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FUTUREARCH for the UK’s landscape architects

september 2017

crowders nursery

growing for hs2 Saving space

getting it right

rooftop gardens

lighting cities & sports facilities

fira

j a n e f i n d l ay o n b u i l d i n g r e l at i o n s h i p s

education special

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DESIGN TANK PHOTO JÚLIA MARTINS MIRANDA

Times Square New York City

Enjoying the outdoors since 1947 vestre.co.uk

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WELCOME

FUTUREARCH for the UK’s landscape architects

WELCOME Welcome to the September issue of FutureArch magazine. From this point forward we will be publishing the magazine on a monthly basis, so you won’t have to wait as long to get your fix of the latest landscape architecture trends, technology and projects. It’s now six months since we first launched FutureArch as a supplement sent out with the March issue of Pro Landscaper magazine – it’s amazing how fast half a year has gone, and we’re continuing to enjoy getting out in the industry and meeting key players and more. Two major industry names in this month’s issue are Jane Findlay from Fira (P15) and Laura Rich-Jones from Richstone Properties (P21). n the 2 and 2 September, we will be exhibiting at the Flood Expo at the ExCel in London. The FutureArch team is excited to attend the event, which has some fantastic seminars lined up on urban design to help prevent flooding. We have a preview for the event in this issue where you can find out more on the seminar topics and how to register for a free ticket (P31). If you’re unable to attend, be sure to follow us on Twitter, @ FutureArchUK, where we will be live-tweeting the seminars. We have many more fantastic projects featured in the magazine this month, including a look at the Rushden Lakes development in Northamptonshire (P26), the increasing use of garden roofs (P35) and a portfolio on Hilden Grange School (P56). If you would be interested in displaying any of your work in the magazine, please don’t hesitate to get in touch for details.

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Have a great month. Joe Betts joe.betts@eljays44.com

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WELCOME

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AGENDA NEWS the landscape institute pro landscaper business awards

FUTUREARCH for the UK’s landscape architects

CONTENTS

FEATURES 15 21 26 28 31 32 35 38 41 45 48

fira landscape architecture richstone properties reinvigorating retail street furniture preview: flood expo london stone commercial garden roofs tim o’hare: soil talk tree planting contract growing greenblue urban case study

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specials 50 56 60 63

education: universities education: hilden grange lighting: cities lighting: sports

suppliers 66 hardscape Eljays44 Ltd

PRODUCTION Production Editor – Charlie Cook charlotte.cook@eljays44.com Subeditor – Kate Bennett kate.bennett@eljays44.com

Published by ©Eljays44 Ltd – Connecting Horticulture

Design: Mandy Armstrong, Kara Thomas

The 2017 subscription price for FutureArch is £125. Subscription records are maintained at Eljays44 Ltd, 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA, UK. Articles and information contained in this publication are the copyright of Eljays44 Ltd and may not be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publishers. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for loss of, or damage to, uncommissioned photographs or manuscripts. Whilst every effort has been made to maintain the integrity of our advertisers, we accept no responsibility for any problem, complaints, or subsequent litigation arising from readers’ responses to advertisements in the magazine. We also wish to emphasise that views expressed by editorial contributors are not necessarily those of the publishers. Reproduction of any part of this magazine is strictly forbidden.

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EDITORIAL Features Editor – Joe Betts joe.betts@eljays44.com

3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 2DA Tel: 01903 777 570

Printed by Pensord Press Ltd, Gwent, UK

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SALES Group Sales Manager – Luke Chaplin luke.chaplin@eljays44.com MANAGEMENT Managing Director – Jim Wilkinson jim.wilkinson@eljays44.com Editorial Director – Lisa Wilkinson lisa.wilkinson@eljays44.com

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AGENDA

AGENDA

Q: IS ENOUGH DONE IN THE UK TO ENCOURAGE YOUNG PEOPLE TO START A CAREER IN THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE INDUSTRY? Dermot Cowper

jon hawes

Daniel Cook

Landscape architect, David Landscape Architecture I would say that there probably isn’t enough done at the moment. Unfortunately, though, it is very di cult to figure out exactly what more can be done to encourage people to join the industry. It is tricky because in landscape architecture there are two areas of expertise that are being squeezed first of all, there is the architecture side of things, and then also urban planning as well. Landscape architecture is a very misunderstood industry, so one thing that could be done is to provide the public with a better understanding about what exactly we do; this may then encourage young people to see that we can make a difference and that it is an interesting field to get involved with.

Associate, HED I decided to join the profession through luck more than choice. I always had a real love of horticulture and it was actually a tutor at my college who suggested it to me, asking whether I had ever considered it as a career option. That was 20 years ago – I am sure things will have changed at schools now. Whether more can be done to encourage people, I am not entirely certain. It depends on how they receive information at school. Landscape architecture is not the typical career that you will think about during your schooling years, so a lot of people are not even aware that it’s an option. That is something that could be improved. People are not even aware of what landscape architecture entails – they have misconceptions that it is all about gardening, and that’s something that could definitely be changed. Get into schools and promote landscape architecture more as a potential career option.

CEO, Landscape Institute This is a huge problem and something that we are taking a serious look at within the Landscape Institute. The industry is thriving at the moment in terms of the amount of work available, but the problem is that there is a shortage of people with the right training and skills to be able to take up that work. The main concern we need to address at the moment is that after Brexit, there is a real possibility that those who come and study from abroad will then not be allowed to stay in the country – which would create massive problems, as a lot of people come from around the world to study landscape architecture in the UK. While that is out of our control, what we can do is work hard on encouraging people in the UK to take up the profession. At the Landscape Institute we are going to focus our efforts there, and will be starting some projects in the near future to help try and achieve this.

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AGENDA

Philip Cave

Matthew Willmott

Owner and managing director, Philip Cave Associates Recently, a lot more has been done by the Landscape Institute. I have certainly heard a lot of noise about that, which is definitely good – I know it runs a lot of schemes to try and encourage people to get involved. Landscape architecture is not the most well-known of professions. I would like to see the Landscape Institute get into the colleges and the schools and aim to teach kids at a younger age about the importance of the role and the influence it can have. This has been happening more, though, and I am sure that it will continue to increase.

Strata Design and student at University of Gloucestershire As a student at the moment, currently studying at Gloucestershire University, I can talk about the reasons that I chose to get involved in landscape architecture and why others may be encouraged to join. Landscape architecture seemed to give me the chance to make a difference to people’s lives designing places that make people happier even just a little is a worthwhile and fulfilling occupation. The family connection played a role too I started working as a CAD technician in my father’s practice, and three years later opted to start the landscape architecture degree at the University of Gloucestershire.

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“LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IS NOT THE TYPICAL CAREER THAT YOU WILL THINK ABOUT DURING YOUR SCHOOLING YEARS, SO A LOT OF PEOPLE ARE NOT EVEN AWARE THAT IT’S AN OPTION” Jon Hawes – Associate, HED

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NEWS

NEWS

Palmerston Court gets green light from Wandsworth Council Wandsworth Council has given planning consent for Palmerston Court, a new housing development on the southern tip of the Nine Elms regeneration project in Battersea. The four-building development, designed by Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios (FCBS) with public realm by LDA Design, will create 162 homes, many with views along the Thames. 21% will be affordable shared ownership. Public courtyards and gardens will create a network through the site and a connection to the wider area. In a part of London previously dominated by industry and warehousing, it will become a place to pause and spend time, setting a marker for design excellence for mixed-use sites. The buildings, which range from nine to 16 storeys, will have flexible roof gardens, planted to provide year-round colour, providing safe and informal places for children to play. “This is going to be a really special development that is well connected with the neighbouring £15bn Nine Elms regeneration scheme,” said LDA Design director, Benjamin Walker. “From a rooftop orchard, which is set to become one of London’s only productive apple orchards, to inviting new places to socialise, the focus is on creating a sense of belonging.” www.lda-design.co.uk

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BDP wins Yancheng Nanhai Future City urban design competition The Mayor of Yancheng and the central Chinese government have selected BDP from a shortlist of five practices to develop Yancheng in south China. The urban design competition sought a detailed design strategy and ecovision for the city, to boost its leisure, healthcare and education services while improving accessibility and circulation, with the aim of developing it as a key tourist destination. The designs for the 16km² district make maximum use of water, green spaces and eco features, including eight parks and new green water networks. A central lake will facilitate transport links and provide a range of leisure activities for both local communities and visitors attracted to the city centre. The lake will be surrounded by an ecological waterfront as well as commercial and cultural buildings. Three green corridors branch off from the lake, connecting surrounding parts of the city, which is divided into different education, economic, residential, cultural and leisure zones. The scheme will be finalised by the end of September and the project is scheduled to be completed within the next 10 years. BDP is providing masterplanning, architecture and landscape architecture for the development. www.bdp.com

Playforce wins contract to create playground in Southwark Playforce has won a £150k contract to create an entire primary school playground in the London borough of Southwark. The project, the price tag of which is unusually lavish for a school, has been made possible thanks to a windfall created by Friars selling a house to developers for conversion into flats. The contract will see the Playforce team removing all the school’s existing play equipment and creating new learning and physical zones for the children. These include a nature zone with a hexagonal viewing pond, a physical climbing zone, a covered stage area and a creative rainbow-coloured wetpour area. Friars chose Playforce after being impressed by some earlier work that the team had carried out, creating a multiuse games area. They were particularly impressed with the new design, and loved the way the zones flowed across the playground. www.playforce.co.uk

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NEWS

Masterplan for Jurong Lake District, Singapore, unveiled

The Singapore Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) has unveiled the masterplan for Jurong Lake District in Singapore, the city’s future second Central Business District. KCAP Architects&Planners, leading a multi-disciplinary team consisting of SAA Architects, Arup, S333 and Lekker, is responsible for many of the key ideas developed in the plan. After its appointment as consultant in early 2017, the team has elaborated the winning design true to concept. The competition design defined key qualities that could be strengthened throughout the integrated design process, and which now find their full strength. The ambition is to develop the area into a new mixed-use business area built around the future Kuala Lumpur-Singapore High-Speed Rail terminus, which will further anchor Jurong Lake District as Singapore’s second Central Business District. Qualities of the plan include its highdensity mixed-use programme, incorporating new waterways and a series of stacked horizontal landscape datum and connections that weave through the entire district; it will create a distinctive identity for Singapore and its vision as a ‘City in the Garden’. An exhibition to gain public feedback on the plans has been opened for the project, along with a new website. www.jld.sg

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Leeds Flood Alleviation Scheme wins large project of the year at NEC Awards Phase 1 of the Leeds Flood Alleviation Scheme has scooped the Large Project of the Year award at this year’s NEC awards in London. The awards were announced at a recent NEC Users’ Group Annual Seminar. The driving force behind the award-winning scheme is a dedicated project team made up of experts from Leeds City Council, Environment Agency, BMMjv (a joint venture between BAM Nuttall and Mott MacDonald) and Arup. One of the key aspects of the scheme is the replacement of the Victorian weirs at Crown Point and Knostrop in the city with innovative moveable weirs, which are being used for the first time as a flood defence in the UK. The new moveable weirs can be lowered in flood conditions to reduce river levels and the threat of flooding. This technology means flood defence walls elsewhere in the city can be lower, to help preserve connectivity with the waterfront. The scheme was recognised for its ‘one team’ ethos, with

members of all partner organisations working side by side on a daily basis. This collaborative approach between client, contractor and consultant puts the project at the forefront of contract management, resulting in a project that is on-programme and within budget despite being affected by some of the worst flooding Leeds has experienced. The NEC Awards recognise excellence in project delivery and showcase examples of good practice through collaboration from across the world. www.neccontract.com

Fields in Trust chief executive joins parks minister on Rugby visit Fields in Trust chief executive elen ri ths joined parks and green spaces minister Marcus Jones as he visited Rugby’s award-winning green spaces. As part of his visit, the minister met volunteers at Centenary Park in the town, who had helped turn a neglected allotment into a space for the whole community. The Newbold on Avon Community Partnership and Rugby Borough Council secured over £215k to transform the neglected land, and Centenary Park was named the ‘most improved park’ at the Fields in Trust Awards in 2016. The site also received an award from the Department for Farming and ural Affairs for providing an excellent home for bees and other insect life, and enjoys reen Flag Award status. Marcus Jones said: “My visit to Rugby demonstrated how parks and green spaces can breathe life into our towns and cities – contributing to the health and wellbeing of the community. I am looking forward to outlining our future plans to support Britain’s parks in due course.” www.fieldsintrust.org

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NEWS

Arup launches new ‘Drivers of Change’ interactive app Arup has released an interactive app that features its exclusive research on the forces that are shaping the built and natural environments. This digital version of Drivers of Change puts the power to visualise future living and the factors shaping the future in the hands of educators, industry professionals and the public. The app offers an informed starting point for conversations taking place within communities and companies alike. 10 topics climate change, convergence, demographics, energy, food, oceans, poverty, urbanisation, waste, and water can be explored through any, or all, of the app’s five STEEP lenses (social, technological, economic, environmental, and political).

