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MAY 24-30, 2019

VOLUME 4 ISSUE 21

CAR. TR. MKTG MAIL US POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 244 BRADFORD, PA

L I L V E G SP RIN TIMES

The official newspaper of the Town of Concord, and the Village of Springville. Serving Springville, the surrounding communities and Springville-Griffith Institute Central Schools

Honor our fallen heroes this Memorial Day By Kellen M. Quigley Memorial Day weekend marks the unofficial start to the summer, many times involving family picnics, great shopping deals and a day off. Before you pull out those white pants and head to the mall, take a few moments to reflect on the true reason for this holiday: remembrance. This weekend, make sure your American flag is flying, immerse yourself in patriotism and take a few moments to reflect on the lives that have been lost and the freedoms we all enjoy. Springville’s annual Memorial Day Parade is scheduled for Monday, May 28. The parade will form on South Buffalo Street by the log cabin and Veteran’s Park at 9:45 a.m.

and will proceed north on Buffalo Street at 10 a.m. to Main Street and turn on West Main Street to Maplewood Cemetery. In Gowanda, the Legion will also host a free breakfast for veterans from 7 to 9 a.m., which is also when the lineup will take place for the 20th annual Ride to Remember. A rider meeting will be held at 9 a.m. along with a moment of remembrance. Kickstands up at 9:15 a.m.; the ride starts at the Gowanda American Legion Post and will travel through Collins to Springville and up Route 240 to Sprague Brook Park in Glenwood, where a ceremony will be held at 11 a.m. The ceremony will commence with placement of the colors by the AMVETS Post 219 Honor

Guard at 11 a.m. It is suggested that people gather at the Memorial Grove prior to 10:30 a.m., at which time many motorcycle riders will arrive from the American Legion in East Aurora and the American Legion in

Gowanda. Gowanda HarleyDavidson will host their Ride to Remember event in conjunction with the ceremony, beginning at the American Legion Post #409 and 100 Legion Dr. in Gowanda. Veterans

can enjoy a free breakfast before heading to Sprague Brook. Beginning at the entrance of the park and leading to the Memorial Grove, the road will be lined on either side with over 1,000 American Flags

placed by the committee on Sunday prior to the ceremony. As they make their way to the Memorial Grove, attendees will pass beneath a giant American Flag. To honor those Erie County citizens who were killed in the Vietnam conflict, the ceremony will be held in front of the wall where their names are engraved. The solemn ceremony will honor all U.S. Citizens who gave their lives in service to our country. Many years ago, the trees that are on either side of the grove were planted, one for each Vietnam Veteran from Erie County who gave their lives for us, by Schichtel’s Nursery, Inc. As the holiday weekend unfolds, remember our fallen heroes.

Concord Town Board addresses issues at Trevett, Groth roads By Kellen M. Quigley There was much discussion at the May 9 meeting of the Concord Town Board concerning the closure of Trevett and Groth roads due to undriveable conditions. The board unanimously authorized Town Supervisor Clyde Drake to send a letter to the Erie County DPW Commissioner regarding the recent deterioration of

Groth Road, “making travel treacherous for emergency vehicles, school buses and the general public.” The board also authorized Drake to send a second letter that would point out the “continued negligence to re-open south Trevett Road at the closed section just north of Zoar Valley Road.” Supervisor Drake said that the letters would put the county on notice, which

is the only legal step the town has available at this time. “I’ve been down there and Trevett Road hasn’t moved,” said Council member Phil Drozd, who was a senior highway engineer for 15 years with Erie County, spending much of his time in area covering the town of Concord. “In the four years that I’ve been gone, that’s four

Make way for the bands

Photo by Kellen M. Quigley The Springville-Griffith Middle School marching band leads the way down East Main Street during the 57th annual Pageant of the Bands Saturday in Springville. The Springville middle and high school bands were among 18 different schools who participated in the annual two-day musical celebration. More Photos on Pg 6.

ck

a B k o o L A

Looking back to when we gathered flowers to lay on the graves of our loved ones who had died during a battle. From the Revolutionary War, Civil War and Spanish American War to the two World Wars, the Korean War, Vietnam War and beyond, we lay flowers on their graves to remember them. Memorial Day is for those who died while in Military Service. But how did it all get started? General John A. Logan called for a nationwide

By Jolene Hawkins day of generations will be able to look backward in remembrance. gratitude to those who “The 30th of gave their lives in the May, 1868, is designated defense of the liberties for the purpose of and privileges which strewing flowers or they are enjoying now. otherwise decorating In 1883, here in the graves of comrades Springville, the GAR who died in defense of auxiliary, the Women’s their country during the Relief Corp requested late rebellion, and whose flowers from ladies in bodies now lie in almost the village so they could every city, village and make arrangements and hamlet churchyard in the wreaths to be laid on land,” he proclaimed. the graves of the fallen The date of Decoration veterans and nurses who Day, as he called it, was died during and since the chosen because it was Civil War. The Women’s not the anniversary of Relief Corp is still active any particular battle. We and still makes wreaths want to remember them, to be laid on the graves he said. Not a man is to of the veterans. be forgotten, the officers By 1901, the parade have been written about route had grown to and statues of them put include the Soldier’s up so that the succeeding Monument, which

years that realistically nothing much has happened down here,” he said. “I fixed that exact same spot twice… it just needs constant maintenance down there.” Drozd said he is ashamed of the condition of the road now. He said the crew employees who worked under him are ashamed of the condition, too. During the pubic discussion portion of the meeting, County Legislator John Mills reported on the roads and infrastructure in the Concord area, noting that the roads the county is responsible for are in rough shape. Mills said that several roads in the town are scheduled to be worked on this summer, according to tony Scolese, the highway department engineer at the East Concord site. These roads would include Abbott Hill Road, Brown Hill Road, Emerling Road and South Vaughn Street. A bridge replacement is also scheduled for Trevett Road at Route 39. According to Mills, the county is working on opening Trevett Road back up soon after a closure last year due to heavy washout. “Heavy duty patching” is also lined up for Zoar Valley Road.

Photo by Kellen M. Quigley Trevett Road in the town of Concord has been closed for several months now, and the detour around it from Route 39 to Zoar Valley Road has emergency responders worried that the failure to fix the road may lose someone their life.

“I’ve been trying to get the state to work with us and the federal government to work with us,” Mills said. “To do that road right, it would cost $22 million dollars. … We have people from all over the country and sometimes the world visit that pristine area. Don’t you think it’s common sense to have a good road to get there?” Firemen Steve Bugary and Bob Darling of the Morton Corners Fire District explained that the fire company has been having problems serving the residents in that area because of Trevett and Groth roads being closed. They said the fire company has to come into Springville and take an alternate route

around, which could take as long as 10 minutes and not save somebody in time. Mills said that he is working with the county on trying to get emergency funding for Groth Road and that the Trevett Road project is in the design stage now. Having things on the record such as petitions, calling the County Executive, flooding social media — “be the squeaky wheel” — is the way to help get something done. Those who wish to submit a petition or do a writing letter campaign can do so at the Concord Town Hall with Town Clerk Darlene Schweikert or with Nancy Heath in Mill’s county office.

A Look Back:

Memorial Day

was put up in 1891. A beautiful statue of Quincy granite, that was 27 feet high and 8 feet across with a Union Soldier on top, stopping there first to decorate the monument.

They then headed up Main Street to Maplewood Cemetery where a ceremony, with a speaker, happened before they laid the wreaths and flowers on the graves, then to processed to

the GAR log cabin for a meal put on by the Women’s Relief Corp. In 1919, The American Legion was formed, with the Auxiliary being formed the following See A Look Back page 2


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SPRINGVILLE TIMES

www.SpringvilleTimes.com

May 24-30, 2019

Local

Springville Fiddle Fest returns for eighth year

This year, the Springville Country and Blue Grass Festival will feature 12 bands along with historic demonstrators, vendors, food trucks, clogging by the WNY Clogging Association and an expanded Antique Car Cruise-In. As a family-friendly event, the festival hopes to extend its appeal to children and families by featuring new and interactive events for kids. The festival starts at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 27 and runs to 6 p.m. on Franklin Street in Springville at Fiddlers Green Park, Heritage Park and the Concord Mercantile. Admission is free. “We’re thrilled to have Creek Bend and City Fiddle return to our music line-up this year and welcome the Buffalo Barn Katz to kick things off in the Jam Tent,” said Event Chairperson Debbie Hintz. “With a grant from the New York State Council of the Arts, we can

offer 12 different bands at three different venues all free to the public.” Hintz said she community support has been great, the Trading Post will be open and serving food and attendees won’t want to miss seeing the new exhibits in the Mercantile Building and the Concord Historical Museum. “It’s an exciting afternoon with three music venues and lots to see and do,” she said. “We have food vendors located throughout the festival grounds and fine restaurants on Main Street.” Car Cruise-in Coordinator, Warren Hashagen, shared the enthusiasm. “The Dash Plaques have been designed and ordered and will be given to the first 25 vehicles to register,” he said. “If anyone wants to see a Big Red Wagon on wheels, we have invited this unique vehicle to be a part of the show along with a

1940s Fire Truck. Weather permitting both vehicles will be just a couple of the antique motor vehicles at the cruise-in.” In addition to the music performances, the WNY Clogging Association will have lessons and demonstrations in the Concord Town Hall. The Fiddler’s Green Militia will once again have its popular colonial encampment in Fiddler’s Green Park along with other historic demonstrators, including a blacksmith. The ever-popular Jam Tent will be located on Franklin Street next to the Trading Post. New for 2019 the Buffalo Barn Katz will be getting the jamming started, so be sure to bring your acoustic instrument to join in on the fun under the tent. The music festival continues Springville’s musical history. Before the village was incorporated in 1834, the hamlet was

A LOOK BACK Continued from front page

year in 1920. The American Legion is 100 years old this year. In 1919, 54 soldiers wearing their khakis were in the parade, having just returned home from the war. In 1950, the Women’s Relief Corp strewed flowers on the Springville Pond for the unknown soldiers that had died and for those that lost their life at sea. In 1971, Memorial Day became an official holiday. The name was changed from Decoration Day to Memorial Day in 1967. We remember all of those that have died in the service and those that are with us still. The sacrifices that they made and the File Photo sacrifices that the families of the soldiers made, so known as Fiddlers Green we can have our freedoms because of the common and rights. area where local folks Let us honor them by performed. Now, the remembering them and green is named Fiddlers placing flowers on the Green Park, the site of the graves and passing the Springville Fiddle Fest. stories on to the next To volunteer, donate generation. You can learn or become a sponsor, more by coming down contact the Debbie Hintz to the Lucy Bensley at FiddleFest716@gmail. Center located at 23 North com or send a donation to Buffalo St., Springville, Fiddler’s Green Country on Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Bluegrass Festival, c/o Concord Historical Society, and Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and on the 23 North Buffalo St., P.O. second and fourth Sunday Box 425, Springville, NY from 2 to 4 p.m. You can 14141. For more information see go through our books we have on the shelves as “Springville Fiddle Fest” on Facebook or visit https:// well as books from the Echoes Through Time springvillefiddlefest.com/.

