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ISSN: 2041-3653

Autumn/Winter 2010

DefenDer

Home Free! Incredible journey for Bolivian lions ends in paradise. Plus: Monkey and baboon rescues

Plus: EU animal experiments rules update ● FurStop campaign Stop Circus Suffering – more circuses exposed Research without animals ● Space experiments on monkeys


ANIMAL DEFENDER ISSN: 2041-3653 published by Animal Defenders International incorporating The Campaigner, published by the National Anti-Vivisection Society

UK: Millbank Tower, Millbank, LoNDoN, SW1P 4QP, U.K. Tel: +44 (0)20 7630 3340 Fax: +44 (0)20 7828 2179 e-mail: info@ad-international.org web: www.ad-international.org

© Lisa Mitchinson / Animal Defenders International

Editorial

Welcome to the autumn issue of ‘Animal Defender’ our combined magazine for NAVS, the Lord Dowding Fund, and Animal Defenders International. 2010 has been an intense year for campaigns on animal experiments and animals in entertainment. And bigger challenges lie ahead.

USA: 6100 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1150, LoS ANgeLeS, CA 90048, USA Tel: +1 323-935-2234 Fax: +1 323-935-9234 e-mail: usa@ad-international.org web: www.adiusa.org

With hard work, we can light the way to a new era in the campaign to end the use of animals in research – where wider scientific and public scrutiny helps to replace the animal research industry with modern, sophisticated non-animal scientific research techniques.

South America: Apartado Postal 359888 BogoTÁ, Colombia. e-mail: info@ad-international.org web: www.ad-international.org

Once the new European directive on animal experiments has passed in the European Parliament, the government will decide how to implement this in the UK. It will be time for action. When we need you, please be there for laboratory animals in 2011.

editors: Creamer/Phillips Design: Creamer/Phillips/Elson Cartoons: Paul Taylor Contributors: Jan Creamer; Tim Phillips; Helder Constantino; Alexandra Cardenas; Christina Dodkin; Jessamy Korotoga; Lisa Mitchinson; Juan Pablos Olmos; Thomas England; Rob Brooks; Ricardo Fajardo.

It is good to hold on to the positive stories in our work, and in this issue we have the uplifting tale of the rescue of the Bolivian lions and baboon from the first circus in Bolivia to go animal-free, following a ban on animal circuses. The lions – Bambek, Dactari, Simba and Camba, will live out their lives in the paradise that is the PAWS ARK2000 sanctuary in California, funded by ADI. We are also funding buildings, enclosures and lifetime care for the baboon, Tilin, to come to the Lakeview Monkey Sanctuary in the UK where, eventually, he will live with other baboons for the first time since being torn from his mother. Soon, our three ex-laboratory monkeys, Baloo, Bacil, and Bacillusk (the 3Bs) will leave quarantine at Lakeview and move into the fabulous new enclosure being built for them.

©2010 ADI. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced for commercial purposes by any means whatsoever without the written permission of ADI/NAVS. ANIMAL DEFENDERS INTERNATIONAL: Founded 1990. To educate, create awareness, and promote the interest of humanity in the cause of justice, and the suppression of all forms of cruelty to animals; wherever possible, to alleviate suffering, and to conserve and protect animals and their environment.

Enclosed in this issue you with find our Christmas Catalogue, full of gifts for both human and furry friends – please help our campaigns by buying from our catalogue!

NATIONAL ANTI-VIVISECTION SOCIETY: Founded 1875; the world’s premier anti-vivisection group. Millions of animals suffer and die in cruel, unscientific, and futile experiments. The NAVS advocates the total prohibition of all animal experiments, and, pending the achievement of this aim, we may support partial measures which would provide steps towards reform.

With all good wishes. Jan Creamer, Chief Executive.

LORD DOWDING FUND: Founded 1974; a department of the NAVS; sponsors non-animal scientific and medical research.

Where there’s a WILL there’s a WAY to help suffering animals If you knew animals were being abused, could you rest in peace? Sadly, throughout their lives, the last thing many animals experience is peace. Toto the chimpanzee, for example, was imprisoned in a circus for 25 years and forced to perform tricks and smoke cigarettes for people’s entertainment. He was one of the lucky ones because he was rescued by Animal Defenders International (ADI) and returned home to Africa where he now lives with his own kind. ADI is a major international force in animal protection. Please help us to help other animals like Toto to live in peace by making a bequest today to Animal Defenders International.

If you believe in reincarnation there are some animals you wouldn’t want to be. Imagine a life imprisoned in a cramped cage, subjected to constant experimentation; a lifetime of suffering followed by a painful death. That’s the cruel, futile fate suffered by millions of laboratory animals in the name of research. The National Anti-Vivisection Society is the world’s premier and leading group working to end the suffering of animals in laboratories. We lobby Parliament; produce scientific reports, educational materials and videos; conduct undercover investigations and expose law breaking. We fund nonanimal scientific research. Please help us to help laboratory animals by making a bequest to the National Anti-Vivisection Society.

Help finance an evolution. Will you leave a lasting legacy of compassion, and help scientific advancement? The Lord Dowding Fund finances scientific and medical research without the use of animals. We believe that cruel animal techniques have no place in 21st century science. We have supported major advances in many fields, including neuroscience, cancer research and safety testing – we developed a humane British Standard Test for the toxicity of dental fillings. Your legacy could help save the lives of animals and advance scientific research. Help finance an evolution in medical science and leave a lasting legacy with a bequest today to the Lord Dowding Fund.

For a free guide to making a Will and helping animals, call us today on 020 7630 3340

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www.ldf.org.uk NAVS & ADI


© Lelah Foster / Animal Defenders International

welcome to paradise: Bolivian Circus Rescue

© Tim Phillips / Animal Defenders International

Late at night in San Francisco Airport; two transport trucks waiting; film and camera crews at the ready; ADI Ambassador Jorja Fox and the ADI Rescue Team on hand with supplies of water; one of the runways was about to play host to a contingent of lions flying in from Bolivia. As the aircraft touched down, the level of excitement hit fever pitch: after months of negotiations, the four lions had finally made it: Camba, Simba, Bambek and Dactari were going to a new home. It had been a hard, hard week with challenges every step of the way.

