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Garden Centre Retail

I N D E PE N D E N T B U S I N E S S S U P P L E M E N T I S S U E 2 • N OV E M B E R 2 0 18

SUCCESS STORY STRATFORD GARDEN CENTRE

DEAN’S GARDEN CENTRE 50 years in the industry

FREE INSIDE Westland wall planner

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For full details on all jobs, please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk Call 01903 777 584 or email liam.colclough@eljays44.com with your vacancy

‘TIS THE SEASON...

TO INCREASE YOUR WORKFORCE! Are you taking on extra staff to deal with the additional pressure the Christmas season brings? Let Horticulture Careers help give you the best exposure online with 25% off all garden centre jobs! Valid until 20/12/18

TECHNICAL SALES MANAGER (HORTICULTURE) BATHGATE SILICA SAND Location: Cheshire

We are looking for a Technical Sales Manager. Bathgate Silica Sand Ltd has been established for more than 100 years and is a leading producer and supplier of high-quality products into a number of different markets throughout the UK. Due to continued expansion of our Bathgate Horticulture product range, an exciting opportunity has arisen for an experienced individual to join the Bathgate team. The ideal candidate must be highly motivated, have the ability to work well unsupervised, and will concentrate on new and current business for our horticultural range.

Essential qualifications and experience: • Excellent verbal and IT skills • Sales experience (preferably in the horticultural industry) • Attention to detail and an ability to multitask • Good level of qualifications • Good level of numeracy This role is in support of an existing office-based sales team, and is field orientated. Excellent knowledge of the retail and professional horticultural market would be a distinct advantage. For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

VISIT THE WEBSITE AT HORTICULTURECAREERS.CO.UK CALL LIAM TODAY ON 01903 777 584 hort careers.indd 1

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WELCOME Garden C entre

I N D E PE

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NDENT

BUSIN

ISSUE

Garden Centre Retail

FR EE IN

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08 EXPANDING YOUR SPACE

Solutions from Worldwide Structures

10 CASHFLOW SUCCESS

Valuable tips from myPOS

12 GCA INSPECTIONS

Maintaining high standards

14 VLOGGING FOR BUSINESS

Making the most of this marketing tool

15 STRATFORD GARDEN CENTRE

CO N TAC T Eljays44 Ltd 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA

We stla nd SID E pla nne r wa ll

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EDITORIAL Managing Editor – Joe Wilkinson joe.wilkinson@eljays44.com Tel: 01903 777 577 Subeditor – Kia Wilson kia.wilson@eljays44.com Tel: 01903 777 597 ADVERTISING Sales Manager – Tina Savelle tina.savelle@eljays44.com Tel: 01903 777 582 Horticulture Careers – Liam Colclough Tel: 01903 777 584 liam.colclough@eljays44.com PRODUCTION Design –Kirsty Turek, Kara Thomas

Joe Wilkinson joe.wilkinson@eljays44.com Managing Editor Garden Centre Retail

This issue is designed to help you get ahead with business in 2019

Printed by Pensord Press Ltd, Gwent, UK Published by ©Eljays44 Ltd MANAGEMENT Managing Director – Jim Wilkinson Director – Lisa Wilkinson Business Development Manager – Jamie Wilkinson MARKETING AND CIRCULATION Client relations – Amber Bernabe amber.bernabe@eljays44.com Tel: 01903 777 581 Subscription enquiries – Chris Anderson chris.anderson@eljays44.com Tel: 01903 777 575 Garden Centre Retail is published bimonthly by Eljays44 Ltd. The 2018 subscription price is £95. Subscription records are maintained at Eljays44 Ltd, 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA. Articles and information contained in this publication are the copyright of Eljays44 Ltd and may not be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publishers. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for loss of, or damage to, noncommissioned photographs or manuscripts.

CONTENTS The 50-year-old business in York

BER 20 18

DE AN ’S CE NT RE GA RD EN 50 yea rs the ind in ust ry

Welcome to the second Independent Business Supplement of 2018! We’ve built on the success of our March issue to give you even more expert advice and information to use as and when you need it. Following this, there’s one more issue of our magazine in 2018, before we embark on what is likely to be a year of economic uncertainty. This issue is designed to help you get ahead with business in 2019. We’ve got an excellent feature looking at the 50-year history of Dean’s Garden Centre in York. They’ve adapted and overcome a fair amount of change in the industry over the years to make sure they stay relevant to today’s market. We also have a feature with Stratford Garden Centre’s Helen Lloyd. In January the centre was voted in the top 10 GCA garden centres and the story of how it has achieved success is certainly worth noting. We also have a feature from the GCA’s inspection team. They explain how the scoring system works and how to maintain high standards. Robbie Cumming of Hornby Whitefoot shares his marketing tips in the form of vlogging and Andrew Byrne at myPOS passes on some valuable cashflow advice. We hope you enjoy the read.

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MENT

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SUCCESS STRATFOR STORY GARDEN D CENTRE

INDEPENDENT BUSINESS GUIDE

Joe and the Garden Centre Retail team

Retail

ESS SU PPLE

18 THERMOFLOR CONSTRUCT B.V. Specialists in construction projects from concept to completion

20 OPEN RETAIL SOLUTIONS

Expert support for your EPoS needs

22 GCS (GB)

Loss prevention and product protection in garden centres

24 CREATIVE SOLUTIONS

Bespoke shopfitting and refrigeration for your retail food area

Whilst every effort has been made to maintain the integrity of our advertisers, we accept no responsibility for any problem, complaints, or subsequent litigation arising from readers’ responses to advertisements in the magazine. We also wish to emphasise that views expressed by editorial contributors are not necessarily those of the publishers. Reproduction of any part of this magazine is strictly forbidden.

Read their success story

www.gardencentreretail.com

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DEAN’S GARDEN CENTRE INTERVIEW

AN INTERVIEW WITH DEAN’S GARDEN CENTRE Plant sales remain at the core of this family-run business that has adapted to change over the last 50 years while staying true to its roots

On 7 December 1968, Ken and Margaret Dean first opened the doors to Dean’s Garden Centre and over the last 50 years this familyrun business has gone from strength to strength. From its humble beginnings as a 60 x 14ft greenhouse and prefab building, the business has extended to the purchase of a second garden centre at Scarborough in 1986 and the opening of the coffee shop at York and nursery site in 1991. The site now covers more than four acres, with the most recent expansion in 2017 of a new, larger coffee shop.