Packed with facts, images and infographics, the app will be regularly updated by Arup experts from around the globe. Additionally, users will be able to shape the app’s content by crowdsourcing their own scenarios for the future. It is available at no cost from oogle Play or iTunes for mobile devices using Android and i S operating systems. The app was created by Chris Luebkeman, osef argrave, and ark Pearsall of Arup’s Foresight, esearch, and Innovation group a team dedicated to helping the firm’s clients understand trends, explore new ideas and develop future markets in collaboration with jingo Labs, a creative technology firm creating unique digital platforms and experiences. www.arup.com

Cregagh Green is first UK project to be awarded London Marathon Charitable Trust funding

SOM masterplan for Colombo, Sri Lanka features designs by Grant Associates Architect Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) has won an international competition to design a new finance and marina district for Sri Lanka’s largest city, Colombo, with a masterplan created in collaboration with rant Associates. Backed by the China Communication Construction Company (CCCC), the scheme will see the transformation of 26 ha of reclaimed land next to Colombo’s Central Business District (CBD), and aims to create a landmark destination for commerce, tourism, and culture in South Asia. Featuring a marina, canals and a sequence of public parks, the masterplan will feature a new skyline’ of skyscrapers that is visible from different viewpoints across the city. Inspired by Sri Lanka’s geography, ecology and tropical climate, S conceived the Port City masterplan concept with rant Associates acting as consultant landscape architect. S and rant Associates’ vision was selected as the unanimous winner by an international jury, which commented that the scheme demonstrated exceptional sensitivity to the ecological and cultural context of Sri Lanka’. Andrew rant, director at rant Associates, commented “A varied and engaging public realm was a key part of the design brief for Port City Colombo. Working in close collaboration with S , our aim was to create a sequence of spaces that complement Colombo’s unique geological character while integrating the new cityscape into the fabric of the existing city.” grant-associates.uk.com

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East Belfast’s Cregagh reen is the first project in the to be awarded funding by the London arathon Charitable Trust (L CT) as part of the Active Spaces programme, delivered in partnership with Fields in Trust to protect and activate outdoor recreation spaces. Cregagh reen will now be protected in perpetuity through a legal Deed of Dedication between Belfast City Council and Fields in Trust. A £5k will help to promote physical activity and community participation. Councillor Adam Newton of Belfast City Council’s People and Communities Committee said “We’ve committed in our Belfast Agenda to making sure that everyone in Belfast experiences good health and wellbeing, and that everyone in Belfast will be able to enjoy its parks and public spaces, so we’re delighted to have secured this investment. Chief grants o cer for The London arathon Charitable Trust, Sarah idley, said “Since 1 1, The London arathon Charitable Trust has funded a huge range of projects, which have inspired millions of people to get active. It’s great to see Cregagh reen become the first in the long list of inspiring projects that will be permanently protected through funding from The Trust, enabling local people to enjoy the benefits of physical activity into the future.” www.lmct.org.uk

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NEWS EXTRA

LANDSCAPE INSTITUTE update

Daniel Cook, chief executive of the landscape institute, fills us in on its recent goings-on – including a new alliance and concerns over brexit

EU withdrawal bill

New strategic alliance

The LI is among seven institutions that have called for a new independent body to scrutinise government and safeguard the environment after Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union. As MPs have been debating the landmark European Union (Withdrawal) Bill, leading scientists, engineers and professionals in the environment sector have called for meaningful parliamentary scrutiny of environmental policies and laws. The Environmental Policy Forum (EPF) has warned ministers that the Withdrawal Bill threatens the future of the environment in the UK. Representing a collective membership of around 70,000, the EPF comprises seven professional bodies that have come together to promote environmental sustainability and resilience. In letters to MPs Michael Gove, David Davis and Pete Walker, the EPF warned that the Bill fails to ensure appropriate parliamentary oversight during the repeal and replacement of EU laws. They also warned that it fails to provide for the full transposition into UK law of the ‘precautionary principle’, the ‘preventive principle’ and the ‘polluter pays principle’ – the three fundamental foundations of environmental protection in Europe. Professor Will Pope, chair of the EPF, said: “The government has welcome ambitions for the environment, with a new 25-year plan imminent and a commitment to improve environmental quality for future generations. Yet plans without appropriate tools and measures for delivery and scrutiny will be doomed to failure. Brexit offers certain opportunities to manage our environment in a more effective manner that is more bespoke to the UK’s needs. Yet it also presents real risks that measures which have achieved cleaner rivers, seas, towns and cities could be eroded. We are calling for appropriate checks and balances to be established from the outset, to ensure we do not risk becoming the ‘dirty man of Europe’ again.’

The Landscape Institute (LI) and Institute of Place Management (IPM) will come together in a new strategic alliance to better enable their members to create and manage great places. The organisations signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) on Wednesday 6 September. This landmark agreement was made during the IPM’s 10th anniversary celebrations, and precedes its fourth biennial international conference at Manchester Metropolitan University. Combining both organisations’ training resources and insight, the partnership will give both place managers and landscape professionals unrivalled opportunities to develop and learn. The practitioners responsible for managing our town centres, public spaces and local environments will be better equipped to attract businesses and jobs, preserve public realms, and prepare for future economic and environmental challenges. Daniel Cook, chief executive of the LI, said that the agreement “marks the beginning of an exciting new era for both organisations”. “We have a great deal in common, so a collaborative approach is very much a win-win,” he said. “By working together, we are paving the way for more professional bodies to cooperate with us on major issues, and so better serve the practitioners and policy makers who make and manage places. Climate resilience, public health and wellbeing, resource security, environmental sustainability and more are all critical factors that our urban and rural environments need to address. This memorandum of understanding between our two institutions will enable us to pool resources and more e ciently equip our members to enrich society.”

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NEWS EXTRA

9 FEBRUARY 2018 EAST WINTERGARDEN, CANARY WHARF Pro Landscaper and futurearch are launching new cross- industry business awards, highlighting those who make outstanding contributions to our industries and bringing people together Supported by leading industry magazines Pro Landscaper and FutureArch, and the industry’s number one event, FutureScape, the inaugural Pro Landscaper Business Awards will be held in the heart of London’s business district at the stunning East Wintergarden, Canary Wharf, on Friday 9 February 2018. The event will bring together businesses across all sectors, and aims to recognise and reward companies within the industry that consistently perform well and strive to raise the standard of UK landscaping. Sharing his vision for the new cross-industry awards, managing director of Pro Landscaper Jim Wilkinson explains: “Pro Landscaper is committed to helping raise the overall professionalism of the landscaping sector. We are also committed to rewarding and sharing good industry practice, and the new Pro Landscaper Business Awards will highlight the fantastic companies that operate within the sector. It will recognise companies that are consistently performing well, building, maintaining and designing great gardens, parks and open spaces companies that are developing the staff of the future and challenging the norm, while constantly delivering outstanding performance. We very much look forward to seeing all the winners in February and sharing their success stories with our readers.” Bringing together over 300 professionals from the UK’s leading landscape businesses, the awards will feature a number of categories aimed at highlighting excellence across the industry. To find out more about the Pro Landscaper Business Awards contact jamie.wilkinson@eljays44.com or telephone 01903 777 570.

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“New cross-industry awards, rewarding consistent excellence”

Categories n Landscape Company • <£1m turnover • >£1m turnover n Commercial Landscape Company n Grounds Maintenance Company • Regional • National n Garden Designer n Garden Design Practice n Landscape Architect Practice Less than five employees ore than five employees n Industry Partnership n Interior Landscape Company n Apprenticeship Scheme n Supplier – Adding greatest value to the landscape sector

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FLOOD EXPO

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14/09/2017 09:10


INTERVIEW

Interview

JANE FINDLAY

Fira Landscape Architecture jane findlay, co-founder and director at fira, talks building relationships and pushing landscape up the agenda

“WHEN YOU DO A PROJECT WITH A CLIENT, YOU START TO UNDERSTAND WHAT IT IS THEY WANT FROM YOU, HOW THEY WORK, WHAT THEIR ASPIRATIONS ARE FOR THE DESIGN TEAM – AND THAT CAN ONLY HAPPEN OVER A PERIOD OF TIME”

Could you tell us a little bit about the history of the company? Fira started life as an in-house landscape architectural practice in 1 6, within an architectural firm called Percy Thomas making last year our 0th anniversary. Sue adley was the first landscape architect to be employed in the group known as PTP Landscape’, which was a standalone company within Percy Thomas. We supported the architects on projects throughout the and across the world, including a lot of work in the iddle and Far East. Percy Thomas was one of the top 10 practices in the country, so it was a substantial firm to be involved with. It was good for us we were a small company, but being part of the group gave us the opportunity to work on larger projects. During that time, we were able to work on some great projects, including the International Convention Centre in Birmingham, the niversity of ong ong, and Foreign ce projects such as embassies. As well as picking up work as part of Percy Thomas, we also started to develop our own clients. When did you become independent? In 1 we took up our option to buy back our shares from Percy Thomas. The practice had decided to close the o ce in Birmingham, but we wanted to stay in the city, and it was a great opportunity for us. We set up an o ce in the ewellery uarter and changed our name. It was the best decision we ever made, and we haven’t looked back. We had a ready-made client base, as some of the architects who had also left Percy Thomas and stayed in the city knew us. I wouldn’t say we have had huge growth since that point, but it has been steady. We are careful about the amount of work that we take on. We try to do the right sort of projects, and our reputation is everything to us. We have a loyal client base and 0% of our work is repeat business. We have a great team that has been with us for a long time, so we don’t have a huge turnover of staff.

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INTERVIEW

What makes you stand out? We are good at getting our projects built, and are one of the few practices that still go out on-site. We are a creative team, and that helps us to perform a wide range of work, including a mix of urban and rural design work. We work in practically every sector; we employ an urban designer and we have an architect to help us with the link between architecture and landscape architecture. We are keen to have a significant influence on each development from the early stages. Steve, our architect, really helps us to do that – particularly as we are getting into the more technical work of podiums and roof gardens. The reason we operate in a lot of different sectors at once is so that if one sector goes quiet and another one is doing well, we will never come to a juddering halt. Even during the recession, we managed to pull through, and came out the other side successfully. We are particularly well-known for our education work; we have done a lot of projects covering all forms of priority schools, academies and further education facilities. We are also very well-known for is our healthcare projects. Those are very technical and require a lot of expertise, particularly when you are dealing with mental health – we work on a lot of child and adolescent units. Healthcare can range from designing areas around the large complex hospitals to doing beautiful little courtyards; creating a healing landscape is a big part of that. That idea of creating a healing landscape and improving people’s wellbeing underpins everything we do. We have done a lot of research into it over the years, and we can see the true benefits of a quality environment and the impact it has on people’s physical and mental health. It has only been in the last few years that people have started to talk about it, but we have been doing it for years. Have you seen a big change in the acceptance of this idea from clients? Yes, we have. Not with all clients – some clients still see the landscape as a necessary evil to get a development through planning. We have some very discerning clients, though: Macmillan is one of them. It really appreciates the impact that we can have on its projects, and realises that landscape is quite a cost-effective way of delivering wellbeing. When compared to the cost of the building and the development, it is actually good value for money. It is so important that we push landscape up the agenda. Have you noticed people getting you in at an earlier stage for their projects? Yes, we have. I think people have realised that here at

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Fira, we are not just good at doing the pretty drawings and being creative – they know that we can deliver a project as well. They know that projects will be welldelivered, completely thought through, well-detailed and specified. We will go out on-site and fight the corner with the contractor to make sure they deliver to our drawings. It is my belief that a landscape architect can only be judged on what is built. It doesn’t matter how many pretty pictures you do: it’s the end result that counts. It is so disappointing if a contractor makes a mess of it, but we try our hardest to pin them down. What do you look for in new work? When we are talking to new clients, we are looking for long term relationships. When you do a project with a client, you start to understand what it is they want from you, how they work, what their aspirations are for the design team – and that can only happen over a period of time. When we find someone who wants to invest in a quality environment, we want to work on their projects, because we know that they are

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INTERVIEW

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going to appreciate what we do. If you build up a long term relationship with them, it is a pleasant journey. It is great to work with people that you like – the construction industry can be quite adversarial at times. Relationships are an important part of our business. Do you do collaborations with other firms? Yes, we work a lot with other consultants. We often act as a subconsultant to architects or engineers and we have had some great collaborative work with architects over the years. In fact, our best schemes are where we have all collaborated well and end up with something that the whole team is proud of. What is your personal role at Fira? I am one of the two founder members of the practice, so the ‘FI’ of Fira is Findlay – my colleague Sue Radley, who is now retired, contributed the ‘RA’. I am one of the five directors that we now have. We have quite a wide age range when it comes to our directors, with new fresh ideas coming into the management team, which is really important.