Civil War museum that are being stored here at the Lucy Bensley. War of the Rebellion Official Records of the Union and Confederate — all 127 volumes — and the supplements to them — all 100 of them — along with the maps and other books to be researched for that time period. We also have books for all the wars that can be researched. Talk to someone from the VFW or American Legion here in town. There are so many ways to remember what was. I recently found out that the Women’s Relief Corp is still active and raises money as well as makes wreaths for the soldiers’ graves. I joined and if anyone else out there is interested, please stop by to visit with me or send us an email at lucybensleycenter@gmail. com. You can even call us at 592-0094. Memorial Day is more than just the start of summer. Post your flags proudly. If you need to retire a flag, you can take them to the Concord American Post 431, 109 Honorary Legion Drive, or the VFW at 650 Main St. or give them to any Boy Scout troop. They all have a retirement ceremony to deposit of the used, tattered and faded flags.

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SPRINGVILLE TIMES

May 24-30, 2019

www.SpringvilleTimes.com

Page 3

Local

Voters pass SGI budget for 19-20, Kellerman and Duwe elected to school board By Kellen M. Quigley Voters approved the SpringvilleGriffith Central School District’s proposed $42.02 million spending plan for the upcoming fiscal year by a 319-176 margin. A proposal for acquisition of seven 66-seat school buses and three 16-passenger vehicles, and related equipment, also passed with a 303-175 tally. Unopposed school board candidates Jenna Kellerman, a newcomer, and incumbent Allison K. Duwe, were elected to their three-year seats after earning 366 and

Obituaries

SPRINGVILLE TIMES

Harold R. Cobo

Call 716-699-4062 to subscribe Bob and Holly Murtiff of Springville are proud to announce the graduation of their daughter, Dr. Rachel Murtiff from NECO, New England College of Optometry. Rachel completed her undergraduate studies at UB with a Bachelor’s Degree in Pharmacology and Toxicology. Rachel then studied at NECO in Boston, MA and has done her medical rotations in her field in private practice, clinics and VA hospitals in NY, MA and MI. Rachel will now serve our country’s veterans’ while completing her final residency at the Veterans’ Hospital in White River Junction, VT. Dr. Murtiff’s residency will specialize in Ocular Disease.

Harold R. Cobo, of Greenwood Place, Springville, died Sunday (May 19, 2019) at Bertrand Chaffee Hospital, Springville, at the age of 98. He was born May 25, 1920, in Springville, a son of the late Arthur C. and Corabell (Witsil) Cobo. Mr. Cobo was a graduate of Springville-Griffith Institute and served in the U.S. Army during World War II from Nov. 7, 1941, through Oct. 26, 1945. He was a truck driver, crane operator and fabricator for Reifler Concrete

in Hamburg and was a member of the Springville First Methodist Church. Mr. Cobo was a longtime member of the Springville Volunteer Fire Department, having joined in 1941. He was also involved with a local camping organization, played the accordion and keyboards and played with area country/ western bands. He is survived by his wife, Rosemond (Webster) Cobo, whom he married Nov. 27, 1943; a son, Dennis (Patricia) Cobo of Springville; a daughter, Linda Tucker of Syracuse; six grandchildren, D.J., Sarah, Brian, Ian, Kim and Andy; nine greatgrandchildren and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents and siblings Arlene Langreck, Arthur Cobo, Jr., Pearl Glass and Albert Cobo. Friends may called May 23, 2019, at Smith-Weismantel Funeral Home, 271 East Main St., Springville, where funeral services will be held Friday, May 24, 2019, at 11 a.m. with Rev. Matthew French officiating. Burial will be in Maplewood Cemetery, Springville. Memorials may be made to the Springville Volunteer Fire Department, 405 West Main St., Springville, NY 14141. Online condolences may be offered at www.smithweismantelfuneralhome.com.

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Eric Allen Crossan, of Waverly Street, Springville, died Friday, May 10, 2019, in Springville at the age of 37. He was born April 28, 1982, in Springville, a son of Jeffrey Crossan and Cheryl (Grigsby) Crossan. He was a member of the Springville-Griffith Institute Class of 2000 and was a member of the Springville Crossing Church. He was a web designer in marketing with Double Clutch, Inc, helped run a window washing business and enjoyed NASCAR and dirt track racing. He was known as the life of the party, making everyone laugh — he wasn’t happy until you were happy. He is survived by his fiance, Christen Bacon of Springville; daughters Aubree Bacon and Olivia Crossan, both at home;

mother, Cheryl Crossan of Springville; father, Jeffrey (Dee) Crossan of Boston, N.Y.; grandmother, Louise Grigsby of Springville; brother, Jamie Crossan of Springville and numerous cousins, aunts and uncles. Friends may call Friday, May 31, 2019, from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. and Saturday, June 1, 2019, from 9 to 11 a.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 38 North Buffalo St., Springville, where a memorial service will follow at 11 a.m. Pastor Keith Clark will officiate. Arrangements were completed by Smith-Weismantel Funeral Home, 271 East Main St., Springville. Online condolences may be offered at www. smithweismantelfuneralhome.com.

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363 votes, respectively. Their terms commence July 1 and run through June 30, 2022. The 2019-20 budget includes a $3.2 million increase in spending compared to the current school year’s budget, a roughly 2.44 percent increase, as well as a 2.5 percent increase to the tax levy. According to Superintendent Kimberly Mortiz, in a newsletter to district residents, the budget’s increase is due primarily to salaries and benefits and payments related to construction, or debt service.

BCH Foundation Garden Party set for May 30 The Bertrand Chaffee Hospital Foundation’s annual Garden Party is planned for Thursday, May 30 at the Springville Country Club. The foundation’s board is very proud to announce that this event will honor the many contributions of Gerard Diesfeld, MD and Mary Kwiatek, RN in the history of the hospital and the Jennie B. Richmond Nursing Home. Dr. Diesfeld was a physician at Bertrand Chaffee Hospital and at his own medical practice in Arcade for many years. Kwiatek was a nurse, manager and administrator at the facility, and continued to serve as a volunteer on the BCH Foundation board until 2018. Dr. Diesfeld continues as a BCH Foundation board member. The Garden Party starts at 5 p.m. and concludes by 8 p.m. The Springville Jazz Orchestra and Matt Bannister will provide the musical entertainment. Tickets are $50 each or $80 per couple and are available at the BCH reception desk. For information and sponsorship opportunities, call the Bertrand Chaffee Hospital Foundation at 592-2871 ext. 1485 or email Kelly Campbell at kcampbell@bch-jbr.org.

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SPRINGVILLE TIMES

www.SpringvilleTimes.com

May 24-30, 2019

Local

Kiwanis’ Maple Madness set WVDP safely relocates high integrity containers for June 1 Maple Madness is branching out into a new and fun event. Springville Kiwanis’ annual fundraiser to raise money for the building of a multipurpose room at the Children’s League will be held at 6 p.m. June 1 at Wendel’s Sugar House. This year, in addition to celebrating springtime sugaring off of maple syrup, ticket holders can partake in playing casino

games hosted by Amherst Children’s League, 592Casino to win prizes. 9331, or at Wendel’s The community is also Poultry Farm. Cost that invited to enter the best night is $30. maple appetizer and/or The organizers thank maple dessert contest. in advance the many There will be light community businesses refreshments and silent and individuals who have auction. Beer, wine, cider donated items and money and pop will be available to ensure this will be a for purchase. special night. Plan on joining us for are guaranteed HAVE GOODChances NEWS? a fun night at this 21 that you are going to LET US Presale SHARE IT... and older event. have a greatFREE! time at this tickets are $25 and are year’s Maple Madness Births - Engagements - Announcements available by calling The Casino Night. Email to info@springvilletimes.com or drop off at our office at 65 East Main St.

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Ale

Alex Simmons is a junior at Springville-Griffith Institute High School and contributing writer and photographer with the Springville Times. She and her dog, Buster, will travel around the area and take pictures of specific things or places they see.

Last weeks Location

Can you guess where they are? Fill out the the information box below take your best guess as to where Alex and Buster were this week. Cut out the info box and return it to the Springville Times office, 65 East Main St., Springville, NY 14141.

: o t o h P ’s k e e W Name: is h T

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Guess:

Last week, Alex and Buster were at the Panda House sign for the Chinese restaurant on West Main Street. Did you get it right? Keep sending in your guesses for a chance to have your name in the paper as a winner!

Photo Submitted Using the 100-ton crane inside the Fuel Receiving and Storage Facility, crews lift the HIC and its interior concrete shield from its exterior carbon steel shield and onto a flatbed trailer. The exterior shield was then lifted and placed on the trailer next to the HIC.

EM and its cleanup contractor CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC (CHBWV) recently completed the relocation of two 69,000-pound HighIntegrity Containers (HIC) from their location inside

the Fuel Receiving and Storage (FRS) facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project. Each HIC, which includes a 14-inch thick inner concrete shield and a two-inch thick exterior

Concord Legion Auxiliary to distribute poppies May 25

Honor past sacrifices and contribute to the continuing needs of veterans at WalMart in Springville where members of Concord American Legion Auxiliary will distribute bright, red poppies. The poppy has become a nationally known and recognized symbol of sacrifice to honor the men and women who served

and died for their country in all wars. “Wear the poppy in honor of the millions of Americans who have willingly served our nation, all too many of whom have made the ultimate sacrifice,” said Auxiliary President Anne Baglio. “This entire Memorial Day weekend will pay an honored tribute to all veterans.”

carbon steel shield, was relocated from the FRS decontamination pit to a secure outside storage area. Each HIC contained filtering materials used in the FRS water treatment system. “This accomplishment allows the continuation of the FRS deactivation,” said DOE-WVDP Director Bryan Bower. “By performing this work now, we can use our highlyskilled workforce to further reduce legacy risks.” A tractor with a lowboy trailer (very low deck to carry tall loads) was backed into the FRS. Using the inside 100-ton crane, each HIC and its exterior shield were moved from the decontamination pit onto the trailer. Once the HICs were secured, the trailer was driven out of the FRS in parallel to a 200-ton mobile crane. Each HIC was safely and deliberately lifted from the trailer and placed in its new location. “Our team continues to use their combined knowledge to safely and deliberately complete high-risk work activities,” CHBWV President Scott Anderson said. “I’m proud of their efforts, accomplishments, and in the work, they continue to do on this project.” The FRS was historically used to receive and store spent nuclear fuel during fuel reprocessing operations from 1966 to 1972. This work scope, which includes the HIC relocation and the removal of asbestoscontaining material, was recently added to the current contract to further prepare the facility for future demolition.

