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PROARB

MAY 2018 PROFESSIONAL TREE CARE FOR T REE SURGEONS

THE 2018

ARB SHOW

AN INTERVIEW WITH

JAMIE SAUNDERS

TROJAN TREE CARE

IDENTIFY AND MANAGE

CANKERS

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW

E M I S S I O N S R E G U L AT I O N S


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23/03/2018 11:42


WELCOME

PROARB

PROARB

MAY 2018 PROFESSIONAL TREE CARE FOR T REE SURGEONS

THE 2018

ARB SHO W

m ay 2 0 1 8 • Vo l u m e 5 • I ss u e 0 4

AN INTERVI EW WITH

JAMIE SAUND ERS

TROJAN TREE CARE

IDENTIFY AND MANAGE

CANKERS

W

elcome to the May issue of Pro Arb. I want to kick off with an apology. It has been pointed out by some very vigilant readers over the last month that we published a few unsavoury images in our last issue (unsavoury here being used to mean dangerous, unsafe, and life threatening). For anyone that didn’t notice, I would like to draw your attention to our April issue, on pages 17 (which Stuart Parry from the HSE pointed out, explaining: “Rear handled chainsaws are designed to be gripped and used with both hands, with the right hand on the rear handle. They should not be operated with the left hand on the throttle as this significantly increases the risk of serious injury,”) and 18 (Stuart

explains: “Arborists should have two anchor points during aerial work in case one fails. They should also position themselves to minimise the risk of being struck by the chainsaw if kickback occurs,”). Stuart does continue to say: “Your magazine is widely read within the industry and it is important that the content supports safe working practices.” So, thank you Stuart, for taking the time to educate us. Sometimes being wrong can be a hard pill to swallow, but nowhere is it more important to do so than in safety. In this issue we’re looking into two problems that are rife in safety problems, from the theft of equipment (as you can read on pages 22-25), which inevitably leads to the dangerous work of cowboys (we’ve asked for some opinions on dealing with

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ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW

E M I S S I O N S R E G U L AT I O N S

them in our Agenda on pages 6-7) We endeavour to try harder in the future when it comes to the images and advice that we send out to our readers, but should we slip up, I have the fullest confidence that our readers will bring it to our attention. So, here’s hoping I never hear from you again.

Ltd, 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA, UK. Articles and information contained in this publication are the copyright of Eljays44 Ltd and may not be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publishers. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for loss of, or damage to, uncommissioned photographs or manuscripts. MANAGEMENT Managing Director – Jim Wilkinson Editorial Director – Lisa Wilkinson Business Development Manager – Jamie Wilkinson FOLLOW US ONLINE www.proarbmagazine.com Follow us on Twitter @ProArbmagazine

Like us on Facebook Proarbmagazine Connect to our LinkedIn group Pro Arb UK For careers in arboriculture and horticulture go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk Every week we send out ‘Pro Arb: The Tuesday Recap’, in which we highlight the most popular news stories from the last week. If you aren’t subscribed to The Tuesday Recap but would like to be, please email Amber Bernabe at amber.bernabe@eljays44.com If you would like to send us press releases to post online and potentially feature in The Tuesday Recap, please email Ashley Lampard at ashley.lampard@eljays44.com

Pro Arb | May 2018

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info@forst-woodchippers.com

+44 (0)1264 721790

www.forst-woodchippers.com


CONTENTS

s t n e cont 8 1 0 2 y ma

41

11

30 51

44

news & views

features

6 > Agenda

18 > the interview

How should the arb industry combat cheap, unskilled rival labour (‘cowboys’)?

8 > NEWS

A roundup of the latest industry news

11 > 3ATC Competition

Plumpton College wins the 3ATC Southern College climbing competition

12 > Gristwood & Toms

Taking a look at the company’s award-winning partnership with Bristol City Council

14 > Joined-up Writing

Jonathan Hazell discusses the report-writing skills arboricultural consultants need

15 > Cutting to the chase It’s important to get to the point when dealing with clients, says Edward Morrow

16 > Pests and Diseases

Bartlett Tree Experts dispenses advice on identifying and managing cankers

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Trojan Tree Care owner Jamie Saunders tells Pro Arb why a smaller, leaner business can be a better business

22 > Security Report

Our special report examines how thieves target arb equipment, and what arborists can do to mitigate the risk

27 > Decay Detection

Arborist Oliver Tong talks to us about his work detecting tree decay for the Royal Parks

34 40 > DMM ID

A closer look at DMM’s new DMM ID range

41 > focus on: rope

How to check your ropes for damage

42 > NRMM Emissions

Paul George explains the EU’s new regulations

44 > focus on: chippers

Greenmech, Timberwolf and Först chipper users tell us what makes a great chipper purchase

47 > Product DNA Stihl MS 500i chainsaw

30 > Top Ten Tips

Expert advice on dealing with oak processionary moth

48 > arb kit

kit

51 > ancient tree column

The latest in arboricultural kit

Old Electric Oak, South Gloucestershire

34 > the Arb Show We preview this year’s event

38 > Toolbox

The kit and machinery used by Bartlett Tree Experts to get the job done

Pro Arb | May 2018

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NEWS & VIEWS

AGENDA

HOW SHOULD THE ARB INDUSTRY COMBAT CHEAP, UNSKILLED RIVAL LABOUR (‘COWBOYS’)? JON COULING ARBORIST REPRESENTATIVE, BARTLETT TREE EXPERTS

“We need to get to the point where there is a set standard for arboriculture, and if you’re not using one of those people then it negates all insurance”

ANTHONY ARROW CONTRACTS MANAGER, DARTMOOR TREE SERVICES

“Unfortunately, conducting themselves as they do, the ‘cowboys’ will always find a way to achieve work” I think that there will always be ‘cowboys’ in tree surgery, as with any manual labour-based job, due to the nature of the work. I also doubt that there is much the industry can do to stop rogue traders operating. What it can do, though, is promote those who work on the right side of things, both morally and legally. The Arboricultural Association’s Approved Contractor scheme is a great way for the public to find good contractors who offer a great

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Pro Arb | May 2018

service; good marketing and making the public aware of the scheme can surely only help the ongoing situation. That said, there are a good number of tree surgeons who are not on the Approved Contractor database, or who have not decided to go down that route, but still offer a very good service. There are a number of other schemes available (Trustmark, etc.) that can help prospective clients to find a trusted contractor, but more promotion and marketing is needed to make the individual workers or companies aware that these schemes are beneficial to all concerned. Trying to police the ‘cowboys’ would be unproductive and a great waste of resources. The industry’s best hope probably continues to be Trading Standards. Unfortunately, conducting themselves as they do, the ‘cowboys’ will always find a way to achieve work – to the detriment of the industry as a whole.

We need some regulation in place. If you look at electricians, plumbers, gas fitters and so on, they are all heavily regulated, and there is a lot of publicity surrounding that. We need to get to the point where there is a set standard for arboriculture, and if you’re not using one of those people then it negates all insurance, etc. – and that needs to be driven by the insurance providers, too. If I wanted to drive around taking pictures of dangerous arboriculture, I’d fill my phone up within a day.

JAMIE SAUNDERS

business by doing a good quality job. Unless we were in a real downturn, I would always tell people upfront that I’m not the cheapest, but we don’t cut corners to make the job fit the price – and people like that. You will always get the price shoppers, though, who will get a cowboy around and end up getting ripped off, with wood left in their garden. People often think they’re getting a good price, but they’re not. I always concentrate on the long game: finding clients and doing a good job, so that they’ll recommend you to their friends and call you back every so often. Once you get a client and do a good job, they won’t look elsewhere – and I don’t want the ones that do. The Arb Association is trying to be the body in the industry to certify arborists, even though it’s not government backed and its efforts aren’t enforceable by law. Without legislation, they can’t be enforced. The government needs to make people aware that they need to hire certified contractors, as with other industries.

OWNER, TROJAN TREE CARE

“I always concentrate on the long game: finding clients and doing a good job” There is a problem, but there always has been. I run my

STEWART WARDROP CHIEF EXECUTIVE, ARB ASSOCIATION

“To address the ‘cheapest quote wins’ issue, it’s important that WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


NEWS & VIEWS the public understands the difference between good and bad practice” Advancing professionalism is one of the reasons the Arboricultural Association exists, and it’s what our members are always calling for – but unfortunately there’s no single quick fix to this issue. In the current government’s nonregulatory climate, we’re unlikely to have higher qualification barriers as a requirement to entering the industry. Therefore, the driver for improving professionalism has to come from the client. The industry, and the Association as its professional body, should work together to raise the profile of professional arboriculture among the general public and all relevant sectors. The Association is striving to achieve greater recognition and awareness for professional arboriculture on many fronts. Over the past five years, we’ve been lobbying government and campaigning politicians to recognise the value of professional arboriculture through our parliamentary group. We’re also working with local authorities to ensure they’re offering guidance to the public on using professionals. To address the ‘cheapest quote wins’ issue, it’s important that the public understands the difference between good and bad practice. We’re currently building partnerships with the Woodland Trust, National Trust and other related organisations to give the industry greater presence in the public arena. Finally, the obvious point is the ARB Approved Contractor accreditation scheme, which was introduced for this very reason – it sets the industry standard and enables

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Arboricultural Contractors to set themselves apart and compete with their contemporaries, rather than the cowboys. We’d also recommend that everyone gets involved with the AA – we’re here to support you. Help us drive things forward and be the change you want to see!

JIM WILKINSON MANAGING DIRECTOR, PRO ARB

“If you look at the electrical and gas sectors, they have very solid associations with extremely strong lobbying processes” This is a question that we come across in a lot of industries that we are involved in, and each market really struggles to come up with the golden bullet. I think that there are two main reasons for this. First, arboriculture has a really low cost of entry – anyone can do it with a van, a chainsaw and a bit of kit, a lot of which you can get with very little upfront payment and then interest-free credit. Second, there’s a lack of understanding and regulation among the consumers. If you look at the electrical and gas sectors, they are seen as potentially more dangerous, which allows for much tighter regulation – but they also have very solid associations with extremely strong lobbying processes. Perhaps, then, the answer lies with the trade associations – they need to drive the need for regulations, look at ways to influence the consumer, and explain the benefits of using an Approved contractor.

NEXT ISSUE... Do you feel that the way Network Rail has embarked upon its recent tree-felling project reflects poorly on the arboriculture industry?