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1 Macmillan Renton Unit, Hereford County Hospital 2 Robert Blake School, Somerset 3 Royal Liverpool University Hospital

How many people work here? We have 15 permanent members of staff, and five freelancers that we use regularly. Earlier this year we opened our London o ce, which has been really good for us. We have a director down there, and we are trying to build business in the area not specifically to do a lot of work in London, but because a lot of our clients are based in London. It makes it easier. What do you think is the next step for the business? We are on a growth trajectory at the moment and we want to build sustainably. You see so many practices hit a rich vein of work but then they expand too quickly and fall off a cliff. Back in the Eighties we were pioneers in using CAD for landscape design – we had quite a complex and sophisticated system. We have always been technologically minded and we have moved forward. BIM is second nature to us and we are currently working on virtual reality and augmented reality as well. The next step for us is to find ways of using

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INTERVIEW

“THERE IS A TREND AT THE MOMENT FOR GREEN WALLS, BUT I’M NOT SURE HOW LONG IT WILL LAST; I DON’T THINK IT IS A PARTICULARLY SUSTAINABLE WAY OF GREENING A CITY”

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technology so that it delivers results and is not just something that is ‘nice to have’. We have invested a lot in equipment training; it is important to us that we are continuing to evolve and staying up to date. We have got plans for growth in the next two or three years, which will hopefully cement us as one of the principal landscape practices in the UK. We are looking for work overseas but we are not rushing anything we want to find the right project. We always take quite a cautious approach, but it has served us well in the past. How important is green space to you? It is absolutely fundamental, and we are always looking for opportunities to bring people, particularly in urban areas, in touch with the natural environment. I am horrified when I hear some of our clients saying things such as, “We are in an urban setting, we don’t need plants”. Actually, it is the one place you do need to bring green into the city, and I think landscape architects are extremely well-placed to do that. My worry is that I don’t think landscape architects are as good at horticulture now as they used to be. It would be a real shame if the profession missed out on that. If you have trees in an urban environment, they have got to grow, so detailing it is important and specifying the right tree is important. I don’t see how

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4 Front entrance of The Forum, Cambridge Biomedical Campus 5 Kirkwood Hospice, Huddersfield 6 Brindley Place All images © Fira

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we can live without having a view out onto a green space. It is essential that we find new ways to green our cities so that people living in urban areas don’t miss out on that. Are you seeing any trends at the moment in what your clients are asking for? There is a trend at the moment for green walls, but I’m not sure how long it will last; I don’t think it is a particularly sustainable way of greening a city. We are seeing more podium and roof garden spaces instead. We actually hear clients talking about wellbeing, which they never used to. I think that landscape architects have an opportunity to push the environmental agenda and cement the profession in that niche. Are there any key issues in the industry that you would like to see improve? Some of the key issues that I think landscape architects should be looking at are things such as being more involved in the transportation strategy – walking and cycling in relation to other strategic forms of transport. You have got to look at it in relation to the public realm and the green space, and link all these things together. At the moment, a lot of these things are being done in isolation – it would be a lot better if we integrated the thinking.

About fira Fira is a nationally recognised, people-centric practice of landscape architects, urban designers, masterplanners and architects. Over the past four decades its pioneering approach to design – with emphasis on sustainability and wellbeing – has positioned it as one of the country’s leading landscape design practices. W: www.fira-la.com

www.futurearch.co.uk

13/09/2017 15:55


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14/09/2017 09:31


INTERVIEW

GREEN AND LUXURIOUS

“WORKING IN HARMONY WITH THE PLOT YOU HAVE, INSTEAD OF AGAINST IT, IS SOMETHING WE PUT A LOT OF FOCUS ON”

Laura Rich-Jones, co-founder of exclusive London developer Richstone Properties, explains why green space is a key factor in the design of each of the company’s projects

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lthough green space can be an afterthought for many smaller developers, it is central to the work of boutique London company Richstone Properties. The Roehamptonbased developer designs its eco-friendly luxury homes to blend seamlessly with their surroundings. “Whether it’s a single house with private outdoor space for a family, or a larger development with communal grounds, the quality of the gardens is incredibly important to us,” explains Laura RichJones, who co-founded Richstone with her husband David. “It can be a very personal space for our clients. From the size of the lawn to the types of flowers and trees planted, we try to create gardens that our buyers want to spend time in all year round.” ne reason ichstone puts so much effort into green space is that it plays a crucial role in making its developments more attractive to people. “A recent report by the estate agents Foxtons showed that 72% of potential buyers would further invest for a home with a garden,” says Laura. “Especially in London, where outdoor space is at a premium, a garden – and particularly a well-thought-out, beautifully landscaped garden – is something most developers will strive to offer. ichstone manages to deliver mature planting to encourage buyers in a competitive marketplace.” However, she says, there is much more to good landscaping than just supporting property sales. “We like to think our green space adds value in other ways, encouraging local wildlife through items such as bat and bird boxes, as well as attracting insects and bees through the specific types of plants used.”

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INTERVIEW

Richstone’s vision for green areas hinges on giving the environment a helping hand while remaining true to the identity of each site. “Working in harmony with the plot you have, instead of against it, is something we put a lot of focus on,” says Laura. This principle is then combined with practical considerations to create outdoor spaces that enhance each development’s aesthetic, seclusion and peacefulness. “We’re consistently aware of the neighbouring plots, to ensure our finished homes retain privacy for both future occupiers and current residents alike,” Laura tells us. It’s an approach that has paid off, winning the company several awards – including the 2014 What House Awards’ Best Landscaping Design and the Evening Standard’s Grand Prix and Eco-Living Awards for Pembroke Gardens, in East Sheen, southwest London. When planning this contemporary, environmentally-friendly development of four houses and two apartments, completed three years ago, Richstone turned to nearby Richmond Park as the inspiration for the design of both homes and grounds. “Maintaining the privacy and daylight levels of the six new homes and the surrounding plots – something of incredible value to all residents had a big influence on the final landscaping plans,” Laura says. The end result is a collection of six timber-clad properties – built using sustainable materials to a Scandinavian design – that are sheltered by a cleanlined, elegant scheme, combining new and existing trees. The homes come with sedum roofs that feature solar panels and a range of perennials, to catch rainwater and draw insects and birds. “We enjoyed emulating Richmond Park’s woodland environment and complementing the Scandinavian-style homes, screening them from surrounding houses. The sedum green roofs provide an attractive and ever-changing view that helps to increase the site’s biodiversity.” While the gardens at Pembroke have a woodland feel, Richstone’s latest development, Isabella House in Mount Ararat Road, Richmond, looks set to have a more formal look. Although situated within easy reach of Richmond Park, this six-bedroom house stands at the heart of the Richmond Hill Conservation Area, and the landscaping reflects the urban character of the setting. Fringed by mature trees, the triangular garden will be mainly laid to lawn, with two neat rows of geometric topiaries – one to the side of the lawn and one down the middle – creating a visual extension of the al fresco dining terrace outside the kitchen. Both the kitchen and the drawing room will have bi-fold

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1 Isabella house drawings 2 Pembroke roof 3 Langdale house 4 Pembroke house 5 Langdale garden

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13/09/2017 16:56


INTERVIEW

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doors that open onto the terrace, forming a seamless living area that makes full use of the greenery. For Richstone, working with the nature of each site also means making the most of its topography. The company’s most recently completed development, Langdale House, is an excellent example of this – a seven-bedroom property in Roehampton with a large south-east facing garden, set in a ¼-acre plot. “Langdale is situated on a slight hill, so the front driveway slopes down from the road to the house,” says Laura. “We created a staged patio area in the back garden that leads down to a large lawn, where the ground naturally levels out. This comes with an automatic irrigation system, guaranteeing all the mature planting and lawns will remain forever green.” The grass is bordered by trees, which add interest and ensure the house remains private without affecting the sunlight levels of the interiors. At Langdale, as at all other Richstone properties, after-sales care includes free maintenance for a year, with weekly landscaping visits to keep the garden at its best. To bring its green space strategy to life, Richstone calls upon well-established consultants that share its philosophy. Over the past 20 years, the company has built up a network of trusted professionals, but it is always open to working with new businesses. “We often look for landscape architects and designers who have great experience and take a sympathetic approach to their sites,” says Laura. The people with whom Richstone has worked most successfully include landscape designer Todd Longstaffe- owan, who is garden adviser to the Historic Royal Palaces and president of the London Parks and ardens Trust, as well as nursery and installation and design companies olden Hill Nurseries, in Marden, Kent, and Creepers, in Addlestone, Surrey. “They all have incredible visions that are translated perfectly into our developments.”

About Richstone Properties David and Laura Rich-Jones founded Richstone Properties more than 20 years ago, and have built a reputation for developing high quality residential property that exudes luxury, sophistication and classic design with a contemporary twist. W: www.richstone.co.uk

www.futurearch.co.uk

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13/09/2017 16:57


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FEATURE

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REINVIGORATING the role of landscape architecture is becoming increasingly central to retail development in the modern day

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retail

uch attention has been focused on the changing face of traditional store-based retail and the impact of internet shopping. Retailers are working harder than ever to find new ways to get customers through the doors. There is an emerging school of thought within the retail sector that attractive and sustainable retail environments are more alluring to customers and thus more profitable. The spatial quality, landscape amenity and location of such schemes play a central role in the future success of developments. It is also increasingly recognised that the retail environment is not just about the stores, but the public

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spaces they enclose and draw upon. Consequently, it is no longer su cient to provide a token greenwash treatment to the car park instead, the focus is turning to the look and feel, active and inclusive design, biophilia, amenity value and the inclusion of community space. One pioneering retail scheme that has embraced current best practice is the newly opened ushden Lakes in Northamptonshire. The new centre has taken advantage of its unique site to provide a high quality, experiential shopping and leisure destination. As customers increase their spend on going out and entertainment, and place increasing value on meaningful experiences to accompany acquisitions, ushden Lakes is placing landscape and nature at its heart. With Phase 1 including approximately 2 0,000ft2 of new retail and restaurant accommodation, the former gravel extraction pit includes a square mile of lake and SSSI wetlands, home to over 20,000 migrating birds, a boathouse and a boardwalk with alfresco waterside dining, a wet play area and a central boulevard with a water feature and rill. p to five million people are expected to flock to the scheme in the first year. Lead project landscape architect Richard Willmott believes the scheme sets a new benchmark for retail development. “A significant amount of space and investment has been devoted to delivering a series of high quality spaces, with dining and leisure options that encourage people to visit and enjoy a range of activities.

www.futurearch.co.uk

13/09/2017 16:19


FEATURE

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6 All the externals have been designed to sensitively integrate into their context and landscape, and include many bespoke features such as fluid tessellated paving patterns, pre-cast furniture and a central boulevard water feature. The robust language of materials and detailing are intended to reflect the intensive use and industrial heritage of the site.” From its inception, Rushden Lakes has aimed to sensitively integrate lifestyle and leisure with its natural setting, and deliver high quality, ecologically sustainable design that complements the natural habitat. Formerly derelict, the site had become neglected and damaged over a 0-year period. Its development has afforded valuable partnership opportunities and enabled The Wildlife Trusts to bring together seven sites to make a giant nature reserve; the resulting Nene Wetlands is a square mile of wild and man-made habitats, appropriately managed for wildlife and people. The development has also given The Wildlife Trusts the opportunity to open its first visitor centre in Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire, facilitated with £600,000 of lottery funding. The enlightened partnership approach between The Wildlife Trusts, developer LXB and The Crown Estate will secure the future of a rich landscape, while the visitor centre, footpaths, cycle-ways and waterways

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Landscape Architecture Retail.indd 27

encourage a new audience to experience the beauty of the Nene alley. Simple but effective improvements to the path network connected to the development have also allowed access to mobility impaired users. The scheme provides a leading example for other developments in utilising landscape assets and environmental quality to combine convenience and ease of use with an inspiring experiential destination. Visitors to the retail park will be able to engage in birdwatching, as well as exploring and enhancing their visit with activities such as canoeing and cycling, and reaping the benefits of a pre or post-shopping mental and physical wellbeing boost. The lakeside trail and associated animal-themed play areas are proving extremely popular and extend the attraction of the site to a much wider age demographic. The landscape design is a key component in creating a vibrant destination that provides a range of experiences. The perceived quality of a retail development and the external environment is a vital factor in increasing footfall, dwell time and customer loyalty, and also has significant impact on employee satisfaction and retention. The role of the landscape architect is increasingly pivotal in achieving and implementing the high quality environments that support a socially and economically viable retail development.

