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ELLEN HARRIS selected works

undergraduate architecture portfolio Clemson University


STUDIO

02 18 22 24 28 30

Charlotte Museum of Architecture

Haven in the Hill : Genovese Cultural Complex

Embellir . Paris

C as ting the Ephemeral : D e troi t River Work shop


DRAWING

34 Architectural Illustrations

Where Sky Meets Earth

TABLE OF CONTENTS

36


CASTING THE EPHEMERAL / detroit river workshop ARCH 4520

P r o f e s s o r s : T i m o t h y B r o w n , D r. D a v i d Fr a n c o , U l r i k e H e i n e , D a v i d L e e , D r. G e o r g e Schafer S t u d i o : K e n n e t h B r a b h a m , V i c t o r M a r d i k i a n , R u s h a b h Pa t e l , Ky l i e Wa l k e r

How can the resilient spirit with which Detroit operates be showcased and celebrated? How can the design of the building take advantage of the site’s existing conditions and architectural remnants, i.e. Brodhead Armory shell and structure, the site’s decreasing topography, and vistas to the Detroit River? In addition, how can our current relationship with water be abstracted and revealed differently in order to promote the public about their role in the Great Lakes ecosystem as well as issues on water scarcity, pollution, and climate change? The Detroit River Workshop is guided by an inhabitable wall that transforms along the course of the site. The feature melds old and new elements, as well as various programs, while celebrating the history of Detroit. The wall incorporates the city not only in its construction but through the traces visitors are encouraged to leave. With the theme of altering our perspectives, architectural elements are designated, shifted, displaced, and eroded to reveal and obscure varying programs. The Inhabitable Wall’s notion of adaptability gives the former Brodhead Armory a future to look forward to—a center that educates, empowers, and celebrates the citizens of Detroit.


B R O D H E A D N AVA L A R M O R Y D E T R O I T, M I C H I G A N

casting the ephemeral

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MASSING STRATEGY using program to inform spatial arrangements and create a campus in place of a singular building

CE

B LE

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P EM U ED

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OW

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D E S I G N AT E

SHIFT

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S I T E M O D E L


DISPLACE

ERODE

After analysis of the existing condition of the Brodhead Naval Armory, it became clear that while the former drill hall had significant historic integrity, the other parts of the building had confusing spatial qualities and had unfortunately fallen into disrepair after decades of neglect. Because of this, the decision was made to keep some of the existing building, including the main entrance and drill hall, intact, while demolishing the back parts of the building. In order to create a campus and introduce new program closer to the Detroit River, the addition of two new buildings is proposed. This allows for more views of the river, as well as the ability to create outdoor spaces in between the three buildings. This decision also allows the gabled roof of the drill hall to be visible from both the street and river sides of the building, revealing the large, historic trusses that were retained in this design. In order to create continuity throughout the project and delineate a clear path through the three buildings, a large, rammed-concrete wall is introduced along a central path connecting each building. This wall is perforated in ways that correspond to the program that occurs adjacent to the wall at each part of the campus, indicating to visitors the types of programs that exist throughout the project.

A

existing Brodhead Naval Armory / education core

B

new building / event core

C

new building / exhibition core

casting the ephemeral

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ED

A X O N O M E T R I C D R A W I N G O F S I T E

UC

I AT

ON

R CO

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EX

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The multiple programmatic needs of the project guide the arrangement of the three buildings on the campus, with two new buildings bridging between the original armory building and the Detroit River. These new buildings reach towards the river and create framed views towards the water as well as back towards the armory.

casting the ephemeral

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PLANS

EET STR ON ERS EFF T J EAS

library reflection pond

adaptive event space

meeting rooms

auditorium

library + workshops reflection pond

offices cafĂŠ


exhibition space D E T R O I T R I V E R

P L A N 0 1

lobby offices

D E T R O I T R I V E R

P L A N 0 0

casting the ephemeral

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CONCEPT / THE INHABITABLE WALL u s i n g d e t r o i t ’s p a s t t o r e c a s t i t s f u t u r e In recent years, many of Detroit’s buildings have been either demolished or have fallen into disrepair due to neglect and vacancy. This loss of the urban fabric, fueled by unfortunate economic circumstances, has affected the citizens of Detroit in negative ways, but the people of Detroit have unfailingly fought for their city despite the turmoil. The conceptual idea behind the introduction of a large, inhabitable rammed-concrete wall throughout this project has to do with the spirit of Detroit’s resiliency and the city’s ability to rebuild. The wall, which is composed primarily of concrete, will also include aggregate from buildings throughout the city of Detroit which are currently in a state of ruin. This aggregate, once part of the vast urban prairies throughout the city, will find new life in the construction of a project aimed at celebrating the city’s ability to rebuild.