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Dean’s has remained a family enterprise and, when Ken and Margaret retired in 1993, the business was taken over by their three children Richard, Helen and Sarah who still run the business today. Between the three partners, they have eight children, four of whom currently work within the business. During the last 50 years, gardening has remained at the centre of the business ethos, with Dean’s growing a large range of bedding plants, perennials, vegetable plants, cyclamen and bowls of bulbs at their nursery site just a short distance away from the garden centre. More than 120 staff are employed between the two garden centres at York, Scarborough and the nursery – over 35 of them have worked for the company for 10 years or more, establishing the business as a significant local employer while staying true to its roots.

Garden Centre Retail Independent Business Supplement November 2018

For a number of years, Dean’s Garden Centre has supported charities in many different ways. Since 2002, a charity of the year has been nominated annually and this alone has raised over £265,000 to date. The charity of the year for 2018 is Macmillan Cancer Support. To help celebrate their anniversary, there will be two celebration days: a 50th Anniversary Charity Day will be held on Thursday 6 December, which will include a cake stall, golden raffle, tombola and book stall, proceeds of which will go to Macmillan Cancer Support. On Friday 7 December they will be celebrating their 50th anniversary with special offers and a golden envelope giveaway.

1957

Changes “The biggest changes we’ve faced in our history are the move from bare root/root balled plants to containerised

1971

Ken Dean starts work at Wright & Harris (a seed and bulb merchant in York)

1965 Ken and Margaret Dean decide to start a garden centre and look for a suitable site

1966 They move to Stockton-onthe-Forest, a village outside York in March and grow and sell vegetables from a shed

1967 Planning permission is granted for a garden centre

1968 Ken Dean leaves Wright & Harris in October. The garden centre opens 7 December in a prefab building and glasshouse with just casual help

The shop is extended linking the prefab building to an old cowshed. There are now six staff employed full time

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INTERVIEW DEAN’S GARDEN CENTRE

1973 The building is extended further and a Pratten greenhouse built. Our longest serving employee starts to work for us

1977 Until 1977 Ken, Margaret and staff packet their own seeds and grow vegetables to sell in the shop

1978 A major extension to the shop replaces several of the older buildings. There are now 14 staff; Richard Dean starts work full time

1981 A further extension is added including an office, staff room and storerooms upstairs

1982 The original greenhouse is replaced with the current Cambridge one

1985 Sarah Dean starts work full time

1986 The site at Scarborough is purchased in February

1987 The new shop building at Scarborough officially opens in April

1989 Helen Jones (Dean) starts work full time

1990 A major re-development at York begins

1991 April – The new sales area, houseplant area, covered area and store open. July –“The Bothy” coffee shop opens. August – Land is purchased to build a nursery site

1992 Glasshouse, poly tunnels and net tunnels erected at nursery site

1993 Ken and Margaret retire in February and Richard, Helen and Sarah take over running the centre. The coffee shop garden and outdoor seating area is built at York

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plants and with it the move from Autumn being the peak sales for plants to Spring,” explains Helen. “We’ve also seen goods and seeds being bought in bulk and repacked on site to the majority of items now being pre-packed now except for a few loose bulbs in showcases.Trade is no longer just plants and gardening items, with a move into other areas such as cards, gifts, Christmas etc which enhance the overall shopping experience. One of our big challenges is finding enough hours in the day to get all our jobs done!” says Helen. Finally, the introduction of the coffee shops, which are now 28% of overall sales has been huge for us.” Growth The garden centre’s biggest growth period was in the late 1980’s into the early 1990’s. A 20% increase in turnover each year in this period wasn’t out of the ordinary, with the latter years of this period being helped by the introduction of coffee shops to both sites. “In recent years we could have perhaps grown faster if we had chosen to sell anything we could have made money from” says Helen. “Instead

we have stuck to our values of offering quality plants and gardening lines along with good customer service and we are still here after 50 years!” The plan going forward for Dean’s Garden Centre is to not lose sight of the fact that they are first and foremost a garden centre, with plant sales at the core of the business. There is also a plan to make sure the integration of the third generation into key

positions within the business goes smoothly. They also hope to have greater analysis processes from the information available through their current EPoS system and are looking into re-establishing links with other business owners within the industry via the Retail Business Improvement Scheme (RBIS) or other similar pathways. On top of this there is the decision regarding the extent

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DEAN’S GARDEN CENTRE INTERVIEW

of redevelopment at the Scarborough site in the current challenging market. Audience Helen says the company has many long-standing loyal customers. Many are aged 60+, but are often accompanied by their children and grandchildren. The opening of the larger Bothy at York has seen a lot of new and younger customers, which is shown by the number of extra loyalty cards we have issued since it was opened.

Industry issues Helen says there is a whole host of industry challenges at present. “The uncertainty around Brexit is obviously a big one” she explains. “There are also the continuous changes in legislation, the ever-increasing costs in wages, overheads and rates and so on.” “Internet shopping is also a real competitor to our industry, but we’re keen to keep quality plants at the core of the business in order to mitigate this risk” Helen says.

On top of these issues, Helen mentions the potential problem of Xylella fastidiosa in this country, and the difficulty in attracting young people with an interest in plants and gardening into the industry, as staff members and as customers.

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Strongest departments Plants have always been at the core of the business for the company, ever since its inception 50 years ago. “The coffee shops are now responsible for 28% of the total revenue of the business,” says Helen. “Plants have always been the strongest category for us accounting for over a third of the other 72%, with 15% of our plant sales grown at our nursery. “Unlike a lot of garden centres, houseplants have always maintained a good presence in our business and are currently 13% of the total plant sales,” Helen explains. “Over the last 15 years, aquatic sales have fallen from around 8% of garden centre turnover to as little as 3% and garden buildings/hard landscaping from over 8% to around 5% today. “Non-gardening has always remained below 20% with Christmas being around a quarter of this. “Furniture and barbecue sales fluctuate with the weather but is usually between 4 and 5% in recent years. “Bird care has been a growth area over this period and is now 5% of garden centre sales. “Other gardening which includes seeds, bulbs, pots, compost, fertilisers and chemicals, tools, watering, propagation etc remains at 28% of sales.”