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“RUSHDEN LAKES HAS AIMED TO INTEGRATE LIFESTYLE AND LEISURE WITH ITS NATURAL SETTING” 1 Rill meanders through central plaza © MartinGardner.com 2 Nature greets visitors to opening of Rushden Lakes © The Crown Estate/Rushden Lakes 3 People enjoying central plaza and pre-cast seating space © The Crown Estate/Rushden Lakes 4 Lakeside view of tessellated paving and pre-cast stone seating © MartinGardner.com 5 Sinuous curves of balustrade lure visitor towards boathouse and woodland © MartinGardner.com 6 Nature takes centre stage at Rushden Lakes © The Crown Estate/Rushden Lakes 7 Visitors combining shopping with leisure © The Crown Estate/Rushden Lakes

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13/09/2017 16:20


FEATURE

THE POWER OF

street furniture

futurearch investigates how street furniture can be used to fulfil a range of important functions – from creating a cohesive social space to keeping the public safe

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t’s easy to take street furniture for granted, but most of us use it every day – whether it’s sitting on a bench to eat our lunch, enjoying the greenery of street planters as we take a stroll down the high street, or simply putting our litter in a bin. In the last issue of FutureArch, Simon Green of Arup flagged up the changing dynamic of our streets, asking where people can go and sit for lunch in the modern day: “I think it is really telling that you struggle to find somewhere. ne or two days a year you might be able to go and sit in the gardens but there are not enough of those small spaces on streets.” This led us to wonder: just how important is street furniture? We posed this question to John Pagan, group marketing manager at Woodscape. “It’s easy to dismiss the UK streetscape as function-only spaces for the movement of pedestrians, while buildings and

high-rises are lauded as architectural wonders,” he said. “In reality, as with all design, the use of spaces between elements plays a vital role. “From practical considerations, such as using bollards and barriers to control the flow of foot tra c while providing protection against ingress from the roads, to more altruistic considerations, such as the relaxation and social element provided by seating and green spaces, street furniture delivers a range of utility. "There’s a distinct trend around the world towards encouraging the social use of space. A bench isn’t just somewhere to sit while waiting for a bus – welldesigned street furniture can bring the community together, providing a place to meet, dine, play or just relax. Beyond that, practical and aesthetic elements play a part. Imposing concrete blocks and cold, rust-prone metal, while practical and low-cost, don’t

www.futurearch.co.uk

14/09/2017 08:34


FEATURE

encourage socialising. Woodscape favours hardwood timber due to its warm and welcoming feel and appearance, which still delivers strength and long life.”

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Street Furniture.indd 29

Images ©Júlia Martins Miranda, Vestre

Times Square One particularly important project for street furniture in recent times has been the Times Square Public Space project. The New York City Department of Transportation selected Snøhetta to lead the design of the new public space back in 2010. Times Square is a busy urban environment, and over time the function of the pavements and pedestrian infrastructure had deteriorated; it was time for an update to improve its functionality and safety. To do so, the model set by the NYC Department of Transportation's ‘Green Light for Midtown’ pilot project was followed. On this project, street furniture was used to close Broadway to vehicular tra c between 2nd Street and th Street, an initiative originally intended to improve safety and alleviate tra c conditions. Street furniture for the Times Square project was supplied by Vestre, a company known for injecting vibrant colours into its products. Interestingly, on this project, the chosen furniture was grey; Romy Rawlings, Vestre's UK business development manager, explains why. “The clients asked for furniture without any colour, because they wouldn't have been able to choose a palette with all the billboards, neon and lighting in the background. It was a deliberate move.” The street furniture chosen for the project is a stackable, flexible variety that is easy to move. omy describes the seating and tables as being ‘café culture’ style fitting for a new, modern Times Square. The inclusion of the furniture has had a huge impact on the area pedestrianising the roads, reducing tra c and improving air quality. The fact that furniture can achieve all of this shows just how vital a role it can play. “Well thought-out seating can be used to manipulate the way areas are used – whether it is for relaxing and people watching or whether it is set up to

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encourage conversation, especially in growing cities with immigration issues, where it can encourage a sense of community," says Romy. According to analysis commissioned by the Labour Party earlier this year, nearly forty million people in the UK live in areas where an illegal level of air pollution from vehicles is causing a risk to their health. With this in mind, we ask Romy whether the idea behind the Times Square project is something that could be used to help reduce this problem. “I think it is a really important project,” she says. “There was an awful lot of research that went into it to ease tra c congestion. The same problems can be found in most of London. If we can reduce tra c and pedestrianise areas such as Times Square, then why can't we do it here? It's the same sort of need, and the air quality and pedestrian experience is as critical in a lot of London.” educing tra c and creating social spaces are just two ways in which furniture can be used to improve our streets. John Pagan explains how safety is another example of the expanded role that street furniture can play. “Recent events have emphasised the need for strong barriers around public and social places, to prevent ingress of vehicles in particular. While everyone appreciates the need for safety, 3ft concrete walls surrounding every open space would be an unpleasant reminder of their purpose. Well-designed hardwood seating, planters and bollards can provide the same function and the same strength and durability, without the stark, utilitarian appearance.” The Times Square project uses the April Go, Stripes and Stoops ranges from Vestre. The project was o cially opened earlier this year, and initial feedback has been that people immediately started using the furniture as though it had always been there.

“WELL-DESIGNED STREET FURNITURE CAN BRING THE COMMUNITY TOGETHER, PROVIDING A PLACE TO MEET, DINE, PLAY OR JUST RELAX”

1 The Times Square furniture was designed with the style of 'café culture' in mind 2 Visitors use the furniture as if it has always been there 3 The use of grey furniture prevents clashing with the bright lights and billboards

FutureArch September 2017 29

14/09/2017 08:34


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14/09/2017 09:17 07/09/2017 10:13


FEATURE

FLOOD EXPO preview with fLOOD EXPO fast approaching, we take a look at what to expect from this year's event and why it is so worthwhile – and timely

Date: 27-28 September 2017 Time: 27 September – 10am-5pm, 28 September – 10am-4pm Location: ExCel Exhibition Centre, Sandstone Lane, London E16 1XL Cost: Free

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lood Expo is the world’s largest exhibition and conference that is designed to showcase the latest innovations that further the way flooding is predicted, prevented, and managed. It takes place on 27-28 September at ExCeL London, and tickets are free from the Flood Expo website. FutureArch will be in attendance at the show. The team can be found at stand F3066, where they will be more than happy to talk to you about the publication and listen to any feedback you may have. The show features over 200 innovative suppliers, 100 CPD-accredited seminars, interactive debates, live demonstrations on the River Thames, one-to-one advice from industry experts, unparalleled networking opportunities and much more. Tickets for the event are free and allow you to gain access to expert-led talks, including United Nations’ Tiffany odgson, NASA’s Dr David reen, ET ce’s Dr Nick Dunstone, ueen of Floods’ ary Dhonau BE, the D’s Colonel Leigh Drummond BE, AEC ’s Steve Cook, the niversity of Exeter’s Albert Chen from Centre for Water Systems, Ambiental’s Daniel Cook, seven revealing talks form the Environment Agency, and more. uests can also move between areas dedicated to flood mitigation, flood resilience, flood rescue and more, as well as the arine Coastal Civil Engineering Expo and the Contamination Expo Series next door. This year’s show has a huge focus on mitigation, resilience and rescue, and exhibitors will be taking

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advantage of the show’s Thames-side location to showcase the most cutting edge products to the crowds of flood, drainage, and resilience professionals in attendance. The extensive list of speakers at the event will be providing plenty of engaging discussions about designing our cities to be better equipped for water management and flooding. This has led to a number of high profile decision makers from large organisations registering for tickets, including those from major international airports, councils, rail networks, large construction companies, land and property owners signing up to attend. To book your free ticket and take advantage of everything the Flood Expo has to offer, register at www.thefloodexpo.co.uk

“THIS YEAR’S SHOW HAS A FOCUS ON MITIGATION, RESILIENCE AND RESCUE”

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13/09/2017 16:01


FEATURE

LONDON STONE commercial QUALITY PRODUCTS, ETHICALLY SOURCED

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LONDON STONE is branching out into the commercial marketplace and continuing its work in keeping supply chains ethical and transparent

“PROGRESSION INTO THE COMMERCIAL MARKETPLACE WAS INEVITABLE”

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ondon Stone has established itself as major force in the supply of natural stone, porcelain and composite decking to the garden design and retail market; progression into the commercial marketplace was inevitable. Through its relationships with landscape architects, contractors, developers, landscapers and local authorities, London Stone is well positioned to supply to the commercial and public development realms. All of London Stone’s materials carry proven track records and hold technical properties that will perform in the most demanding environments, as well as offering aesthetic benefits. The commercial offer includes concrete products from Ireland and Belgium, designed to withstand the harshest of tra cking scenarios and offering an economical installation solution.

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Tailored for commercial clients The company employs a commercial team to assist with design briefs, product choices, client liaison, and aftercare; regular cleaning and maintenance visits can be scheduled as part of a wider package of services. It also has an e cient bespoke

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www.futurearch.co.uk

13/09/2017 16:49


FEATURE

production facility in Heathrow. Working in-house, a team of sawyers and stonemasons use state-of-theart machinery, enabling London Stone to react quickly to the bespoke requirements of its clients. Quality control checks ensure that materials reach site in perfect condition. London Stone operates an ‘open house’ policy at the Bespoke Stone Centre, and encourages clients to take a tour of the facilities. “We are proud of the services that we offer to our commercial clients,” says Commercial anager on uinn. By showing off our skills, we believe we give clients the confidence that we can deliver a great result on site." Another area where London Stone offers a bespoke solution is with its on-site Laser Templating Service. The estimating team is fully trained in the technology, enabling the accommodation of complex shapes or curved sections within a scheme. Removing the need for physical templates made from hardwood or Corex, the Laser Templating Service offers accurate measurements of a specific area. nce measured, the dimensions are converted into drawings by the estimator, using CAD. This data is uploaded into the CNC machine at the Bespoke Stone Centre, where the stone is cut under the eye of an experienced sawyer. “ ur commercial clients have really benefited from the Laser Template service, allowing us to take design responsibility for the more complex parts of a project,” says Estimator Ryan Burge.

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London Stone has developed a commercial range sample box, which is proving popular with specifiers and contractors alike; the box directly corresponds with the 100-page commercial range brochure that was released earlier this year. London Stone’s commercial team already has exciting plans for new product additions to the range as it grows. In employing a dedicated commercial team, London Stone offers the full package when it comes to engaging with commercial clients. Specifier-led meetings in the early stages of project design and ongoing regular communication are key to providing an e cient, above-andbeyond offering. Partner that with collective knowledge and understanding of a project’s progression, and London Stone can add real value to a commercial scheme. With exterior showrooms spread around Greater London and the home counties (and more on the way), and an operations team that delivers more than 100 tonnes of stone daily, London Stone can pave the way with commercially oriented developments – from the education and health sectors, to mixed-use developments, retail and public realm schemes. No Child Left Behind As part of its commitment to ensure that no child is harmed by the stone that it imports, London Stone has joined forces with Belgian stone importer Beltrami to work on a project called No Child Left Behind; this aims to eradicate child labour in Budhpura, the town in which the majority of its Indian Sandstone Setts are produced. The project also involves Indian N s Manjari and ARAVALI, and the India Committee of the Netherlands, working with local community leaders, schools and cobble traders. London Stone is a member of The Forest Trust’s (TFT) esponsible Stone Programme, and so is expected to implement a set of standards within its supply chains. The first requirement is to provide full transparency all the way to quarry level. TFT puts in place a plan to inspect the supplier’s factories and premises, and joint work-plans are agreed on between the supplier, TFT and London Stone. All TFT members have an online transparency hub that gives visibility to the status of that member’s supply chain.