It had been our most ambitious and complicated rescue mission ever, but it was the culmination of five years of investigative and campaign work, leading up to this amazing moment. Our field officers had infiltrated Bolivian circuses and caught the brutality on camera; the campaign was launched and Bolivia gave us the world’s first national ban on all animals in circuses. Now we had rescued the first animals from Bolivia's circuses and brought them to freedom. Actress and campaigner Jorja Fox and the ADI team had barely slept for days and would not sleep that night. However, as the aircraft rumbled to a halt and the cargo doors opened to reveal the precious cargo of lion crates, it was all worth it. Here was everything

we fight for, representing the undercover investigations, the campaigning and lobbying to secure new laws, overcoming the logistical difficulties, and giving animals a new life. When the lions were on the tarmac and the crates opened, they began to roar – first Bambek and then everyone. This time they were roaring freedom.

Above: CSI actress and ADI Ambassador Jorja Fox, with ADI vet Mel Richardson, gives the lions a drink of water on arrival at San Francisco airport.

Handed over In the last issue of Animal Defender, we reported on the campaign for the ban on animal circuses in Bolivia and the five lions and baboon being handed to ADI as the first Bolivian circus went animalfree. As we go to print, preparations are being made to relocate Tilin the baboon to the

Below: Sitting pretty the following day in the ADI enclosure at the PAWS ARK2000 Sanctuary.


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© Lisa Mitchinson / Animal Defenders International © Lelah Foster / Animal Defenders International

As the long negotiations to get the Bolivian export permits were reaching their conclusion, the team in Cochabamba reported that Maiza, the oldest lioness of the group and believed to be the mother of our Bolivian Pride, had fallen ill. The animal carers noticed a sudden drop in Maiza’s condition, so the local veterinary surgeon, Nathalie Quintin, was called in to attend her. Video and photographs were quickly sent to Dr Mel Richardson in the US, while arrangements were made for Dr Fernandez of La Paz Zoo to fly to Cochabamba immediately to examine Maiza and discuss his findings with Dr Richardson and Dr Quintin. Various drugs were given to alleviate the symptoms and fight infection, pending further tests and examination. The veterinary surgeons agreed that further investigation with specialised equipment was necessary, and arrangements were made for Dr Fernandez to bring the equipment to Cochabamba and for Dr Richardson and Dr Quintin to join him there. Sadly, the results of the tests and the examination were not good news for Maiza, and the three veterinary surgeons agreed that the most humane course of action would be to put Maiza out of her suffering. Maiza’s death so close to her relocation was heartbreaking. We had pushed so hard to get her to freedom. However, our veterinary team advised that she had peritonitis and a condition such as this can arise so suddenly and with such severity, that they could not be sure that it would not have happened anyway. Clearly, her advanced age had not helped. Our veterinary teams are often faced with animals whose health and background is vague or unknown. Circus animals frequently endure years without proper nutrition and as a result, have poor immunity. Severe confinement and lack of exercise, poor muscle and intestinal condition, and physical abuse, all contribute to making ex-circus animals vulnerable to sickness. For example it was only when Tarzan the tiger from the Portuguese circus arrived at the rescue center in South Africa, we discovered he was considerably older than claimed. The sad fact is that we are rescuing animals whose lives have not been conducive to good health. It is a comfort to know that poor Maiza was treated with love and respect at the end of her days, and when her time came, it was carried out with kindness. However, this tragedy pushed us to work even harder, to ensure the rest of her family got to the paradise that is the PAWS sanctuary in California.

© Lisa Mitchinson / Animal Defenders International

A whisker away from freedom: Maiza passes away

© Lisa Mitchinson / Animal Defenders International

Bolivian Circus Rescue

Lakeview Primate Sanctuary in the UK – but for the lions, the road from Bolivia to California was quite a journey. We took charge of the animals in Cochabamba, a fairly remote city in Bolivia, where the authorities requested we keep the lions until they could be permanently relocated. This meant building a temporary quarantine facility and involved protracted negotiations with various levels of local and national government. In both logistical and political terms, this was a difficult location. The animals came into our hands, skinny, with shaggy hair and malnourished from a poor diet. Our first task was nutrition, health tests, and the animals were treated for internal parasites. In fact, since arriving in the US one of the lions has been found to be suffering from a shellfish parasite; this is very unusual, and something that is not killed by the normal anti-parasite treatments. He is, however, now recovering well. The lions were put on a high-quality food regime, with


The journey begins As the rescue unfolded, we deployed two teams to ensure everything went ADI & NAVS

© Lisa Mitchinson / Animal Defenders International

© Jan Creamer / Animal Defenders International

smoothly, a rescue team in Bolivia and a reception team in San Francisco. ADI Chief Executive Jan Creamer, Supporter Relations Director Lisa Mitchinson and vet Dr Mel Richardson, flew down to work with the ADI Bolivia team in Cochabamba. Campaigns Director Tim Phillips travelled from Los Angeles with the US team to oversee operations in San Francisco. CSI actress and ADI Ambassador Jorja Fox, who had written personally to Bolivia’s President Morales when the ban was passed, joined the ADI San Francisco Team. Daily video diaries kept everyone updated with events; these were put on our rescue blog, YouTube, Facebook and Twitter. Jorja Fox provided video updates of the status of the US preparations. The diary is now available on DVD and online. In Bolivia, the team hit the ground running. The animals were checked by Dr Richardson and given the all clear to fly; travel crates were constructed and tested; it was all systems go, for loading on the Sunday and a flight to San Francisco via Medellin, Colombia. Then on the Friday afternoon, the technical staff at Cochabamba airport reported that they were not able to lift the

lions onto the aircraft, and it would take over a week to get other equipment. We went into the weekend utterly dejected. A feverish search ensued for alternative aircraft, or airports. A senior Technical Engineer from Boeing advised the ADI US team which of their aircraft could take the crates, supplying diagrams and specifications for us to review as we assessed flight options. The ‘other airport’ option was not good. It would take about 18-24 hours to drive the lions through the mountains; there was potential for rockslides and strike protestors were blocking many roads. New permits to leave Bolivia would need to be issued; these had already taken months to obtain. In San Francisco, there was a different headache: US President Barack Obama was due to visit the city. San Francisco Airport – which proved to be the most helpful and co-operative airport we have ever worked with – understandably did not want a bunch of lions being

Top Row: The boys in the ADI quarantine facility in Bolivia; ADI’s Dr Mel Richardson and Jan Creamer appear live on Bolivian TV; One last look around and then into the travel crate; Travel crates are closed ready to be loaded onto trucks; ADI’s Team in Bolivia outside our quarantine facility. Bottom Row: Maiza; Jorja, Damion and Tim working on the rescue video diaries in San Francisco; our lion convoy en route to Cochabamba airport; the first lion is loaded at Cochabamba airport. Below: Jorja Fox with Camba at San Francisco Airport.