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SPRINGVILLE TIMES

May 24-30, 2019

www.SpringvilleTimes.com

Page 5

SGI

SGI teacher travels to China

Photo by Ely Schosek Springville physical education teacher Gerry Czemerynski presents to students on his recent trip to China and the unique experiences he had while there.

By Ely Schosek Student Reporter Not everyone will have the opportunity to travel to another country during their lifetime, but Gerry Czemerynski is not just anyone. A physical education teacher at SpringvilleGriffith High School, and known to his students as Mr. C, Czemerynski recently had the opportunity to travel to China. One of his daughters, Brooke, teaches English to children there. Students of Marianna

Krolikowski and Diane Waterman were lucky enough to recently hear about Mr. C’s trip. “Anything that can get you out of Springville, even for an hour, and help you see the world is priceless and valuable,” said Waterman. “Let your mind experience what it’s like to be in China through him.” Also in attendance for the presentation were Superintendent Kimberly Moritz, High School Principal James Bialasik and Vice Principal Joe DeMartino. Mr. C started off his

presentation by talking about the setting, saying there were both bamboo trees and palm trees but he “didn’t see any pandas.” He also noted that it was 85 to 90 degrees consistently throughout the two weeks they were there over spring break. “Lots of rain too!” When it comes to food, that’s different in China too, he said. There are many outdoor open markets. In regard to dining, there are small amounts to be shared. Each meal starts with hot water that is used

to clean the utensils and dishes even though they are brought to you clean. Although this may seem strange to us, it is customary in China. After showing the audience an image of a meal he had in China, Mr. C said, “I was in my glory there because the vegetables were awesome,” earning a laugh from everyone in the room. “Starbucks is opening a store in China every 15 hours,” Mr. C. mentioned. “It’s almost like you’re at a photoshoot at every Starbucks,” in that there

are many young girls taking photos and then getting paid for posting them online. While taking a train ride through some of the more rural parts of China, he noticed one thing: rice. “I knew it was a different land because of the rice patties,” he said. This led to Bialasik’s question on the proper way to eat rice with chopsticks. Also during his train ride, Mr. C. noted, “Everywhere I looked there were mountains.” While showing some pictures from his trip, Mr. C. showed a photo of the Port of Hong Kong and stated, “The picture doesn’t really do it justice.” Additionally, he discussed what Hong Kong looked like at night. A large crowd gathered every night to watch the light show on the water projected from the tops of the buildings. During the day, his family took a double decker bus through the back streets of Hong Kong. After a short flight, they arrived in Beijing. “In Beijing, you see a lot of military. They’re all over,” Mr. C. said. “Definitely a huge military presence.” But despite the pollution, “Beijing was beautiful!” Among the sights they saw was the Forbidden City, which he noted was “never ending” and the Great Wall. While walking along the wall, he said, “Every time I thought I was at the highest point, I saw another higher point.” In regard to the economy, Mr. C. mentioned that everything was extremely cheap in

China. Socially “on one hand they have all that technology, but on the other hand they don’t have social media,” which results from the communist government and the censorship that goes along with that. The cities were extremely crowded but well organized, he said. Mr. C. explained how big of a decision it was for his daughter to make to go live and teach in China. The family had talked to a couple who lived in China for 10 years before they made any decisions. Safety was another key component of the trip. The use of chopsticks to steal was apparently very common and if you were to catch them they would apologize and give it back. “They fear that if they were to hurt you or worse, fatally harm you, they would be haunted for a thousand lives.” The incident would surely end without any violent confrontation. Mr. C. said that it was very important for them to plan before they went because “the Chinese government is very suspicious” and you would not want them to think you had illintentions. In respect to communicating in Chinese, he said that he had created a basic list of Chinese words and phrases on his phone spelled phonetically which helped tremendously. Next week, look for part two of this story to see what the students’ opinions of the presentation were.

SGI bus drivers recognized for their role in school district

Photo by Ely Schosek The bus drivers of the Springville-Griffith Institute school district were recognized at the May meeting of the Board of Education for all they do each year for the students.

By Ely Schosek Student Reporter For the millions of miles they drive and thousands of students they

transport, the SpringvilleGriffith Institute Board of Education recently recognized all the district’s bus drivers as they do each year.

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At May’s school board meeting, Maureen Lee, School Business Administrator, began with a small speech thanking the bus drivers for all they do. “SGI bus drivers safely transport about 1,700 students a day,” she said. Lee also noted the fact that

the district covers nine different towns over 140 square miles. Additionally, she mentioned the huge variance of road conditions these drivers must brave throughout the year. “There’s no such thing as just a bus driver,”said Lee, adding that they know so much about the kids. For some they are one of the first friendly faces they see in the morning and one of the last ones they see in the afternoon. They hear stories about field trips, pets, wins, loses and everything else in between. “You are unsung heroes!” Lee said. “You do your job with pride and professionalism and we thank you for that.” “We don’t take you for granted,” District Superintendent Kimberly Moritz added. “We realize the job you do is vitally important to our students and our community and we’re very grateful for all of you.” During the meeting, the board members took a brief break to have some cake with the drivers in celebration of all they do for the district.


Page 6

www.SpringvilleTimes.com

SPRINGVILLE TIMES

May 24-30, 2019

Local

Ellicottville’s Nannen Arboretum sees cleanup work from CTE class By Deb Everts Thanks to the Natural Resources class at Ellicottville’s Career and Technical Education (CTE) Center, the Nannen Arboretum in Ellicottville is getting a good clean up and a fresh start for the spring and summer season. Instructor Dave Swaciak said his students in the junior class went to the arboretum behind Ellicottville’s town center May 8 to work on cleaning up the tree damage from the last two years. He planned to take the class back this week on Wednesday and Thursday to finish the job, weather permitting. “I guess what happened is they had winter tree damage from the previous year, then a tree care company came and removed some of the limbs and left them there,” he said. “So, we took care of the debris that was left there. We also did more pruning and helped with tree planting.” Using a wood chipper with a dump truck, climbing gear with ropes and harnesses, shovels, rakes and a chainsaw, the whole class of 16 students participated, including two girls. The students come from Cattaraugus-Little Valley, Springville-Griffith

Photo Submitted Juniors from the Natural Resources class at Ellicottville’s CTE center are cleaning up the Nannen Arboretum so visitors can enjoy its beauty this summer. Students (from left) Nick Mangano, Springville; Jake Cieszynski (blue shirt), Springville; Tom Vanderbosch (plaid shirt), Cattaraugus-Little Valley; Bill MacMillan, Nannen Arboretum, help plant Chamaecyparis.

and Franklinville high schools. “About half of my class is afraid of heights, but we need ground workers as well,” Swaciak said. “One of my best ground workers doesn’t like heights, but he knows all of his knots, and he’s very safe. He knows what to look for when the climber is up in the tree to help keep

the climber safe. So, everybody has a job, even if they are afraid of heights.” The students are using what they’ve learned in class and are applying the techniques to a reallife experience. Swaciak said they learned about tree climbing and the use of harnesses in October and November, then went over pruning in

February. During March, they learned how to use a chainsaw and, in April, they studied tree planting and soil testing. “So, this is kind of a culmination of a lot of the things they learned this year, and a nice final project for the year,” he said. Swaciak said this class activity is a type of internship for the

students because it’s off the premises and there are more requirements off campus. He said because they’re in the public eye, they have to be presentable. “One of the things I talk to the students about, especially when operating the wood chipper at the gate, is to be mindful of visitors who might be coming

to the town center or the arboretum,” he said. “The visitors come first and that’s something we don’t get when we’re working here at the CTE center. We don’t have the public coming and going, so that’s why it’s a good experience for them to get out and realize that they have to be presentable, they have to use good language and act professionally.” According to Swaciak, about half of his students go on to college for environmental sciences or forestry-related majors. Then, every year, he has a few students that go directly into tree work in arboriculture. He said there are a lot of jobs available in tree climbing. The student can graduate and go right to work. “You can get a job in arboriculture without being certified, but you can also work towards a certification,” he said. “Some of my students have graduated and done that. Having a BOCES diploma looks good on their resume.” The CTE center at Ellicottville is located at 5550 Route 242. For more information about the career and technical education programs offered by the Ellicottville, Olean and Belmont centers, visit online at caboces.org.

Pageant of the Bands in Springville Photos by Kellen M. Quigley

The 57th annual Pageant of the Bands returned to Springville May 17 and 18 where 18 different bands performed and competed, giving the community a one-of-akind musical experience. On Saturday, the pageant parade made its way down East Main Street to crowds of family members, friends and music enthusiasts.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

May 24-26 The Music Man at Springville Center for the Arts. Tickets start at $12. Showtimes 7:30 Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. on Sunday.

May 27 Memorial Day Check with your local American Legion or VFW for ceremonies in your community.

Morgan Morgan Bonn

Promotions Director

office 716-699-4062 cell 716-472-3861 mbonnspvtimes@gmail.com

May 30 BCH Foundation Garden Party at Springville Country Club. Celebrate local healthcare, honor healthcare professionals and support Bertrand Chaffee Hospital and the JBR Nursing Home. 5 p.m. May 31 – June 2 Girl’s Getaway Weekend

at Ellicottville. Visit www.ellicottvilleny. com for more information.

June 2 Pancake Breakfast and Basket Raffle at the East Otto Fire Hall, 8990 Reed Hill Road, East Otto. Hosted by CattaraugusLittle Valley Boys Basketball team. 8 a.m. to noon. June 6 Thursdays, Downtown at Heritage Park, Springville. The Probables, a folk and grassroots band. 6:30 p.m. June 7-9 WNY Dairy Festival at Springville-Griffith High School, Springville.

Have an event to add to the calendar? Email info@springvilletimes.com.