Pro Arb | May 2018

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NEWS & VIEWS

news

A ROUNDUP OF ALL THE LATEST ARBORICULTURE NEWS FROM AROUND THE UK. FOR MORE STORIES VISIT WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

WOODLAND TRUST PROVIDES 50,000 TREES TO ITV VIEWERS

ROUNDUP

The Queen plants a tree as part of the Woodland Trust’s Jubilee Woods campaign in 2012 (Photo: WTML)

COUNTY DOWN ARBORIST IN INTREPID CAT RESCUE

Portadown resident Vilma Orzekauskaite spotted the cat, perched on a high branch dangling over a river, and quickly realised it was stuck. Having unsuccessfully tried to coax it down, she contacted the NI Fire and Rescue Service, but discovered that it no longer deals with cat rescues. She then turned to the internet for advice. Fortunately, after three days, tree surgeon Peter Boyd of Moira, County Down answered Vilma’s plea. Peter, who works for Annett ARB Tree Care Specialists,

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Pro Arb | May 2018

arrived at Vilma’s home around midnight. “I used the rope and harnesses as it left my hands free to get the cat,” he said. “He was happy enough in my arms, but then about three yards from the bottom he climbed off me onto another branch. He scaled the last leg down himself.” Vilma believes that the cat is a local domestic cat, as it appears to be well fed, but fears that this may not be the last time it needs saving, as it has been stuck in the same tree before. www.annettarb.com

A recent ITV documentary, entitled The Queen’s Green Planet, explored the ambition of a new initiative – a vast network of native forests across Britain and the Commonwealth, protected forever in the Queen’s name. The Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy (QCC) is creating a network of forest conservation initiatives across all 53 Commonwealth countries. In the run-up to the documentary, ITV announced a campaign that gave viewers the opportunity to be part of the initiative. The Woodland Trust provided 10,000 tree packs for viewers, funded by Sainsbury’s, in a campaign that ran leading up to the documentary’s airing on Monday 16 April. The campaign was open to all viewers, as well as schools, community groups and associations. Each pack contains two silver birches, two rowans and a hazel for ITV viewers to plant as their own contribution to the QCC. The trees will be sent out in

autumn 2018, and the packs will include guidance on planting and nurturing them. “The Woodland Trust is delighted to be partnering with ITV in support of the Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy,” said Woodland Trust chair Baroness Young. “We are giving people the opportunity to connect with nature and their wider community by planting and nurturing native trees while becoming a tangible part of this inspirational legacy. Sainsbury’s CEO Mike Coupe said: “As the Woodland Trust’s largest corporate partner, we’re committed to raising awareness of the importance of the UK’s woods and trees, and contributing to their conservation.” ITV’s controller of factual Jo Clinton Davis said: “The Queen’s Green Planet shows not only the Queen’s interest in trees, but also how an ambitious global project has spread across the Commonwealth, with countries all around the world dedicating forests and tree planting initiatives in her name. www.woodlandtrust.org.uk

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NEWS & VIEWS

TIMBERWOLF TO LAUNCH NEW VARIABLE TRACKED CHIPPER AT ARB SHOW 2018 Timberwolf will be launching its new TW 280TVGTR at the ARB Show 2018 on 11 and 12 May 2018, at Westonbirt, The National Arboretum. The TW 280TVGTR combines Timberwolf’s TW 280 performance with the ability to move the tracks in and out, raise the height of the machine off the ground, and alter the angle. The Wolftrack variable tracking

SERBIAN SPRUCE ARTICLE WINS JAMES CUP 2018

An article examining Serbian spruce (Picea omorika) as an alternative to Sitka and Norway spruces for building resilience in British forests has won the 2018 James Cup. Coauthored by Peter Savill, Scott Wilson, Bill Mason, Richard Jinks, Victoria Stokes and Tom Christian, the article appeared in the January 2017 issue of the Quarterly Journal of Forestry (QJF). Part of a Species Profile Project looking at tree species that could deal with climate change, tree pests and diseases,

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NEWS.indd 13

it examined Serbian spruce’s habitat and ecology, record in Britain, silviculture, growth, genetics and provenance, and potential uses. The authors concluded that the tree might have a role in eastern Britain, where Sitka spruce is expected to suffer from moisture stress, and within spaced-tree silvopastural systems – but that other species could be more productive elsewhere. One judge said the report “contains a vast amount of detailed information that is succinctly presented on virtually all aspects of the species. It could be considered a source of future reference for Picea omorika.” The award was presented to Peter Savill by RFS President Andrew Woods, at a meeting of the RFS Oxon and Bucks Division. The James Cup is presented annually, for an article that an RFS panel judges to be the best original article appearing in the QJF that year. www.rfs.org.uk

system features heavy-duty twin arms supporting each track, with dynamic control over track width, ground clearance and machine tilt angle, providing control and comfort – even when navigating uneven and sloping ground up to 35º. The extra-wide feed funnel and open top section provide users with visibility and ease of feeding, while the 280mm x 210mm infeed aperture can process more than 6.5t per hour. There’s also Timberwolf’s ‘no-stress’ auto-feed

control for smooth operation, combined with a heavier rotor giving added inertia to get the job done quicker. The TW 280TVGTR has a low vibration and ergonomically designed ride-on platform for ultimate comfort and safety. There are also additional safety controls, such as reverse feed rollers overriding the stop bar, and the carefully positioned air fi lter intakes to draw in cool, dust-free air. www.timberwolf-uk.com

ONE MORE ASH DIEBACK SPORE COULD KILL EUROPE’S LAST ASH TREES Just one more ash dieback spore could kill off Europe’s remaining ash trees, according to a recent study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. Analysis suggests that the dieback problem may have been caused by just one or two mushroom-like fruiting bodies of a fungal pathogen. The pathogen grows on Asian ash trees without causing disease, but has devastated European varieties. As many as 95% of all European ash trees are under threat from dieback. It has already destroyed 80% of young ash trees in Norway,

and threatens to kill or severely damage a quarter of the species in southern Sweden. “It’s incredible that from such limited genetic diversity, the ash dieback fungus has already devastated trees across Europe,” said the study’s lead author, Mark McMullan of the Earlham Institute. “Now that the disease is established, the introduction of genes from outside of Europe would tremendously increase the genetic diversity of the pathogen, and seriously threaten the remaining ash trees.” www.nature.com/natecolevol

Pro Arb | May 2018

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02/05/2018 16:53


30u30 FULLPG Pro Arb.pdf

1

01/05/2018

08:56

Are you under 30 and deserve industry recognition? (Or know someone who does?)

If so, then the time has come to enter... C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Let’s recognise the UK’s leading young arboriculture professionals Head to www.prolandscapermagazine.com/30u30 to find out more

The rules are simple: You must have been aged 30 or under on 1 January 2018 and must currently work within the horticulture sector. You can nominate yourself or a colleague and the competition is free to enter. Head to our website www.prolandscapermagazine.com/30u30 to find details on how to apply. Applications will close 1 September 2018, before being passed on for judging. Shortlisters will be contacted if they have been successful and will feature in the November issues of all supporting magazines.


NEWS & VIEWS

N E W SA EXTR

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n Friday 16 March, Plumpton College students took part in the 3ATC Southern College Climbing Competition at Capel Manor College, entering the Year 1 and Year 2 categories and competing against three other colleges. A Year 1 team, made up of three students, must have less than one year’s practical climbing experience, and can climb using either the Prusik or the Blake’s Hitch system. The year 2 team, which is also made up of three students, consists of those with less than two years’ climbing experience, and can climb on any AA-approved hitch system. On the day, Capel Manor

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Plumpton success at 3ATC competition

PRO ARB REPORTS BACK FROM THE 3ATC SOUTHERN COLLEGE CLIMBING COMPETITION

College, Merrist Wood College and Bridgewater College all competed in addition to Plumpton. During the competition, students complete a series of tasks as a team; each task is designed to resemble different obstacles that an arborist would face at work. The tasks allow the competitor to show their skill by efficiently and safely completing each one in the quickest time possible, following industry best practice. Using a ‘Work Climb’ tree, the students take part in challenges such as using a pole saw, completing a log toss, doing a limb walk, hitting hand bell targets and successfully finishing in a landing zone while

team mates offer support and guidance from the ground. Using a ‘Work Climb’ tree involving these techniques helps students to prepare for the industry. Plumpton College has been entering teams into the climbing competitions for the last six years, as they provide invaluable experience for the students studying forestry and arboriculture courses, allowing them to put everything they have learned into practice. Since starting these competitions back in 2012, the college has also been able to make key industry links with estates such as the National Trust’s Cragside in Northumberland, as well as developing a good relationship with competition sponsor Gustharts. “Taking part in competitions such as the 3 ATC College Climbing Competition allows our students not only to develop

their skills for industry, but also to network with their peers and industry leaders,” says Vicki Richardson, programme manager at Plumpton College. “The judges of the competition are world class climbers and can offer support and tips during the competition – and for their future careers.” Plumpton College had a very successful weekend, winning both the Year 1 and Year 2 competitions and a prize of a £250 Gustharts vouchers for the college; each student also won a Gustharts goodie bag and a pack from the Arboricultural Association. Winning competitions like these allows the college to purchase new equipment for the department, which can be used with students on the course. For full list of results from the weekend, visit the Arboriculture Association website. www.trees.org.uk

Pro Arb | May 2018 11


8 FEBRUARY 2019

REGISTER YOUR INTEREST NOW WWW.PROLANDSCAPERBUSINESSAWARDS.COM

2017 WINNER PROFILE T

he award-winning partnership between Gristwood and Toms and Bristol City Council has become a shining example of how a local authority and a contractor can work together. Since 2014, when the council awarded Gristwood and Toms a five-year contract to provide arboricultural services, the organisations have worked together to deliver a number of initiatives throughout the city, transforming the client-contractor model.