© Tim Phillips / Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International © Jan Creamer / Animal Defenders International

nutritional supplements. The local veterinary surgeon coordinated and monitored on the ground, under the direction of veterinary surgeon Dr Mel Richardson. At first, the animals remained in their beast wagon (their cage on a truck), in which they had lived all their lives, while permissions were obtained and the temporary facility built. This had to be a quarantine unit, to satisfy the local health authorities. Unfortunately due to threats from locals, including so-called “animal lovers” who threw stones at the animals, a perimeter fence had to be erected and security guards employed. Meanwhile, several thousand miles away at the Performing Animal Welfare Society sanctuary in California, work began on construction of a state of the art ADIfunded habitat – a home for life. The logistical and bureaucratic difficulties mounted – delays in getting permits, which had to be re-issued several times; airline strikes prevented vital documents getting to their destination on time; delays in personnel reaching the animals; a volcanic eruption in Iceland closing down airspace around the world; strikes and riots across Bolivia, with mountain roads blocked. Then during the final few days, technical difficulties at the local airport meant that the animals could not be loaded into the aircraft; after several days another aircraft was found, but that developed a hydraulics failure before finally, we secured an aircraft to take us on our journey.


© Tim Phillips / Animal Defenders International © Tim Phillips / Animal Defenders International

Below: The lions are unloaded at San Francisco Airport and everyone is well!

disembarked at the same time as the President! On day six, the team in Bolivia secured a new flight with Bolivia’s TAB airlines from Cochabamba via Panama, to arrive on the Thursday, two days after the President. The excellent team at the airport then generously allowed the lions to use the same unloading spot as the Presidential aircraft ‘Air Force One’! With less than 12 hours to go and everything for the move in place, we were notified that our aircraft had suffered a hydraulic failure and had been turned back. After several heartstopping hours a replacement was secured, although the six-hour delay would push our arrival into the night. It was always important that this rescue publicised the suffering of animals in travelling circuses. By now the operation was attracting massive media attention in South America, with regular updates on Bolivian TV.

Take Off In the early hours of the morning, the lions were loaded into their individual travel crates. Camba first, followed by the three brothers. They were then lifted by crane onto trucks. The Cochabamba police were wonderful, closing roads and providing the convoy with an escort all the way to the airport. Camba was nervous and was shifting in her crate but settled when she heard Bambek, Dactari and Simba calling out their locations. After a long wait on the tarmac, before being loaded, all of the lions talked to each other, first one, then another, until finally all four joined in the morning roaring – farewell Bolivia. This was a cargo aircraft so the team had access to the animals throughout the flight, giving them their first drink of water at 35,000 feet, heading north. Periodically the lions would call to each other, checking each other’s location, and then settle down for a few hours. Members of the crew, unused to flying in

an aircraft with four lions roaring around the empty cabin, anxiously checked back each time to be reassured that the lions were definitely still in their crates! During refuelling in Panama the San Francisco team got news that everything was going well and mobile phone pictures of the journey poured in.

Touchdown 9pm at San Francisco Airport, the gantry that had been set up for the President was bristling with TV cameras and photographers and Jorja and Tim were briefing the media. It was a magical moment for the team waiting as they watched the aircraft approach. Finally, the aircraft rumbled into place and the huge cargo door opened: the hatch opened, the ADI team waved and there were the lions in their crates. They had finally arrived safe and sound. Each crate was gently lowered from the aircraft and opened up so that they could be checked and watered. Bambek

© Lelah Foster / Animal Defenders International

Above: Somewhere 35,000 feet over Central America, Mel and Jan check the lions; The lions are unloaded in San Francisco and Jan directs the forklift into position; The ADI team heaves the crates into position at PAWS


© Tim Phillips / Animal Defenders International

© Tim Phillips / Animal Defenders International

from the males until they can all be neutered). Camba appeared to be the smartest, heading out down the hillside and into the bush first, while the three brothers watched her, baffled as to how she had got into the outer enclosure. Eventually, they worked it out, with a little help from Ed Stewart and Pat Derby of PAWS! It was the first time they had walked on grass. It was the first time they had looked up into the sky overhead, with no solid ceiling or bars; the first time they had run more than a few steps; and the first time they could play together

Tilin’s Tale

ADI & NAVS

© Lisa Mitchinson / Animal Defenders International

This is freedom The PAWS ARK2000, sanctuary is one of the finest wild animal sanctuaries in the world and specialises in animals rescued from circuses. Camba, Simba, Bambek and Dactari could not have come to a better place. A year earlier they had been in a stinking cage on the back of a truck; now they are in paradise. Following a brief press conference, Jorja tugged open the doors to the larger daytime enclosures (Camba is separated

properly, in a natural environment. They charged up and down the hillside, Camba running alongside them. They stalked each other through the undergrowth, playfully leaping out from behind bushes. Eventually they wore themselves out and settled down in the sunshine together. Today their coats are lush and glossy; they have the space to run and play; they can build muscle so that they can walk properly; they have specialised care and a healthy diet; and they live in a natural and safe environment. These four lucky lions have been on the journey

Tilin is a magnificent Hamadryas baboon handed over to ADI by Circo Abuhabda, along with the lions, following the Bolivian circus ban. Tilin had been filmed with the circus by our undercover field officers five years earlier. He lived in a cage on a truck and was chained by the neck. It was a special day during the relocation of the Bolivian lions when Dr Mel Richardson sedated Tilin and cut the chain from his neck. As we go to press we are preparing to move him to Lakeview monkey sanctuary here in the UK, where our rescued laboratory monkeys are housed. ADI has funded new facilities for Tilin at Lakeview where he will initially be kept for six months in quarantine; however this quarantine has more indoor and outdoor space than he has ever known. After quarantine, he will move into a new enclosure designed for baboons, and it is hoped to eventually give him some baboon companions. ADI is therefore looking for other Hamadryas baboons to join Tilin!