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“LONDON STONE IS A MEMBER OF THE FOREST TRUST'S RESPONSIBLE STONE PROGRAMME”

1 Photo showing recently completed public space in Southwark, London (Black Basalt paving) 2 On-site Laser Templating Service in action 3 CNC Machine ready to cut scant Yorkstone at London Stone’s Bespoke Stone Centre 4 Gavin Walley, Founding Director and Production Manager, engaging with clients on an open day at London Stone’s Bespoke Stone Centre 5 London Stone MD Steve Walley speaking with locals in Budhpura, India

LONDON STONE T: 01753 212 950 E: info@londonstone.co.uk W: www.londonstone.co.uk

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13/09/2017 16:49


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14/09/2017 07/09/2017 09:19 16:36


FEATURE

MAKING THE MOST OF space

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FutureArch explores the trend of rooftop gardens and terraces to find out how spaces such as these are changing the way we head outside in the UK’s urban environments

“WITH EVER INCREASING POPULATIONS AND THE CONSEQUENT NEED FOR NEW HOUSING, THE AMOUNT OF AVAILABLE SPACE FOR THE USE OF SOCIALISATION, EXERCISE AND RELAXATION IS DECREASING”

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n busy, urban areas, space is something that is in high demand. With ever increasing populations and the consequent need for new housing, the amount of available space for the use of socialisation, exercise and relaxation is decreasing. Over the last few years, this problem has been addressed by the increased utilisation of the rooftop. No longer are these areas of unused space – we are now starting to see designs that make the most of them, showing off incredible views and providing much needed room. One of the most recent examples can be found on top of London’s award-winning Whitecollar Factory. The newly refurbished o ce building houses globally renowned brands such as Adobe, comparethemarket. com, Spark and Capital ne, and is already firmly established as an award-winning example of creative contemporary design. It secured BREAM 2014 Outstanding status for sustainable building in design and function, as well as the MIPIM UK Visionary Building of the Year 2016 award. Designed by architects Allford Hall Monaghan Morris, the building overlooks Old Street and the technological hub of London’s ‘Silicon Roundabout’. The futuristic design extends across every inch of the building, culminating in a running track that encircles the top of the building and a rooftop leisure area that offers panoramic views of the city. Charlotte Rowe, director of Charlotte Rowe Garden Design, has designed a number of rooftop gardens and terraces. “The main problem that you have to take into consideration is the elements,” she tells us.

“Obviously, it depends on where you are, but when designing for a space that is that high up there is a lot of wind, so you need to make plans to deal with that. I have done some roof terraces in New York, which were really interesting because there it is very hot in the summer and very cold in the winter – we don’t have anything that extreme in the UK.” With its height and exposure, making sure the unique sport and recreation areas don’t degrade from wind and sun damage was a core concern. To combat this, SEL Environmental Ltd’s SELSports division, the contractor managing the roof and track area, worked closely with sports flooring specialists and suppliers CONICA to lay 290m² of running track over a resinbound gravel base. To ensure effective drainage, the CONICA surfacing was laid on SELSport’s subbase replacement units, an innovative rooftop solution that allows water to be trapped and stored without the need for pumps or irrigation – useful in a dense urban area with limited green space. “Exposure to the elements in a project like this is unavoidable, so making sure the surfacing was able to withstand strong winds and the heat and UV exposure from the sun was crucial,” says Michael Davis, CONICA’s representative on the project. “With its strong adhesion and flexibility, C NICA’s single-layer EPDM was an ideal solution. “We also included an aliphatic binder to protect against UV rays, so that the surface would withstand colour degradation over time – meaning the track will still be vibrant and in optimum condition for years to come, with minimal maintenance.”

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FEATURE

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“Logistically, every aspect of the installation posed a challenge,” says SELSports division manager Chris Stephenson. “Every element of the build needed to be strictly monitored and tailored to ensure it would fit in a service lift on pallets, with weight being a constant issue – rolls of geotextile membrane, for example, were cut to fit into the space available in the lift, and aggregate had to be supplied in small 25kg bags. “It was worth it, as we’ve had outstanding feedback from the client. They are delighted with the new leisure and track areas, and for those using the facilities it’s certainly a run with a view!” Charlotte owe spoke about the benefits that providing these rooftop spaces bring. “The biggest asset that these spaces provide is their fantastic views. One particular project we did in Bermondsey had an amazing view of the Shard, but then it also looked over some rather ugly buildings from the Sixties. You just have to incorporate this into the design; in this instance we had to find something we could use to shield that. This can be done by using things such as planting or furniture.” Despite the positives, Charlotte explains that rooftop gardens and terraces are not an easy option. “A lot of designers won’t touch them because they are quite complicated. There are three main areas of di culty the actual planning of the work, gaining permission from the estate management or whoever is in charge of the building, as they have to give consent for it to be built, and then there is a structural issue. You need to make sure the building can take it and is

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suitable for heavy items and planting.” In August of this year, plans were approved for Google’s impressive looking King’s Cross Campus. One of the most striking aspects of the 11-storey building, which will begin construction in 2018, is the park-like rooftop garden, featuring trees, timber, steel decking, and a running track. The garden will be split across multiple storeys, with ‘plateau’, ‘garden’ and field’ areas where a variety of fruits, vegetables and herbs will be planted; there will also be solar panels to create sustainable energy. Rooftops are certainly becoming an increasingly popular choice for both o ces and residences that lack space for a traditional garden. The additional space provides extra planting opportunities – not only helping to create places where people can enjoy the fresh air, but also helping to ease air quality and pollution problems in our urban areas.

1 & 2 Google’s planned new London HQ © Hayes Davidson 3 & 4 Whitecollar Factory, London

www.futurearch.co.uk

13/09/2017 16:13


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14/09/2017 09:37


FEATURE

SOIL TALK:

Commercial schemes Tim O’Hare talks through the key things that need to be considered when using soil in commercial landscaping

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ommercial landscape schemes are usually integrated into some type of construction project, whether it’s a new o ce development, a retail park, school, hospital or housing scheme. This in itself conjures up a host of potential problems for the designer and contractor to deal with, such as programme constraints, working in all weathers, excessive soil compaction, and contaminated ground to avoid. Choosing a topsoil that will still be able to perform and support a new landscape in such an environment is therefore important.

Soil types An academic soil professor will tell you that a loam textured topsoil is best for most plants, as it has roughly equal proportions of sand, silt and clay to offer a balance of water and nutrients, as well as drainage. In a perfect world, this would be true, but not on a construction project, and not with the UK’s temperate maritime climate (i.e. wet!). For commercial landscape projects with time constraints and inclement weather to factor in, sand-dominant topsoils (sandy loam 60- 0% sand) offer the

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greatest flexibility and least risk. They remain non-plastic at higher moisture contents, and are less prone to compaction and structural degradation. The lower water and nutrient holding capacities can be easily compensated for with a bulky organic compost. Our investigations on landscape schemes constructed 15-20 years ago show no discernible decline in soil fertility or signs of poor establishment through drought stress. Many more schemes show decline in plant quality (trees and shrubs) from compaction caused during installation; this often leaves a legacy of problems. Unfortunately, the British Standard for Topsoil does not take this into account, and allows excessively high limits for clay and silt. Organic matter content An organic matter content of 4-8% in topsoil is ideal for most

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landscape applications. The 3-20% given in BS is too broad – at 1520% OM the topsoil will often act like a sponge, holding too much water and increasing the risk of anaerobic conditions. In lawn situations, this can also result in a soft, uneven surface. pH range The optimum pH range is 6-7, but most plants that are now grown for commercial landscaping tolerate a much broader range of 5-8. At the high end (>7.5), the source of the alkalinity should be checked, as potassium ions have far less impact on soil/root function than calcium. Natural or manufactured? There is an ongoing debate within the industry as to whether manufactured topsoil is better or worse than natural ‘as-dug’ topsoil. Both can be excellent, as demonstrated by the Olympic Park (manufactured) and Hyde Park (natural). However, both can also be horrific. The outcome depends on several factors, for example: • Natural topsoil is more reliant on its soil structure to ensure good drainage and aeration. If this is lost during the topsoil strip and stockpiling, the resultant topsoil

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FEATURE

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after storage can be poor If the wrong ingredients’ are used to make a topsoil, or their mixing ratios are incorrect, the end product simply won’t work Natural topsoil will always have a weed seedbank to contend with, particularly in the first few years Screened muckaway’ topsoil has a range of risks, including glass ceramic sharps, asbestos, excess lime and infertility. Contamination testing Don’t forget to include contamination testing in specifications for imported topsoil. ost imported soils these days are relied upon as a clean cover system for land remediation, as well as a growing medium. Coordination with the project’s environmental consultant is essential to make sure this is picked up and crossreferenced in the Soft Landscape Specification with respect to topsoil depths and composition. There is a requirement in the British Standard for Topsoil for contamination testing, but it isn’t that clear. It states, “Attention is drawn to the Environmental Protection Act 1 0 and the National Planning Policy Framework, under which there is a requirement for topsoil to contain no concentrations of chemical contaminants that would cause a significant risk to human health and the environment.” Not many soil testing laboratories seem to consider

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this, and as a result, they don’t routinely test for contaminants. Don’t accept topsoil test certificates or reports that only show the horticultural properties the topsoil should have been tested for heavy metals, PA s, phenol and aromatic and aliphatic petroleum hydrocarbons. Asbestos is also often required on many projects. Don’t forget the subsoil Subsoil is a fundamental part of the soil profile, and complements the functions of the overlying topsoil. It has a number of key roles Acting as a reservoir of water during dry periods Absorbing surplus water percolating down from the topsoil layer above Providing the main anchorage and support for large shrubs trees Supplementing the topsoil with reserves of mineral nutrients. In a wider context, subsoil provides an environmental service in the form of water attenuation during high rainfall. For subsoil to fulfil these functions, it must a su cient volume of air-filled and waterfilled (capillary) pores to enable root development, allow water movement and store water. Lack of drainage can be mitigated by installing land drains, and low levels of available water can be offset by irrigation. owever, the health and stability of larger shrubs and trees will be reduced if root development is limited to the topsoil layer.

If the composition soil structure of the subsoil is not capable of these functions, the consequences may include waterlogged and or anaerobic topsoils (resulting in plant failure), surface water ponding, increased flood risk, additional irrigation during dry spells, and shallow rooting (leading to increased drought stress and tree wind throw’). iven the excessive amount of compaction caused by construction activities, decompaction of the subsoil is essential but unfortunately it is hardly ever carried out The most capable piece of kit for decompaction is the ripper tine that is attached to a standard tracked excavator. Every landscape contractor should have one

1 Construction sites – no protection for the soil 2 Compacted Topsoil 3 Natural topsoil stockpile 4 A ripper tine in action – the best tool for soil decompaction

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Tim O’Hare Tim O’Hare is the principal soil consultant of Tim O’Hare Associates LLP, which is running another Soil CPD Conference – SoilsCon2017. W: www.toha.co.uk

Soil depths Appropriate soil depths for different landscape environments are largely governed by the maximum rooting depths of the plants, as well as the need for water attenuation and the remediation design of the project (re clean cover system). The table below considers the plants and water attenuation. Table 1: Soil depths Planting type

Topsoil thickness

Subsoil thickness

Total soil depth

600- 00mm

1000mm

Trees and large shrubs

00- 00mm

Shrubs, groundcover, perennials

00mm

00mm

600mm

150mm

150mm

00mm

Amenity grass, wildflower grass

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14/09/2017 09:41


FEATURE

LET THEM thrive with tree planting season almost upon us, we speak to a host of experts in the field to find out how to give a newly planted tree the best possible chance of thriving

Relocating a 100-year-old black Mulberry tree with the Newman Frame (Glendale)

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ccording to advice from the Woodland Trust, tree planting season begins around November, as tree roots are dormant at this time and can cope better with being moved. With just over a month to go, now is the time to start preparations. Trees, especially larger mature species, can be an expensive investment, which is why it is imperative for trees to be planted with long term survival in mind. Planting the tree is only the start: it is no use if the tree becomes unhealthy or grows too large for the location and needs to be removed sooner than anticipated. Ground preparation Deric Newman and Marc Greenaway, sales manager and operations manager respectively at Glendale Civic Trees, recommend conducting a site survey to

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highlight any obstructions that will impede excavation works. “Look out for any issues with hardstanding, drainage, furniture and changes in gradient. Think of the space that the tree occupies above ground, at ground level, and below ground – and give it as much space as possible to grow in each of those zones. “The survey should also look for any services, both above and below ground. Below ground services can cause challenges when excavating the tree pit, while overhead services can block the movement of planting equipment such as cranes and tree spades. “Also, don’t forget to consider the area in terms of soil type and drainage characteristics before you excavate a new tree pit. Trees don’t typically like being in water, making drainage away from the tree pit a major consideration.”