THE AWARD RECOGNISES AND CELEBRATES THE HARD WORK AND DEDICATION OF THE EMPLOYEES INVOLVED – IT’S A GREAT MORALE BOOSTER Gristwood and Toms, in partnership with Bristol City Council, was announced as both the winner of the Industry Partnership Award and the CED Stone Group Supreme Winner at the Pro Landscaper Business Awards on 9 February Gristwood and Toms in partnership with Bristol City Council. Together, Gristwood and Toms and Bristol City Council have held community days to engage local people, raising environmental awareness throughout

Bristol, along with making Bristol’s Blaise Plant Nursery home to the South West’s first local authority wood fuel station. Darren Kilby, head of sales and marketing at Gristwood and Toms, comments: “Winning the ‘Industry Partnership Award’ and the ‘Supreme Award’ at the Pro Landscaper Business Awards has been fantastic for Gristwood and Toms. Most important, the award recognises and celebrates the hard work and dedication of the employees involved – it’s a great morale booster. It has also helped us to attract new employees – after all, who doesn’t want to work

for an award-winning company! “I would strongly encourage any business within our industry to enter the 2018 Pro Landscaper Business Awards. Winning an award has increased our profile and helped us to forge new business relationships. The team at Pro Landscaper have been excellent, providing ongoing publicity through their printed and online publications, social media channels and networking opportunities at their Pro Landscaper Live Events. If you enter just one award this year, make it the Pro Landscaper 2018 Business Awards.”

THIS COULD BE YOU - REGISTER YOUR INTEREST NOW! PLBA winner.indd 110

02/05/2018 08:38


The Arboricultural Association’s

52nd National Amenity Conference

SOILS & TREES Standing your Ground ©Kyle Ellefson

University of Exeter 9–12 September 2018

This year we are working in partnership with the Sustainable Soils Alliance

An in-depth journey exploring the relationship between soil science and arboriculture Top-rated national and international speakers Diverse and innovative perspectives State-of-the-art venue and exhibitor facilities Sunday Field Trip UK & Ireland Tree Climbing Competition under ISA Rules Earlybird booking available Spring 2018 Industry-leading trade exhibitors

Keep a look out for the Amenity Conference App launching end of August!

To keep up-to-date and register for updates visit:

www.trees.org.uk/Amenity-Conference Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc. Apple and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.


NEWS & VIEWS

Joined-up writing VIEWS J O N AT H A N HAZELL

T

his issue I’m going to ask you to think about education, particularly surrounding the role of the arboricultural consultant. There are three broad areas to consider: how the consultant is trained or educated to perform their role, how well the consultant can educate their client, and whether the client is receptive to the advice. In my experience, a good grounding in practical tree work is a great foundation for an ongoing career as a consultant – it’s useful to know from experience how species are likely to behave, how they will interact with other species, which particular pests and diseases they are susceptible to, and so on. A good practitioner will display their ability daily by producing good work that will enhance the useful retention life of the tree or trees, without adversely affecting the contribution that they make to the local environment. But how can the consultant showcase their skills? Generally, the consultant will need to produce a report of some kind, by which they, and probably their client (such is human nature), will

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Pro Arb | May 2018

JONATHAN HAZELL PONDERS THE KEY SKILLS AN ARBORICULTURAL CONSULTANT NEEDS WHEN WRITING REPORTS FOR CLIENTS

be judged. The consultant’s skillset is different from that of the contractor, even though the subject matter and the conclusions may well be the same. As a consultant, you may presume that your reader has the reading age of 14 – but you should have the communication skills of an adult. Without seeming to be a turgid old bore, the consultant’s report needs to be persuasive and reassuring. That can most often be achieved by a short report that contains the critical information only, and a workmanlike analysis and discussion of that and that alone. I remember that in one of my English O Levels the exercise was to condense a few paragraphs of flowing prose into 100 honeyed words, without losing the sense or meaning of the original piece; if that skill can be taught, then the budding consultant should take the course. Another skill that might be taught is limiting what you say to what the client needs to know in order to achieve their desired outcome – identifying the ‘white noise’ and cutting it out. If the client has the reading age of a 14-year-old, it’s reasonable to presume

they have the same intellectual capacity when it comes to questioning and challenging what is presented. How many clients really care what Table 1 of BS 5837 says, and why

persuasive nor reassuring, and the idea was never taken up. Some of the documents in support of a tender made for dull reading, but perhaps that was a finely honed skill – if so, I was

The consultant’s skillset is different from that of the contractor, even though the subject matter may well be the same is that information so often repeated ad nauseum in a tree report? Nobody gains any knowledge or understanding through its inclusion. Again, if there were a course helping people to think about what a client really wants to read, then consultants should take it. In a former life, I recommended that bid-writers take creative writing courses; unfortunately, I was neither

taken in. Another idea was that we consider basic marketing strategies and techniques, and learn how to react to the client. Internal courses were run with some success, and I realise I fail to meet their expectations almost every day!

Jonathan Hazell is an arboricultural consultant. jhazell.com

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NEWS & VIEWS

EDWARD MORROW CONSIDERS WHAT’S REALLY IMPORTANT TO CLIENTS, AND HOW YOU CAN GET STRAIGHT TO THE POINT

Cutting

XXX

to the chase VIEWS E D WA R D MORROW

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eing an arborist is a wellrespected profession. We do much more than just ‘cut trees’, ‘remove brush’, or ‘grind stumps’. We remove dangerous and decaying trees that can cause harm to property. We help estate agents sell homes and allow parents to raise their families in the comfort of those homes, without having to worry about limbs crashing down unpredictably. We give children the opportunity to play safely outside their homes and experience the great outdoors (helping them get away from the TV and iPad for a while), without their parents being fearful of a branch taking a nosedive on their loved ones. So why does all this matter? Always remember that people

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really only care about one thing: results. When you understand the results that they’re seeking, you can discover what is valuable to them. Value is always relative, or dependent on the particular person. Your client will never receive value from the dual-locking carabiners, colourful stationary climbing ropes, razor-sharp Silky saws or the sporty Kask helmets that you use to impressively take down challenging trees. You must understand the distinction between features (things you have) and benefits (the results you deliver). Your features, which are critical to getting the job done, are things like your tools, equipment, crew, knowledge and experience – and they are irrelevant if you cannot translate them to the results your client is looking for. Why is your client interested in having a tree or limbs removed?

When you understand why, you can position your service in a way that aligns with their needs, and immediately build your status as a trusted arborist, an expert in the field – not just another ‘person who cuts trees’. Your client may be interested in removing a tree to install a pool, or to clean out space for an add-on for their home – deep down they care not so much about removing the tree, but the satisfaction that will come from letting their kids swim on a hot summer day, or entertaining guests when the home remodelling project is completed. If so, you should address these things as you consult and give your assessment, explaining how you and your team will work efficiently in order to allow the pool or home contractors to start working – which will get your clients closer to the experiences that they are looking forward to having.

The simplest way to get tree jobs is to understand and align your services with their desires. In other words, bridge the gap between your features and the benefit your client is looking forward to receiving. Here are a few simple tips: 1. Be an active listener: listen as twice as much as you speak. 2. Ask questions: figure out what is important to them. 3. Understand their true needs: make sure you are on the same page as them. Effective communication is key: it shows that you are listening and paying attention to the needs of your client, which is one way to raise your status from common ‘tree-cutter’ to a professional arborist and a trusted expert in the field.

Edward Morrow is an author, accountant and arborist. info@accountstaffers.co

Pro Arb | May 2018 15


NEWS & VIEWS

PDEISESASTES

&

w at c h

Apple canker (Nectria galligena)

C

ankers are dead sections of bark on the branches or trunks of trees, killed by mechanical injuries or fungi and bacteria. Most fungi causing stem cankers are restricted to bark and xylem tissue that is degraded due to the effects of toxins or secreted enzymes. Such fungi include Nectria galligena, Cryphonectria parasitica, Diplodia pinea and Hypoxylon mammatum. Fungi that cause cankers and also invade the xylem, causing wood decay, are termed canker rot pathogens (e.g. Cerrena unicolor). Generally, canker pathogens are unable to penetrate bark directly, but will quickly colonise open wounds. In addition, plants weakened by environmental stress (drought, waterlogging, salt damage) are more susceptible to attack. Canker diseases may cause extensive damage to trees when they kill all of the bark in a particular area, girdling a branch or main stem. Girdling results in death of all parts of the plant above the canker. If the trunk is affected, the entire plant may die.

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GLYNN PERCIVAL OF BARTLETT TREE EXPERTS EXPLAINS HOW TO IDENTIFY AND MANAGE CANKERS

Cankers Target-shaped canker on willow

Symptoms Wound cankers – Injury to the base of the trunk by lawnmowers or other equipment results in bark abrasion, girdling and death. Barriers can prevent this type of injury, and mulching around the base eliminates the need to mow near the stem. Target-shaped cankers – Infections occur through bark wounds or at junctions of dead and live branches. The fungi grow through the bark during autumn and winter. In the growing season, healthy trees can respond by forming callus tissue in rolls around the edges of infected areas. This alternating grow th of fungus and tree results in the target-like appearance. Diff use cankers – Some canker fungi grow through host tissue so rapidly that the tree cannot respond. The cankers are shallow, and bark on the advancing margins is discolored. They are usually lethal, and diseased branches should be removed immediately. Cytospora canker, Hypoxylon canker and chestnut blight are typical of this group.

Management Recommendations vary between species and the nature of the canker. All management practices should include: Spring or autumn fertilisation – healthy trees are better able to cope with cankers. Mulch and irrigate during drought periods – inadequate moisture is a common stress factor in urban sites. Correct pruning – pruning should be done in early spring, prior to bud-break, or in mid-June after leaf expansion. Remove dead and weak branches and those that are rubbing against others. Cuts should be made so that no stubs are left and the resulting wound is as small as possible. Excise the canker by cutting outside the cankered area into healthy bark. Shape the cut to an ellipse, and avoid infection of the fresh wound. Sterilise tools between cuts by dipping them in 10% household bleach or 70% alcohol for several minutes. Washes of copper based products are recommended during the growing season. www.bartletttree.co.uk

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S E R U FEAT 8 1 0 2 y ma

features 18 > the interview

Trojan Tree Care owner Jamie Saunders on streamlining his business

22 > Security Report

How to make your company and its equipment less of a target

27 > Decay Detection

Oliver Tong’s case study on decay detection for the Royal Parks

30 > Top Ten Tips

Everything you need to know about tackling oak processionary moth


FEATURES

INTERVIEW

W IT H

JAMIE

SAUNDERS

JAMIE SAUNDERS, OWNER OF TROJAN TREE CARE IN KENT, TALKS TO PRO ARB ABOUT THE REALITY OF ARBORICULTURE AND WHY HE CHOOSES NOT TO GROW HIS BUSINESS

18

Jamie, how did you get into the arb industry? By accident, really – I like trees and being out in nature and originally wanted to go to America to work in the national parks, so I enrolled on a course but didn’t like it. I spoke to my tutor, who admitted that after two years I would only be qualified to volunteer at the National Trust! I was friends with some guys on the tree surgery course there and they looked like they were having fun, so I switched over onto that course.