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Above: Jorja and Jan with PAWS founder Pet Derby – all smiles – the lions are free! Camba is delighted to see the boys in the next enclosure; the boys play after being released from their travel crates.

© C. Dodkin / ADI

© Tim Phillips / Animal Defenders International

began bellowing to announce his arrival, and everyone else joined in. Jorja gave each of them a good drink of water, the crates were closed and loaded onto the trucks to take them to PAWS, and we drove into the night. The extended convoy finally arrived at 4am at the PAWS ARK2000 sanctuary. The sun rose over Calaveras County as we unloaded the animals, with PAWS Director Ed Stewart skillfully organising everyone to move the crates into place, and moving the lions into their night dens. As the morning light shone through the trees surrounding their new home, Camba, Dactari, Bambek and Simba were then released into the two night enclosures. They ran around, playing with the shrubs and logs, Camba chasing along the fence as the three brothers chased each other in sheer joy at their freedom – more space than they have ever had in their lives. It was 6am and although the release into their main enclosure would be later in the day, it was utterly exhilarating. A family united and at play.

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Main picture: Tilin the baboon will be on his way to a UK sanctuary soon. Above: Construction of Tilin’s quarantine unit – everyone from the ADI London office has lent a hand with the building work.


© Lisa Mitchinson / Animal Defenders International

© Tim Phillips / Animal Defenders International © Tim Phillips / Animal Defenders International

This is the life! The lion’s enjoying thier new home.

facilities at PAWS. We have made the commitment to fund the care of these animals for the rest of their lives, including staff, feeding and veterinary care. It was necessary to move Tilin the baboon to a secure location in Bolivia, and we continue to care for him in his quarantine unit. We are funding Tilin’s relocation to the Lakeview Monkey Sanctuary in the UK, where a new quarantine unit and permanent enclosure are being prepared for him. Tilin will be in the presence of other primates and eventually, for the first time in his adult life, he will have the company of other baboons. We will be funding Tilin’s care for the rest of his life.

of their lives – one which has taken them from a small cage on the back of a truck, being forced to perform demeaning tricks, to an expansive natural enclosure surrounded by stunning hillsides. Each morning they roar together and it echoes across the valley. Ed says a neighbour recently remarked how much they enjoy hearing their morning song. Help support Tilin the baboon, and Camba, Bambek, Dactari and Simba. ADI funded this entire operation, with the kind and generous support of ADI Ambassador Bob Barker; this included construction of the quarantine units in Bolivia, veterinary care, food, legal fees in preparation for travel; crates, ground and air transport; construction of the

There will be ongoing costs for these animals for many years, so we urgently need the help of supporters to adopt Tilin, Camba, Bambek, Dactari and Simba; a regular donation will help them for years to come. See the form enclosed with this magazine. Adopters receive a certificate, DVD, regular updates on the animals in our newsletters and other offers. Please get in touch today – Call 020 7630 3340 or email info@ad-international.org

Bob Barker: a true Animal Defender This rescue mission was made possible thanks to the incredible generosity of American TV personality and ADI Ambassador Bob Barker, whose support for our campaigns and investigations are making a difference all over the world. Having supported our campaign for the ban on animal circuses, the support from the former ‘Price is Right’ star enabled ADI to undertake this important rescue. This included the negotiations to get the animals out of Bolivia; construction of quarantine facilities; veterinary and animal care; ground and air transport; building the state of the art ADI lion enclosure at PAWS. This was a rescue that was in the spotlight because we had secured the ban on animal circuses in Bolivia. The support of Bob Barker helped us show governments that circus animal bans can be effectively implemented: we are immeasurably grateful. During the rescue Bob Barker said, “I am delighted to have helped ADI give these animals a wonderful new life after they have endured so much misery. Circuses are no place for animals, and lions and tigers should not be forced to live in small cages on the backs of trucks, or elephants forced to live in chains in the name of entertainment. Circuses with animals are cruel and archaic. I commend the Bolivian Government for taking this progressive step and hope that other South American countries, and indeed the USA, will follow suit. Next week these animals will start a new life in California and a new era will begin in Bolivia, one without circus suffering.”

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Campaign News

© ADI

Apes demonstrate more intelligence. Orangutans have been reported to act out mimes, in order to share information, for example memories, with carers. eDM calls for study into reliability of animal testing. EDM475 tabled by Bob Russel MP highlights serious drug side effects and “calls on the Government to initiate a comparison of currently required animal tests with a set of human biology-based tests, as proposed in the Safety of Medicines (Evaluation) Bill 2009, to see which is the most effective means to predict the safety of medicines for patients.” The NAVS is urging MPs to sign the EDM.

© ADI

Thomas Hartung awarded for humane toxicity research. The scientist who was interviewed in our New Science magazine this year has received an Agilent Thought Leader Award. The Fercos Brothers, who we investigated as they toured, have applied for import and export permits for “four captive-born tigers and one captive-born African leopard to worldwide locations for the purpose of enhancement of the species through conservation education”.

The NAVS Kick Animal Testing out of the House campaign made a major breakthrough this summer, as the Home office announced the government’s commitment to ‘ending the testing of household products on animals’. In a statement applauded by the NAVS, Lynne Featherstone MP, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Home Office said ‘Work is underway to define the range of products affected and to determine how this can best be achieved. I am not yet in a position to confirm when such testing will be finally brought to an end, but hope to be able to do so shortly.’ Back in 1998, the NAVS fought vigorously and hailed a UK ban on cosmetics testing as a massive victory. This was followed by EU legislation introduced in 2004 and 2009, resulting in the beginning of a phase-out of all animals testing for cosmetics – both the finished products, and any of the ingredients. And though a small number of exemptions apply to the sales ban, these will finally also be completely banned by 2013, whether or not they say suitable alternatives have been found. This statement was not only the culmination of a 25 year campaign: it also demonstrates that a phased approach to banning animal testing is possible, and achieves real results. The NAVS has written to every MP urging them to ensure this commitment becomes a reality. Consumer pressure from NAVS supporters, too, has led to the abandoning of most testing of household products on animals: recent Home Office statistics showed that there were no animals used in 2009 to test household products – unlike the 132 used in 2008. So a big thank you to all our supporters who have been instrumental in this step forward!