Speramus meliora; resurgent cinerbus We hope for better things; it will rise from the ashes

From the city ’s turmoil, Detroiters’ resilience was forged.

Where urban prairies and abandoned homes dominated the landscape, the Detroiters transformed the city in their vision of beauty and pride.

Inspired by the resilient spirit of Detroit, the Detroit River Workshop centers on the goal of recasting the city ’s past for its future.


C O N C E P T M O D E L

casting the ephemeral

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MOMENTS ALONG THE INHABITABLE WALL

A. APPROACH / entry

B. GLIMPSE / education core

A rammed concrete wall, dotted with delicate punctures and debris of Detroit’s past, protrudes from the existing armory structure and into a shallow pool of water. The entrance of the Detroit River Workshop guides its visitors from the former entrance of the Brodhead Naval Armory to the inside. Visitors are guided by the inhabitable wall as it continues down the length of the site.

A woman standing in the wall, giving her visual access to a more priv armory structure, the concrete wall perform to the lower level, defining the library and by revealing and obscuring elements of the

A B

S E C T I O N T H R O U G H E X I S T I N G B R O A D H E A D A R M O R Y + E V E N T C O R E B U I L D I N G


C . G AT H E R / e v e n t c o r e + p i a z z a

e event space peers into an opening in the vate area. Within the interior of the existing ms several functions: anchoring the staircase flexible event space, and arouses curiosity e program alongside it.

Defined as a piazza, this portion of the wall anchors a lively gathering space inviting interaction. Perforations are at times large enough for humans to physically inhabit and small enough for memorabilia to be infilled. The wall also allows for a visual connection between the courtyard and the pool of water on the other side, revealing what is happening in other areas of the site.

C

casting the ephemeral

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MOMENTS ALONG THE INHABITABLE WALL

D. INTERRUPT / exhibition corridor

E. INHABIT / exhibition core e

The inhabitable wall is pulled back from the facade, creating a corridor between the wall and the exhibition spaces. Continuing the idea of revealing and obscuring, the wall influences the visitors’ path and the pace with which they walk through the space. This corridor, which ascends as it moves closer to the river, ultimately reveals an elevated view of the Detroit River, which is not initially visible at the beginning of the corridor.

Underneath the corridor a an outdoor corridor which ultimately brings of the wall, which has large, bold perforatio presence of infill elements.

D

S E C T I O N T H R O U G H E X H I B I T I O N C O R E B U I L D I N G

E


exterior

F. R E F L EC T / r i ve r f ro n t

along the exhibition spaces, the wall defines s visitors directly to the riverfront. This part ons, allows for physical inhabitation and the

At the water’s edge, the Inhabitable Wall connects and intersects the Detroit River Walk to the campus. The nexus provides visitor with the chance to explore and enjoy the river’s edge in a peaceful setting.

F

casting the ephemeral

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INHABITABLE WALL using the wall as a generator of intrigue and interaction

Inh a b i ta b l e Wa l l I nf i l l : Ar t s

Inhabita ble Wall I n fill: Spor t s

I n h abita ble Wall I n fill: Co n s er vatio n

“Aretha” by Desiree Kelly “Detroit Chimera” by Kobie Solomon

Detroit Lions Detroit Redwings

Lichen / Creeping Vines Ferns / Moss

Potential infill for Cultural Events

Potential infill for Major Sporting Events

Potential infill for Great Lakes Commission Events

Various openings are produced by re-purposing abandoned building material in the aggregate of the rammed concrete. The various size openings that are produced are adaptable in their nature as they provide openings for users to leave a trace or occupy themselves.


15.

02. 03. 04. 05. 06. 07.

01.

08. 09.

10. 13.

11.

12.

14.

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05.

06.