SPRINGVILLE TIMES

May 24-30, 2019

www.SpringvilleTimes.com

Page 7

Community Concord Senior Center news and updates

We all have clothes that we have outgrown or don’t like, so bring them into the center by Tuesday, May 28 by noon. Either come in Wednesday, May 29 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. to swap them or just donate them to someone that could use them. We are taking women’s and men’s clothing. No underwear or clothes that are ripped or stained. If you wouldn’t wear it, don’t bring it to us. What is left will be donated to The Bread of Life in West Falls. Our vegetable garden will be starting to get worked in soon as we have a few days of sunshine. The Club of Springville again will

have their girls and boys helping in the garden with their mentor Dave, so if you know anything about gardening, please stop in. Questions or ideas, call 592-2764 or email concord2017sc@gmail. com. Monday, May 27 CLOSED Tuesday, May 28 9:15 a.m. — Yoga 10 a.m. — Blue Cross Rep here 11 a.m. — Stay Fit Exercises Noon — Stay Fit Lunch

Wednesday, May 29 10 a.m. — First Concord Senior Center clothes swap-meet Thursday, May 30 9:30 a.m. — Stitches Quilt Group 11 a.m. — Stay Fit Exercises Noon — Stay Fit Memorial Lunch 12:30 p.m. — Euchre Card Group

Stop in with your questions about email, ebooks, using the internet and more!

BECOME A LIBRARY TRUSTEE! Library trustees are powerful advocates for libraries in our community! Interested? Contact Jennifer Morris, Library Director at 5927742.

Thursdays​ Drop-in Storytime, 10:30 a.m. — Join us for stories, songs and a craft. All ages welcome. SPCA Paws for Love: Read to a Dog, 3:30 p.m. — Come practice reading aloud to Gracie, an SPCA therapy dog! for ages 4 and up. No registration is required. Teen Game Lab, 4 p.m. — Drop by for board games, robotics and more.

‘Detective Pikachu’ a live-action Pokémon adaptation to satisfy all fans

Friday, May 31 11 a.m. — Stay Fit Exercises Noon — Stay Fit Lunch 1 p.m. — University Express Lecture: Quilts and the Underground Railroad

Concord Public Library upcoming events

The library will be closed Monday, May 27 in observance of Memorial Day

MOVIE REVIEW

Alvarez. Copies available at the library. June 1, 1 p.m., Cactus Rock Painting — Local master crafter Kelli will host this workshop focused on rock painting, specifically to look like cacti. The second part of the workshop will focus on arranging the completed cacti into a decorative potted “plant.” Each participant will be able to assemble and take home their very own creation. Registration is required. Please call 5927742 or stop in to reserve your spot.​

Warner Bros. Pictures A talking Pikachu (voiced by Ryan Reynolds) and Tim Goodman (Justice Smith) appear in a scene from “Pokémon Detective Pikachu,” the first live-action adaptation of the game and TV franchises.

By Kellen M. Quigley

Pokémon has been a lot of things to a lot of people over the past 23 years. A video games, trading cards, an animated show and WEEKLY PROGRAMS AT THE more. LIBRARY — All programs are free With more than 30 and open to the public Buffalo & Erie County public official games and over libraries have more than 3.2 million 1,000 TV episodes, this Mondays (Closed for Memorial UPCOMING SPECIAL EVENTS ​ materials such as books, eBooks, DVDs, Japanese behemoth of an Day) May 25, 11 a.m., Dad & Me music and more. Free library cards, entertainment franchise Builder’s Bonanza, 3:30 p.m. — Storytime — Dads are invited to traditional and eLibrary, are available has no signs of slowing Drop in for an afternoon of building join us for stories, songs and a craft. to Erie County residents and to those down any time soon. The with LEGOs, Magformers and Keva Recommended for ages 2-6 but all are who work and/or attend school in Erie next games come out in Planks. Ages 6 and up. welcome. County. Follow the library on Facebook, November with the 22nd May 28, 1:30 p.m., Last Tuesday Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Flickr and season of the show close Tuesdays Book Club — May’s pick is “In on our podcast All Booked Up! Call behind. Drop-in Computer Help, 4 p.m. — the Time of the Butterflies” by Julia 858-8900 or visit www.buffalolib.org. And yet, “Pokémon Detective Pikachu,” the first live-action movie of the franchise has just hit theaters, something that fans now in their 30s have been waiting a very long time for. love their library. “The Chronicles of Narnia” June 4, 5:30 p.m. — We Creative Crafts for It may not be exactly will be discussing “The Tinkering in the by C.S. Lewis. You can Adults, May 25, 1 p.m. — what we wanted, but Radium Girls” by Kate Library, June 8, 12 noon request a copy online or at We will be making a “Tea seeing real people walking Moore. You can request a — With different rotating the library desk. for Two” paper craft. All alongside and interacting copy on line or stop by the activities each month, Computer Class: materials are provided but with life-like Pokémon on there will be new things to Introduction to Facebook, Library Desk. Please call registration is limited. Ages the big screen is a sight 532-5129 or stop by if you explore. Fun for the whole June 1, noon to 2:30 18 and older please. that will make even the are interested. family. Stop by or call to pm. — Students will set Closed, May 27 — most grown-up of fans Teen Craft Night, June sign up. up a personal Facebook The library will be closed feel like their 10 years old profile, learn how to upload 4, 6:30 pm. — Join us each Monday, May 27 for again. month for a fun craft for Did you know? Erie a profile photo, update Memorial Day. Please use After ace detective teens. Registration required, County Library cards are a status, send a private book drop or renew online please call to find out what available to all Erie County Harry Goodman goes message, add a friend and at www.Buffalolib.org the craft is and to register. mysteriously missing, his residents, all individuals learn about the privacy Tinkering in the Ages 12-17. who work in Erie County, settings. Free and open to distant 21-year-old son, Library, May 28, 5:30 Toddler Time, June and all those who live in library patrons 17 and older. p.m. — With different Tim (played by Justice 7, 10:30 a.m. — We read the Gowanda School tax Registration required. rotating activities each Smith), a former Pokémon stories, play games, sing district. Stay up-to-date Lap Sit with Miss month, there will be new trainer, goes to find out songs and have a snack. with events at the library by what happened to the Abbie, June 3, 10:30 things to explore. Fun for Ages 2 to 5. Please call or ‘liking’ our Facebook page, father he hasn’t seen in the whole family. Stop by or a.m. — Join us for this stop in to register. Collins Public Library. New years. fun program for children call to sign up. Friends of the Collins Library Hours: Monday, ages 6 months to 2 years Quilting with Florence, Aiding in the Public Library Meeting, Tuesday and Thursday, 10 with a caregiver. A great May 29, 10 a.m. — Join investigation is Harry’s a.m. to 8 p.m.; Wednesday introduction to early literacy June 8, 10 a.m. — There these knowledgeable ladies former Pokémon partner, are applications in the and Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 skills with rhymes, finger as they work on projects. a wise-cracking, adorable library or come to the p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m. to plays, music, stories and Young Adult Book Pikachu (voiced by Ryan meeting. Always looking 3 p.m.; Closed Sundays. more. Sign up required. Club, May 30, 6:30 p.m. Reynolds) who is also for enthusiastic people who Telephone: 532-5129. Evening Book Club, — We will be discussing a super detective in the futuristic Pokémon utopia Rhyme City. When Tim and Pikachu discover they can talk to each other, they join forces with reporter Lucy Stevens (Kathryn Newton) Pick up your copy at the following locations and her Pokémon partner Psyduck to unravel the tangled mystery of Tim’s 5 STAR BANK SPRINGVILLE CHAMBER COUNTRY FAIR DAFFS missing father and a FINNERTY’S M&T BANK BURGER KING ADVENTURE BOUND new dangerous chemical WINGATE TOWN OF CONCORD DUNKIN DONUTS DTINA’S infecting Pokémon and M&T BANK HURLBURT LIBRARY LAMB & WEBSTER ERA REALITY KWIK FILL CONCORD HISTORY TOPS making them crazy. AMERI CAN BIKE SHOP CONCORD LAND MCDONALDS For anyone who may AVA GRACE KATIE’S CAFÉ METRO REALTY WALMART know the original games ALEXANDRA REALTY EDGE BERTRAND HOSPITAL TIM HORTONS JOHN NELSON and TV show, this plot DOMS SPRINGVILLE DISTRICT TIM & BONNIES EARTH ART is nothing like what you SUBWAY LANDPRO EQ. CONCORD SENIOR EVL SALT CAVE might have expected. None HOWARD HANNAH COZY CORNERS SENIOR LIVING JEFFERSON WEED ROSS SPRINGVILLE HEALTH ROUTE 39 SALON of these characters are EVL CHAMBER THE EDGE JIM MURPHY APPLE DUMPLING Ash Ketchum, this isn’t a HARVARD’S EVL WINE CHEAP CHOLLIES EMERLING FORD familiar region and nobody TAMARACK LOBBY EVL SPIRITS KATIE’S FLY IN DELCON KITCHEN is battling for gym badges OASIS MUD, SWEAT & GEARS GREAT VALLEY BUILDERS EARLY BIRD HV LODGE and the Pokémon League. BALLOONS EVL OFFICE PAPA JAKES MCCARTHY’S But that’s OK, because MONROE BREW TIM & BONNIES KIRILS REST INN AT HOLIDAY VALLEY for the most part, that GADO GADO RUSTIX EMERLING JEEP EVL SCHOOL NATURE’S REMEDY CCSE RITE AID means most people who DOLLAR GENERAL EVL BREW TIM HORTONS CROSBY go to see this movie won’t EVL PHARMACY WATSONS GROOVE VILLAGE SPRINGVILLE OFFICE have to know much about TOWN HALL KAZOO II EVL LIBRARY JULIE’S RESTAURANT CLARK’S the games or TV show to GIN MILL TOPS COMMUNITY BANK understand what’s going

Collins Public Library Events

ILLE SPRINGVTIMES

on. Pikachu is a universal character nowadays, so everything else can just be explained in the movie and not depend on audience members being super fans. Now, that’s not to say the life-long fans of Pokémon won’t be rewarded with dozens of Easter eggs referencing the games and TV show. Hardly a scene goes by where there’s isn’t some sort of wink and nod or a blatant mention of something that has happened in the games or show. But that’s not why people are going to see this movie. No, “Detective Pikachu” exists to show hundreds of different Pokémon in a realistic way and in a realistic setting. Most Pokémon are adorable, and that’s where a lot of the charm of the movie comes from. A lot of these creatures are the size of a dog or small child and are often just as cute. However, it’s Pikachu who really steals the show, primarily because of Reynolds as the voice. While Pikachu is obviously adorable, it’s Reynolds doing his usual schtick of riffing and joking like his Marvel character Deadpool that brings a lot of enjoyment to this character. Unfortunately, on the flip side of that, the human characters do not hold up their end of this film. The draw may be seeing Pokémon in real life, the people here should at least have some characterization to back up the story, or even act well. While not awful, Smith and Newton’s performances occasionally came across as stiff, awkward or just bad. But that’s OK because Pokémon has never been about the people and the story. It’s about the creatures themselves and how awesome they are. This world feels live-in and believable, with so many of the Pokémon filling roles that make sense. Ones that use water attacks help the firemen, ones that use fire attacks help the chefs and cooks, etc. By the end of the movie, I had seen exactly what I was hoping to see with the first live-action Pokémon movie: these creatures that have been a part of so many childhoods for decades existing with real people. I couldn’t ask for anything more.