The outdoor covered area is extended at York

The Future “For the future, we want to continue with our business philosophies and remain as a traditional garden centre with plant sales at our core, but be able to adapt to the ever-changing market place as re uired, Helen finishes. w

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Garden Centre Retail Independent Business Supplement November 2018

The coffee shop kitchen is extended at York. The Scarborough garden centre is extended to include a coffee shop “The Gardener’s Choice”, that opens in July

2000 2002 A new outside information office and meeting room is built at Scarborough. We start nominating a local charity for our Charity of the year

2005 EPOS System (Electric point of sale) is introduced at York

2006 The EPOS system is introduced at Scarborough. Celebrate Scarborough’s 20th Anniversary

2008 December - celebrate York’s 40th Anniversary

2015 Planning permission is granted for development work at York. The first phase iextending the car park and improving the storage yard is completed in December

2016 The second stage – the construction of a new storage building, two covered areas, modification to the original store and alterations to the outside sales area – are finished in February. In July, work starts on the new “Bothy”

2017 The new enlarged “Bothy” and new kitchen opens in March

2018 7 December – we will be celebrating our 50th anniversary. There are 125 staff employed across the three sites in addition to Richard, Helen and Sarah the owners. Our longest serving member of staff has been working for the business for 45 years. Four of the grandchildren Emma, Laura, Rachel and Sam currently work in the business, with three others having worked here previously.

www.gardencentreretail.com

08/11/2018 10:18


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07/11/2018 10:58


BUSINESS TEMPORARY STRUCTURES

EXPANDING YOUR SPACE

Creating extra space within a garden centre can often be a long drawn-out process but Colette Sowerby from Worldwide Structures explains how you can achieve this in just a few days by installing one of their temporary or semi-permanent structures

W

orldwide Structures are experts in extending garden centres with their temporary and semi-permanent structures. Their extensions fix seamlessly onto your current building or alternatively they can be used as a stand alone structure. The structures can be fully operational and ready to accommodate your customers in just a few days, with little to no disturbance to the day to day running of your business. One of the major benefits of using their Space Building

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System is it negates the need for expensive ground works prior to installation. Designed and manufactured in Wiltshire, the building is delivered to site in kit form and is built from the ground up, regardless of the terrain. The only requirements are a small crew and a forklift. With 100% of the structural elements being re-usable, the environmental impact is negligible.

ALTON GARDEN CENTRE

“We were approached by Alton Garden Centre, which is the largest garden centre in Essex to provide an extension to its popular restaurant,

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Digby’s,” explains Colette Sowerby, who is marketing and business development manager for the company. “Digby’s restaurant has a beautiful large courtyard which is incredibly popular during the summer months, but not always so well utilised during the winter months. The restaurant manager wanted to offer its valued and loyal customers the same seating availability and service all year round, therefore maintaining the café’s capacity and turnover. Together, Alton’s manager and restaurant manager considered various options to cover the outdoor

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TEMPORARY STRUCTURES BUSINESS

seating area. These included building a permanent conservatory or installing a temporary marquee, however neither of these options were suitable as they created additional problems which weren’t easy to overcome. “We discussed various structural configurations to cover the outdoor restaurant space, from single storey to double storey structures. It was decided a single storey structure was most suitable. “ pon confirmation of the project, the structural components were prepared and delivered to site. We provided and built a 7.5m x 12.5m single storey, flat roof temporary structure covering the outdoor restaurant space, seamlessly bringing the outdoor space indoors. The installation of the building only took three days, with the

café remaining operational throughout. “In addition to delivering the structure, Worldwide Structures also supplied and coordinated the installation of heating and floor covering, plus they worked alongside the garden centre’s electrician when installing temporary power into the structure. “They manufactured a bespoke ramp from the existing café area to the temporary building and an external ramp from the decked area to the gate in the courtyard for access purposes.” Alton Garden Centre said: “We were really impressed with the service we received from start to finish. The end result looks amazing, this has ticked all the boxes and more! Would not hesitate to recommend.“

Stuart Sowerby, general manager at Worldwide Structures said: “This is another one of those enjoyable projects, when we helped provide a solution to a problem. With our unique building system, what seemed

a complex problem was easily solved. “We were able to prepare, supply and install our building system in a restricted space, while the garden centre restaurant remained open.”w For additional information, or if you would like to discuss your requirements further, contact Colette Sowerby on 01672 565060/07484929702 or email colette@w-sl.com worldwide-structures.com

www.gardencentreretail.com

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08/11/2018 10:20


BUSINESS CASH FLOW SUCCESS

C A S H L E S S PR O O FI N G

FOR CASH FLOW SUCCESS Andrew Byrne, chief operating officer of FinTech payments start-up myPOS discusses cash flow issues within the industry, and how to mitigate those risks For many businesses, cash flow issues can cause endless sleepless nights, potentially hurting a business’s financial health. A persuasive argument can be made, however, that they hurt small businesses and independent retailers most of all. ith SM s comprising 99 of all K businesses and being a fundamental part of the machinery that drives the British economy, many are identifying cash flow problems as the core reason they may go under. Research this year by the Small Business nsights index reveals that just under half of SM s operate in the red regularly, which means that many find themselves constantly under money-related pressures, often fretting about their ability to keep their heads above the water, let alone sustain growth long term. From customers and suppliers taking liberties by excessively delaying payment of invoices, to isa and Mastercard ramping up card payment fees in response to consumer-friendly directives, in this day and age a

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business’s finances can become easily strained. And the undeniable move that our societies have been making towards cashlessness means that garden centre retailers, as with retail as a whole, have to adapt to the

earlier this year shows that debit card payments overtook cash in 2017, and as such, garden centre retailers that choose POS systems that bypass banks in how they process payments will be the ones to gain the most. Also,

be paid instantly, cheaply and on the go. n this way, garden centre retailers can endeavour to avoid cash flow problems, and use the analytics obtained through such tools to plan ahead, and even free up time and resources.