© ADI

California has upheld a ban on importing live frogs and turtles for use as food, despite pressure from vested interests and state legislators. ADI investigated the trade last year and urged the Commission to keep the ban in place.

ADI & NAVS

© P. Taylor / ADI

World Farm Animals Day, october 2nd: To commemorate the billions of animals killed annually for food. For information on what you can do to mark the day, visit www.wfad.org

I’m sure glad those lions are in cages – they’re making a fearsome noise....

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Campaign News

ADI’s shocking report ‘Bloody Harvest: The Real Cost of Fur’ was circulated to the Members of the Knesset, Israel’s Parliament, in March 2010 and was a key piece of evidence in support of a Bill banning not only fur farming, but the sales of all fur products in Israel. Working alongside the International AntiFur Coalition (IAFC), Animal Defenders International presented the report and the Hebrew version of our ‘Bloody Harvest’ investigation video. Although a decision is awaited, the debate itself sent waves of hope around the world: if passed, the bill would be the first of its kind and this initiative could be followed in many other countries. The bill has, however, come under fire from Hassidic Orthodox Jews who occasionally use a traditional hat called Shtreimels, which is worn by married men on Shabbat and some religious holidays. Although the bill includes an exemption for religious use, the fur industry has attempted to mislead the Hassidic Jewish community into believing that the proposed law would be discriminatory. Assertions which are completely unsubstantiated and misleading. Moreover, the Government of Denmark – one of the world’s main producers of fur has been putting strong pressure on the Israeli Ministry of Trade to stop the ban, on the grounds that it would go against World Trade Organization (WTO) rules. The United States and Canada have also expressed their opposition to the initiative. These challenges under WTO rules are familiar to animal protection campaigners, as there have been similar challenges to the European Union’s desire to ban fur products from leg-hold traps, and other animal protection measures. While such pro-commerce scaremongering is not unusual from companies with vested interests, it is especially shameful in this case considering the plight of the animals concerned. It is expected that the Knesset will meet again later this year to take a decision on the bill. Animal Defenders International will continue to support IAFC’s campaign to get this bill passed and will work towards achieving similar legislation in Europe.

Please help us: ● Please send a polite letter to

● order our leaflets and get active

online at www.furstop.com ● Please send us a donation to

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© ADI

support our investigations and campaigns.

Lab monkey breakout. Twelve monkeys escaped from Kyoto University’s lab over a 5.3-metre highvoltage wire fence. Japan Today reported that the monkeys first climbed up trees and then used the branches as slingshots to propel themselves over the fence, researchers said. The trees are about two metres high and about three metres from the fence. “Their jumping power was greater than we thought,” said Hirohisa Hirai, deputy head of the institute. The following day two of the monkeys returned to the center, five others were lured back with peanuts, while five remained unaccounted for. Baboons trapped for vivisection. Vivisectors in South Africa are taking advantage of a cheap supply of baboons being trapped in the wild after it is claimed they cause problems on farms. Whaling ban upheld. Attempts to reintroduce commercial whaling failed to pass muster at the International Whaling Commission conference, leaving the 1986 ban in place. This encouraging show of strength from the Commission followed a recent demonstration, organised by Sea Shepherd, outside the Japanese embassy, adressed by ADI’s Alexandra Cardenas (pictured). © ADI

Israel’s Minister of Industry, Trade and Labour to ask him to support the ban: M. Binyamin “Fuad” Ben-eliezer, Minister of Industry, Trade and Labour, Ministry of Industry, Trade and Labour, 5 Bank Israel Street, Jerusalem, ISRAeL.

Amex removes foie gras from advert after ADI supporters, Carol and Peter Tracey, wrote and complained.

© ADI

World awaits Israel’s decision

Adolfo Dominguez says no to fur. Spanish design house Adolfo Dominguez has pledged to go fur-free in the wake of increasing awareness of the cruelty of fur farming. The designer stated “There are plenty of synthetic alternatives.”

© ADI

FurStop:

NAVS & ADI


Campaign News A dolphin at okinawa Churaumi Aquarium, Japan jumped out of its tank onto the floor during a show. The other dolphins in the tank appeared to be distressed and gathered around the side where the animal leapt out.

© ADI

We have a new coalition Government which in the coming year will be making decisions on animal issues that will affect millions of animals. The new European legislation on animal experiments is expected to be approved by the European Parliament in September (see p14) and then it must be implemented in the UK. We have the unfinished business of the promise from the previous Defra Minister to ban wild animals in circuses. We hope that the new Government will move forward with the ban, after the public consultation showed overwhelming support for it (94.5%). ADI and NAVS will be lobbying at the 2010 party conferences to generate awareness of issues such animals in entertainment, animal experiments, fur and primates as pets, to ensure that UK parliamentarians have all the information related to the increasing calls for animal protection. We have information stands at the LibDem Party Conference in Liverpool, (18-22 September), Labour in Manchester (27-30 September) and at the Conservatives in Birmingham (2-6 October). A special party conference report, ‘Political Animals 2010’ will be available alongside our in-depth briefings and reports. We will also screen our DVDs. © ADI

Victory:

Catalonia bans bullfighting

July saw the Catalonian Parliament approve a Popular Legislative Initiative (PLI) banning bullfighting in Catalonia as of 1 January 2012. The ban was approved with 68 votes in favour, and 55 against. Under Catalonian law, a PLI is debated only once 50,000 signatures are collected in the local community. Spanish animal protection group Prou! (Catalonian for “enough”) secured more than 180,000 signatures! Since the 1991 decision to ban bullfighting by the Autonomous Community of the Canaries, several Catalonian municipalities passed motions against this bloodsport. The Catalonian Parliament decision has strengthened campaigns across Spain, with reports of other PLIs being started. An online site in Navarra and a group in Madrid are working to emulate the Catalonian success. Although some of the members of the right-wing parties at the Catalonian Parliament said that this decision has been a reflection of the political differences between the Autonomous Community and the rest of the country, a large number of artists, journalists, actors and other public figures have supported the initiative. The decision has sent shockwaves across countries where bullfighting is still practiced, with debates about the legitimacy of its alleged cultural significance. For example, the Constitutional Court in Colombia is now to decide on the legality of bullfighting.