Page 8

Professional Serv. / Contractors

Employment / Help Wanted

Employment / Help Wanted

Now taking orders for Driveway repairs and French Drains and Gravel. 716-378-7968

Music Teacher Scio CSD is seeking qualified candidates for a NYS Certified Music Teacher. Starting salary will commensurate with experience. For details & how to apply visit: www.caboces.org “BOCES & District Vacancies” Deadline: 5/28/19 EOE

Randolph Academy UFSD has the following vacancies: · School Nurse (RN) · Certified Culinary Teacher (Grades 7-12) For details & how to apply visit: www.caboces.org “BOCES & District Vacancies” EOE

Employment / Help Wanted Bolivar-Richburg CSD is accepting applications for the following anticipated vacancy to commence in the 2019-2020 school year: Special Education Teacher (Certification in K-6 and/or 7-12) For details & how to apply visit: www.caboces.org “BOCES & District Vacancies” Deadline: 6/7/19 EOE Camp Turner in State Park seek PT school bus driver. Avg 20hrs/wk. Mon.-Thur. 7/6-8/19. $17/hr. local runs 716-354-4555 Camp Turner in State Park seek PT prep cook. about 4 hrs/day. Mon. - Thur. 7/1-8/19. $13/hr 716-354-4555

The Olean Times Herald is looking for interested applicants for Delivery Drivers & Carriers in all areas 7 days a week; Monday-Friday afternoons and Saturday/Sunday/ Holiday morning delivery. Carriers must be at least 12 years old. If interested please contact Nichole at 716-372-3121 Ext 266 or stop in at the Olean Times Herald at 639 Norton Dr., Olean, NY to fill out an application ACCORD’s Domestic Violence Program is hiring a Full and Part Time Family Advocate. Visit www.accordcorp.org, click on Careers Employment Opportunities for more information.

and Section 19.5.B

SPRINGVILLE TIMES

www.SpringvilleTimes.com

The Olean Times Herald is seeking a part-time page designer for the sports department. Experience with computer graphic design using InDesign and Photoshop is a must. Night hours and weekends. Send resume and work samples to: jeckstrom@oleantimesherald.com

Garage / Yard Sales

LAWN SALE Fri. 24 - Sun. 26 3998 Bucktooth Run Little Valley, Right out side of Salamanca ****** Memorial Day Weekend Giant Yard Sale at The Jefferson Inn – 3 Jefferson Street Multi family yd sale w/ lots of treasures. Antiques, toys, books, furniture, jewelry, home furnishings, sports equip, clothing and much more. Fri May 24th 9-5pm, Sat May 25th 9-5pm. No early birds please.

****** Memorial Day Weekend Giant Yard Sale at The Jefferson Inn – 3 Jefferson Street Multi family yd sale w/ lots of treasures. Antiques, toys, books, furniture, jewelry, home furGarage / nishings, sports equip, clothing Yard Salesand much more. Fri May 24th 9-5pm, Sat May 25th 9-5pm. No early birds please.

Autos For Sale 2011 F150 Super cab auto, 4x4, V6, 3.5 ecoboost, 86,000 mi, $17,550 Call for more info 716-244-1657

Apartments For Rent 1 & 2 BR, quality, furn/ unfurn., gar., $495 to $800 incl. util. No Pets Olean. 716-560-6656 Park Centre currently has various modern apts. for rent. Call Denise for details 716-372-5555 ext 227 Weston Mills 1 bedroom apt. 1st floor. $525 a month, plus security deposit, gas & electric. No pets or smoking. 716-307-8194

Legals LEGAL NOTICE NEAL FARM LLC filed Articles of Organization in New York on April 18, 2019. The LLCʼs office is in Cattaraugus County. The Secretary of State has been named as agent of service of process against the LLC and shall mail such process to 9067 Otto-East Otto Road, Otto, New York 14766. The LLC is formed to carry on any business for which an LLC may be formed in New York. MDP Solutions, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 04/15/19. Office: Cattaraugus County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 9151 Broadway Rd, Gowanda, NY 14070. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF RESOLUTION, SUBJECT TO PERMISSIVE REFERENDUM, GRANTING THE VILLAGE'S CONSENT TO AN EXTENSION OF THE TOWN OF ELLICOTTVILLE Legals CONSOLIDATED WATER DISTRICT NO. 1 INTO THE VILLAGE Notice is hereby given that at its May 20, 2019 meeting the Village Board of Trustees of the Village of Ellicottville adopted a resolution that grants the Village's consent to the extension of the Town of Ellicottville Consolidated Water District No. 1 into the Village. Such resolution is subject to permissive referendum pursuant to New York law. NOTICE OF SUBSTANCE OF ARTICLES OF ORGANIZATION On 04/08/2019, SWANSON HILL STABLES, LLC filed with the NYS Department of State its Articles of Organization. The office to be located in Cattaraugus County. The NY Secretary of State is designated as agent for service of process. The mailing address for the LLC is 554 Prospect Avenue, Olean, NY 14760. The purpose of the business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Law.

of the Village of May 24-30, 2019

Legals

Legals

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Town Board of the Town of Concord will hold a Public Hearing on proposed Local Law #2 of the Year 2019: “Amending the Zoning Ordinance for the Town of Concord to Regulate Solar Energy Systems.” Said hearing will take place on Thursday, June 13th, 2019 at 6:30 p.m. at the Concord Town Hall, 86 Franklin Street, Springville, New York 14141. The proposed Local Law #2 of 2019 is available for viewing in the Town Clerkʼs Office during regular business hours. Any and all interested persons will be heard. By Order of the Town Board, Darlene G. Schweikert Concord Town Clerk

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS VILLAGE OF ELLICOTTVILLE, NEW YORK Pursuant to Section7-712-a of NYS Village Law and Section 19.5.B of the Village of Ellicottville Zoning Local Law, a Public Hearing before the Village of Ellicottville Zoning Board of Appeals will be held on Tuesday, June 4, 2019 at 5:30 P.M.in the Ellicottville Town Hall, 1 West Washington Street, Ellicottville, New York, to consider: Application No. ZBA-2019-02, an appeal by Paul Masliwec for an Area Variance to Section 3A-4.C.3) of the Village Zoning to allow construction of an accessory structure (garage) within the required minimum 15-foot side yard. The site is located at 15 Rockwell Avenue, identified Stark Cabic Road Farms LLC, Arts of as tax map parcel 55.036-2-40. Org. filed with Sec. TheZoning Board of of State of NY Appeals will hear (SSNY) 1/31/2019. interested persons Cty: Cattaragus. at the public SSNY desig. as hearing. Persons agent upon whom wishing to do so process against may submit written may be served & comments at or shall mail process prior to the public to 9097 Cabic hearing. Road, Dayton, NY Application 14041. materials are General Purpose. available for review at the Ellicottville Town Hall, 1 West Washington Street, P.O. Box 475, Ellicottville, NY 14731 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday Bentley, 31, of Fillmore, was arrested through Friday.

Ellicottville Zoning Local Law, a Public Hearing before the Village of Ellicottville Zoning Board of Appeals will be held on Tuesday, June 4, 2019 at 5:30 P.M.in the Ellicottville Town Hall, 1 West Washington Street, Ellicottville, New York, to consider: Application No. ZBA-2019-02, an appeal by Paul Masliwec for an Area Variance to Section 3A-4.C.3) of the Village Zoning to allow construction of an accessory structure (garage) within Legals the required minimum 15-foot side yard. The site is located at 15 Rockwell Avenue, identified as tax map parcel 55.036-2-40. TheZoning Board of Appeals will hear interested persons at the public hearing. Persons wishing to do so may submit written comments at or prior to the public hearing. Application materials are available for review at the Ellicottville Town Hall, 1 West Washington Street, P.O. Box 475, Ellicottville, NY 14731 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

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NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF RESOLUTION, SUBJECT TO PERMISSIVE REFERENDUM, Commercial / Rental GRANTING THE Property VILLAGE'S Local landscaper CONSENT TO AN looking for laborers. EXTENSION OF Must have a clean Commercial Space THE TOWN OF drivers license and for Lease ELLICOTTVILLE pass drug & Convenient Olean ANYTHING & EVERYTHING! CONSOLIDATED alcohol tests. Location in the Classified Section. WATER DISTRICT Call 716-373-3446. Call 716-372-5300 NO. 1 INTO THE VILLAGE Notice is hereby given that at its May 20, 2019 meeting the Village Board of Trustees of the Village of COLLINS — Paul Renaldo, 31, of North Collins, was charged at 7:47 Ellicottville adopted ARCADE — Aaron K. at 6 p.m. May that p.m. May 12 with criminal possession of a weapon, criminal possession ofagrants aresolution the Village's 13 on a bench warrant issued out of Machias Town Court. Bentley was arraigned controlled substance and criminal use of drug paraphernalia. He was processed consent to the exand remanded to Cattaraugus County Jail on $1,500 bail. tension of the Town and released with appearance tickets. of Ellicottville Consolidated Water District No. contempt, 1 into L. Wielkie, 27, of Delevan, both class He was held on cash bail. at 10:20 with sevenththe Village. Such was charged at 1:40 p.m. A misdemeanors, and SARDINIA — Brandon degree criminal possession resolution is subject to permissive May 17 with trespassing, second-degree harassment, M. Cross, 30, no address of a controlled substance referendum pursua violation. Wielkie was violation. He was released provided, was charged at and unlawful possession of ant to New a York No injuries were reported. YORKSHIRE — A issued an appearancelaw. ticket. on his own recognizance. 10:29 p.m. May 19 with marijuana. Both Carcione

Police Reports

Erie County Sheriff’s

Cattaraugus County Sheriff’s

New York State Police

two-vehicle accident was reported at 12:35 p.m. May 14 on Countyline Road near Route 39. Linsey E. Heferle, 28, of Derby, and John Karl Kosmerl, 65, of Arcade, were identified as the drivers. No injuries were reported. YORKSHIRE — A two-vehicle accident was reported at 6:07 p.m. May 15 on Route 16 and Westover Street. Jacqueline Lee Enders, 47, of Belfast, was identified as a driver. An unidentified 18-year-old Gainesville woman was reported as the other driver.