From customers and suppliers taking liberties by excessively delaying payment of invoices, to Visa and Mastercard ramping up fees in response to consumer-friendly EU directives, in this day and age a business’s finances can become easily strained

times. t’s not all pessimism however, as an increase in entrepreneurialism coupled with advances in technology are giving rise to innovations in payments technologies designed to overcome such barriers. These will only increase with the growth of the modern gig economy and point of sales systems POS are a fundamental part of this change. Research released

Garden Centre Retail Independent Business Supplement November 2018

in the age of e-commerce, customers expect frictionless customer journeys within which payments processes play a significant role. Savvy retailers who are aware of this can thus steal a march on slower-toadapt rivals. n the interests of streamlining the payments process by making it easier, cheaper, and uicker to take payments, technologies of this nature enable businesses to

By embracing an innovative cash flow strategy and POS tools, retailers can get ahead of the less tech-wise competition, and sei e large slices of their respective markets. The opportunities are boundless for garden centre retailers and entrepreneurs to use technology in this way to catalyse growth and to hedge their finances against the threat of negative cash flow, as well as gaining future focus. w

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Contact Joe 01903 777570 joe.wilkinson@eljays44.com www.gardencentreretail.com

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07/11/2018 14:02


INSPECTIONS GCA

GCA INSPECTIONS Roger Crookes speaks with Garden Centre Retail about GCA inspections, and how independent garden centres can improve their scores

The Garden Centre Association’s annual inspections are the core of the business and they help drive members’ standards across all areas of their business including customer service, merchandising, plant quality and marketing. They’re also a great way for member centres to collaborate with each other and share ideas. The main purpose of the role of inspector is to visit members’ sites to assess standards and give feedback. Roger Crookes has been a Garden Centre Association (GCA) inspector for 11 years. He started in 2007 after a career working in garden centres around the UK since 1977.

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This year was Roger’s last as a GCA inspector before retiring from his role. Roger says: “The scoring system is very detailed with more than 200 separate criteria for the inspector to assess, from the website and telephone surveys (usually before we visit), and then when we arrive on site from the roadside and car park, all the way through the various retail departments. “Most criteria are scored out of 10 (although there are a few variations). Some sections have an extra ‘loading’ on the scores based upon that section’s importance/contribution to the overall turnover of a ‘typical garden centre’. At the end of the form we use to carry

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out the inspection there is some detailed analysis of the scores, including a comparison between this year’s visit and previous years’ scores.”

“A lot of the detail is on the form so that centres can refer to the details in advance to help them prepare for their inspection, and more

It’s not just about what we as inspectors think is important, the process is developed by members and delivered by us

Are there specific things Roger is looking for when inspecting? Well, yes actually, and this all comes from putting himself in the customer’s shoes.

importantly, to provide a great experience for their customers. So, depending on the department it usually covers details such as layout

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GCA INSPECTIONS

and flow, merchandising, signs, maximising hot spots and housekeeping. “All the retail details we are looking for have been added to the form over many years, through discussions with garden centre members. t’s not just about what we as inspectors think is important, the process is developed by members and delivered by us. Consistency Consistency in scoring is a major thought for the GCA inspectors. Members need to know that they are being fairly compared to each other. “ e work hard to be as consistent as possible, says Roger. “ e realise that this is important to members. e really think hard about each score – weighing up what we are seeing in each department against what we have seen in other centres all over the country. There is a benchmarking process involved. “ hen it comes to our comments, both on the form and in person during our feedback sessions, members value our individual styles of communicating, so although the scores should be consistent, a different inspector each year

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may well bring up different observations during their feedback. Common challenges Having done the job for over a decade, Roger must be expecting to see some of the same mistakes time and time again. “ am not sure about mistakes. Garden centres are trying to cope with all the commercial challenges of running a modern retail business. My observation is that staffing has become a major challenge for most centres over the last 10 years, especially in the plant areas. “ e have rightly recognised that the wage bill needs to be tightly managed, but when the sun comes out and staff start to struggle, our retail standards start to slip right at the time when we need to look our best to maximise that sunny spring weather. A lot of members use the imminent arrival of the inspector as an extra motivational tool for their teams to keep on top of standards. Basics “There are some basics’ on the inspection form, he says. “Keeping paths clear and

accessible, stock neat and tidy, trolleys visible and general housekeeping go a long way to helping the scores, and customers’ ease of shopping. Feedback Once the inspections is over, what happens with regards

send through a big folder of photos from our visit when the form is completed, which can help centres to understand our scores and comments. “After the season, usually in uly, we present a picturebased feedback presentation and some awards to all the

This can be a great way to see what is happening in UK garden centres, and particularly helpful for staff

to the constructive feedback given to the centre Roger comments: “On the day of our visit, we give the manager the option of one to one’ feedback or we can include some of their team if they wish the choice is theirs. e can do this face to face around a table in an office or on the shop floor, whatever suits the member centre. “On the inspection form, we will include comments for each department and some summary comments – so centres like to print these off to pass on to their teams. e also

centres. This can be a great way to see what is happening in K garden centres, and particularly helpful for staff. Similar presentations are delivered at the GCA annual conference and again regionally around the K in February to help teams prepare for the season. “ n the end all we want to do is help members keep on improving and retain their own uni ue commercial strengths – and looking at GCA members growth over the last few decades, they seem to be making it work w

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08/11/2018 10:59


BUSINESS VLOGGING

TA K E V I E W ER S O N A J O U R N E Y:

THE SECRETS TO VLOGGING FOR BUSINESS At this year’s HTA Marketing Forum, Hornby Whitefoot PR account manager Robbie Cumming discussed what it takes to create a successful vlog

T

he 36-year old’s YouTube channel has over 7,000 subscribers, with more than 800,000 views across 70 video logs about his experience of travelling the UK in his narrowboat home. Here he answers questions from suppliers and retailers about vlogging for businesses. What is vlogging and why should my business do it? Vlogging is recording yourself speaking to the camera as if it was a good friend. If your goal is to increase sales by building trust with your potential customers, then the vlogging approach to social media videos is the most direct method. More and more businesses are turning to it as a way of showcasing their human side, using it to strengthen public relations and increase customer loyalty. How do I get started? Begin by watching other vlogs on YouTube. Look outside the industry and find a subject that you’re interested in, however niche it might be! As you’re

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Vlogging.indd 14

watching, you should be able to work out why some videos have more views than others, but also use the time to make a note of all the things you do and don’t like to prepare you for filming your own content. What equipment do I need? Make the most of what you’ve got. Smartphones not only allow you to film broadcastquality content, but you can also make professional looking edits using apps and record your own background music, all on the same device. There are also several inexpensive accessories made exclusively for smartphone filmmaking. I use a £40 lapel mic for improved sound and a £10 flexible tripod for holding the camera at a more comfortable length, which works well for time lapses and static shots. What can I vlog about? Avoid generic content. You want to attract people that care deeply about what you’re saying, so share something uni ue that they won’t find elsewhere. If in doubt, choose something that you can talk

Garden Centre Retail Independent Business Supplement November 2018

about, unprompted – and something you’re genuinely passionate about. How do I get more subscribers? Storytelling is the most fundamental part of your content. Take your viewers on a journey. et them know where you’re going at the beginning of the video, and then get straight to into the story as quickly as possible. At the end, tell people what you’ve got planned for the next video. How often do I need to upload vlogs? Don’t vlog just for the sake of vlogging. I experimented with daily vlogs for 10 days in a row this year, and saw a very small increase in the number of subscribers. The views I got for each video also took more than a few weeks to reach their normal levels. If the content is valuable enough your followers will wait. Promote via other social media channels to make sure they don’t miss it when you do upload the next one.