“WHEN PLANTING TREES IN AN URBAN ENVIRONMENT, THEY NEED TO HAVE BEEN PROPERLY GROWN AND PREPARED”

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FEATURE

Tree pits The tree pit is fundamental to a tree’s health. Howard Gray, sales account manager for GreenBlue Urban, has nearly 40 years’ experience planting trees in an urban setting. He carries out on-site visits as part of a commitment to ensuring every tree is given the best opportunity to achieve its potential. “Modern day tree pits have made a massive difference to urban planting,” oward explains. “The whole understanding of the volumes and the quality of the rooting environment over the last 20 years has had a huge impact. We first designed the principle of a soil cell back in 2000 – a load-bearing cell incorporating a high quality uncompact soil was a game changer. “What this does is it enables the soil to remain viable for rooting growth. It enables the microbiotic activity within the soil itself, so the fungi, worms, weevils, bugs and bacteria keep breaking down the organic content into a form of carbon that the tree can absorb. Without this microbiotic activity, the tree will struggle to gain any nutrients, and will not be healthy.” Urban planting When planting trees in an urban environment, they need to have been properly grown and prepared. We asked the Civic Trees team at Glendale what specifications a tree should ideally have to ensure it can survive. “Trees in a public, urban environment should ideally be at least 16cm in girth, preferably 20/25cm girth. By the time a tree has reached this size it will have received formative pruning to create a clear stem height to a minimum of 1.8m, have a strong leading shoot at its tip, and a well balanced and developing branch structure in the crown.” Steve Vincent, horticultural sales adviser at Practicality Brown, breaks down the age a tree should be when it is being street planted. “Semi-mature trees that have been regularly undercut or transplanted and have been prepared for this type of situation will typically be between nine-15 years old, speciesdependent. Deciduous trees are typically transplanted every three years and evergreen trees every four, so they are well prepared and suffer minimal stress when they are moved to their final location.” The Civic Trees team goes into detail about how you can ensure that the trees you select are properly prepared. “Trees should be sourced from a reputable nursery that specialises in growing trees to the size that is required. The tree must have been transplanted (or repotted, if container grown) regularly as it grows,

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to encourage the development of the rootball. When transporting to site, trees that are in leaf should either have their crown wrapped or be transported in a covered lorry to avoid windburn to the leaves. “We would always encourage personal selection of the trees where practicable, in order to assess the quality of the tree before undertaking a planting project, as it is a resource-heavy process.” So, what should you be looking out for on a nursery visit? “Check container-grown trees for root girdling – this occurs when the tree has been left in the container for too long. In the case of rootballed trees, check whether the tree is loose in the rootball. Both of these are indicators that the tree has not been given the care it needs during growing and lifting. In addition, it is worth looking out for crossing branches. A good nursery will address this during growth, while carrying out formative pruning. If it is not dealt with at an early age, it can cause major problems as the tree matures.” Fixing the tree Newly planted trees need to be fixed securely, for the health of the tree and the safety of passers-by and nearby buildings, as the Civic Trees team explains. “All newly planted trees should be supported using a suitable guying method to secure the tree while its roots develop. The method used can vary based on the morphology of the tree. Rootballed trees up to 50cm girth or 6m tall can usually be adequately guyed using an underground anchoring system, such as deadman, plinth or ground anchors. For larger trees and smaller evergreens, we would generally recommend an overhead system, with three or four-point anchoring wires fixed to the tree stem at a suitable height. Site conditions, particularly exposure to wind, will have a bearing on the system adopted.” Mandy Balcombe from anchoring company Platipus tells us about these systems. “Our above and below ground systems can transplant trees up to 20m in height, but we are also able to supply bespoke systems for more challenging situations. In 2013, we

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introduced an alternative to the traditional deadman system, the D-MAN Anchor System Plati-Mat, which uses lightweight plastic cells. The system can also be used to cover and protect large planting areas and roof gardens when the cells are connected together.” These anchoring systems have been used on prestigious projects worldwide, including the Olympic Park in London and the ilan Expo. Aftercare The job is not complete once the tree is planted – to make sure it remains healthy and reaches its potential, it needs to be given a full aftercare programme. The Civic Trees team explains just how important it is to get this right. “Aftercare is the most important aspect of any tree project, to ensure it establishes in its new habitat. Aftercare ideally includes a three-year programme of regular watering, adjusting the guying system, root control, pest management, fertilisation and pruning (depending on the needs of the tree). “As part of any aftercare programme we’d also advise checking the health of the tree regularly to catch any issues quickly. Leaf wilting is a sign that the tree needs more water, whereas yellow leaves, or sudden leaf drop, is a sign of overwatering. Both of these can be quickly remedied before it’s too late.” Steve from Practicality Brown explains the best method for keeping the trees watered and fed. “We always recommend using an automated irrigation system wherever possible, as it is the most costeffective way to water your trees. We also recommend a feeding programme to encourage sustainable growth and strengthen the root systems of the trees. We work closely with pest and disease specialists to monitor conditions, to ensure that trees are in the peak condition prior to and after planting.” Pests and diseases are common reasons for trees being removed early, so it is essential to safeguard against them by monitoring trees regularly and keeping up to date with all the latest disease warnings from local council websites. 1 Front garden planting detail (Practicality Brown) 2 Supply and plant of semi-mature trees for a development in Surrey (Glendale) 3 Guying avenue (Glendale) 4 Moving a tree (Glendale) 5 The Newman Frame, developed in order to move large trees economically (Glendale) 6 Semi-mature trees just planted (Practicality Brown) 7 Platipus Rootball Fixing System and Platipus DMAN System (Platipus)

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14/09/2017 09:53


FEATURE

CONTRACT GROWING:

Crowders

FutureArch speaks to Robert Crowder, owner of Crowders, to get inside the world of nursery growing for large contracts

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n December of 2016 it was announced that Crowders was the nursery chosen to supply the m trees involved in the first phase of the construction of the HS2 railway line. HS2 will be creating more than 650ha of new woodland between London and Birmingham in order to reduce the visual impact of the line and create valuable wildlife habitats. The planting will be a mix of native species, tailored to each location, with a commitment to reintroducing species that are in decline – such as the midland hawthorn and the black poplar, the latter considered to be the UK’s most endangered native tree. “HS2 is doing more than any other major project to protect the environment and leave as little trace as possible,” the HS2 minister Andrew Jones said earlier this year. “The new woodland will be managed for up to 50 years so that the trees are protected and communities will be able to enjoy the new woodlands for hundreds of years to come.” “I recognised three years ago that this would be a once in a generation opportunity,” says Robert Crowder. “I found out as much about the HS2 procurement process as possible by reading everything on its website. I also attended its supplier engagement roadshows and business networking events all around the country. “I did a lot of work, getting myself in tune with HS2's procurement process and what it was looking for from their supply chain. I wanted us to be set up from the very beginning to win this contract, because it is exceptional.” The tendering process Before companies could tender for the contract, there was a pre-qualification questionnaire (P ) process. It was conducted entirely online and applications were invited from both individual suppliers and consortiums. “In the end, we decided that we had the capability and the capacity to go for it alone,” Robert explains. “We had six weeks of really intense work where

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2 we had to supply all sorts of information about our financial security, which was key, but also all sorts of information on previous comparable contracts, our capacity, data security, health and safety – those are the core values for them.” ut of five applicants, Crowders was one of three teams to make it through to the tendering process. This next stage saw applicants given four weeks to answer questions that would demonstrate their capability to meet 12 categories: environmental management, assessment of risk, health and safety, equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI), skills education and employment (SEE), project management, capability, biosecurity, data traceability, water resource management, communications and collaborative working, and transport. “Interestingly, only 35% of the award marks in the tender valuation was going to be based on price

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1 Cell grown oaks 2 Robert Crowder

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– the rest would be about the quality and technical aspect of the job,” Robert tells us. “With this in mind, we decided that this was where we should focus our attention and devote our time.” For the route, HS2 has requested seeds from three different areas one third from the area of the route, one third from two degrees south of the line, and the final third from three to five degrees south of the line. In which particular areas does Robert feel the contract was won for Crowders? “One thing we do have is complete data traceability of our trees,” he says. “Not only for the seedlings and the smaller trees, but right up to extra heavy standard trees. This allowed us to provide S2 with the confidence that the trees would be exactly as they wanted.” Before being awarded the contract, a risk was taken by the Crowders team to strengthen their position further. “In preparation, two years before the contract was let, we started buying seeds from the other regions. That was a big gamble, but it put us in a very strong position as we were able to say we have these plants coming through our system already.” It was a risk that paid off, with a tender evaluation score of 97.85% – higher than any previous score given to an applicant for a government project, including the Crossrail garden and the Olympic Park. A secure future The first phase of S2 planting is a significant contract, spanning over 10 years and set for completion in 2026. ow much of a difference will this

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contract make for business? “Winning this contract has given us a lot of confidence going forward it will be huge,” he tells us. “It is spread over several years, which is a benefit, as we don t want these massive peaks and troughs in our output. It is not going to treble the size of our business and we wouldn t want it to, but it gives us the confidence to know that the business is secured and that we can build on it. “We are taking on apprentices and one or two other full time staff, but we are not doing anything dramatic at this stage, because we still don t know when the peak requirements are going to be for the 7m trees.” With such a large quantity of trees required in that time, do there need to be changes made to the usual process? “We are just going ahead with normal, good horticultural practice,” Robert says. “We will deliver them in good condition and then HS2 will appoint contractors to plant them and make sure that they get in the ground as soon as possible after delivery. There is nothing different that we will be doing from our normal contracts in that respect.” The importance of the task is summed up by S2 s environmental director Peter Miller. “Our woodlands are some of Britain’s most important natural habitats,” he says. “That’s why it is vital that we leave behind a positive legacy of high quality green spaces all along the route.” The first batch of around a million trees and shrubs will be delivered to sites identified for advance planting throughout the route, between now and spring 2018.

“HS2 WILL BE CREATING MORE THAN 650HA OF NEW WOODLAND BETWEEN LONDON AND BIRMINGHAM IN ORDER TO REDUCE THE VISUAL IMPACT OF THE LINE AND TO CREATE VALUABLE WILDLIFE HABITATS”

3 Eurostar high speed bullet train in London St Pancras station

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13/09/2017 15:51


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14/09/2017 09:43


FEATURE

CASE STUDY

Bletchley GreenBlue Urban worked with milton keynes council on its regeneration of bletchley town centre, utilising its rootspace system to aid water attenuation

PROJECT DETAILS Council Milton Keynes Contractor Ringway Jacobs Ltd Subcontractor Smith Construction Group Ltd

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FEATURE

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ilton Keynes Council’s Master Plan was to redevelop and regenerate land in and around Bletchley's town centre, building on the opportunities that has been created by the development of East West Rail and the work undertaken by the Bletchley ‘Fixing the Links’ project – a series of works aiming to upgrade the pedestrian and cyclist links between Bletchley railway station and the town centre. In line with the NPPF (National Planning Policy Framework), the development of Bletchley town centre would enable new shops, services and facilities to serve the population of the proposed new residential areas that have been identified in the plan. A high quality public realm was proposed to develop the relationship of the buildings to the public realm and thus increase pedestrian activity – providing a thriving outlook with improved safety. The plans contained detailed information relating to ground levels, adjoining developments and site boundaries, trees, planting and other features, both on-site and in the surrounding area. The quality of both the hard and soft landscaping was a fundamental contribution to the value of the development. The daily burden that vehicle movement, people, storm water and road gritting would cause to the environment was considered carefully, as was how best to maintain the landscaping over the long term without affect its quality or visual features. Green and blue infrastructure GreenBlue Urban was brought into the team to provide design support and technical input to design of the tree pit. The project presented an excellent opportunity to combine tree planting with the best practice in water-sensitive urban design. By utilising GreenBlue Urban's new RootSpace soil support tree system, large volumes of uncompacted soil could be provided, with a high-strength air deck support that allows both flood dispersion and replenishment of air to the soil zone. Maintaining an uncompacted soil structure is key to ensure long term water attenuation within soil. This means that the soil's macro pores and the micro pores, so critical to water and air transport and storage within the soil, are protected. Soil composition and installation are both areas that reenBlue offers support and guidance on, as it is fundamental to both tree health and SUDS performance. With the Bletchley project tree pit design, a modular, scalable root zone construction allowed tree

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pits to be linked below ground, meaning that they could accommodate a large volume of storm water. In this project, the system has eight trees, with a minimum combined storm water capacity of 19,511L. That’s a staggering 2,438L of attenuation per tree. This water capacity is actually likely to be significantly more, but the current calculating methodology ensures a baseline figure that engineers can rely on. This baseline figure does not allow for tree canopy interception (which can account for 70% of the rain interception in the first hour of a rain event) or ground percolation and recharge, which varies between each site. As GreenBlue often reminds its clients, one of the wonderful things about using trees for water attenuation is that every year the tree grows, its canopy volume expands, and thus the rainfall interception capacity increases. Milton Keynes has successfully completed this scheme and installed what could arguably be described as a truly 'multi-role' example of both green and blue infrastructure. When one considers the multiple assets that trees bring to urban space – which include improving the air quality, increasing local real estate values and contributing a number of health and socioeconomic benefits to local residents it is di cult to imagine anything else that could bring the equivalent levels of value and benefit to the urban realm.