SARDINIA — Matthew J. Power, 33, of Cuba, was charged at 3:50 p.m. May 16 with third-degree aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle and first-degree operating a motor vehicle while impaired by drugs. He was issued an appearance ticket. YORKSHIRE — Michael R. Daskavitz, 21, of Lockport, was charged at 9:19 p.m. May 16 with third-degree criminal trespassing, a class B misdemeanor. Daskavitz was issued an appearance ticket. MACHIAS — Amanda

TOWN HALL SUMMER HOURS

MACHIAS — Kelly J. Nichols, 37, of Silver Lake, was charged at 1:40 p.m. May 17 with trespassing, a violation. Nichols was issued an appearance ticket. MACHIAS — Leonard J. Groff, 24, of Delevan, was charged at 1:40 p.m. May 17 with trespassing, a violation. Groff was issued an appearance ticket. SARDINIA — Jack R. Carnahan, 59, of Delevan, was charged at 9:41 a.m. May 18 with unlawful possession of marijuana, a violation. He was issued an appearance ticket. MACHIAS — Corey A. Tingue, 35, no physical address reported, was charged at 6:50 p.m. May 18 with fourth-degree criminal mischief and second-degree criminal

CONCORD — Deniro J. Bly, 21, of Concord, was charged at 3 p.m. May 19 with reckless driving, speed in zone, failure to stop at stop sign, unsafe turn, moving from lane unsafely, failure to obey traffic device, failure to obey police officer, third-degree flee officer in a motor vehicle and resisting arrest.

driving while intoxicated and aggravated DWI per se. He was issued an appearance ticket. COLLINS — Peter M. Carcione, 32, of Buffalo, was charged at 10:15 p.m. May 20 with seventhdegree criminal possession of a controlled substance. Taylor M. Austin, 21, of Gowanda, was also charged

and Austin were issued appearance tickets. CONCORD — A two-vehicle accident was reported at 6:20 p.m. May 21 on Genesee Road near Trevett Road. Ryan M. Hopkins, 20, of Boston, and Hakeem J. McCarty, 27, of West Valley, were identified as the drivers. Two injuries were reported.

Three traffic stops across the county conducted by the Southern Tier Regional Drug Task Force resulted in methamphetamine arrests Thursday night and early

Friday morning. First, Cody R. Bemish, 25, of Delevan, was charged at 7 p.m. May 16 with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance, a class A misdemeanor. His charge stems from a traffic stop on Keller Road in Yorkshire, during which deputies allegedly found a gram of cocaine and a small amount of meth. Bemish was processed and released with a ticket to appear in court at a later date. Later, Shawn S. Esis, 25, of East Otto, was charged at 11:30 p.m. with fifth-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance, a class D felony. His charge stems from a traffic stop on Bowen

Road in East Otto. During the stop, deputies allegedly discovered approximately five grams of meth. Esis was processed and remanded to Cattaraugus County Jail pending further proceedings. Early May 17, Gregory J. Schroeder, 37, of East Otto, was charged at 1:06 a.m. with fifth-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance, a class D felony, and criminally using drug paraphernalia, a class A misdemeanor. The charges stem from a traffic stop on Route 353 in Little Valley, where deputies allegedly found over a quarter of an ounce of meth. Schroeder was arraigned and remanded to Cattaraugus County Jail in lieu of $1,000 bail.

Traffic stops result in three meth arrests

(May 28, 2019 to August 30, 2019)

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SPRINGVILLE TIMES

May 24-30, 2019

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Page 9

Compost is part of the circle of life in gardens

The season for fresh fruits and vegetables grown right in the backyard is upon us. Warm weather breathes life into fresh berries, tomatoes, eggplant, cucumbers, and many other delectable fruits and vegetables. Home gardens can be supplemented with delicious finds from the supermarket or farmer’s market, including melons, corn and more. The bounty of the garden can be made more abundant and fruitful with the addition of the right soil amendments. Compost is a key element of rich, nutritious soil. Scraps from items that have been grown in the garden can then be reused in the production of the com-

post that feeds that same garden. It’s a continuous circle of garden life. Getting started with compost is relatively easy. Homeowners should choose an outdoor space near the garden but far away from the home so that it won’t be disturbed by kids or animals. Some people opt for an open compost pile, while others choose closed bins to contain the possible smell and to camouflage the compost. A sunny spot will help the compost to develop faster, according to Good Housekeeping. The next step is to start gathering the scraps and materials that will go into the compost. Better Homes and Gardens suggests keeping a bucket

or bin in the kitchen to accumulate kitchen scraps. Here are some kitchen-related items that can go into the compost material: • Eggshells • Fruit peels • Vegetable peels and scraps • Coffee grounds • Shredded newspaper In addition to these materials, grass and plant clippings, dry leaves, bark chips, straw, and sawdust from untreated wood can go into the pile. Avoid diseased plants, anything with animal fats, dairy products, and pet feces. A low-maintenance pile has an equal amount of brown and green plant matter in the compost plus moisture to keep

the bacteria growing and eating at the right rate. Aerating the compost occasionally, or turning the bin when possible, will allow the compost to blend and work together. Compost will take a few months to form com-

pletely, says the Planet Natural Research Center. The finished product will resemble a dark, crumbly soil that smells like fresh earth. Compost will not only add nutrients to garden soil, but also it can help

insulate plants and may prevent some weed growth. It is a good idea to start a compost pile as a free source of nutrition for plants and a method to reduce food waste in an environmentally sound way.

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SPRINGVILLE TIMES

May 24-30, 2019

SPRINGVILLE

SPORTS Photo by Alex Simmons Pictured is the SpringvilleGriffith Institute varsity baseball team. Front row (from left): Jarrett Wolf, Austin Walker, Evan Elkins, Collin Rice, Austin Lux, Nick Pfarner. Middle row: Travis Mansfield, Garon Domes, Nick Sullivan, Cody Wells, Sean Barry. Third row: Ryan Johnson, Mike Sobota, Nick Emmick, Ty Dash.

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Photo by Alex Simmons Pictured is the SpringvilleGriffith Institute varsity softball team. Front row (from left): Lilia Dinse, Kait Wolf, Ella Wittman, Marin Lehr, Kaitlyn Mesch. Middle row: Lina Voegele, Olivia Fisher, Meadow Wittman, Meghan Rehauer, Samantha Yetter, Emily Ehlers. Back row: Coach Pazzuti, Makayla Place, Bella Oakley, Autumn Woodruff, Coach Stedman.

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Photo by Alex Simmons Pictured is the SpringvilleGriffith Institute junior varsity baseball team. Front row (from left): Hunter Keem, Keaton Wnuk, Austin Yetter, Garrett Walker, Wyatt Jerome. Middle row: Dan Komenda, Zach Hughey, Josh Connors, Hunter Thompson. Back row: Coach Tim Komenda, Austin Boies, Domenick Sicignano, Damian Kendall, Alex Elkins.

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Photo by Sam Wilson Pictured is the Springville-Griffith Institute modified softball team. Front row (from left): Elsie Fisher, Autumn Andreeff, Kailea Sullivan, Taylor Doctor, Graicyn Kramer, Alivia Sipes. Middle row: Mikayla Roberts, Gracie Gilchrist, Layla Winfield, Kelsey Perkins, Kellie Phair, Riley Ballantyne, Amelia Hintz-Strub. Back row: Lily Vanuga, Abby Woodring, Kaitlyn Hender, Halley Hayden, McKenzie Steff, Coach Rob Cain. Missing: Mia Kendall.

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Photo by Sam Wilson Pictured is the Springville-Griffith Institute modified baseball team. Front row (from left): Chris Doty, Carson Longbine, Jack Nannen, Kai Kendall. Middle row: Isaac Henderson, Nick Gold, Josh Sullivan, Ryan Kruszka, Tanner Lux, Ben Einarsson. Back row: Hunter Runser, Jackson Crone, Max Thelen, Max Perry, Zack Evans, Aiden Brown. Missing from picture: Gabe Murphy.


May 24-30, 2019

SGI’s Rowe & Solly earn MVP awards at Pioneer Invite The Springville-Griffith Institute girls track and field earned both the track MVP and field MVP at the Pioneer Invitational on Saturday in Yorkshire. The Griffins’ Payton Rowe won track MVP and her teammate Nyah Solly won field MVP at the invitational, where Springville finished third of 13 teams with 96 points. Rowe won the 400-meter hurdles with a season-best and meet record time of 1:05.68. She also finished second in the 100 hurdles (:16.15). Solly won the triple jump with a personal best 35-feet-7-inches. She took second in both the pole vault (9-0) and long jump (16-2). Also for the Griffins, Chloe Chamberlin claimed two second-place finishes with the 100 (:13.33) and 200 (:27.51) sprints, Alyssa Greaves took second in the pentathlon (1,817 points) and the 400 relay team (Chamberlin, Evelyn Smith, Rowe) was second at :52.08. Sonya Krezmien was third with a season-best 8:12.0 in the 2,000-meter steeplechase. Allison Emmick was fourth in the high jump (4-9) and Brooke Walker fourth in the pole vault (8-6). Jaime Dickinson (400), Brooke Walker (triple jump) and Marinna Heichberger (shot put) each had a sixth-place.

Griffins baseball (15-1) keeps rolling before playoffs

SPRINGVILLE TIMES

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Sports

SGI softball rides early lead to win playoff opener

The postseason started without a hitch for the Springville-Griffith Institute varsity softball team, riding an early lead to defeat Lackawanna 12-2 in the Section 6 Class B-1 pre-quarterfinals on Tuesday at home. SGI scored early on a double by Marin Lehr in the first inning, a double by Lehr in the second inning and a single by Lilia Dinse in the second. The Griffins added four runs in the third as Katelyn Mesch, Ella Wittman, Lehr and Dinse each had RBIs in the inning. Starting in the pitcher’s circle, Kaitlyn Wolf threw a complete game, allowing just two runs on three hits while striking out 12 and walking none. Out of Springville’s 18 hits, Wittman, Dinse, Mesch, Lehr and Emily Ehlers all collected multiple hits, with Lehr, Mesch, Dinse and Wittman marking three each. No. 6 Springville (12-7) advances to Thursday’s quarterfinals, visiting No. 3 Depew (9-9) for a 4:45 p.m. first pitch. Springville 22, JFK 1 Meghan Rehrauer came the ballpark and meant business on Monday, driving in seven runs on three hits to lead Springville past JFK 22-1 in the Griffins’ regular-season finale in Cheektowaga. Rehrauer drove in runs on two singles and a grand slam, which she knocked in the fifth. Meadow Wittman also had a two-run double. SGI scored seven runs in the second inning. Kaitlyn Wolf had a double and pitched two shutout innings, striking out three and walking one. Earlier in the day, Springville finished a Sunday game at Cleveland Hill, falling 16-9. Springville 22, Lackawanna 5 Meghan Rehrauer collected four hits in six at-bats, including two doubles as Springville ran away with a win on May 17 at Lackawanna. SGI had eight runs in the second inning as Rehrauer, Lina Voegele, Katelyn Mesch, Meadow Wittman, Lilia Dinse and Marin Lehr all had RBIs in the inning. Wittman had a third-inning home run. Dinse, Rehrauer, Sydney Wittmer, Mesch and Bella Oakley each collected multiple hits In the pitcher’s circle, Dinse allowed five hits and five runs over seven innings, striking out eight.