What if I don’t have time? Running a successful YouTube channel takes a lot of time. As well as filming and editing, you also need to respond to comments, promote your content via online/offline channels, plan, research and monitor analytics. The other option is vlogging live from your smartphone. As live streams are currently less common, they tend to receive more attention because they are highlighted in social media feeds. Interacting with viewers whilst also taking them on a journey allows you to condense all of your vlog activity into a set period of time. You may not be able to deliver high definition footage, and live video often disappears after a short while, but you’ll show a refreshingly raw version of your business that could help you build a loyal fanbase. w If you have any questions about vlogging, live video or any other consultation, contact Robbie Cumming via email, robbie@ hornbywhitefootpr.co.uk.

www.gardencentreretail.com

08/11/2018 10:26


S U C C E S S S T O R Y S T R AT F O R D G A R D E N C E N T R E

SUCCESS STORY: STRATFORD GARDEN CENTRE Garden Centre Retail visits Helen Lloyd at Stratford Garden Centre to talk about being fiercely independent, competition and growth plans for the 10th best garden centre in the UK according to the latest GCA results Southern, my uncle, is our finance director.

What’s the history of the business? We took over this site in May 2004. It was an old bedding plant nursery with three glasshouses. We ran it for about 18 months before knocking down the old centre in September 2005. We reopened in March 2006 with the first phase of development focused on the main building. We quickly realised we had an opportunity for concession traders to come in, such as Maidenhead Aquatics and Cotton Traders. By the October of 2006 we started building phase two which was our two Dutch barns. Why were they keen to come in to such a new business? We dealt with First Franchise at this time when concessions were just starting to come into garden centres. It gave us the confidence to go ahead with phase two a lot quicker than we intended. When we got the original planning permission, we were granted permission

www.gardencentreretail.com

Stratford Success.indd 15

for three phases. The third phase is for the construction of a 9,000sqft building which would increase our food and catering offering, we are just in the process of finalising the plans to start building in January 2020. How have you competed with the chain stores? We have a Blue Diamond in Evesham, Burford Garden Centre right in the Cotswolds, a Wyevale north of Stratford and Webbs of Wychbold. There is quite a distance between these destinations. Our customers are willing to travel. You’re obviously fiercely inde endent as a business. We are a family business, myself and my husband Gwyn run the garden centre with a fantastic team of department managers and staff. Paul

What is your background? I used to work for Barton Grange and both Gwyn and I worked for Notcutts as management trainees. My experience within the garden centre is the indoor areas and Gwyn’s is in the outside areas and in his plant knowledge. It seemed a perfect partnership.

What has changed for independent garden retailers since you started in 2004? People’s expectations are a lot higher than they were. The standards are also higher. Our retail practices are much improved compared to how traditional garden centres used to be in the sixties, seventies and eighties. The chain garden centres have probably pushed us as independents to be different and unique because we couldn’t compete on price with them.

It’s a very different story to how lots of others get into the industry. Paul was in corporate finance so he came from a finance and accounting background. Gwyn

What challenges are you facing? Well, Brexit is looming. That leads to uncertainty I suppose. We weren’t particularly hit too badly with the last recession. We stood still rather than

and I have come with hands on experience. I started in this industry when I was 14. I’ve done it all my life. We’re both horticulturally trained. I went to Hadlow College, Gwyn went to Pershore.

losing. We’ve grown 83% in the last five years and much of that is because Stratford, our local area, is expanding. There are so many new houses around here that are either planned or have been built. That basically

Garden Centre Retail Independent Business Supplement November 2018

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08/11/2018 14:13


S T R AT F O R D G A R D E N C E N T R E S U C C E S S S T O R Y

Your catchment area is relatively big then? Yes, it is. Stratford is a tourist area and it swells from around 25,000 to over 1 million during the tourist season. We haven’t really tapped into the tourist market, we’ve tended to focus on attracting local people from arwick, eamington, the north Cotswolds and south Birmingham, which are all affluent areas.

You’ve got a couple of coach loads in today, is that something you promote? We haven’t really promoted ourselves to that market because we’re not really geared up for that with regards to the car park. e’ve also outgrown our toilet facilities. That’s a challenge in that we need more retail space and more room for everything else

Was the plan to set up in an a uent area and aim at t e high end? ot necessarily. e try to aim at everyone, we have a mantra of good, better, best with regards to the products we offer. e have what you would expect to see in most garden centres, but we’ve also got some brands that might seem more boutique or more John ewis or department store. e try to offer something a little

What are we talking in terms of turnover growth then? e’ve gone from just over £2.5 million in 2013 to over £4 million last year. e’ve had a good spring and summer this year, and our catering has steadily grown for us. Catering this year should do around £900,000. e’re limited again now with that because we need the extra space. e altered the catering facility, we changed the service. e had

grew our customer numbers overnight. There are going to be 10,000 new houses within five miles and a bypass to be built in the next 10 years. That will help bring people to this side of Stratford.

I started in this industry when I was 14. I’ve done it all my life bit different from what you’d expect, and we’ve not been afraid to bring in ranges that aren’t typically garden centre ranges. That’s worked well for us.

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two offerings, one waitress service and one self-service. Now we’ve gone to counter ordering, but everything is brought to the table, even the drinks.