“SOIL COMPOSITION AND INSTALLATION ARE BOTH AREAS THAT GREENBLUE OFFERS SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE ON, AS IT IS FUNDAMENTAL TO BOTH TREE HEALTH AND SUDS PERFORMANCE”

GreenBlue Urban GreenBlue Urban was set up to provide solutions for trees struggling to establish in urban spaces, with the goals of improving urban planting success and increasing leaf canopy in urban areas. W: www.greenblue.com

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UNIVERSITY challenge universities are increasingly making significant upgrades in order to draw in prospective students, for whom the campus environment is becoming a crucial factor

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niversity development is going through a golden age, with billions being poured into new facilities and external spaces. This spending spree puts landscape design at its centre, as universities from She eld to Swansea green their campuses, banish the car and provide calm and inspirational outdoor gardens, squares and courtyards where students can chat with friends or study – complete with outside Wi-Fi. There may be big question marks over the impact of Brexit in terms of funding and risk. And this year

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saw applications drop by 25,000, or % the first drop in applications since 2012. But for the moment, as competition gets even fiercer, investment is considered to be essential to attract research funding, lure the best students and staff from home and abroad, and help secure an elevated position in those all-important league tables. More than a third of students say that when considering where to study they reject institutions because of the poor quality of the buildings, facilities and physical environment, according to new research

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FEATURE

“MORE THAN A THIRD OF STUDENTS REJECT INSTITUTIONS BECAUSE OF THE POOR QUALITY OF THE BUILDINGS, FACILITIES AND EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT”

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3 by the Association of University Directors of Estates (AUDE). High quality facilities were also ranked as among the ‘most important’ factors, according to the 2016 Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey. Connecting campus and city A DE figures suggest that £2bn was spent in 201 -15 on maintaining and upgrading estates, and the UK’s total university estate (excluding halls of residence) now occupies almost 21m square metres of space (up

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half a million on the year before). University spending on estates continued to grow last year, increasing by 5.6%, according to A DE. igher Education Estates Statistics eport 2016, spanning the 201 -15 academic year, also showed that universities spent £2. 5bn on capital projects in that period. The 2 ussell roup universities alone were projected to be have spent £ bn between 201 -201 , according to the group’s own research. any universities have developed campus-wide masterplans for redeveloping their estates over a 10

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1 Nottingham Trent University © Re-Form Landscape Architecture 2 University of Glasgow © AECOM-7N 3 Nottingham Trent University © Re-Form Landscape Architecture

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FEATURE

4 4 University of Sheffield Arts Tower

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to 20-year period, which can include refurbishing existing facilities and developing new buildings. Enhancement of the public realm provides a way to unify the campus. A key trend of the work is often one of knitting the fabric of the university more seamlessly into the city: connectivity and collaboration are the watchwords, with greater pedestrianisation, shops, cafés, pocket parks and places to sit and relax. “Universities are interested in becoming an integral part of the city and breaking down the idea of being remote,” says Jonathan Rose, architect and principal – design and planning at AECOM, who has been working for over a decade on new urban extensions

to Cambridge University in the north-west and west of the city. “They also want to create opportunities for research and collaboration amongst disciplines, and to provide external social spaces that foster that.” AECOM has also drawn up a masterplan for Glasgow University in conjunction with Scottish architects 7N, which received outline planning consent in February this year (see box). “Even out of town campuses want facilities that attract the public. They see themselves as having a key role in the city and as public institutions,” he says, adding that the trend is being picked up in overseas university projects that the firm is working on.

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Award-winning projects Keith Lilley, director of estates and facilities management at the niversity of She eld which is undergoing its own transformation makes a similar point. “Some universities have always had beautiful campuses, but we’re seeing a transformation in the city centre ones. The landscape architecture we’ve seen over the last seven to eight years has been truly world leading.” She eld’s ambitious masterplan, drawn up by rant Associates in collaboration with architects Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, sets out to create a unified, sustainable and green campus over the next decade. The first phase, also being delivered by Grant Associates, includes a project in partnership with She eld City Council to transform public spaces around the university by improving pedestrian walkways and crossings, creating safe cycle routes, adding new trees and plants, and integrating public art into the area. “The opportunity for improvement has been brought about in part because staff and students are largely looking for more sustainable means of travel to university,” says eith. “Being able to turn more areas over to pedestrianisation and cycle lanes has provided more landscaping opportunities for pocket parks and public art.” The transformation of the public realm at She eld helped earn his team the Times Higher Education magazine’s utstanding Estates Strategy award in une. The niversity of She eld was described by judges as being a “worthy winner” for exhibiting “great creativity” and for successfully “uniting university and city goals to improve the environment and public realm of She eld”. Nottingham Trent University is another higher education institution that has been investing in estate improvement across its three campuses over the last decade, and has also won a number of highly

prestigious awards. Its most architecturally lauded development has been at its Clifton campus, four miles outside Nottingham s city centre. ntil 2015, this was a ramshackle 5-acre estate of Fifties buildings it has since been given a new lease of life, with redeveloped buildings and extensive landscaping. At the heart of it now is an iconic new pavilion designed by architects Evans ettori, which provides caf s, study pods and meeting places. The university’s director of estates and resources is ed ’Donoghue. e says that landscaping was used to unify the campus and bring people together, with the formation of spaces to create different ambience, including a striking plaza and new green zone. The outdoors has been Wi-Fi enabled, so exterior areas can become extensions of the library. And it’s not just cars that have been banished so has smoking and chewing gum. e-form landscape architects in Leeds was commissioned to produce a campus-wide landscape strategy to address specific issues including identity, connectivity, and the quality and coherence of the existing landscape fabric. “The new student plaza in front of the pavilion provides a space for events,” says annah Smith, senior landscape architect at eform. “There is a smaller quad space next to library, where we have created an amphitheatre for outdoor teaching.” Sustainability has been a key theme throughout. This has included a system for piping surface water to tree pits, which reduces maintenance requirements and helps provide flood storage. Native species of trees have been planted, including maples and cherries, which are at their best during term time for students. “Cherries blossom in the spring and maples produce striking foliage in the autumn,” Hannah tells us. The transformation of external spaces in the city campus, where 0% of the students are based, is less dramatic and a little more piecemeal but the

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Case study: The Spine, Lancaster University Grant Associates is currently working on implementation works to rejuvenate the Spine – the principal pedestrian walkway at Lancaster University’s Bailrigg campus. “Underpinning all the proposals was early and continued engagement with a wide variety of stakeholders, which helped to energise the project and create a sense of excitement and ownership before the work began,” explains Grant Associates director Keith French. “The works are currently on-site, and are really starting to take shape and have a transformative effect on the quality and life of the campus. “The landscape proposals will redefine the Spine as a ‘necklace’ of spaces with enlivened building frontages, and a series of characterful courtyards and gardens to help knit the campus together. The Spine connects with a series of ‘green fingers’ that offer relief from the grid of the campus, and open up views to Morecambe Bay and the Forest of Bowland. The use of local and timeless materials is proposed, together with local ecology gardens and an extension of the existing SuDS system to help manage the rainfall and collectively support the university’s sustainability strategy.”

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FEATURE effect has been just as impressive. The university has brought more life to the street level by making the area more pedestrian friendly and creating new pocket parks planted with traditional English garden shrubs and roof terraces, where students can relax something they’d been asking for. “It makes your heart sing when you see people sat there eating lunch,” says ed. rant Associates director eith French sums up the prevailing mood in the sector “A key aim is to make students and people feel good about the place in which they study, live, work and relax, and to help establish the campus as a flourishing place, where the landscape and public realm supports a place full of life and a vibrant mix of university and community uses. “I think for all cities and campuses, the landscape and public realm needs to work hard and offer a range of benefits and value. These include spaces to connect people with nature, inspire learning, integrate food production, manage water sustainably and establish rich places for biodiversity, as well as create beautiful spaces you want to be in and which have the least possible impact on the world’s finite resources.”

5 Nottingham Trent University © Re-Form Landscape Architecture 6 University of Glasgow © AECOM-7N

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Case study: University of Glasgow One of the most ambitious new university developments in the UK is a £1bn masterplan for the University of Glasgow, where global infrastructure services firm AECOM and 7N architects have secured planning permission in principle from Glasgow City Council. The masterplan provides a development and placemaking framework for a significant expansion of the university’s Gilmorehill Campus, on the site of the former Glasgow Western Infirmary in the heart of the city’s West End. It will provide up to 85,000m2 of learning, teaching and research space within a mixed use quarter, which will integrate the historic core of the campus – listed buildings designed by George Gilbert Scott – with the surrounding neighbourhoods to the west, and form a new frontage to Kelvingrove Park to the south. AECOM and 7N collaborated on the design of the masterplan, which is focused on creating an environment that will strengthen the university’s position as one of the world’s leading research-intensive universities. The placemaking approach uses the public realm as the spatial framework to cultivate social and intellectual interaction between colleges, and stimulate collaborative learning and research. The AECOM-led team also includes Simpson and Brown, Muir Smith Evans and Spaces that Work. A major element of the new masterplan is the creation of a new public realm that prioritises pedestrians and cycling and emphasises connectivity to the park and the city. This includes a new university square, and a cascade of green spaces leading down to the park and the Kelvin River. The extensive new landscaping includes rain gardens, sustainable drainage systems, lawns and tree planting. Jonathan Rose, architect and principal – design and planning at AECOM, says that the plan maximises collaboration and is an excellent example

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of a university integrating and enhancing the public realm of a city. It has been shortlisted for a World Architecture Festival prize. “Our aim for the masterplan was not only to create a collaborative learning and research hub for the university in the West End, but also set a new trajectory for the Gilmorehill Campus within Glasgow, affirming its integral role in the city’s life and future economy,” says Jonathan. “Development will transform the campus with world-class facilities, while sensitively reflecting the historic character of the city’s West End.”

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PORTFOLIO

HILDEN GRANGE SCHOOL TONBRIDGE by Hawkins\Brown Architects LLP, B|D landscape architects Client: Alpha Plus Group Landscape architect: B|D landscape architects Awards: Tonbridge Civic Society Design Award 2012 RIBA National Award 2014 RIBA South East Regional Award 2014 Project size: 3.2ha Project team: Architect: Hawkins\Brown Architects LLP Quantity surveyor: Arcadis Structural engineers: Price & Myers M&E engineers: Peter Deer & Associates Design and build contractors: BAM Authority: Tonbridge & Malling Borough Council

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PORTFOLIO

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ilden Grange School was experiencing falling numbers of pupils enrolling. A series of innovative new buildings by Hawkins\Brown, in tandem with a redesign of the school grounds by B|D landscape architects, has kick-started the school’s transformation. The brief was to create a dynamic landscape with characterful play spaces for year groups, with a multi-use games area that links the new buildings into the school grounds. Work is now complete on a collection of innovative buildings and enhanced play spaces that have transformed the school. Temporary classrooms have been replaced with simple but innovative buildings that frame and overlook the vibrant terraced play spaces. The new wings provide new teaching spaces, as well as specialist science, art & design and learning support areas. The scheme comprises two low level wings extending into the landscape on three levels. The integration of the new school buildings with the existing topography has defined three distinct playscapes in between, with views over the surrounding fields and the green belt beyond. The vibrant and dynamic learning landscape comprises a series of play terraces that are tailored to each age group, spilling out from the surrounding classrooms. A magic carpet-inspired undulating rubber crumb grid provides subtle opportunities for external learning and play, and creates interest from the many aerial vantage points. Groves of specimen Scots pine and birch trees humanise the terraces, providing shelter and shade,

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PORTFOLIO

and take reference from the majestic tree framework that surrounds the school. eotextile-reinforced wildflower banks and biodiverse wildflower green roofs add to the scheme s ecological credentials, maximising the B EEA ecology potential and responding to the local biodiversity action plans. Cross-laminated timber construction meant that the entire project could be completed in a single academic year. The project has been largely successful, picking up awards including the 201 IBA South East egional Award, the 201 National IBA Award, and the 2012 Tonbridge Civic Society Award. ob Beswick, the founder and director of B D landscape architects, said “We are delighted that ilden range School has recently been awarded a number of regional and national awards and featured as a case study for the EATSC LS publication by the A , as well as being one of Learning through

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Landscape’s Innovative Designs’ case studies for transforming school spaces. This complex and constrained site has been challenging at times, but we are really proud of the completed project.” ohn Withers, headteacher at ilden range School, is very pleased with the work carried out. “We are absolutely delighted with our new buildings, he said. They have surpassed our expectations and provide an outstanding learning environment.” ichard ones, the property director at Alpha Plus roup Ltd, said B D landscape architects was asked to develop a brief and execute a plan that was not only sensitive to the rolling topography, but also linked carefully and seamlessly into the very natural boundaries, and at the same time provided vibrant interesting (practical) play and open space for the school on the multi-levels that were created by the architects awkins Brown. They have achieved this with great success no mean feat.