Holding Holland to just five hits, the SpringvilleGriffith Institute baseball team won its 11th consecutive game on Monday, edging the Dutchmen 2-1 at home. Senior Collin Rice threw the first 5 ⅔ innings for Springville, scattering four hits for one unearned run while striking out five and walking five. Sean Barry finished the job with the final four outs, allowing one hit. SGI (15-1) won the contest, originally scheduled for Alden 7, Springville 0 May 4, despite recording only four hits of its own: one After a first-inning, two-run home run for Alden’s each for Nick Emmick, Evan Elkins, Mike Sobota and Madison Gadd, Springville never came back in a loss Nick Pfamer. on May 15 at home. Kaitlyn Wolf went 2-for-3 for Springville and pitched a complete game, striking out three and Springville 26, Lackawanna 5 walking one. Springville piled up 17 hits in a victory on May 17, as Austin Walker (double, 2 RBI) and Austin Lux (4 RBI) marked three hits each at Lackawanna. Also for SGI, Jarrett Wolf (double, 2 RBI, 4 runs), Nick Emmick (triple, 4 RBI) and Mike Sobota (double, 2 RBI, 3 runs) had two hits each. Also marking extra-base hits were Evan Elkins and Sean Barry, each with a double. Emmick, Elkins and Cody Wells handled the pitching for Springville in the five-inning game with four total strikeouts, holding Lackawanna to four hits.

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Nyah Solly

GIRLS TRACK & FIELD Springville’s Nyah Solly earned MVP of the field events at the Pioneer Invitational on Saturday, winning the triple jump with a personal-best distance of 35-feet7-inches. She also finished second in the pole vault and long jump and was on the 400-meter relay team, which finished in second place. On Tuesday, May 14,

at Tonawanda, Solly won the long jump and triple jump and was on the winning 400 relay.

Holland takes on a new path: swimming at RIT

SGI Sports Schedule FRIDAY 5/24 V Track & Field: ECIC Championships, at Hamburg, 2 p.m. JV Baseball: at Eden, 4:30 p.m. SATURDAY 5/25 V Track & Field: ECIC Championships, at Hamburg, 11 a.m. TUESDAY 5/28 Unified Basketball: playoffs, TBD Mod Baseball: at Maryvale, 4:30 p.m. JV Baseball: vs. Iroquois, 4:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY 5/29 Mod Girls Lacrosse: at Lake Shore, 4:30 p.m. Mod Softball: vs. Depew, 4:30 p.m. THURSDAY 5/30 Unified Basketball: at Lancaster Mod Girls Lacrosse: vs. Eden, 4:30 p.m. Mod Baseball: at Eden, 4:30 p.m. JV Baseball: vs. Eden, 5 p.m. FRIDAY 5/31 Mod Softball: at Maryvale, 4:30 p.m. Mod Baseball: vs. Eden, 5 p.m.

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Photo by Sam Wilson Joined by her parents and high school swim coaches, Springville-Griffith Institute senior Elle Holland signed paperwork to attend the Rochester Institute of Technology, where she plans to swim for the Tigers, on Thursday. Seated (from left): Heather Holland, Elle Holland, Ryan Holland. Back row: Christy Komenda, Karen Reynolds.

By Sam Wilson After one of the most accomplished swim careers in school history, including three straight trips to the state championships, it’s time for Springville senior Elle Holland to move on to another path in the sport. Holland made her posthigh school plans official on Thursday, May 16, signing paperwork to attend the Rochester Institute of Technology, where she plans to join the Tigers’ women’s swimming and diving team. “I was a looking for a team that was just like a team I had before, one that was very family-oriented but filled with people that are ready to work hard and want to improve,” she said of her decision after a signing ceremony in the school library. “So at RIT, I found a good balance of both academically what I wanted to as well as that family atmosphere that I was looking for in a swim team.” And in meeting with the team and coaches, Holland

said she felt interested in more than just her ability as a swimmer. “I feel like the team was very into learning about me, not just knowing what I’m going to bring to the team as a swimmer, but what my hobbies were, what I like to do, what makes me who I am, not just me swimming,” she said. “And the coaches were also super-willing to work with me and help me get where I needed to be, solidify where I wanted to go to school and provide any resources that I needed during that tough decision time. So I really just fell in love with everything about that team.” Holland’s prep career included the three state final appearances, six individual event school records, three school record relays and at least three pool records in the Griffins’ home pool. She said her favorite memories include several small moments, and one big, unforgettable one. “I think my favorite memories are just the little moments I have with my

teammates,” she said. “My favorite memory is when I qualified for states the first time and everyone ran over to me and it was just super-awesome. I wish I could go back and picture it again because it was just so wonderful. That was probably my favorite memory, but just being with my friends and my teammates every day and working hard and trying to get the best we can be.” At RIT, Holland plans to study biotechnology and molecular bioscience. “Which is a mouthful,” she said. “But eventually I want to do work in genetics.” She also anticipates focusing on her top events, the 50-meter freestyle and 100-meter freestyle and backstroke at the more specialized college level. “We’re obviously very proud of her, not just for her swimming accomplishments but certainly academic accomplishments that got her into RIT,” said Heather Holland, Elle’s mother. “Her work ethic got her where

she is academically and athletically.” Holland swam six years on the varsity starting in seventh grade, but her coaches saw potential even before that. “In sixth grade when she was our manager, we could tell,” SGI head coach Karen Reynolds said. “She was already rising above then. She had started her career when she was seven years old and she was swimming real fast at that age and so it just wasn’t slowing down.” Administrators including athletic director Joseph DeMartino and principal James Bialasik spoke before the signing, as did Holland’s high school swim coaches, Reynolds and assistant Christy Komenda. “It’s a proud day for the swimming community here in Springville, both from boys and girls to the youth program,” Reynolds added. “It’s just a legacy that she’s leaving behind and people are going to remember Elle Holland and see her name, and see her banner and she is what swimming is all about. She is a great role model for kids coming up and so this is just a culmination event for her to put everything that she’s worked for together.” Komenda credited the senior’s talent and work ethic for getting her this far. “It was a natural talent for her and ability, and it’s nice because we have a lot of people that have natural talent and ability, but they lose the drive and the ambition,” Komenda said. “She didn’t lose that and just hungered for more to up her game or just listen for different tidbits for ‘How do I improve? What’s going to knock another tenth of a second off?’ That’s where that drive is.”


Page 12

SPRINGVILLE TIMES

www.SpringvilleTimes.com

May 24-30, 2019

100-plus runners come out for annual Crouse 5K

File Photo

By Bill Peglowski

resulting in slower than average course completion times. Taking first place, with a time of 18 minutes 3.6 seconds, was Josh Zubler. Coming in 1 minute and 52.1 seconds later, Christian Cook was second. Taking third, just 30 seconds later, was

The annual Crouse 5K Challenge run was held in Gowanda on May 19, beginning at the Gowanda American Legion Post 409. Due to the extreme weather conditions, the race turned out to be more challenging than usual

Dominik Rodriguez. Cook and Rodriguez are both currently active in the GCS athletics program. The first female finisher was Kristine Twoguns. In total 122 racers participated. The youngest being 3-year-old Mayson who, along with his brother, Marcus, were

passengers in a jogging stroller that was powered through the course by their mother, Shannon. The oldest participant was 71-year-old Peter Palmer, who came in at position 51. After the race, before awards were handed out in the pavilion at the legion, race organizer Jennifer Horth-Gernatt announced that this would be the last Crouse 5K that she would head up. She thanked all of the sponsors that have supported the event over the year and her family and friends who have been involved in helping her. The race was initially headed up by the Gowanda Area Chamber of Commerce after the idea of a race had been suggested as part of the former Pioneer Days event. She then mentioned

TY N A R R A W N I VETRA IL FETIME DRI UR PURCHASE WITH YO

that, at first, the race had 30-40 runners, adding “we’ve grown quite a bit.” After the first two years, the race evolved, changing the course and becoming the Crouse 5K Challenge. Horth-Gernatt indicated that the race was named after Dennis Crouse, her former business teacher, track and cross country coach, whom she respected and admired. As she concluded her comments she said it was “amazing to watch so many young athletes discover the love of running through this race” and noting that, over the years, the race had directed $15,000 back to student programs at GCS. Dennis Crouse spoke about working with Horth-Gernatt on the race over the years. He said he “couldn’t ask for a better

person to work with,” adding that, when she had asked him to help out, “how could I say no.” Crouse said there were four qualities that described Horth-Gernatt, all starting with “D”: Direction, Dedication, Drive and Determination. Using a track meet relay race analogy, Crouse said that a replacement for Horth-Gernatt was needed, someone to whom she could “pass on the baton.” It was obvious that the respect and admiration between the two went both ways. Having concluded his remarks, Crouse presented Horth-Gernatt with a bouquet of white roses as a parting gift. Complete race results can be found online at www.webscorer.com.

OIL CHANG WITH YOUR E FOR LIFE PURCHASE

C H K E R V A R M O D L N E T A L

PRE-SUMMER SALES EVENT

TRADE VEHICL AND LOWER Y ES OU PAYMENTS R

GET TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR TRADE-IN

BE READY FOR YOUR SUMMER WITH A NEW CAR 2016 CHEVROLET SILVERADO LT Z-71 P6412, DOUBLE CAB, SHORTBED, 4X4, 5.3 V-8, 6 SPD., AUTO, OD, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, ONSTAR XM SATELLITE, PW, PL, P. SEATS, TRAILER TOW, 18” A. WHEELS, 44,000 ONE OWNER PAMPERED MILES, SO DARN GOOD LOOKING, TUNGSTEN GRAY METALLIC W/BLACK INT.