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Stratford Success.indd 16

e had two centres once. e had a smaller centre up in orth arwickshire which we sold for other use. That enabled us to build our shopping courtyard, which are wooden cladded, cabin-like shops next to our plant area with a range of independent retailers. As a family, we are continuously investing back into the business. e’ll get to a point where we’ve got a good-si ed, independent family-run garden centre turning over £6 million in the next five years. Are you a member of any of the marketing or buying groups? e’re not a member of a buying group as such, but we are a member of the ilford Group which is really an idea and sharing group. e’re not tied into each other in any financial way at all, it’s just like-minded business with owner-managers very similar to ourselves that we share ideas with. e get together every month at a different centre. e do a criti ue of each

garden centre, then share our ideas and plans, even sales figures too. You’ve not got a buying deal for that group? o, we share ideas and if there is a product working well for one centre, we’ll all know about it. t’s all about sharing and evaluating each other. t can get very honest at times which is nice. e’ve built friendships through this. hen we’re going through a tough patch it’s helpful to be able to pick up the phone for some support. You’re involved with the GCA too? e’re members of the GCA and the HTA. e’re not particularly active members. But you are a top 10 GCA centre, aren’t you? e were unable to attend the GCA Conference this year as we were in the middle of redeveloping the ime Tree Restaurant, but we were delighted to come in the top ten. don’t believe we

www.gardencentreretail.com

08/11/2018 10:30


S U C C E S S S T O R Y S T R AT F O R D G A R D E N C E N T R E

will this year though and we haven’t changed anything! It is important to us to continue to grow our sales and improve the customer experience. What other independent garden centres do you look to for inspiration? There are a few. We obviously take inspiration from the other members of The Wilford Group. Barton Grange is an inspiration, and we take a trip up there every so often. Bent’s is great, we’ve not been there for two years or so. They are completely different to us, on a different scale, but it’s always inspirational. What do you learn from the chains, or is it a case of you learn what not to do? That’s true of everywhere you go. You go somewhere, and you always learn something. You take things you would do, and things you wouldn’t. There is a big difference between a Blue Diamond, a Wyevale and an independent. We’ve got

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Stratford Success.indd 17

such a scale of diversity in this market. It’s about getting that balance right. It’s interesting to hear your views having been trained at Notcutts. There is no real grudge from you against the big players? Not at all. When we worked for Notcutts, it was family owned. It had 11 centres and their management training programme was excellent. Gwyn and I will both say a lot of the retail disciplines that we have today are down to Notcutts. There were managers there who showed us the importance of paying great attention to detail. We both learnt so much. Gwyn then worked for Homebase for a while and again, he saw a completely different side and he learnt a lot about having a multidisciplined offering. It’s about being aware of the whole spectrum, picking the best bits out and forgetting the not so good bits.

What is your typical customer? We have a traditional garden centre customer. That’s where we’ve seen the growth over the past few years, with the repeat custom. We thought we’d open the door and, being

we’re also good at generating our own ideas. Do you think you’re an inspiration for other centres? We do get a lot of people coming around to have a look at the shopping courtyard. It’s

We have what you would expect to see in most garden centres, but we’ve also got some brands that might seem more boutique or John Lewis a brand-new centre, people would just come. It took longer than that to get established. We’ve now been going 13 years and we’re less affected by the weather, we’ve got a steady flow of business. Our offering, the food shop, toy shop, gifts etc, has helped us weatherproof ourselves. We’ve got a good balance. Was this style of garden retailing just starting in 2004? We were probably one of the first garden centres to have a food shop. Our food element was quite strong back then. We were the first garden centre to have Cook as a concession. The shopping courtyard we built is unique. We are quite forward thinking in our own way. Without a doubt we do follow the industry – everyone gets ideas from everyone else, but

very easy to give a concession indoor space, it’s a lot harder to do it in an external space. What do you think the garden retail industry will loo li e in fi e years’ time If you’d have asked me six months ago, I would have said there would have been little change, but with Wyevale selling up, some of the small to medium-sized groups will grow. There’s talk of a management buyout for the remaining Wyevale Centres, so that would have an effect. Some smaller centres are likely to disappear to make way for housing. Other than phase three of the build, what’s next for Stratford Garden Centre? We want to grow from the current £4.4 million turnover to £5 million in three years. £6 million in five years would be great too! We want to continue to grow the rental income so we can continue to use the shopping courtyard at its best. We also need to be more profitable going forward w

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08/11/2018 10:31


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E T H E R M O F L O R

THERMOFLOR CONSTRUCT B.V. nternational business development director Christian Gombert explains how the business takes care of construction projects from concept through to completion Can you give us a brief outline of the brand? This flexible family business specialises in the construction of glass, steel and aluminium constructions for agricultural and horticultural businesses, garden centres, research centres and industry in general. Architects and engineering firms rely on our know-how for the design, production and construction of challenging, complex architectural structures. What are the key selling points of your service? e take care of building your project and provide advice on the development and design of your garden centre. e can offer all round support from start up to completion. e can support you in your search for a suitable location, your market research, the determination of the type of conservatory that fits your ambitions and more. Thanks to our years of experience with projects of different types and si es, our people have a valuable wealth of skills and knowledge. This is in your interest for the

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roll-out and implementation of all kinds of systems. The entire preliminary process, in which the final choices are determined, is also based on their technical expertise. The purchase, replacement or expansion of systems re uires a well thought-out choice whereby a wide range of factors must be taken into account. You have to deal not only with the re uirements of the users, but also with all kinds of architectural and installation technical facilities, the possibilities and impossibilities to integrate systems, etc. Our competent advisors are happy to support you in determining functional and technical programs when guiding re uirements. e will be happy to discuss this with you without any obligation. Design e are happy to work with your architect or you can entrust our expert team to handle the entire process from idea to final design. What are the lead times for ordering your service? very project is uni ue so

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NEW Deforche.indd 18

we do not have standard timings. From the start, clear agreements are made regarding timing. What support do you offer garden centres? e appreciate that growth and success are not dependent on a building alone. ually important are your location, range and the layout and routing of your shop. That’s why we will gladly help you analyse your customer potential and the competition in your particular market. e can also support you in determining your range of products and the routing through your garden centre to generate maximum turnover and profits. Finding the right location/ market research A good location is one of the most important keys to success. That’s why we will gladly help you make a sound decision. e will analyse your market and competition to obtain a good impression of your customer potential. e always study all the potential influential

factors, such as household composition, distribution of income, types of nearby buildings and travelling times. e include an analysis of the competition in your specific market, which we will clearly visualise for you. You will then know whether the location you have in mind has the potential for your envisaged turnover and profits. Layout/routing e will discuss how you aim to stand out in your market, and determine your greatest strengths. e will devise the layout of your garden centre and the number of m2 per group of articles according to your wishes. e will work out the most suitable routing with due allowance for your various target groups, including run shoppers and fun shoppers, which we will optimally balance to ensure maximum turnover and profits for you. w CONTACT