It started as a way of making money, but then it grew and grew. You get a few clients, a bit more business and then you’re ready to take someone else on and you grow a bit more and it repeats. Then I got married and realised I would have to really knuckle down and run the business properly, but it wasn’t really ‘me’ – you end up managing the business, continuing to grow, getting Arb Approved and all the parts that you’re supposed to do, but I wasn’t out on the tools, I was just sitting in front of the computer dealing with paperwork and emails.

Where was that? Moreton Morrell College in Warwickshire. I did a two-year National Diploma from 1997 to 1999. Once I’d fi nished that I came back to Kent, got an old estate car and a big 066 saw and started pruning apple trees with it. I was 19 years old and just wanted to earn some money – I built everything up from there.

How did you find clients? Through word of mouth mostly, as we always did a really good job. I used to advertise with the Yellow Pages and Thomson Local and spent a lot of money with them in the early Noughties before digital came in. I’ve been going for 18 years and I’ve gradually built up a really good client base of repeat customers, around 60:40 domestic to commercial.

Pro Arb | May 2018

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FEATURES

The problem with being bigger is that you’re impacted more by economic ups and downs Which do you find is the most profitable? Neither is inherently more profitable, it just depends on the client. Some of the commercial that I’ve tried is not profitable. I did try subbing stuff off of Gristwood and Toms, and that wasn’t profitable because they’re taking the lion’s share and you’re working your nuts off to get some numbers. But then I’ve got an NHS property services contract across Kent, and that’s a really good client. You get some domestic clients who are just price shoppers, and they’re a pain in the arse to save themselves £20 – and then you find good clients who like dealing with you and are happy to pay for a great service. The problem I found with being bigger is that you’re impacted more by the economic ups and downs we’ve had since 2008. It’s great while business is good, but you end up riding out the troughs, trying to avoid letting guys go by dropping prices to keep busy – and then you’re busy but not making a lot of money. During one of these downturns I thought, I’m just keeping bums on seats here, not enjoying it and not making much money all because of my ego – because you look at other firms in your area and you don’t want to be seen to shrink in comparison to the competition of your local market.

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My take is this: there’s a small pool of people that are willing or interested enough to endure the rigours of tree surgery and within that, even fewer that are really good people. They don’t give you any issues, they think and solve problems for themselves and are a pleasure to employ, but they get looked after by their fi rms and are hard to get without over-paying them. Then there are other guys who need to be constantly micro-managed and give you headaches. At some point around 2015/2016 I wanted to do something different. I hate repetition. When my interests change I just need to move on and have the freedom to do what I’m interested in. I was earning good money at times, but I didn’t enjoy what I was doing every day. I wanted a new challenge and realised I wouldn’t ever really compete with the bigger fi rms in the industry because I’m just not interested in the grind of running a big operation. To be frank, I just don’t have the passion for it like some guys do. They would do it for fun and that’s why they’re successful. If you don’t enjoy it, it won’t work. I realised that I was working in my weak area, not enjoying myself and I’d never grow to that size – and I wouldn’t enjoy it if I did. 

Pro Arb | May 2018 19


FEATURES

I don’t want to grow my business to earn more money – I’m happy with the balance I’ve got now

Thankfully by that time, I’d saved enough money to turn a three-bedroom bungalow I’d bought into a fi ve-bedroom house, so I let some guys go and shrunk the business down to a skeleton-sized fi rm to focus on project managing this. This was really interesting for me, but unfortunately it also coincided with some problems in my personal life, so once that was fi nished I had to reassess what I wanted to spend my time doing and decided to shrink further. I’m happy with the balance I’ve got now. I got rid of all my excess kit and just kept the best truck, the best chipper and a stump grinder, and I do the little easy jobs with customers who I’ve known for years, I sub out the bigger projects to some startup fi rms in the area. I’m only looking for profit now, over turnover. I’ve got low overheads, I’ve got the yard, the kit is all paid for and I can earn a nice keep without it becoming all-consuming. I find that when your company is big, it’s like being in a tunnel – you wear the uniform and everything in your life becomes about the business, and I just didn’t enjoy that. Some people do and that’s why they’re successful, but it’s not me.

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Do you think you’ll carry on as you are? We’ll see. I’ve put adverts out for staff, but the good people are being looked after, so you only get the stragglers coming around, and I can’t be bothered to go into that again and the same old problems that come with it. I know I’m leaving a lot of money on the table at the moment, but that’s the way it goes. Would you price a job or would they price it for you? I get a day rate from the guys I sub my work to because I can give them regular work – we agree a day rate and I’ll price it and take a margin on it. Do you take a risk where, if you get bumped or not paid, you lose out? Of course, but I’ve never not been paid in 18 years, so that doesn’t really worry me. It can happen when you’re subbing to bigger companies that then go on to liquidate themselves, but it’s rare in this industry.

www.trojantreecare.co.uk 0800 028 2588

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FEATURES

Safe &

sound

THEFT IS RIFE IN THE ARBORICULTURE INDUSTRY. IN OUR SPECIAL REPORT, WE SPEAK TO VICTIMS OF THEFT, AS WELL AS EXPERTS IN ARB SECURITY, TO FIND OUT HOW TO TACKLE THE PROBLEM

E

very tree surgeon has their own story of equipment theft. A chainsaw, a chipper, a stump grinder – the potential resale value of these big-ticket items makes them susceptible to theft, as does their ability to earn a quick bit of money for the thief should they want to try their hand at some unskilled tree surgery. Though we are currently in a slower period for thefts, it is worth considering how secure your equipment will be in October and November, when thefts pick up due to the larger amount of tree work that is available. Stephen Lewis, account executive at Arb Cover, tells us about one robbery so simple it borders on the absurd. “A tree surgeon had pulled up at some traffic lights with his wood chipper on the back,” he tells us. “Somehow, as he was stationary, another driver had managed to unhook his chipper and attach it to the back of his own van, driving past him at the traffic lights. The thief’s van was a bit quicker than the owner’s, so they got away with it.”

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FEATURE -SECURITY.indd 12

Such a cavalier attitude is uncommon, but a large portion of thefts are undertaken when a tree surgeon leaves their equipment momentarily. “They will leave their truck and chipper or stump grinder, have a chat with a client and go around the back of the garden, leaving their vehicle and machinery at the front,” says Stephen. “Then, when they come back around, they realise they have been followed to the site, and the chipper has gone. It’s so easy to leave your equipment unattended, thinking you’ll only be a couple of seconds – but someone can just unhook it and drive off.” There is no single solution to theft, but the most effective practice is to layer your security, according to Stephen. A large portion of thefts comes from opportunists – those who will steal a chipper from the back of a truck when the owner isn’t watching, or follow a truck and wait for the opportunity to strike. A hitch lock will make unhooking equipment a much slower job, warding off the opportunists.

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02/05/2018 16:28


FEATURES

Stephen recommends removing your exact whereabouts from search engines, advertising your company through social media instead It’s also important to try and keep machinery out of sight as often as possible, particularly overnight. Buildings and shipping containers are great for this; if neither of these is possible, the next best solution is to get a ground anchor fitted – again, it slows down the process of taking the equipment. “The way tree surgeons store equipment can be varied,” says Stephen. “You can’t say to an entire industry that they will have to keep their equipment in a locked building of a standard construction, as it’s not always possible. We tend to work with clients to see what they have and what they can do, rather than trying to impose certain conditions on them.” It is likely that anyone using a shipping container will be based in a remote area. The problem here is that the thieves can turn up with welding equipment and easily cut holes in the side of a container to remove the equipment. Jamie Saunders of Trojan

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FEATURE -SECURITY.indd 13

Tree Care has come under attack this way before, even though the landscape of his yard makes it difficult to break into. “I had one break-in where I lost some chainsaws,” he tells us. “My yard is good as it’s on a slope in a valley, with only one entrance for vehicles, and that has a metal electronic gate. The house of the man who owns the yard is also right on the front of it. People have come in through the woods on foot and tried to break in to steal stuff, but we have CCTV and the landscape makes it difficult to come in with a truck.” “There are three tree surgeons in the yard, and there’ve been a lot of break-ins. One time, the thieves went in the back of the yard and broke into every unit, but stopped just before mine – everyone was looking at me a little suspiciously in the morning!” Jamie and the other tree surgeons at his yard have consequently taken great precautions to 

Pro Arb | May 2018 23

02/05/2018 16:28


FEATURES

prevent any future thefts. CCTV and difficult landscapes deter thieves – but clearly they aren’t always enough. Establishing yourself in a remote area has its pros and cons: if a potential thief can’t find you, then they won’t be able to take your equipment – but should they figure out where you’re storing your gear, they will have a nice quiet place in which to conduct their business. Part of the current problem is that thieves can find the whereabouts of a tree surgeon’s yard online; the maps on search engines can even pinpoint the best ways in and out. Stephen recommends removing your exact whereabouts from search engines, advertising your company through social media instead. “The key is physical security,” he explains. When it comes to this, people will often opt for bell alarms, as they’re the cheapest – but a bell will have little benefit in a rural area. “If people are going to get an alarm, we tend to recommend getting one that can notify their

mobiles, should anything happen. Then, they can notify the police.” If an alarm does go off, it is obviously not recommended that you turn up yourself. You can also add layers of security into shipping containers. Arb Cover recommends having chains looped through the handles and then attached to the inside of the container, for added protection. Jon Couling, an arborist with Bartlett Tree Experts, took a layered approach to security after receiving a call one morning from the estate manager of the lot where his equipment is stored, informing him that the gates to his compound were wide open. “We had just taken delivery of two brand new chippers two weeks before, and they were no longer there,” Jon tells us. “The problem is that, until recently, it was an easy estate to prey on. We didn’t have electric gates on either end, so you could drive in from one end and drive down the track on the road. It was so easy. We made a point

of saying that, unless things improved, we’d move out.” The way in which Jon secured has his compound is a great example for anyone to follow, whether you’ve experienced problems in the past or want to make a pre-emptive strike against would-be thieves. “Everything is alarmed, there is CCTV everywhere, and there is an electric gate on the compound and one on each end of the estate,” he tells us. “All of the vehicles and chippers have live satellite trackers on them, and we put wheel clamps on the chippers at night.” One underused tool is Arb Safe, an online inventory in which you register your equipment and its serial number. The information is held securely, and the information can only be accessed when the owner logs into their account and marks the equipment as stolen. Arb Safe has been around for four years, and has the potential to make a significant difference in security for the arb industry. It may not deter the thieves,

If people are going to get an alarm, we tend to recommend getting one than can notify their mobiles, should anything happen

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02/05/2018 16:29


FEATURES

The general consensus is that layering is the best method. You don’t just lock it up, you have layers of security that thieves have to get through but it gives users the chance of getting gear back once it’s stolen. Steve Bullman, owner of Arb Safe, explains that the tool is free and does nothing with your data – and yet it hasn’t taken off. “There are all manner of devices to put on chippers, but at the end of the day, if thieves want something enough, they’ll carry around every tool necessary to get it,” he says. “Over the years, there have been numerous conversation on the ArbTalk forum about securing equipment, and the general consensus is that layering is the best method. You don’t just lock it up, you have layers of security that thieves have to get through. It’s going to be a pain for them, as they must go through all of those layers just to get the equipment. Really, Arb Safe is just another layer. It’s not significant alone, but it’s a layer all the same. If everyone was on it, and I mean everybody, then it could become more significant. That’s how I envisaged it.”

