Office: (716) 699-4800 www.teampritchard.com Scan this image with your smart phone to see ALL of our listings!

We’re Open! Our New Branch is Now Open on Bristol Lane. Take Fillmore Drive off Rte 219.

Call Ryan at (716) 592-7242 or (800) 640-0370

Holland Propane. A Family Run Business in the Heart of Ski Country.

Prepare for Winter Weather Now! Our business sells and installs quality space heaters, fireplaces and water heaters from companies like Monessen, Napoleon, Rinnai Modine, Bradford, Generac and Weber. We stock motor and hydraulic oils, methanol and racing gas. Patio heaters and gas fire pits are also available. Ryan, Rob and Kim, and Mick and Molly Holland, as well as our dedicated staff – Wes

The Holland kids

Sabin (16 years) and Sharon Dietrick (12 years) and Dave – have been committed to serving your family with reliable service, quality brands and competitive pricing. Consider a Guardian Home Stand-by Generator and be prepared for stormy weather! Are you signed up for our Budget Program? We have Auto propane delivery for cost savings options.

M &M Holland Propane • 10035 Route 219 • Springville, NY 14141

Visit our website for our latest low rates on Auto and Home Equity Loans! www.ccseonline.com

Want to become a credit union member so you can take advantage of all CCSE offers? Visit www.ccsonline.com/ membership or contact our office at (716) 945-5340. 37 Bristol Lane, Ellicottville, NY (716) 699-1004 417 Broad St. • Salamanca, NY (716) 945-5340 • Fax (716) 945-5351 loans@ccseonline.com Federally Insured by NCUA


Ellicottvilletimesr1 24 14  

Ellicottville, holiday valley, holimont, Acklin, GinMill, Entertainment, EVLTrail, Allegany State Park, Arboretum, moriarty, Tips Up Cafe,...