8 Northumberland Avenue London WC2N 5BY 07850 776488 www.thermoflor.com info@thermoflor.com

www.gardencentreretail.com

08/11/2018 11:02


Open Sky

Sky Wall

Sky n e p O w the ne or outdo nce e experi

natural daylight

natural ventilation

multifunctional all year round

www.thermoflor.com Advert template.indd 4

07/11/2018 13:22


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E O P E N R E TA I L S O L U T I O N S

OPEN RETAIL SOLUTIONS Customer focus is at the heart of this Nottingham-based company, providing EPoS solutions to garden centres and retail plant nurseries across the country Established in 2003, Open Retail Solutions is now under new ownership. Russell Wilkins and Richard Ball have been with the company for many years. Russell has been technical director since 2006 and Richard has been a member of the development and support team since 2009. Both have embraced their new roles of running the business and have been making changes to better help existing and new customers alike. The company is based in Nottingham and this central location means we have great transport links to service our customers around the country. We are members of the HTA and regularly attend the HTA Nursery Supply Show and Glee trade shows. We specialise in providing EPoS solutions to garden centres and retail plant nurseries nationally, with over 40 using our system. The EPoS software is our own and developed in-house

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which means we can respond uickly and efficiently to any new feature requests from our customer base. Technical support is offered seven days a week, from 8am to 8pm, 362 days a year, on site installation and training is all included as part of our package. The solution works with Microsoft Excel to import supplier spreadsheets and export sales and product data. The system uses real time radio handsets and tablet devices to manage stock on the shop floor and make your workforce more mobile. Our solution also caters for garden centre cafes and restaurants. Counter top or table service are both available, with the option of multiple kitchen printers to remove handwritten orders. With only one database you can control what’s happening in the garden centre and cafe from the same place – price

Garden Centre Retail Independent Business Supplement November 2018

Company Profile Open Retail.indd 20

changes and menu changes are instantaneous. Open Retail Solutions also work closely with farm shops and delicatessens, which a many garden centres are now introducing into their stores. Our solution links to both Avery Berkel and Bizerba weigh label scales for easy maintenance of butcher and deli counter lines. Integrated weigh scales at the checkout make fresh fruit and vegetables easy to sell, and we have an integrated credit card solution which enables seamless transactions. Sales orders can also be provided for customer specific orders such as garden furniture, and customer deliveries can be managed by the system. Integration to e-commerce sites can also be added if required. To further understand our customer needs, we have recently recruited a new member of staff with more

than 20 years garden centre management experience, and over 11 years experience using our software. David has come on board to take over sales and training, and our current customer base is finding his knowledge very useful. For a free no obligation demonstration and quotation, please contact one of our sales team to answer any questions. We are experienced in moving customers from existing EPoS systems, so if you are unhappy with your current provider we may be able to help you. For more information go to our website www. openretailsolutions.co.uk and be sure to follow us on Facebook or Twitter. w CONTACT

0115 9677 439 sales@openretailsolutions. co.uk Facebook: openretailsolutions @epossupplier

www.gardencentreretail.com

08/11/2018 10:35


Advert template.indd 5

08/11/2018 11:12


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E G C S L I M I T E D

GCS LIMITED GCS managing director Jeremy Davies describes some of the products and the ethos that make this national retail security company a success Company overview GCS is a national retail security company which specialises in retail loss prevention and product protection in garden centres. With more than 25 years in the loss prevention industry, the team at GCS focuses on providing exceptional products and service to all sizes of company. Becky ones, GCS office manager says: “We go that step further to ensure our customers needs are more than just met. “Specialising in Electronic Article Surveillance (EAS Tagging), CCTV and Product Source Protection, GCS are here to help you meet your loss prevention needs. We would be genuinely thrilled to work with you and look forward to welcoming you aboard.”

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GCS is also the manufacturer of the retail security awardwinning candle protection tag, Jarloc. The company is the trusted supplier to retailers including Klondyke, Dobbies, Wyevale, Tesco and Boots. “With their specialist knowledge of garden centre loss prevention, GCS designed our security tagging policy and provided a range of security tags best suited to the products we need to protect. I would be pleased to recommend GCS to other garden centres.” Klondyke Garden Centre Group. New security products GCS is expanding its already broad range of security products with a particular focus on high quality IP CCTV systems to help retailers.

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Company Profile GCS.indd 22

Their candle protection suitable for main brand candles is also expanding, with the launch of Jarloc(3), which can be removed at the till using existing detachers and Jarloc(4) which is for protection of contemporary candle jar designs without a lip. Cost-effective maintenance GCS maintains and supports all makes and models of security tagging and CCTV equipment. Using specialist knowledge, GCS assesses the fault via the phone and allocates the most suitable member of the support team to resolve the issue. To help keep costs down, the GCS approach is to repair the equipment rather than automatically replace with new. And for many retailers, GCS

keeps systems working where other security companies won’t. “GCS provides support and service to our EAS Tagging estate. We are safe in the knowledge GCS will find a solution in the event some of our older discontinued equipment fails. GCS help keep our costs down through their careful management of our estate, recycling equipment and only install new equipment when absolutely necessary. Top notch service and we are please to recommend GCS.” Cherry Lane Garden Centres. w CONTACT

01892 300878 www.gcsgb.com www.jarloc.com customer.service@gcsgb.com

www.gardencentreretail.com

08/11/2018 14:05


Security and Loss Prevention GCS Security Tagging Systems Reduc

Our systems will monitor your stock and alarm when goods have not been paid for, allowing your team to focus on serving your customers rather than be store detectives. Our skilled engineers also maintain all makes of Systems.

Choose from our great range of high quality CCTV cameras and recording equipment from 1 to 200+ cameras. Cover key areas including tills, entrances, shop stock, goods in and offices.

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installed EAS Security Tagging Systems into a number of our high risk centres. We have found the team at GCS to be very professional. We would be pleased to recommend GCS.

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Give your existing security measures a boost and improve staff awareness to security risks at the same time. Our secret thief team will act as thieves stealing from your business, in order to be able to identify weaknesses and provide clear guidance to plugging any gaps in security.