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FEATURE -SECURITY.indd 15

“The general opinion,” Steve explains, “is that everything that is stolen is taken out of the country and never seen again – but actually, you look at different police forces on social media and you see a lot of stuff is going to auction because they can’t find the owners. If it had been listed on Arb Safe, for example, the police could have checked that, found the owner and returned the equipment.” Thefts have a knock-on effect within the industry. Some thieves go on to try their hand at tree surgery themselves in an attempt to make some cash, creating more problems in an industry that is already rife with cheap botch-jobs. Cheap, stolen equipment can also be sold to other unskilled operatives. “People will regularly go for the cheapest client,” says Stephen. “Often, it comes down to the professionals getting across the fact that they are professional, they are qualified, they know what they’re doing and they’ll do a decent job.

It is important in this sense for the Arb Association to continue working with the public, raising awareness of the importance of hiring professionals. There are so many stories of have-a-go tree surgeons doing half a job and leaving a mess, with the client then having to hire a professional to clear it up – ultimately costing them more. This is a common complaint from Arb Covers clients. “A lot of our clients have said in the past that they’ve had to go around to rectify work that a non-specialist has done for someone,” Stephen explains. “We recently heard about one of our clients being undercut by a non-specialist; the group turned up, butchered the trees at the back of the garden, and said that they needed the money now but would be back to clear up the mess after. They then left and didn’t come back. The customer had to get a professional to clear up the mess they left. It’s those sorts of people who are stealing the chainsaws.”

Pro Arb | May 2018 25

02/05/2018 16:29


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FEATURES

Decay

detection ARBORICULTURAL CONSULTANT OLIVER TONG TELLS US ABOUT THE WORK HE AND JUNIOR ARBORICULTURAL CONSULTANT STEPHEN COZENS CARRIED OUT FOR THE ROYAL PARKS USING THE PICUS 3 SONIC TOMOGRAPHY DEVICE

I

n 2015, Place Services Tree Team was successful in securing a place on The Royal Parks Arboricultural Advisory Services Framework for Detailed Tree Investigations. This mostly involved the use of specialist decay detection equipment, but also included advanced aerial tree inspections when required, to help The Royal Park’s tree officers with their tree risk management duties across the estate. Place Services possesses a full suite of specialist decay detection equipment, including PiCUS 3 Sonic Tomograph, IML-RESI PowerDrill 400 and PiCUS Tree Motion Sensors (TMS). We also have a number of qualified and experienced tree climbers in the team, who are fully equipped to provide this service. The Royals Parks is a charity for London’s eight amazing Royal Parks. It cares for each of London’s Royal Parks so that present and future generations can explore, value and enjoy them. Covering more than 5,000 acres of historic parkland, the parks provide beautiful green spaces in the heart of the capital, where people can escape the hustle and bustle of the city. They’re places for people to relax, unwind, exercise and clear their minds. They also have hundreds of buildings, statues and

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memorials, giving a fascinating insight into London’s heritage. The Royal Parks manages Greenwich Park, St James’s Park, The Green Park (including Victoria Tower Gardens, Canning Green and Downing Street), Hyde Park (with Grosvenor Square Gardens), Kensington Gardens (with Brompton Cemetery), The Regent’s Park (with Primrose Hill), Richmond Park and Bushy Park (with the Longford River). The estate also includes associated park infrastructure, such as roads, buildings and bodies of water. The parks contain extensive tree stocks which, as well as being

we have had Sorbus International come to our offices in Chelmsford to provide us with training in the correct use of the equipment; it also provides us with ongoing product support. I was lucky enough to attend one of the PiCUS Masterclass Seminars with John Harraway in 2016, which was organised by Sorbus International. I found it really helpful to learn from the experts in the field, and would recommend these courses to anyone with an involvement or interest in decay detection work. In addition to the work for The Royal

In providing this service, it is highly important that our staff receive the correct training in the use of specialist decay detection equipment of high amenity value, are also of historic, cultural and ecological importance. In providing this service, it is highly important that our staff receive the correct training in the use of specialist decay detection equipment, as well as the interpretation of results. Previously,

Parks, we also provide this service to other tree owners and managers within the South East, including local authorities, arboricultural consultants/ contractors, highways departments, companies, schools, country parks and private landowners. 

Pro Arb | May 2018 27


FEATURES

1

2

IMAGES ABOVE: 1 A high-value grafted copper beech (Fagus sylvatica Atropurpurea Group) located next to West Carriage Drive, a busy road that intersects Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park in central London. 2 The graft point is easily distinguishable, due to the unusual bulging base of the lower part or rootstock, which contrasts drastically in width with the upper part or scion. Fungal fruiting bodies of two separate decay fungi were identified by tree officers; due to the high value of the tree and the potential risk posed to the road, this required a more detailed inspection. 3 Multiple brackets of Ganoderma spp. could be seen on the rootstock with further fruit bodies of Kretzschmaria deusta at the asexual or anamorph stage on the scion.

3

GRAPHS TO THE RIGHT: It was decided to perform two tests at different levels; the first was carried out on the rootstock near to ground level and the second above the graft point on the scion. The readings or tomograms to the right here both indicate advanced decay with minimal functional wood remaining. The results of this work enabled the tree officers to make an informed decision on the management of this tree.

Oliver is an arboriculturist with more than 16 years’ experience. He is a technician member of the Arboricultural Association and an associate member of the Institute of Chartered Foresters. He is currently an arboricultural consultant with Place Services, forming part of a large multidisciplinary team. Email: arboriculture@essex.gov.uk

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Pro Arb | May 2018

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FEATURES

TOP 10

TIPS

FOR OAK PROCESSIONARY MOTH WHAT IS OAK PROCESSIONARY MOTH, AND HOW CAN YOU IDENTIFY AND ERADICATE IT? DOMINIC BLAKE AND IVAN HOPKINSON OF ADVANCED TREE SERVICES FILL US IN

30

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FEATURES

01

Initially brought in on nursery stock from Europe, OPM is only found on oaks – mainly Turkey oak, English oak and other deciduous oaks, rarely on holly oak. In rare cases they will build their nests in other trees, but they will only feed on oak leaves.

02

The caterpillars feed on the leaves from budburst in mid-late April, eating only the fleshy parts and leaving the mid rib and major veins on the stalks. Finding this leaf damage is one of the best ways to identify the presence of OPM in the early stages, as the nests are not generally built until the start of June onwards.

03

During May, the caterpillars are quite transient, and will move around the tree regularly. When they are getting ready to build nests, they will start to move around the tree in larger numbers, looking for a suitable site. They can be found moving in single file, nose to tail, or in groups, nose to tail. It depends on the size of the population.

04

They can be found on the ground, as they regularly fall off branches – especially if there is a high population, or an exposed site. Old nests can also fall off the trees, as they weather over time, which can be an unexpected hazard.

05

Woven from silvery silk and hairs, the nests are typically about the size of half a grapefruit – although with heavy infestations, they can grow to be up to 3ft in length. The nests are generally located on the trunk, under branches and other areas that are protected from the elements, behind bird or bat boxes, and even at the feet of trees. They can be seen all year round, but are easiest to spot on bright days during the summer and autumn, turning brown over winter as they weather and break up.

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06

Silvery webbing trails reach from the nests out to the feeding areas (leaves). These are made of toxic hairs and webbing, and should therefore be avoided.

07

Don’t go near them unless your skin is covered – the microscopic hairs, which are barbed, can settle and embed in your skin. You will be left with an itchy patch, which can itch for as long as six weeks. Keep pets away from them. If you suspect OPM, notify the Forestry Commission through its website. This is also a good source of information for the identification of the nests and caterpillars. Advanced Tree Services also has information on its website, and is available for consultation and advice.

08

09

Spraying is normally done within a five-week window, from mid April to mid May. Timing is governed by both caterpillar and leaf emergence. The insecticide lands on the leaves, which are ingested by the caterpillars. Live nest removals take place from end of May through to August. Local awareness of the presence of OPM is a major hurdle; they normally move from one tree to the next, so if they’re on one oak, there is a good chance they will also be on neighbouring oaks. It is currently found mostly within the M25, with a large outbreak in the Guildford area and a smaller one around Bracknell Forest and Slough.