ADI & NAVS

Fight repeal of the Hunting Act. We are urging MPs to oppose any repeal of the Hunting Act, and call on supporters to contact their MPs and ask them to protect Britain’s wildlife from these cruel practices. © ADI

New look Government

Liberian bushmeat and wildlife ban. Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has by proclamation banned the exportation of wild animals and bush meat pending the passage of proposed legislation. Police officer Andy McWilliam, of the National Wildlife Crime Unit, has been awarded the 2010 Clark R. Bavin Wildlife Law Enforcement Award for services to fighting wildlife crime. The award recognised a distinguished career investigating and breaking up the illegal trade of reptiles, ivory, birds of prey, Chinese medicines and caviar. A TV commercial for the europcar rental agency that was shot in South Africa using a trained chimpanzee imported from the United States has been discontinued, following protests by JGI-Chimpanzee Eden and other primate care organisations.

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Political Animals:

Convention on International Trade in endangered Species. The 15th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to CITES in Doha proved a disappointment for the protection of marine species. Among many failures, a bid to ban the export of the threatened Atlantic bluefin tuna was sunk, by pressure from importers Japan and China. Some species did benefit – notably resumption of the ivory trade was blocked.

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Campaign News

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The Home Office annual statistics, ‘Statistics of Scientific Procedures on Living Animals 2009’ were published recently, reporting that an appalling 3,541,252 animals were used in the UK in 2009. This was a slight decrease of 41,971 animals, on the figure for 2008. Of these animals, 3,111,587 were used for nontoxicological research and 429,665 for toxicology tests (poison/safety tests). No animals were used for testing household products, a fall of 132 animals since 2008. NAVS and ADI have campaigned to ‘Kick Animal Testing out of the House’ and we therefore welcome this as a step in the right direction. We hope to see the new Coalition Government take action on household product testing in the near future. The statistics reveal that the most frequently used animals were mice (2,618,674), followed by rats, of which 323,054 were used. Other animals were used, such as rabbits (11,643) dogs (4,129, of which 4,089 were beagles and 40 were “others including cross bred animals”) and cats (172). Thousands of other animals suffered and died in UK laboratories, including 791 ferrets, 199 horses or “other equids”, 8,015 sheep, 114,301 “domestic fowl” and almost 400,000 fish. 2,815 primates were also used, and although this was a slight reduction on the number used in 2008 (3354), the number of marmosets and tamarins used increased from 262 the previous year to 498 in 2009, almost double the previous year’s figure. Marmosets and tamarins were used for “fundamental biological research” and “applied studies – human medicine or dentistry”. The macaques that were used for the same research areas totalled 162 and 1,866 animals respectively. In addition, 289 macaques were used for “Protection of man, animals or environment”. A sickening first was also achieved when it was reported that more procedures were performed on genetically modified animals than “normal” animals. “For the first time there was a higher total of procedures using GM and HM [harmful mutant] animals than using genetically ‘normal’ animals”. This increase was reported as being due largely to an increase in the use of GM mice in breeding procedures. At the same time, the Home Office also published the annual report of the Animals Scientific Procedures Inspectorate Division (ASPD) and Inspectorate (ASPI). In a stunning admission of irresponsibility, this boasted how, “Of the personal licences granted in 2009, 134 (5% of the total) were processed under “fast-track” procedures, taking an average of just five working days”. In addition to this speedier approval of licences, the overall number of visits and the time actually spent at the establishments had decreased from the previous year. The report also outlined 3 infringements, which were deemed to be in the most serious category. One case involved “unnecessary avoidable suffering in a marmoset”. This occurred when the animal was under deep non-recovery anaesthesia and was to be bled to death. The report states that the animal began to recover consciousness so was killed with an anaesthetic overdose. As a result, “The personal licensee was placed under close supervision, and the certificate holder introduced a number of measures to prevent recurrence”.

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© T. Phillips / Animal Defenders International

For many, an affinity with animals is something you are born with, and never leaves you. For Princess Elisabeth de Croÿ, this was the case. Added to this was a burning desire to help others, to provide sanctuary for those in need, and to rail against injustice. Such a Nuisance to Die tells the life story of a remarkable woman and a great friend to animals. Whether charming the Chilean President into halting an upcoming bullfight, or her tireless work at the Refuge de Thiernay – the shelter she founded for abandoned dogs – this dazzling account never fails to surprise, amuse and absorb. After her early years of society life, during which time she rubbed shoulders with celebrities such as Orson Wells and Salvador Dali, Princess Elisabeth put her privileged position to good use, generating publicity and support for animals in need. She also made many close friends within the animal protection world – including ADI Campaigns Director Tim Phillips, who contributes a memorable chapter. Writing in his account of his many brushes with the Princess, Tim recalls ‘Although Elisabeth would sweep into our London offices or to receptions and publicity events, glamorous and looking every bit the princess, it is among the chasing, happy dogs of the Refuge that she would shine. Here she would always be surrounded most closely by the outcasts – the damaged, the odd little dogs that would not find homes’. And it is indeed in the account of the Refuge de Thiernay, which became the centrepiece in her work for animals, that Elisabeth’s character really glows. Not only does Elisabeth’s dedication to animals shine through, but so does her witty, often eccentric and above all, generous, nature.