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L E G E N D : S T R U C T U R A L WA L L S E C T I O N 01. 02. 03. 04. 05. 06. 07.

capping / flashing loose gravel waterproofing membrane thermal insulation vapor barrier screed / concrete topping in situ reinforced concrete

08.

fascia panel

0 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

smooth white finish thermal bridging glazing mullion beam well compacted gravel rammed concrete aggregate wall

casting the ephemeral

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EMBELLIR.PARIS ARCH 4520

P r o f e s s o r s : T i m o t h y B r o w n , D r. D a v i d Fr a n c o , U l r i k e H e i n e , D a v i d L e e , D r. G e o r g e Schafer S t u d i o : K e n n e t h B r a b h a m , V i c t o r M a r d i k i a n , R u s h a b h Pa t e l , Ky l i e Wa l k e r

embellir. paris is a design competition that invites artists and designers to select one of 20 sites throughout Paris that are currently neglected or insufficiently developed, even though they are frequented daily by many Parisians. The competition’s goal is to select designs which will liberate spaces through art instillations that activate spaces which are currently overlooked. The site, located within the 18th Arrondissement, is underneath an approximately 700 m stretch of the Boulevard de la Chapelle, between the Barbes-Rochechouart and Stalingrad stations. The site of the urban promenade realizes itself as the spatial byproduct of mass transportation, wedged between two boulevards and the metro track above. Without a clear purpose, the events that unfold within the space fluctuate. This location hosts the Barbes market twice a week, which draws large crowds of Parisians to the site. When the market is not in full swing, the space is home to local children playing amongst themselves, homeless people seeking shelter, and commuters passing through before making their way up towards the metro stations. The surrounding cityscape operates in perpetual motion, which is an indelible part of urban life. The urban experience is often literally and figuratively reduced to a series of blurs among the hundreds of people passing each other for the shortest of moments, becoming temporary memories soon to be forgotten. People are lacking the physical means to tell their story and share connections. Amidst the rushing nature of the city, the ability to stop and connect becomes paramount in materializing thoughts, desires, polemics, emotions, ideas, and dreams.


R E F L E C T E D C E I L I N G P L A N

S O U T H E L E V A T I O N

F U L L S C A L E M O C K - U P

embellir . paris

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PROMENADE URBAINE neglected space with the potential for fostering human connection

T R AV E L E R ’ S TA L E S

INTERRUPTED STROLL

ELEPHANT IN THE CITY

C A P T I VAT E D C R O W D

PARISIAN P OET (and friend)

LOVERS’ QUARREL

A LISTENING EAR

E AV E S D R O P P E R S

CRAZY KIDS


In order to transform the underside of the metro into a living public space for interrupting routine, encouraging chance encounters, and creating memories from typically forgotten moments, this project introduced an framework of intertwining tubes that extend alongside the columns of the elevated metro track. These tubes carry the sounds of whispers, voices, music, and stories. The colored network of tubes, coded for their respective purpose, give vibrancy to the stark site. Within the promenade, the tubes manifest themselves as visual and auditory devices for listening, speaking, recording, and connecting. They attempt to capture attention haphazardly or through the willful engagement of people who pass through this space often but rarely stop to notice the space or the other people who occupy it. Operating much like a stage, the space within the center gives flexibility to multiple kinds of events, yet the presence of the tubes on the periphery provides the opportunity for people to take on the role as actors in the constantly evolving play of the city.

embellir . paris

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I N T E R I O R O F C O N T E M P O R A R Y F R E S C O M U S E U M

HAVEN IN THE HILL / genovese cultural complex ARCH 3530

Professors : Henrique Houayek, Luca Rocco Pa r t n e r : Ky l i e Wa l k e r

The initial visit to the site of the proposed cultural complex reflected the extensive history ingrained in the steep Mediterranean port city as well as its more recent hardships. Within the terraced space, which acts as a rare moment of open space within the crowded medieval district, are the remnants of la Chiesa di Santa Maria in Passione. The church and its surrounding buildings suffered an aerial attack during World War II, but prior to the bombing, the religious complex included a church, adjacent cloister, and network of underground pathways for the monks and nuns who inhabited the space. What is left today is a ruin of what once existed in this space, along with interventions that have been made during the decades after the bombing. Fractured frescoes, fallen arches, and eroded plots of land remain in a space encompassed by added pathways through and around the site. Rather than recreate the space as it was before, this proposal focuses on revitalizing the site by simplifying the religious architectural elements with modern materials and introducing programs that will draw in the community. The combination of these notions allows experimentation with form and light to create a cultural haven within the city. The space is meant to foster self-reflection and peace, similar to the goals of a traditional church, but without any religious specificity. The programs included are a modern fresco museum that has both exhibition space as well as laboratories to continue the decorative technique in future generations. Other programs include an enclosed market, a meeting hall, a public park, and a series of piazzas.