Hawkins\Brown Architects LLP An internationally-renowned award winning practice of over 250 architects, interior designers, urban designers and researchers. Founded in 1988, they bring a wealth of experience designing and delivering innovative and socially sustainable buildings across multiple sectors. W: www.hawkinsbrown.com

b|d landscape architects B|D landscape architects is a design-based consultancy with outstanding expertise in the field of public realm design, and a growing reputation for contemporary landscape architecture, urban design and space-making. W: www.bdlandarch.com

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14/09/2017 10:01


FEATURE

LIGHTING:Cities

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Lorraine Calcott, founder and managing director of it does Lighting, goes through some of the key things to consider when lighting with LEds

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hen it comes to the recent publicity around blue light in the public domain, it’s hard to know what is fact and what is fiction. Do LEDs really cause harm, or can we use them to great effect if we apply them properly and with care What should you be asking your lighting suppliers and designers to ensure you are not in danger of creating a streetscape worthy of an alien invasion movie First, ensure you get someone competent to advise you. Look for somebody with qualifications from institutes and industry bodies, who can prove their competency and has experience in producing the sort of work you are hiring them for. It’s no good using a company known for its interior lighting design if you want streets or amenity spaces lit. There are many to choose from, so choose wisely. The Institution of Lighting Professionals, the Society of Light and Lighting, and the International Association of Lighting Designers are all good places to start your search.

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Then it time to double your budget. Yes, I can hear

the moans from here, but if you want a quality, fit-forpurpose lighting design, don’t expect it to happen for wholesaler prices. You really do get what you pay for with LED lighting, and unless you are hoping to leave the country when it all goes wrong six months after installation, apply a sensible allocation of money to the project’s lighting budget. It’s going to showcase your architecture after dark, allow visitors to enjoy the space to its fullest and provide a safe and secure environment for everyone using the space – so see it as an investment in a discipline that can really make or break your project.

1 Lumenpulse, The Wellesley, Knightsbridge 2 Interior, The Wellesley 3 Bromley High Street 4 Aylesbury Hub

Choose wisely LED light sources are incredibly flexible now, making them the likely light source of choice for your designer. You might want to consider a few key points when agreeing to the parameters that make up this user-

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FEATURE friendly light source. To begin with, pay a bit more for an LED system that has an effective heatsink and optics. This way, you will benefit from extended life and e cient LED optical management. A bare, uncontrolled chip has no place in a professional lighting design – it will likely cause glare issues, and possibly cost you more in the long run by being less optically effective in its use of light. Due to the concerns over blue light on public health, a LED with a warm colour temperature is preferable, as this has less of a negative effect on humans’ circadian rhythms and ecology receptors. Stick with 000 where possible, and never go above 000 . This way, you will still get the energy saving benefits of LED, but without the harsh blue-white light that is rarely the right choice for the . Power for the people Cities require a plethora of functions to be considered when designing a space, but always remember that the most important consideration should be people. We light for many reasons, including the safety, security and usability of the space – whether it’s interior or exterior, these factors initially shape how we approach the design. Without light, buildings, parks and even homes cannot be used after dark, so it’s of prime importance to get it right. Do big cities sleep? Of course they do, but not as they did in the past. Since the advent of electric lighting we have been pushing the envelope of our day’ to the maximum. Some work nights, others late shifts; people come and go at all times, and our cities are lit accordingly. We need to ensure our designs are fit for purpose and cater for a changing world and the functions of modern living. owever, let’s not forget that we light for people. We should try and do no harm, using adaptive lighting that works with our bodies’ requirements and doesn’t cause problems with our biological functions, so that we can be healthy and lead a 2 -hour lifestyle if we choose to. ow someone feels within a space is instinctive we just know’ when we feel safe or at ease. If you get the lighting wrong, you can deter people from using an area, possibly creating crime hotspots due to a lack of natural surveillance. et this part of your project right and it will cause a stir for all the right reasons. So, before you progress another project and leave the lighting to the last moment, have a think about your requirements. ow will it work with the space, both during the day and at night et a professional lighting consultant involved and give this hugely important factor the time and budget it deserves, so it can really shine.

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“IF YOU GET THE LIGHTING WRONG, YOU CAN DETER PEOPLE FROM USING THE AREA, POSSIBLY CREATING CRIME HOTSPOTS DUE TO A LACK OF NATURAL SURVEILLANCE”

5 Bromley Market Square 6 Cavendish Hotel lobby

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FEATURE

LIGHTING:Sports Lorraine CALCOTT advises on how to avoid glare in sports facilities

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e’ve all seen that eerie glow from badly aimed floodlighting at a local sports pitch. There is a misplaced idea that pointing luminaires up into the air spreads light further, when all it really does is push light upwards. The local residents and ecology are unlikely to be happy about this, and rightly so. This should, however, be a thing of the past. We have no end of quality, welldesigned luminaires available to us as designers, and with the advent of LED technology we can now control light in ways that were previously extremely hard to do.

Beware of budget, poorly designed LED products making low glare’ claims, as this is not usually the case. Single chip LED units with no optical control or lens are unlikely to perform well, and are not technical’ products. If you want to be safe, go for something with actual photometric data, so that a professional design can be produced. It should also include vertical or cylindrical illuminance to ensure that all aspects are correct, and the floodlights should not be aimed too high, as this means that the light source can be seen from miles around. If your product specification

1 Interior tennis court 2 Stadium with open roof lit as skies darken 3 Products which look like this are unlikely to perform well

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FEATURE resembles image three, you are unlikely to be able to focus the light where it’s required, and your glare issues may be greater than anticipated. If you want to do a good job and have fewer issues after installation, use a product where the LED light source is not visible. It should be controlled with optics and have a good luminous e cacy (lm W). A high quality product will have a heat sync to ensure its lifetime is in line with the long life we all now expect from LED lighting. If you can’t see the source, then you are unlikely to experience glare, and your scheme is more likely to sail through planning applications. The tilt of the luminaire is a critical consideration. It’s a myth that increasing the upward tilt increases the spread of light; height of installation and a quality optic are the only things that can do that – it’s simple physics. A well-designed scheme strives for excellent uniformity. The higher your mounting height, the lower the aiming angle you need to employ, which increases uniformity and reduces glare. It’s a win-win. Shields and ba es are not usually required nowadays, as LED optical performance lacks the previous issues with igh Intensity Discharge ( ID) lamps, and contains light to the required photometric footprint. If it is required in sensitive areas, some manufacturers do still supply them as options. Be sure to check the accessory list before you specify your product, so you are not caught out once they are installed. A professional design will always give you added comfort, and will ensure that light ingress, spill and glare are measured during the design process before you go ahead. This will minimise the risk to you and the client. The colour temperature of your LED luminaire should remain at the warm end of the spectrum, with 3000K being optimum. It should certainly be no higher than 4000K, especially if there are sensitive ecology receptors within the vicinity. Colour rendering is only really a consideration if TV coverage is expected. This application also has more design parameters to consider, and a design should never be attempted by anyone other than a competent lighting designer. Floodlighting of a sports pitch or facility is complex, and involves many challenges. Ideally, it should always be undertaken by a competent lighting professional, as the consequences of getting it wrong may well be addressed legally as well as through planning. Light released into the atmosphere or people’s homes causes nuisance and distress, and is viewed unfavourably by all councils. ectification can be costly, should it be found to be unacceptable, so the best advice is to play it safe and use a professional.

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“A PROFESSIONAL DESIGN WILL ALWAYS GIVE YOU ADDED COMFORT, AND WILL ENSURE THAT LIGHT INGRESS, SPILL AND GLARE ARE MEASURED DURING THE DESIGN PROCESS BEFORE YOU GO AHEAD. THIS WILL MINIMISE THE RISK TO YOU AND THE CLIENT”

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SUPPLIER FOCUS:

Hardscape HARDSCAPE shares some of its most prestigious and creative projects

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ardscape handpicks ethically sourced hard landscaping materials to help create visionary urban spaces that stand out, while being delivered within the required budget. Products are recommended on a project-by-project basis and sourced from a worldwide network of ethical and trusted suppliers; in-house technical support and production design teams ensure the correct material specifications. ardscape’s collaborative and consultative approach goes beyond the obvious solution, constantly challenging convention with new products and techniques.

Marine Lake, Rhyl Landscape architect Denbighshire County Council (Senior Engineer) Main contractor Alun Griffiths Contractors, Abergavenny The area adjacent to Marine Lake in Rhyl was run down and neglected; Denbighshire County Council wanted to transform the highway into a destination for visitors as part of a £4.5m investment into the town’s waterfronts. ardscape provided a contemporary scheme that breathes new life into the area. ardscape needed to source a paving material that would complement the blue street furniture situated at the entrance into Marine Lake. For this reason, a new Kellen Kaleido mix of 2-4mm light blue recycled glass was used alongside Kellen Breccia Bianco and Tagenta. Denbighshire County Council wanted to be as inventive as possible on a very tight budget and the aleido mix offered the perfect solution, with the blue tones bringing vibrancy to the scheme and providing a striking finish. The new enhanced paved areas, cycle paths and walkways allow visitors to enjoy the refreshing views of Marine Lake.

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14/09/2017 08:36


FEATURE

Kidderminster Town Centre Landscape architect IBI Group, Liverpool Main contractor The Casey Group Ltd, Rochdale

Hardscape worked with IBI Group and The Casey Group Ltd on a regeneration of the pedestrianised shopping area in Kidderminster town centre. The project took part in two phases, the first being the creation of a public square designed to look like the Penny Black stamp. This is in honour of oland ill, a local philanthropist who founded the modern postal system and whose statue is in the square. Crystal Black ranite was chosen as the main paving material due to its durability. oyal White ranite setts were laid in a fan pattern to recreate the stamp s details and create a striking contrast to the rest of the paving. The second phase involved resurfacing the pedestrianised streets and reconfiguring a key route through the town centre. For this phase, Hardscape used a gold, silver and bronze colour palette. Tower Sandstone was used as the gold’ material in the main squares, while the ellen Breccia Tagenta range was used as the silver’ for the retail streets and highway route footpaths. The scheme helped to transform the area into a pedestrian friendly public space that reflects idderminster’s heritage.

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Oban Waterfront Landscape architect Capita (Carlisle) Main contractor Balfour Beatty Civil Engineering Ltd, Newcastle upon Tyne (Phase 1), Land Engineering, Kilmarnock (Phase 2)

A public space overlooking ban’s bay was transformed as part of an initiative to rejuvenate the area’s waterfront towns. ardscape worked alongside architects from Capita (Carlisle) to deliver hard landscaping that contributes to a vibrant and contemporary town centre. agma ranite paving was used, brightening up the pathways from their previous dark appearance. Burlington Stone walling and Prima Porphyry were also used, offering a traditional appearance that complements the architecture. The purple tones and glittering crystals of the Porphyry

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combine well with the raw texture of the Burlington walling, establishing a unique look. The benches were sculpted out of obra ranite and crafted in a curved shape to reflect the sweeping tide. ardscape also crafted a beautiful Artscape plaque commemorating both world wars, etched using CAD techniques. Artscape is the process by which ardscape can create bespoke art features using natural and man-made materials. The result is an inviting space running alongside the town centre’s waterfront, which tourists, residents and passers-by can enjoy.

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Peel Park Campus Marks a New Era The new campus at the University of Salford has, at its focal point, a fibre glass statue of Friedrich Engels, the German radical, who founded Marxism with Karl Marx, lived and worked in Salford in the 19th century. Hardscape supplied a total area of 12,000m2 of Kellen Lavaro mix of 50/200x200/600x80mm Wit, Zwart, Grijs and Rood paving and Kellen Lavaro Wit 701 steps with Crystal Black granite inserts. This was a complex range of Kellen materials used in different patterns together with Kobra granite edgings, Kobra and Poppy granite seating, Kobra granite copings and Royal White granite walling units with internal Crystal Black, Royal White and Cloudy White granites so ultimately the logistics and production processes had to be accurate to ensure materials were delivered on site at the right time. Landscape Architects: DEP Landscape Architecture, Manchester (Gateway and Adelphi Creative Arts building); Gillespies, Manchester (Public Realm); Aecom, Manchester (hard landscape design and layout). Contractors: BAM Construction, Salford.

For further information on our paving products please visit: www.hardscape.co.uk or telephone: 01204 565 500

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FutureArch September 2017  
FutureArch September 2017  
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