Slight decrease in UK animal experiments

© ADI

Pub: The Book guild Ltd (UK, 2010) Price: £16.99 Author: Joy Leney


Cosmetics testing update The Cosmetics Directive 76/768/eeC aims to protect “public health”, and lay “down rules on the composition, labelling and packaging of cosmetic products”. It also introduced a ban on animal testing and on the marketing of products tested on animals. Although the ban on cosmetic ingredients tested on animals has been in place since 2009, the deadline for replacement of certain animal tests was extended to March 2013. The European Commission has produced a draft technical report on development of alternatives for these remaining tests, and opened a public consultation on their proposals. Once finalised, this report will be submitted to the European Council of Ministers and Parliament. Five expert working groups were commissioned to find “a broad and objective picture of the scientific/technical issues involved in establishing alternative test methods for the five human health-(related) effects falling under the 2013 deadline for the marketing ban of the EU cosmetics directive”. The tests studied are: ● Repeat dose toxicity – effects of longterm exposure to a chemical. ● Skin sensitisation – toxicology of chemicals which may cause allergy. ● Carcinogenicity – potential for causing tumours, or increase their incidence or malignancy. ADI & NAVS

Toxicokinetics – the bioavailability of a substance, its movement, metabolism, and then excretion from the body. ● Reproductive toxicity – poisonous effects on fertility, sexual behaviour through to offspring growth and sexual maturity. Four of the working groups take a pessimistic view of the ability to, even partially, replace animal tests that are used to evaluate the safety of cosmetic ingredients. The exception is the chapter on toxicokinetics. This working group, instead of taking the simplistic view that one-to-one replacement of animal tests is the only option, concluded that “A whole array of in vitro/in silico methods at various levels of development is available for most of the steps and mechanisms which govern the toxicokinetics of cosmetic substances”. The report also discusses that conventional validation processes might not be the most efficient way to proceed where in vitro/in silico methods are already available, “an expert consensus procedure of collecting methods, assessing them according to test quality criteria and ranking them could be an acceptable approach”. ●

Some of the alternative methods highlighted as potential replacements for animals include complex computer programmes which predict the toxicity of a chemical based on its structure; blood brain barrier models; reconstructed human skin models. These alternatives will replace cruel and unnecessary animal experiments such as repeatedly dosing pregnant rats with chemicals and killing them just before they give birth in order to study the babies; long-term dosing tests lasting up to 1 year; use of transgenic mice. However, despite the known problem of species differences, some of the “alternatives” suggested include growing of animal embryos (e.g. rat and frog) in culture, to test reproductive toxicity. Many of the working groups emphasised that current in vitro methods do not replicate results gained from animal tests. However, there is little mention of the known unreliability of animal models for predicting adverse effects in humans. Although one working group concluded that there is “a need to change the mindset from trying to mimic animal data and one-to-one replacement for each target organ”. This same group also concluded, “toxicity testing in animals models cannot reveal all potential toxicity in humans”. Some acknowledgement of the limitations of animal models are made: on repeat dose toxicity, “the dose range…used it is

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Animal Experiments in Europe


Animal Experiments in Europe seven years for some tests. One group found “it is not currently possible to predict when full replacement of animals might be achieved” and another concluded they “were unable to suggest a timeline”. Another comment was that “the ban of in vivo tests will have a negative impact on the development of new cosmetic ingredients”.

This is not a good reason to continue using animals in experiments. There is already a wealth of ingredients available for cosmetics and most combinations of ingredients have already been used for many years; thus, their effects are wellknown. We are urging the european Commission not to extend the deadline for the animal test ban.

© Animal Defenders International

generally higher than human exposures. High doses may cause toxicity which is irrelevant to humans”. In addition the report concludes that some in vitro models using 3D human reconstructed skin for carcinogenicity testing, were “closer to the human situation than animal testing”. Time estimates for full replacement of animals ranged widely, from five to

EU Animal Experiments Directive europe’s revision of the 25-year-old eU Directive on animal experiments is reaching its conclusion. The Council of Ministers stage was difficult, but the new draft directive had its second reading in July at the Agriculture Committee of the european Parliament. Next step is final vote at the main Plenary later this year. Despite our lobbying efforts for the Agriculture meeting, the amendments to the Council's agreed text tabled by Brian Simpson MEP (Labour) and Martin Hausling MEP (Greens), were rejected. These reasonable amendments were aimed at: (a) allowing Member States’ laws to go further than the directive; (b) additional restrictions on the use of primates; (c) adoption of non-animal methods. Although these areas are already covered by the new directive, we felt they required both clarification and strengthening. These amendments would have improved the text, and perhaps more importantly, ensured it was in line with the promises being made to the public about the new directive. Whilst the Greens and the GUE/NGL groups advocated taking the opportunity to ensure the best possible text moved forward, the other political groups (EPP, S&D and ALDE) had already agreed to reject all amendments in order to avoid a probable reopening of negotiations with the Commission and the Council.

It is expected that the new directive will be debated and adopted in early September at the Plenary session of the Parliament. We do not expect there to be any appetite for amendments at that debate, as it would be unusual for the text agreed by the lead committee on this issue (Agriculture) to be changed. However, the final vote marks the starting point of the transposition process, as the Member States of the European Union introduce the new directive into their national legislation. ADI and NAVS have already set up meetings with ministers and Home Office officials to lobby for replacement of animals with non-animal methods, phasing out of primate use, wider implementation of alternatives and other measures. The final text of the new directive is expected towards the end of 2010. This will be the most important UK campaign on animal experiments since the introduction of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, as the Government takes steps to bring the new EU directive into law, and it will be important for us to campaign hard to gain as much ground as possible to save animals. We will advocate for the UK to set a higher standard on animal protection than that included in the new directive. This would set an example and

encourage other Member States to rise above the shortcomings of the European text. Our core demands will include: ● Primates: No exemptions to the ban on the use of wild caught monkeys; rapid implementation of ban on F1 primates; targets to phase-out primate use. ● Thematic Review: Every two years, to review specific animal tests and whole areas of animal research and set timetables for replacements ● An effective UK National Centre for the Replacement of Animals in Experiments ● Prohibition of animal experiments in: Areas such as higher education; household product testing; forensic studies; preservation of species. ● Wider scientific, independent and public scrutiny of proposed animal experiments. ● Stringent regulations to implement non-animal methods ● Increased Transparency and public access to information ● Compulsorary data sharing to prevent duplication. How to Help: We will need YOUR help – please be there for laboratory animals in 2011 – watch out for our action alerts!