CITY + SITE ANALYSIS genova, liguria, italia

S I T E O F C U L T U R A L C O M P L E X

Remnants of the religious elements in the site are distinctly Italian, and can be seen throughout the entire city of Genova. The main religious typologies found in the site are cloisters, arcades, arches, piazzas, and frescoes. By imbuing the site with these elements, familiar programs and forms start to take shape for the public, without any overt religious themes.

s u r r o u n d i n g s i t e s | L a C h i e s a d i S a n t ’A g o s t i n o Universita degli Studi di Genova

C A S T E L L O H I L L I N R U I N S

La Chiesa di Santa Maria in Passione

haven in the hill

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FORMAL DEVELOPMENT taking inspiration from regional religious architecture for the contemporary desires of the community

green space adjacent to museum

piazza b/w cloister and museum

center of cloister

facade of meeting hall

E F F E C T S O F W W I I

view of park from the street

Castello Hill is integral to Genova’s history, as in many ways it lies in the heart of the city. This hill was the site of the first settlements in Genova over 2700 years ago. Eventually, in the 18th Century, it was acquired by fraternal and monastic orders, featuring ten churches, four oratories, and eight monasteries, each with attached cloisters. The neighborhood, which was rarely visited by lay people, had a network of underground and above-ground walkways. After the Napoleonic suppression of monastic orders, the area was converted to other uses, and after the bombings from 1942 to 1944, the site has been largely in an abandoned state. The construction of the a new University Center, featuring The University of Genova’s Architecture School, started the process of recovering the area.

I N S P I R A T I O N F R O M P A S T U S E

entrance to museum

Research revealed that the religious complex included a system of underground and above-ground pathways to allow for complete independence from the outside community throughout the year. Similar enclosed pathways currently exist adjacent to the site in multiple instances. This approach is adopted in the site multiple times to allow the users to navigate throughout the site based on their specific end point. This notion is most noticeable in the covered corridor that carves through the three main site elevations. Three piazzas have also been added to the site, as well as large green spaces. Piazzas are essential and abundant in the Italian urban fabric. The piazzas offer an accessible place to cultivate a sense of community.


contemporary fresco museum

restaurant

arcade

permanent market space

fresco laboratories

S T R U C T U R A L S E C T I O N

EXISTING: segmented green space staircase excavated ruins cloister ruins cathedral ruins

PROPOSED: amphitheater seating + park covered walkway contemporary fresco museum fresco laboratory permanent market space adaptable community space

ruins

market entry

haven in the hill

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FINAL DESIGN taking inspiration from regional religious architecture for the contemporary desires of the community

1 8 m

21 m 18 m 13 m 8 m 0 m

S E C T I O N

A A


1.

bell tower

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amphitheater seating + park

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21 m 3.

adaptable community space

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market entry

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permanent market space

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restaurants

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arcade

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contemporary fresco museum

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13 m 9.

fresco laboratory

10. piazza 11.

covered walkway

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09 m

haven in the hill

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CHARLOTTE MUSEUM OF ARCHITECTURE ARCH 2520

P r o f e s s o r J a m e s F. B a r k e r, FA I A

This project called for the design of a more complex and defined building which was located on a site in downtown Charlotte, North Carolina. The studio focused on designing based on rigorous site analysis and the investigation of a precedent. The program for the project was to be for a museum of architecture that acted as a welcoming, public space in the heart of the city. The studio was divided into three parts: the analysis of the site, the investigation of a precedent, and the design of a final building. By taking the time to study the site and learn from precedents about the ways that museums operate within a city, the design for the museum was able to be responsive to its context and its intended program.


CITY AND SITE ANALYSIS responding to a small site on the edge of the urban fabric

I - 277

s i t e l i g h t r a i l l i n e

LARGER CONTEXT small urban site adjacent to a light rail line

s i t e

SURROUNDING BUILDINGS situated between one of the most dense parts of the city and a more vacant area

l i g h t r a i l l i n e

p a r k i n g g a r a g e s i t e

I M M E D I AT E C O N T E X T s i t e r e c e i v e s h e a v y s h a d o w s d u e t o i t s p r ox i m i t y t o taller buildings

charlotte museum of architecture

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ANALYSIS THROUGH MODEL-MAKING a n e x p l o r a t i o n i n t h e e l e m e n t s t h a t d e f i n e a b u i l d i n g’s l a n g u a g e