10

Advanced Tree Services is a Surrey-based tree care and conservation company covering the South East of England. www.atstrees.co.uk

Pro Arb | May 2018 31


F I R S T

A I D


KmaIyT2018 kit 34 > the Arb Show

What to expect from the 2018 edition

38 > Toolbox

Bartlett Tree Experts takes us behind the scenes for a look at its equipment

40 > DMM ID

44 > focus on: chippers

41 > focus on: rope

47 > Product DNA

The new DMM ID range aims to make kit management easier

Top tips on checking the safety of your ropes

42 > NRMM Emissions

Bringing some clarity to the new EU regulation

KIT COVER.indd 11

Arborists share what they look for in a chipper – and which brands ďŹ t the bill

Stihl MS 500i chainsaw

48 > arb kit

The latest in arboricultural kit

02/05/2018 16:18


KIT

THE ARB

SHOW

FRIDAY 11-SATURDAY 12 MAY 9AM-5PM

THE 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE PERENNIALLY POPULAR SHOW PROMISES TO BE A SPECTACULAR OCCASION

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ast year’s ARB Show was a record breaker, with 6,900 attendees and 109 exhibitors, and this year’s edition looks as though it may well improve upon those figures. The show will be celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, returning to Westonbirt, The National Arboretum, and marking the occasion with an extended showground to allow for more activities. The event will feature the same plethora of attractions that visitors have come to expect from it, with workshops, tree climbers’ forums, exhibitors demonstrating the latest in equipment and techniques, the fantastic arboretum, and, of course, the welcome appearance of Stroud Brewery. The latter will be

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returning with the 2018 version of the Official Arb Show Ale – suggestions for this year’s ale name welcome! The 3ATC UK Open Tree Climbing Competition will be taking centre stage in the showground, high up in Westonbirt’s canopies. Last year’s contest saw nearly 50 climbers take part across three skill categories, showing off the array of technical skills associated with being a professional arborist. There will also be a range of other attractions and interactions vying to capture attendees’ attention: The Tree Climbers’ Forum will return, bringing arborists together to discuss a range of modern techniques, while the Arborists’ Workshop, knot-tying and throwline competitions, and the Welsh

Axemen can all be found throughout the showground. There will also be attractions for kids of all ages, with a tree climbing area, zip wire and climbing wall. The Holford Arms will be contributing to the full ARB Show experience once again. The traditional country pub will be offering camping tickets for Friday, Saturday or both, with the Friday ticket including live music, an outside bar and barbecue. The Holford Arms Campsite is located just a few minutes down the road from the arboretum. The Stihl demo arena will also be back for another year, with professional demonstrations, hands-on testing and great displays. Keep an eye on the app, or on its on-site boards to make sure you catch the arena demonstrations.

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WORKSHOP TIMETABLE:

Hosted by the Arborists’ Working Group (AWG), the Arborists’ Workshop will be hosting a range of presentations in the Great Oak Hall on 11 May. Entry is free, with the AWG also running the knot-tying competition.

FRIDAY 11 MAY – GREAT OAK HALL 11AM

Safety in the arb industry Stuart Parry, HSE

12PM

Developing safety cultures and behavioural safety Chris Cooper-Abbs, Arb Matters

1PM

Managing safety: The role of the supervisor and manager Paul McBride, Arboriculture Association

2PM

Effective emergency action plans Mike Popham, LOLER UK

3PM

Arb Approved Contractor Scheme Paul Smith, Arboriculture Association

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY

STIHL DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMME

10:30-11:30AM

Top handled tree demonstration Marston Vale from Tree care with a MSA160T top handled chainsaw and HTA85 cordless telescopic pole pruner demonstration, along with a ‘new release’.

12:30-1:30PM

Showcase of Stihl’s extensive forestry chainsaw range A chance to see the range in action, with the latest MS462 C-M and a preview of the MS500i

2-3PM

Carving creations Simon O’Rourke creates wood carvings to be auctioned off for Stihl GB’s chosen charity Keep an eye out for the full timetable – to be released imminently

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HI GH LIG HT S, AC TIV ITI ES & NECE SS ITI ES :

20th anniversary show Bigger showground with

in the Arboretum More than 100 exhibitor plots

3ATC UK Open Tree Clim bing Competition New first-time exhibitors Free entr y to the show and arboretum for AA members Arborists’ Wor kshop (spo nsored by Stihl) Lantra Demo Arena Tree Climbers’ Forum Ancient Tree Forum Rela x and meet old friends and colleagues Show ales and good food

Throwline competition (spo nsored by Gusthar ts) Knot-tying competition

Lumberjack sports arena Kids’ tree climbing

Tree pests and diseases talks and trails The latest technologies

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KIT

ARB SHOW KIT

THE ARB SHOW IS A GREAT OPPORTUNIT Y TO CHECK OUT THE LATEST AND GREATEST IN KIT; KEEP YOUR EYES PEELED FOR THESE STANDS

TIMBERWOLF B4-B9 Timberwolf will be launching its new variable tracked chipper, the TW 280TVGTR. The 280TVGTR combines 280 performance with the ability to move the tracks in and out, raise the height of the machine off the ground, and alter the angle at which it sits; Wolftrack, meanwhile, makes it easy to tackle difficult ground conditions. The Timberwolf stand will also feature three ‘2019-ready’ low-emission petrol hydraulic chippers, two tracked hydraulic chippers, a road-towable green waste shredder, and three road towable diesel chippers.

FÖRST C13 Först will be showcasing its latest fuel-efficient, petrol-powered machines. The ST6P and TR6P will be highlighting the efficiency of the brand’s new petrol-driven fleet, as well as showing how its petrol-driven products can match the strength and performance of Först’s diesel-powered machines. Visitors to the stand will also be able to get a close look at Först’s extensive range of established wheeled, tracked and PTO woodchippers.

ISUZU D07 Isuzu Truck UK will be exhibiting the newly launched Grafter Green truck. With a new engine, gearbox and upgraded suspension, the Grafter Green is the lightest Isuzu Grafter ever, and is available to view with tipper, arb tipper and Utilitruck bodies.

BU X T ONS C01-C02 Buxtons Ltd will be displaying a wide range of the latest gear at stands C01-C02, including the latest Arbortec products, new climbing helmets, ropes from Cousin, and much more – all at special show prices.

T REE DI AGNO S T IC S T28 Tree Diagnostics products – from pocket devices such as the Microsecond Timer to the ArborSonic 3D Acoustic Tomograph – help with difficult management decisions. Its newest product is the ArborElectro Impedance Tomograph, which provides information on fungi before the wood decays.

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Pro Arb | May 2018

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We are leaders in forestry and arboricultural training in the UK. Our instructors offer a wealth of experience which contributes to our 95% pass rate.

Tel: 01962 857951

We offer a large range of forestry and arb courses covering chainsaws, tree-climbing, Forestry First Aid +F and Lantra Refreshers. Our Combination Arborist course is hugely successful, and all you need to start your career in Tree Surgery.

We are at stands A1 & A2 at The Arb Show, and can be Please see our website for further details on our full range of courses. reached online, in-store or over Leading arborist training. First class the phone with latest products chainsaw and arborist courses, great training environment and and free advice! friendly instructors. TreeHouse Training incorporating Kingswood Training Services

Tel: 01732 811162 www.treehouse-training.co.uk

Tel: 01732 811162 www.treehouse-training.co.uk

Commercial Vehicles with Body Conversion New vehicles for the Arb industry supplied throughout the UK

Midland’s Leading Stockist

of Arborist Equipment EXTENSIVE stocks large showroom next-day delivery competitive pRICES

e g a im

T S I R O B R a Visit Us at the arbOFshow:

Stands c01+C02

• • • •

Available with fully welded aluminium bodies, Arb conversions to used & factory tippers Tow bars, tool boxes, LED lighting & sign writing available Finance options available

Call 020 8539 0611 www.tipmaster.co.uk

Located on the A34 Between Stafford & Cannock sales@buxtons.net - www.Buxtons.net - 01785 712397


KIT

TOOL BOX

JON COULING, ARBORIST AT BARTLETT TREE EXPERTS, TAKES US THROUGH THE COMPANY’S KIT SELECTION

PPE Most of our crew is using Stihl trousers and their helmets are usually Petzl, Cask or Stein. Each member of staff normally has a personal preference to a certain make or model. We have found that over the years giving the guys their personal choice of equipment improves our safety standards, because if they like a piece of PPE they are more likely to use it. The boots that we use are usually Meindl, which we feel have taken the market lead in arboricultural footwear.

STUMP GRINDERS We invested in Predator heavily last year so we’re using the Predator 38RX, which is a great compromise between a small pedestrian grinder and a large tracked grinder.

C H A I N S AW S We’ve stuck with Stihl, and for what we do, they are still the best of what is now a bad bunch. Across the UK, you struggle to find Bartlett employees using anything that isn’t Stihl. The reliability and build quality isn’t there – the brands are all trying to go cheaper to increase returns, and the general quality isn’t as good compared to how it used to be.

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S P R AY R I G Our scope of works in this area can be anything from soil amendment to root zone de-compaction using the air spade, right the way through to fertilization and pest and disease treatment. At this time of year we’re focusing our efforts on controlling oak processionary moth and will have in excess of 10 spray rigs working at any one time throughout London and the Home Counties.

CHIPPERS The UK division of Bartlett Tree Experts used to mainly use Brush Bandit chippers. We used to use 7.5t lorries in conjunction with Bandit 150 12in chippers. This was a fantastic set up, but with the new driver licensing laws we have downsized to 3.5t Isuzu lorries and sub 750kg Timberwolf Chippers. Predominantly the tree crews will be crown thinning, dead wooding and light pruning, so the smaller set up that we now run is superb for that style of work.

COMMERCIAL VEHICLES We’ve used Isuzu lorries for more than 15 years. We went over to them as they are very reliable – they’re heavy duty and they put up with what we do as an industry. There aren’t a lot of vehicles that can do that. We replace them every five years. We have all of the backs custom built for us to suit our needs. There are a few good Isuzu main dealers dotted around the country, which works well for servicing. They’re all on 10-week PMIscheduled, six-month servicing. We used to run 7.5t lorries, but the driving licencing implications that are in place now it has made it very difficult, so we downsized everything to 3.5t with small chippers – then, anyone who comes on board can drive them with a bit of training.