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We would be pleased to provide more information and offer quotations

01892 300878

customer.service@gcsgb.com 07/11/2018 11:00


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E C R E AT I V E R E TA I L S O L U T I O N S LT D

CREATIVE RETAIL SOLUTIONS LTD Director Andrew Drake explains the bespoke shopfitting and refrigeration service they offer garden centres when creating a food offering Can you give us a brief outline of the brand? We offer a bespoke refrigeration and shopfitting service to create a food-led retail environment with the ability to cater to a range of project sizes. We are industry leaders in what we do, and we have more than 35 years of experience. Creative Retail Solutions is an innovative company, with in-house design facilities, relationships with some of Europe’s foremost refrigeration and shopfitting manufacturers, allowing us to provide state of the art equipment and service. What are the key selling points of your service? We offer a complete end to end package, which includes, design, project management, customer service, supply and installation of refrigeration and shopfitting, and full after sales support. We tailor make our service to suit your needs. Every project is different, but we work closely with our

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clients to ensure the end result is unique to them and reflects their individuality and styling. We encourage all our customers to view any of the projects we have completed to build confidence in what we do and see our work close up. What are the lead times for ordering your service? Every garden centre is different, and all come with different objectives and challenges. We can deliver projects in as little as 4–6 weeks, but the larger, more ambitious projects require longer time to really understand and interpret the needs of our client. We will work closely with the client within an agreed budget and timeframe. Supplying and installing equipment is usually the quickest part of a project, most of our time is usually spent discussing work with our clients and evaluating options, designs, materials and different cost levels of

Garden Centre Retail Independent Business Supplement November 2018

Company Profile Creative Solutions.indd 24

equipment, so that when a project goes live we are all confident that the best decisions have been made. What support do you offer garden centres? From initial enquiry, every garden centre would be assigned a dedicated account manager/project manager to look after their every need, with regular visits, meetings and project discussions. Introducing a food offering can be a big change to what a traditional garden centre has done previously so we can guide you through the various phases of the project to ensure its ultimate success. We also provide a range of energy-saving options to align with a garden centre’s own environmental policies. What’s the next step for the brand? We will continue to evolve, grow and offer the appropriate solutions for all our customers. From a refrigeration point

of view, our product range both modular and bespoke, will continue to change as we strive to be industry leading from both a design and manufacture point of view. We will also continue to listen to our customers and gain feedback post project; we see this as key because this helps us to learn and offer the best solutions, products and packages. Through relationships with our manufacturers, we monitor food retailing trends across Europe, the USA and further afield, which allows us to offer our clients new ideas and technology before they become commonly adopted in the UK. w CONTACT

Creative Retail Solutions Ltd, 2c Aston Way, Poole, Dorset, BH12 4FE 01202 233088 www.creativeretailsolutions. co.uk sales@creativeretailsolutions. co.uk

www.gardencentreretail.com

08/11/2018 10:38


Presenting Fine Foods 01202 233088

Garden Centre Retail Ad 7- Oct 18 - Opt 1.indd 1 Advert template.indd

www.creativeretailsolutions.co.uk sales@creativeretailsolutions.co.uk

02/11/2018 15:40:15 07/11/2018 11:00


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E F O R M B A R LT D

FORMBAR LIMITED Sales and marketing director, Hannah Lewis describes the key selling points of their trusted brands and their personal customer service Can you give us a brief outline of the brand? Established in 2005, Formbar Ltd supplies quality shopping trolleys, shopping baskets, trolley baskets and flatbed trolleys with the principle of putting our customer first. Some of our clients have been with us from the start, trusting the service we provide gives them the support they re uire. Growing our loyal customer base over the years steadily, mainly via recommendation, has allowed us to remain steadfast to our founding principles. e are recognised as retail specialists with a small team building strong customer relationships. e provide retailers, large and small, across the UK and Ireland with high quality products that have longevity, are cost effective and just right for their stores. What are the key selling points of your service? Our innovative trolleys and baskets help garden centres give a true impression of their brand values from the first moment a customer arrives.

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Customers are more likely to fill a trolley or basket that is clean, feels strong and is easy to manoeuvre or carry. Per customer spend and loyalty have been shown to improve when a retailer has the right baskets and trolleys. It is also important for centres to consider having disabled shopping trolleys or children’s trolleys depending on what their customer re uire. What are the lead times for ordering your service? In stock and ready to ship at our warehouse, we have a substantial range of standard products; therefore delivery for the majority of orders is within three days of the order being confirmed. For items that re uire any modification, such as a bespoke colour, branding or different castors fitted to assist with rough ground then lead times vary from one to six weeks. What support are you offering garden centres? e stock a large range of wire trolleys, including standard deep and shallow shopping

Garden Centre Retail Independent Business Supplement November 2018

Company Profile Formbar.indd 26

trolleys of every capacity and two-tier garden centre trolleys, flatbeds and more. • Every shape of basket is available in wire and plastic, with and without wheels plus stackers to suit. • Our new garden centre trolley received a great reception at Glee. ith four wheels customers find this trolley very easy to manoeuvre and with a good sized top basket impulse sundry buys are accommodated away from plants or bags of compost that are in the much larger lower basket. • Launched at Glee our new range of all plastic trolleys was a massive hit, the positive feedback and subsequent orders are remarkable for such a new product. ightweight with good sized quiet castors these trolleys are very easy to push. As they are all plastic they do not rust and can be simply hosed down from time to time. • The Ellipse is our own design of hand basket – a contemporary, extra

capacity, oval wire basket, ergonomically designed with gently tapered sides giving an aesthetically pleasing look and the rounded shape a comfortable feel. e offer a hire service with prices from just £4 per week, per trolley; it is a very costeffective way to have enough trolleys or baskets available during busy sale periods. An on-site maintenance service is available for all brands and ages of trolleys. Service costs start at less than £4 per trolley and can avoid costly replacements. What’s the next step for the brand? e want to grow our brand within the garden centre industry, building on our successful Glee exhibition. e will keep on top of industry innovations and offer only the best products available. w CONTACT

7 Court Drive, Shillingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 7ER 01865 858590 www.formbar.co.uk info@formbar.co.uk

www.gardencentreretail.com

08/11/2018 10:39


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Garden Centre Retail Independent Business Supplement November 2018  

Garden Centre Retail Independent Business Supplement November 2018  

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