The second part of the studio focused on using a precedent to understand the unique demands to consider when designing a museum. The precedent was the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, designed by Preston Scott Cohen. In order to better understand this building, a series of four models were developed. These models aimed to represent the programmatic organization, circulation, natural daylighting, and threshold conditions of the project. Four additional models explore how the design elements discovered through the precedent studies could be applied to this project. These models informed decisions about the design of this building, and eventually led to the design of a parti. The precedent uses a complex light well in the center of the building to allow natural light to enter the exhibit spaces along the perimeter of the building. It also features a central ramp that circles the light well and allows for easy circulation between levels. These elements were used as inspiration for the design of the Charlotte Museum of Architecture, but adapted it to the much smaller site. The exhibit spaces are arranged around a central, triangular courtyard which allows natural light into the surrounding spaces. By manipulating the topography around the building, a natural ramp is formed. This ramp allows circulation from the ground floor to the first floor of the museum along the exterior of the building.

C I R C U L A T I O N

N A T U R A L L I G H T

T H R E S H O L D

C H A R L O T T E M U S E U M O F A R C H.

T E L A V I V M U S E U M O F A R T

P R O G R A M

P A R T I


FINAL DESIGN an introspective building which responds to its context For the final stage of the project, the previous studies in site analysis and precedent were utilized to inform the final design. This design is a building that is introverted, focusing inward on gallery spaces, auditoriums, and classrooms, as well as extroverted, engaging passersby and commuters as they enter the city. In order to do this, the act of carving inspired and informed the form of the building. A solid form, void of windows, was created first. Then, carving was used to create corridors, space for circulation, and outdoor gathering spaces. The interior spaces where this carving took place create places where curtain windows allow natural light into the building. This allowed for the natural lighting to be very controlled, only entering the building in spaces that were intentional. The gallery spaces were able to be protected from direct sunlight, while areas of circulation, offices, and classrooms were able to receive natural light. In order to engage the public, the topography of the site was manipulated to include a public green space which envelops the museum. The back of house is underground, allowing for temperature control, while the second floor of the building can be accessed on one side by a gently sloped park that connects the first and second floors of the building.

F I N A L M O D E L A T 1’ = 16�

charlotte museum of architecture

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FINAL DESIGN an introspective building which responds to its context

1 2 3 4 B

GALLERY GIFT SHOP ENTRY B AC K O F H O U S E

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5

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C 1 2 3

4 B

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C

F L O O R 1

F L O O R 2

S E C T I O N A A

S E C T I O N B B

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5 6 7

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AU D I TO R I U M CAFE T E R R AC E

8 9 10

B

A

CLASSROOMS LIBRARY OFFICES

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C 8 9 10

7 6

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F L O O R 3

S E C T I O N C C

charlotte museum of architecture

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WHERE SKY MEETS EARTH ARCH 2510

Professor Joseph Choma

The goal of this project was to design a public pavilion located at the end of a hiking trail. The site, which was steeply sloped, overlooked a sweeping vista of mountains and hillsides. The design appears introverted when approaching it from the trail, with two overlapping concrete curves creating a wall. After walking under the wall’s upturned corners, a visitor would then encounter two corridors formed by the space between the curved walls. The form was created through the manipulation of a single sheet of paper with one curved crease. The spaces within the design were formed by nesting one of these folded plates within another. At the point where the sheets kiss, a small space is created where one or two people can enter a room completely open to the sky. The other spaces are larger and designed for groups of people to gather and enjoy the shade while looking at the beauty of the nature around them.


A

B

C

D

E

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west elevation

B

west elevation

C

east elevation

D

roof plan

E

section

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floor plan

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where sky meets earth

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ARCHITECTURAL ILLUSTRATIONS


architectural illustrations

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Charles E. Daniel Center / Genova


Villa Rotunda / near Vicenza

architectural illustrations

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B r i o n C e m e t e r y / S a n V i t o d ’A l t i v o l e


Ve n i c e

architectural illustrations

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M u s e o G i p s o t e c a A n t o n i o C a n o v a / Po s s a g n o


Boccadasse, Genova

used as cover art for book of student work, self-published by the Clemson Architectural Center in Genova in the fall of 2018

architectural illustrations

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ELLEN HARRIS eharri6@g.clemson.edu (803) 431 - 1944

Profile for Ellen Harris

Ellen Harris Undergraduate Architecture Portfolio  

Selected works completed while pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Architecture at Clemson University.

Ellen Harris Undergraduate Architecture Portfolio  

Selected works completed while pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Architecture at Clemson University.

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