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KIT

FOCUS on

DMM ID

tag along PRO ARB TAKES A LOOK AT DMM’S NEW DMM ID TAG RANGE, DESIGNED TO SIMPLIFY THE MANAGEMENT OF ARB KIT

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MM, together with Papertrail, has identified a problem faced by anyone who handles incoming and outgoing kit, or manages a lot of kit in general. The laborious task of having to input serial numbers every time you receive a shipment of equipment can take up a lot of time and is susceptible to human error. The aim of the new DMM ID range is simple: the RFID technology has a unique ID chip built into it, which is scannable with the DMM ID reader, so that the unique serial number is automatically typed into your computer, instead of having to be input manually. The technology The chip works as either a RFID tag, which can be stuck on your PPE (these tags are waterproof and dustproof and have a 50-year lifespan), or is already inside the metal products – you’ll find an ‘ID’ icon on their labels. UHF frequency ID tags require a specific reader, which works using Bluetooth technology. This means that it can be used within 20m of a mobile device, desktop or laptop computer. The DMM IDReader will pick up the unique serial number on contact. For the time being, this technology will have to be input by scanning one piece of equipment at a time; it will, however, turn a long, boring job into a much shorter one. The ID tags also mean that the products can be used even if they’re covered in paint, or the serial number is scratched off. This means that you won’t have to get

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DMM.indd 40

rid of a carabiner if it is in an undesirable condition at its six-month review. Recordkeeping Though DMM won’t be providing a software package with this new equipment, it can be used with Excel spreadsheets and Papertrail. Consider the reader a keyboard that automatically types serial numbers into your choice of software. DMM has worked with and recommends Papertrail for tracking equipment. Though Papertrail isn’t a requirement for using this technology, it will make it easier and more user friendly. For a basic package, you’ll get up-to-date status reports for each item accessed via a dashboard, as well as folders and tags for locations and roles. With an advanced subscription, you can customise inspection schedules, status reports, export options, workfl ows and integrations and task management.

Users can also create ‘kit bags’ made up of different equipment, which allows you to track an individual kit bag easily when it’s out. There are different costs associated with different levels of Papertrail, so it’s worth exploring which package will suit your needs. Kit DMM doesn’t sell all of the products that you’ll need to track in your day-to-day work, so it has created a range of ‘retrofit’ ID tags, designed to be placed onto the rest of your kit – including zip ties, rope labels, helmet stickers and dots. These are self-explanatory, apart from the dots, which are small and durable dome-shaped tags to be stuck on metal devices. The rest of the DMM products that come with built-in UHF RFID covers carabiners, wire lanyards, rope lanyards, rope, slings, gyro pulleys, rope protectors and centre harnesses. dmmclimbing.com

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02/05/2018 16:39


KIT

FOCUS on

ROPE

On the ropes ARE YOUR ROPES LOOKING A BIT ROPEY? PAUL DYER OF MARLOW ROPES TELLS US HOW TO INSPECT THEM – AND WHAT THE TOP SIX SIGNS OF WEAR AND TEAR ARE

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hether it’s for your first climb of the year or part of your usual pre-use inspection, a thorough kit check is a must. It’s also a good idea to thoroughly check any rope or hardware that is nearing the end of its life. A quick visual check of a rope won’t tell the whole story – it’s easy to miss a problem with a core, or damage that’s hidden from view. Only by carrying out a detailed inspection can you ensure that nothing’s been missed. To inspect a rope, check a short section at a time, feeling for inconsistencies and looking for damage. If all is well, move on to the next section. Here are the main six signs of rope damage to look out for: 1. Changes in diameter Your ropes should not change in diameter. Lumps or thin sections in the rope can signify damage to the core. 2. Fusion When ropes run quickly over a surface under load, heat can be generated. This can cause the covers of ropes to become melted and fused; in extreme cases, the cores can be damaged by this heat, too. Shiny sections in the rope cover can indicate fusion abrasion. 3. Stiff sections This could be a sign of core fusion, and it can also indicate areas of rope that have been subjected to abnormally high loads.

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A quick visual check of a rope won’t tell the whole story – it’s easy to miss a problem with a core, or damage that’s hidden from view 4. Terminations The termination you choose will determine how much strength you retain in your rope, and these are one of the most important areas to check. A key part of your inspection should be checking whether the splices are in good condition. See if the bearing points are damaged or worn, and whether there is any evidence of movement. 5. Fading/discolouration This is key in identifying whether the rope has been compromised through contamination, UV or chemical damage. 6. Hardware checks Your ropes and hardware work hand in hand, so it is vital that they are inspected as part of your kit. Check all the sheaves and look for play in bearings. Just because the equipment rotates freely without load doesn’t mean it will spin when it matters. Play in bearings also

means that the loading isn’t spread as the hardware designer intended – and that can lead to catastrophic failures. Ensure ascenders and descenders are in good condition; look for scratches and nicks at any points that the rope may contact. Sharp scratches can sometimes be removed with fine emery paper, but remember to ensure you are complying with the recommendations of the equipment manufacturer. If you are in doubt about the health of your rope, replace it. The consequences of any items in your kit failing unexpectedly can far outweigh the cost. Don’t leave it to chance – replace rather than regret.

Paul Dyer has more than 20 years’ experience in the design, production, testing and use of fibre ropes. For more information and advice visit www.marlowropes.com

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KIT

NRMM emissions

F O C UmSi s soi onn s regulationS e x p la in e d NRMM e r e g u l at i o n

I

n its bid to improve air quality on the continent, the EU has amended its previous regulations for non-road mobile machinery (NRMM) emissions – this time, covering a broader range of NRMM, with more stringent limits. According to the EU, NRMM accounts for 15% of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and 5% of all particulate matter (PM) emissions. These are predicted to increase over time, confirming the need to review current legislation. Now known as ‘the world’s toughest emission standards’ for NRMM, Regulation (EU) 2016/1628 includes engines in the 25.5hp to 751hp power range, as well as a limit to the particle number (PN) on top of the required particle mass limit for engine emissions. Signed by the European Parliament in 2016, this new regulation was applied at the beginning of 2017 and will come into effect across the UK and Northern Ireland in 2019. Here’s a breakdown of its pertinent areas: Objectives The regulation is aimed to harmonise the laws among EU members that aim to reduce gaseous and particulate pollutants, particularly CO (carbon monoxide), HC (hydrocarbons), NOx and PM. Its overall goal is to protect human and environmental health, while aligning technical requirements with international laws. With standardised requirements, this ensures that there will be a level playing field on global markets and removes the risk of unfair competition from non-conforming, low-cost machinery.

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PAUL GEORGE TAKES A CLOSER LOOK AT THE EU’S NEW NRMM EMISSIONS REGULATION, EXPLAINING WHAT IT AIMS TO DO AND HOW IT WILL AFFECT NRMM USERS

Key changes Regulation (EU) 2016/1628 has repealed Directive 97/68/EC and amended Regulations (EU) No 1024/2012 and (EU) No 167/2013. Significant changes include: ● Regulation, not directive – Meaning, this is immediately applicable and enforceable among all member states. ● Covers entire range of nodes – Stage V limits are applicable to diesel and gas-generating sets power nodes from 0kW to infinity. ● Engine categories – Engines inside NRRM are categorised according to ignition type and engine power rating. Each category now has limits, falling under Stages I to V. ● Stage V limits – More stringent emission standards that now include a PN limit of 1x1012 #/kWh for diesel and spark-ignited engines, with a power

range of 19kW to 560kW. ● More responsibilities for everyone in the supply chain – On top of manufacturers, OEMs, distributors, and importers are equally responsible over the legal compliance of all equipment. ● Penalties – Non-compliance by any means (e.g. falsification of results) is subject to penalties, including the repair or recall of engines. Impact to agricultural, forestry and arboriculture industries In line with Article 19 [3] of the typeapproval ‘Mother’ Regulation 167/2013 and the complementary Delegated Act, engines installed in agricultural and forestry tractors fall under the NRE, ATS, and NRS categories. This also covers various pieces of arboricultural equipment, such as chainsaws and chippers. All manufacturers should

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KIT

comply with Stage V regulations by the following dates: ● December 31 2018 for engines below 56kW and above 130kW (<56 kW and ≥130 kW) ● December 31 2019 for engines between 56kW and 130kW (56 kW≤ P <130 kW)

When approved, the engine should have the manufacturer’s name, type and family, individual engine identification number and type approval number. Non-compliance is subject to the following penalties: ● £5,000 ● Three months’ imprisonment, or ● Complete recall/replacement of products

Enforcement and penalties Engine manufacturers are required to have their products type-approved prior to selling. This is applicable to all engines produced on or after January 1 2019. For engines with a power range of 56kW to 130kW, the effective date is January 1 2020. In the UK, the Vehicle Certification Agency (VCA) is responsible for handling the approval of engines. Upon submission of a product’s technical information, the VCA will oversee the manufacturer’s quality assurance tests.

Exceptions The following engines are exempt: ● Engines meant for export to third countries, for military use, or for field testing ● Engines installed in potentially explosive atmospheres will have less strict emission standards, but need to be in compliance with Stage IIIA as defined in Directive 97/68/EC ● Engines installed with new technologies which may not be compatible with current regulations.

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Air pollution remains a top concern, especially since the UK pledged to reduce 57% of its carbon emissions by 2030. Regulation (EU) 2016/1628 addresses the gaps in laws between EU member states, to decrease the impact of emissions on human and environmental health. In this sense, the NRMM is an important step in getting the levels of air pollution in the UK and across the wider European continent under control. Paul George is the managing director of Landmark Trading Ltd, and has worked in the arboriculture industry for 14 years. Landmark Trading is one the the UK’s leading suppliers of arborist equipment. You can connect with Landmark Trading on Twitter @LandmarkTrading, on Facebook @LandmarkTradingStamford, or call 01780 482231.

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FOCUS ON

CHIPPERS GreenMech

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iver Clyde Homes is an Inverclydebased housing association. In 2017, River Clyde Property Management was created as an ‘in-house’ specialist team to maintain the grounds, landscaping and the local environment. Grounds supervisor Derek Robertson specified a GreenMech Arborist 150 woodchipper to join his fleet, calling it “versatile enough to cope with the variety of arboricultural work we were going to face”.

Timberwolf

SAFETY FEATURES AND ACCESSIBILITY MAKE THE GREENMECH ARBORIST 150 CHIPPER A WINNER FOR RIVER CLYDE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT’S DEREK ROBERTSON

“Above all else, it’s the range of safety options you get with the GreenMech machines that made me go for one.” The Arborist 150 is a road-tow chipper that has been designed for the disposal of waste brash. Among other features, it has a bottom-bar safety mechanism, no-stress feed system and a steel engine bonnet which provides robustness while lowering noise emissions. A 970mm x 790mm infeed hopper is coupled with a 150mm x 230mm letterbox-style infeed throat opening, allowing heavily forked branches to be fed in easily. “Being a road-tow unit, and under 750kg in weight, is important, as we can move it

For more information on GreenMech wood chippers, visit www.greenmech.co.uk or call 01789 400044

STEVE PAMMENTER OF SP LANDSCAPES SAYS THAT THE CUSTOMER SERVICE KEEPS HIM LOYAL TO TIMBERWOLF

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e had our first machine, then known as the Entec Chipper, in 1996, and our businesses have grown together,” says Steve. “We’ve always had an excellent relationship with Timberwolf, and the company has been highly receptive to customer feedback to help us get more out of the machines. If a problem does occur, we can rely on Timberwolf and our dealer Ben Burgess to get us up and running again.” SP Landscapes has three main departments covering tree surgery, grounds maintenance and highways services.