WAS $32,995

ON SALE NOW

$27,860

2014 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT 4 DR.

P6496, V-6, AUTO, 6 SPEED, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, ALUM. WHEELS, 69,000 MILES, FACTORY SUNROOF & MORE!

WAS $13,980 ON SALE NOW

$10,980

COME VISIT WITH OUR FRIENDLY NON COMMISSIONED SALES STAFF 2010 FORD FUSION SE 4 DR.

2008 NISSAN FRONTIER SE 4X4

FREE APPRAISALS NOBODY GIVES YOU MORE FOR YOUR CAR 2008 INFINITY EX35 AWD

P6429A, V-6, AUTO, OD, AC, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, ALUM. WHEELS, REAL NICELY KEPT BY AN OLDER COUPLE, ONLY 83,000 MILES. WOULD BE A GREAT CAR FOR SOMEONE!

TU067A, V-6, AUTO, OD, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEAT, A. WHEELS, TRAILER TOW, SOUTHERN TRUCK, 88,000 MILES, BURGANDY & LIKE NEW!

P6497A, V-6, AUTO, OD, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, P. MOONROOF, P. HEATED LEATHER SEATS, PW, PL, ALUM. WHEELS, ABSOLUTELY LIKE NEW AND GARAGE KEPT, 101K, MUST SEE!

WAS $6,995

WAS $13,995

WAS $10,995

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

TU052A, SHORTBED, 4 DR., 5.3 AUTO, 6 SPD., CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, XM SATELLITE, ONSTAR, PW, PL, P. SEATS, TRAILER TOW, GM RUNNING BOARDS, BEDLINER, UNDER COATED 4 TIMES. ONE OWNER CREAM PUFF.

“18,000 MILES”

OR $179 PER MONTH O DOWN

$4,950

2017 CHEVROLET COLORADO Z/71

2011 FORD ESCAPE 4X4 XLT P6370A, V-6, AUTO, OD, AC, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, A. WHEELS, 106,000 MILES, LIKE NEW & RUST FREE!

P6477A, OFF ROAD, SAHARA EDITION, RED WITH BLACK CUSTOM WHEELS AND THE FACTORY ALUM. WHEELS & TIRES, HARD TOP, SOFT TOP & BIMINI TOP, REAL NICE! “HURRY”

P6481, 4X4 LT SHORTBED, 5.3 EFI V-8, AUTO, 6 SPEED, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, MUNICIPAL VEHICLE, SUPER CLEAN FIXER UPPER!

P6464, EFI 4 CYL., AUTO, OD, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, A. WHEELS, 42,000 MILES, VERY WELL KEPT.

WAS $36,995

OVER $48,000 NEW

WAS $8,995

WAS $8,995

WAS $26,995

WAS $19,995

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

2017 CHEVROLET EQUINOX PREMIER

2012 FORD F-150 4X4 XLT PLUS

2016 CHEVROLET HD 3/4 TON LT CREW CAB P6443, SHORTBED, 4X4, 6.0 EFI V-8, AUTO, 6 SPEED, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEAT, ONSTAR, XM SATELLITE, TRAILER TOW, 40,000 MILES, ONE OWNER, MUST SEE!

P6468, CREW CAB, DURAMAX DIESEL 4X4 SHORTBED, AUTO 6 SPEED H.D., CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, ONSTAR, XM SATELLITE, PW, PL, P. HEATED LEATHER, 20,000 MILES.

$33,500 $33,700 P6461 AWD, EFI 4 CYL., 6 SPEED, AUTO, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, ONSTAR, XM SATELLITE, P. HEATED LEATHER, PW, PL, PEARL WHITE, SUPER SHARP!

P6490, EXT. CAB, SHORTBED, 5.0 V-8, AUTO, OD, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TITL, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, CHROME PKG., 105K, SHOW ROOM NEW! RUST FREE!

$10,600 $8,460

2014 CHEVROLET SILVERADO Z-71 4X4

2005 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4

WE BUY CARS AND TRUCKS GET TOP DOLLAR 2017 DODGE RAM 4X4 1500 HEMI

2017 FORD FUSION SE HYBRID

TU071A, REG. CAB, 8’ HEMI V-8, AUTO, OD, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, FULL POWER LINE X BEDLINER, FACTORY RUNNING BOARDS, 29,000 MILES, BRANDY WINE W/BLACK INTERIOR, MUST SEE!

TU061A, IN RED JEWEL TINT COAT FINISH W/BLACK COMBO INTERIOR, VERY CLASSY WITH ONLY 20,000 MILES, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, BIG FOOT POLISHED ALUM. WHEELS, ONE OWNER, BALANCE NEW CAR WARRANTY, MUST SEE!

WAS $26,995

WAS $17,990

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

$23,500 $15,925

2016 KIA 2016 CHEVROLET 2015 CHEVROLET SILVERADO CREW CAB SORENTO LX AWD EQUINOX LT2 AWD

2016 GMC SIERRA Z-17 DOUBLE CAB

P6451, BIG EFI, 4 CYL., AUTO, 6 SPD., DUAL ZONE CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, P. MOONROOF, HEATED P. SEATS, ONSTAR, XM SATELLITE, PW, PL, CHROME WHEEL PKG. & A BRANDYWINE FINISH MAKES THIS 20,000 MILE GEM... SHARP!

P6398, SHORTBED, 5.3 V-8, 6 SPEED, AUTO, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, PW, PL, P. SEATS, 18” ALUM. WHEELS, 19,000 MILES, SHOWROOM PERFECT & VERY SHARP!

ON SALE NOW

$20,980 $16,960

“PRICED RIGHT”

“PRICED RIGHT”

2013 CHEVROLET SILVERADO Z-71

2014 CHEVROLET SILVERADO LT 4X4

2014 TOYOTA CAMRY LE 4 DR.

$5,960

$5,980

2015 CHEVROLET SILVERADO LT

2017 CHEVROLET COLORADO CREW CAB

P6431, 4 DOOR, SHORTBED, AUTO, 6 SPEED, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/ FM STEREO, CD, ONSTAR, XM SATELLITE, PW, PL, P. SEATS, ALUM. WHEELS, TRAILER TOW & MORE! 33,000 MILES, SUPER SHARP! HURRY ON THIS ONE!

2016 GMC H.D. 3/4 TON SIERRA

P6495, 4X4, 4 DR., SHORTBED, 6.0 V-8, AUTO, 6 SPD., H.D., CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, CHROME PKG., TRAILER TOW & MUCH MORE. LIKE NEW.

TU044A, Z-71 4X2, V-6, 330HP, 6 SPD., AUTO, OD, CLIMATE CONTROL, AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM BOSE STEREO, CD, NAVEGATION, PW, PL, P. HEATED LEATHER SEATS, TRAILER TOW, S. CAROLINA TRUCK, CANDY BLUE & LIKE NEW! 50K HIGHWAY MILES, DON’T MISS IT!.

P6493, CREW CAB, 4X4 SHORTBED, 5.3 EFI V-8, AUTO, 6 SPD., CLIMATE CONTROL DUAL ZONE AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, 18” ALUM. WHEELS, TRAILER TOW & MUCH MORE! ABSOLUTELY PERFECT!

TU050A, 4 DOOR, V-8, 5.3 6 SPD., AUTO, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, 18” ALUM. WHEELS, 69,000 MILES, ONE OWNER, MINT CONDITION! MUST SEE!

TU060A, ONE OWNER, EFI 4 CYL., AUTO, OD, AC, TILT, CRUISE CONTROL, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEAT & EVEN MORE! LIFETIME DRIVETRAIN WARRANTY, INTERIOR WAS COVERED SINCE NEW, MINT CONDITION!

WAS $28,995

WAS $34,995

WAS $28,995

WAS $23,995

WAS $13,995

ON SALE NOW

WAS $26,995

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

2016 CHEVROLET TRAX AWD

2015 SUBARU FORESTER

2016 CHEVROLET TRAX LT 4X4

WAS $22,995 ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

2017 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE AWD

2017 KIA SORRENTO AWD LX

2018 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT AWD

$16,980 $12,900 $23,780 $27,800 $24,700 $18,780 $22,900 $10,500 TU043A, QUAD SEATS LS2 V-6, AUTO, 6 SPEED, DUAL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, BIG FACTORY WHEELS & TIRES, OLD COUPLES TRADE, REAL CLEAN, 40,0OO HIGHWAY MILES, MINT CONDITION!

P6497A, BIG EFI V-6, AUTO, 6 SPD., CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, BLUE & LIKE NEW! 37,000 MILES, MINT CONDITION! 3RD ROW SEATING, RARE FIND!

WAS $26,995

WAS $21,995

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

P6448, EFI 1.5 TURBO, 6 SPD., AUTO, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, MP3, ONSTAR, XM SATELLITE, PW, PL, P. SEATS, ALUM. WHEELS, BACK-UP CAMERA WITH ALERT, 21,000 MILES.

P6467, BIG EFI 4 CYL., AUTO, 6 SPEED, AC, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, ALUM. WHEELS, 34,000 MILES, MINT CONDITION!

P6432, I PREMIUM PLUS AWD, BIG EFI 4 CYL., AUTO, OD, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, P. SKYROOF, PW, PL, P. SEATS, REMOTE START, FOG LAMPS, 40,000 MILES, SHOWROOM PERFECT!

WAS $26,995

WAS $17,995

WAS $19,995

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

$20,900 $18,970 $22,800 $13,900 $17,980

P6408, BIG EFI 4 CYL., AUTO, 6 SPEED, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEAT, ALUM. WHEELS, 18,000 MILES, GORGEOUS ROOT BEER METALLIC W/BLACK INTERIOR.

“PRICED LOW”

2015 CHEVROLET 2017 FORD ESCAPE SILVERADO LT 4X4 AWD SE PLUS P6478, 4 DR., Z-71 SHORTBED, 5.3 AUTO, 6 SPD., CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, ONSTAR, XM SATELLITE, PW, PL, P. SEATS, TOUGH TRUCK, W/ FACTORY 2” LIFT! BIG TIRES, BURLEY FRONT BUMPER, SWOOPING FIBERGLASS CAP W/SKY WINDOWS, SUPER SHARP!

P6473, ECOBOOST, 4 CYL., TURBO, AUTO, OD, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, ALUM. WHEELS, 47K, EXTREMELY CLEAN & VERY SHARP!

WAS $28,995

WAS $20,995

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE NOW

$24,780 $17,860

WWW.SHOPLANDMARKCHEVROLET.COM H

LANDMARK

CHEVROLET INC.

41 East Main St., Randolph, NY 716-358-9009 www.ShopLandmarkChevrolet.com

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