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easily to various locations – no two days are the same,” Derek says. “It’s a compact machine, but delivers high power and throughput. The Arborist 150 is competitively priced and backed up by fantastic support from both our local dealer Hamilton Brothers at Bishopton and GreenMech. We have a team of young lads who are all trained up to use it – with all the safety features and how easy it is to use, we’re all comfortable with the machine. We know we can trust it.”

“Our work is very diverse, so we need a good range of machines. Currently, we have a pair of TW280s on a wheeled chassis and three tracked TW280s. The large infeed capacity makes them ideal to take larger pieces of wood, yet they partner well with the aluminium arb bodies on our vehicles to keep the overall weight down. “We also have two TW230s, which are great if you have younger drivers, as they are below 750kg. It’s very good for domestic jobs.” For more information on Timberwolf wood chippers, visit www.timberwolf-uk.com

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KIT

FÖRST

SIMON ROTHERAM OF BEECHWOOD TREES AND LANDSCAPING TELLS US WHY THE BUSINESS HAS SWITCHED OVER TO FÖRST WOOD CHIPPERS

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eechwood is an arboricultural, fencing and landscaping contractor established in 1998. Managing director Simon Rotheram explains why he chose to work with Först: “The majority of our work consists of site clearances and sectional take downs with housing associations and local councils, so it’s vital to have a chipper fleet that can tackle any job, while keeping maintenance and service to a minimum. Time is money, so we can’t afford machinery downtime or lack of performance. “To make sure we maintain our high standards, we carry out a rigorous maintenance programme that sees us review our fleet every three to four years. Over the past 20 years we have generally stuck to what we know when it comes to wood chippers, but on this occasion Först kindly agreed to lend us an ST6 and ST8 machine for a week, and we were curious to see how they matched up against our current fleet.

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FOCUS on

chippers

The Först machines also come with a three-year warranty, which is a great asset, as these chippers really are put through their paces “We put both wood chippers straight to work and the feedback I received from my team of operators out in the field was great. In addition to the productivity of the machines, the wood chippers are also light and mobile, which makes transportation and completion of jobs in difficult-to-reach locations very simple. “The Först machines also come with a three-year warranty, which is a great asset, as these chippers really are put through their paces. In addition, our local Först service partner is just down the road to cover any minor mishaps, so the service and aftersales care Först can offer is second to none. When you combine all of this, the decision to move across to Först

really was a no-brainer, and we purchased three ST6 machines as soon as we could. “Although it’s still early days, the service support we have received from the manufacturer, as well as the performance of the wood chippers, is something I have been really impressed with, and this enables the team and I to simply focus on the job at hand.”

For more information on Först’s high performance range of woodchippers, or to book a demonstration, visit www.forst-woodchippers.com or call 01264 721790

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W S O NT SH OU C IS

D

Tree

Diagnostics Level 3 – Hi-Tech Equipment Suppliers Importers for Fakopp and Others Microsecond Timer Dynaroot – Root Stability Static Wind Load ‘Tree Pulling’

See us at

THE

ArborElectro Impedance Tomograph

ARB SHOW STAND

Investigation service available

C06/C07

Arborsonic 3D Tomograph

S U P P LY - T R A I N I N G - S U P P O R T

Contact Ian Barnes

01423 323851

07831 530563

www.treediagnostics.co.uk

Invest in the Vermeer BC190XL 8” chipper TO GET TOUGH TREE WORK DONE • • • • 8” (20 cm) X 12” (30.5 cm) infeed opening • 34.9 kW (48.8 PS/48.1 hp) 4 cyl water-cooled Kubota diesel engine • Automatic drive belt tensioner • Offset oversized horizontal feed rollers • Smartfeed with infeed auto reverse • Push-button throttle control

07879 600050

Stump grinder and Chipper Hire, short or long term hire available! Stump grinder and Chipper sales, new or used with part exchange and finance available! Servicing available for all chippers, also offering on site servicing! Covering the South West!

leslie.goodman@vermeeruk.co.uk

Tel: 01963 370752 ● Fax: 01963 373915 ● www.landpoweruk.com

www.vermeer-uk.co.uk

Common Lane, Yenston, Templecombe, Somerset, BA8 0NB


KIT

product

dna

IMPROVED ERGONOMICS AND PRACTICAL DETAILS MAKE WORK EASIER The innovative fl ywheel, with a reduced installation height and lower weight, reduces the gyroscopic forces that arise during operation. With the low overall weight, the result is a machine that is particularly easy to move along the trunk while limbing.

ST I H L

M S 5 0 0i C H A I N S AW

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tihl has introduced the new MS 500i, the world’s first chainsaw with electronically controlled fuel injection and a power-to-weight ratio of 1.24kg per kilowatt. Together with the many additional design optimisations, the MS 500i provides a substantial increase in operator comfort. It also provides powerful performance for the toughest jobs, and the saw chain accelerates extremely rapidly – from 0 to 100 km/h in just 0.25 seconds. The reduction of gyroscopic forces provides the 80 cm³class high-performance professional saw with dynamic manoeuvrability – a particular advantage during limbing. This makes the professional big timber harvester easy to handle in all disciplines, from felling to cutting to length. The MS 500i has exceptional starting behaviour and provides optimum engine power right from start-up. The engine does not need a carburettor, since the fuel metering is done using a sensor and automatically adapts to the different operating conditions, no matter the altitude and ambient temperature. Make sure you catch a preview of the MS 500i at the Arb Show, Westonbirt Arboretum from 11-12 May 2018. It will be available to forestry professionals worldwide from the beginning of 2019.

BEST POWERTO-WEIGHT RATIO OF ALL CLASSES

Thanks to intelligent lightweight design, as well as an extremely high engine power, the MS 500i excels with an exemplarily low power-to-weight ratio of 1.24 kg/kW. This value is unique within all displacement categories.

EASY STARTING AND SENSOR-CONTROLLED FUEL MIXING

The MS 500i is easy to start in all operating conditions, and automatically adapts to different locations of use. The sensor-controlled fuel mixing ensures that the mixture is adjusted optimally for the oxygen content in the air, right from the first ignition.

enquiries@stihl.co.uk / www. stihl.co.uk

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Pro Arb | May 2018

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KIT

ISUZU

ARB KIT

Grafter Green • • • • • •

3,500kg gross vehicle weight 3,500kg towing capacity New 1.9L Euro 6 diesel engine New lighter chassis No AdBlue required New six speed manual gearbox

STIHL PROTECT MS cut protection and high-visibility trousers • Robust design, made from functional material blend • Ventilation material on back of thigh. Sturdy material at knee and lower leg • Two side pockets, one back pocket, one tape measure pocket • Kidney protection and pulled-uprear part to help protect against draughts • EN ISO 20471 class 2 high-vis standards • Class 3 high visibility when combined with PROTECT MS high-visibility jacket • EN 381 class 1 cut protection • Available in sizes S to XXL RRP: £110 www.stihl.co.uk

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Pro Arb | May 2018

• Rear wheel drive • Available in flint grey or white

RRP: POA www.isuzutruck.co.uk

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ANCIENT TREE COLUMN

EACH MONTH WE FEATURE AN ANCIENT BRITISH TREE. THIS MONTH THE ANCIENT TREE FORUM INTRODUCES US TO...

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Old Electric Oak – South Gloucestershire

B

eside a public footpath near the village of Wickwar, Gloucestershire, sits an impressive oak with an electrifying tale. As is typical of ancient trees, it has a squat appearance, with a large trunk and small crown. Measuring 10.5m in girth, it is one of the largest oak trees in the UK. This tree is teeming with life: on the outside, its old, gnarly and fissured bark provides habitat for specialist mosses and lichens. The exposed deadwood contains the emergence holes of various beetle species, and the hollow trunk provides decaying wood habitat for a range of fungi and invertebrate species. The tree’s vitality and rich wildlife assemblage may be typical of most ancient trees, but it is remarkable considering the adversities the tree has faced during the last century. In 1938, the power company responsible for installing overhead power lines between neighbouring villages tried to burn the tree down in order to make it easier to run the power line through the field. Following the fire, it installed the lines directly over the top of the burnt tree – but despite these attempts, the tree continued to grow. Having grown into the lines, the top of the tree was removed during the Seventies; this left the tree as a trunk, approximately four metres tall. Despite this harsh treatment, the tree has managed to produce a new crown, albeit a much lower one. The capacity for this

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tree to produce a new crown lies in the epicormic buds growing on the trunk. Laid down in the burrs covering the trunk, these buds remained relatively dormant until the top of the tree was removed. The removal of growth inhibitors, which are typically produced by the buds at the top of the tree, and the removal of shade from the original branches, meant these buds were free to grow and produce a new crown. The tree has continued to grow, and in 2017 it was noted that the branches were in contact with the pole and approaching the lines themselves. An arborist surveying the lines recommended the tree be felled to remove the risk of damage to the lines, and the surveyor approached the quarry asking for permission to undertake the work. Fortunately, the quarry manager recognised the historical and ecological importance of the tree, and refused permission. Subsequently, a local councillor and a tree warden contacted the Local Planning

Authority to request that the tree be protected by a Tree Preservation Order. With the tree successfully protected, the quarry requested the overhead line be moved away from the tree to prevent any future conflict, protecting the tree from further clearance work. The tree now sits inside a protective fence, awaiting the alteration to the overhead power line that has been its neighbour for the best part of a century. This resilient tree, and the history it contains, will live to see another year thanks to the actions a few determined individuals.

The Ancient Tree Forum champions the biological, cultural and heritage value of Britain’s ancient and veteran trees, and provides advice on their value and management at www.ancienttreeforum.co.uk ©Ancient Tree Forum

Pro Arb | May 2018 51


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