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1. The ADI team carry the acclimatisation pen into the Colombian forest. 2. The pen is constructed at the heart of what will be the monkeys’ home. 3. The monkeys are loaded into travel crates and flown from Bogotá. 4. Arriving at night the monkeys are carried into the forest. 5. The first monkey peers out of a travel crate as they are released into the pen. 6. Don’t look so glum, this is first step to freedom! Monkeys after release into the acclimatisation pen. 7. The monkeys are fitted with radio collars so that they can be tracked during the initial phase of freedom. 8. Out they go! Having just been released, a monkey stands on the roof of the pen; they are free. 9. Back amongst the trees. A wrong put right: The monkeys are back in their natural habit from which they were snatched .

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Orlandito and the other capuchin monkeys were torn from their forest homes by pet dealers. They were confiscated but, like so many animals, ended up in limbo in a holding centre. After years of determined work, this summer their cage door was opened and they returned to the Colombian forest, free again, at last. Orlandito was illegally trafficked, then rescued by Colombia’s environmental police and placed in the Unity Rescue and Rehabilitation of Wild Animals Centre (URRAS) in Bogotá. Here Orlandito was placed with two female capuchins, Meekú and Cibroa, and a young male, Jivi, to form a release group when a suitable site was found. The first site chosen seemed perfect but complications with permits prevented their release – a devastating blow. After negotiations with local authorities a site was identified in a remote location near Yopal, in north east Colombia. With a warm climate, a forest abundant with primates and a variety of tree species including mango, guava, blackberry and jobo trees the location was perfect. ADI paid for the construction of a mobile acclimatisation enclosure, which would enable the monkeys to experience the sights, sounds and smells of the forest in safety. In this our monkeys would experience the forest environment and interact with other animals. As their relocation date approached, small transmitter collars, designed to stay on for up to six months, were attached to each of the four monkeys. Tracking them during their initial release is vital, to monitor movements, identify social changes and interactions, and to verify their survival. Once their collars drop, these monkeys will simply disappear into the forest forever. In April the monkeys were loaded onto an aircraft in Bogotá, the destination Yopal; freedom is in sight. Throughout the short flight the monkeys remained calm. They could not have imagined what would await them. Upon touchdown the ADI team drove to the release area, then trekked through the forest to the acclimatisation enclosure. Although free to leave, Orlandito and

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Into the WILD, freedom at last!

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© J. Korotoga / Animal Defenders International

chums remained in the security of their travel crates before finally, in the early hours, taking their first tentative steps into their new enclosure – home for the next 21 days. Over the following days, Orlandito, Meekú, Cibroa and Jivi began to relax. With a diet of fruit rich in water to keep them hydrated, they settled into forest life. Their diet of familiar fruits expanded to include local wild forest fruits, coconuts, wild guavas, mangos and bananas. Some of the more unfamiliar varieties needed encouragement, so they were shown how to open and consume the fruit; they learned fast. They also gorged on an abundance of insects; Jivi proved to be particularly quick in snatching any opportunity to vary his diet. The ADI team monitored them each day, and it was clear that the Orlandito family were all doing well; their fur was looking better then ever and they had gained a little weight. On Saturday 8th May, the cage door was opened. Cibroa was the first out, darting into a nearby tree, followed by Meekù. Jivi hung back as if to try to entice Orlandito out, but soon the temptation grew too much and, like the females, he bolted for freedom. It was to be 8 long minutes before Orlandito mustered the courage to join them, but soon he, too, was out in the forest. They were free at last. Staying close to the enclosure, the group explored the surrounding area, excitedly darting from tree to tree. The ADI team stayed for some time to keep watch before leaving; it was a poignant moment when we had to leave them to fend for themselves. Over the following days the group was monitored from a distance using the tracking device. Initially our team left food in trees, but it wasn’t long before the monkeys were feeding themselves and thriving in their new world, a truly glorious sight. However, on day 6 the signal for Orlandito was lost. For 14 days the team searched the forest, to no avail. The rest of the group was located, but no Orlandito; the team started to fear the worst. Thankfully, on day 21 Orlandito’s signal was picked up, much to everyone’s relief. But still no sighting. Finally on day 23 he was spotted near the enclosure with the group, he was alive and well. Subsequent visits have found that the monkeys are thriving, and are staying close to a group of 6 howler monkeys, possibly for security. We are delighted with their progress, and will continue to monitor them over the next few months. Thank you to everyone who donated towards this remarkable release, a magnificent triumph for the animals.

Toto: Seven years on

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Older, wiser, free......

© J. Korotoga / Animal Defenders International

Toto is an incredible animal; as anyone who has heard his story and seen the Toto Goes Home video can attest, he is not a personality easily forgotten. The magnificence of this handsome, intelligent and gentle chimpanzee shines through the first time you meet him. NEVER AGAIN: We rescued Toto in 2003 from a circus in Chile. He had been snatched Chained with the circus from the wild as a two-year-old. By that time, he had been alone for over 20 years. His home was a packing crate; his only comfort a small blanket. Toto was seized by authorities and we took him home to Africa, to the Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage in Zambia. His home is several acres of bush, with trees to climb, lemons to pick, long grass to play in and most importantly – other chimpanzees. Due to his gentle nature, Chimfunshi has been able to put Toto with very young chimpanzees and over the past 7 years, his family has steadily grown, and grown up. Toto is still close to Fred Sims, whom Toto took under his wing when Fred first joined the group as a baby, and also Madonna – the first chimp that Toto had contact with after over two decades alone. (Those who have seen the video of their first meeting will never forget it). Also in the group are some ex-pets, and a few younger animals, including 5-year-old Dominic who appears to have replaced Fred as Toto’s protectee. Chimfunshi staff noticed that Toto allows Dominic to take his food! As this led to Toto going without his lunch each day, porridge has been added to his twice-daily bottles of milk. And cheeky Dominic can continue his game. Toto has friends to play with, room to roam and enough space to be alone, if he chooses. He is safe and happy for the rest of his life. He is cared for by those who not only understand the needs of chimpanzees, they also understand the animals are all individuals. ADI rescued Toto and we have committed to provide for him for the rest of his life. Toto will continue to be a symbol of the courage and resilience of animals. Despite all he has suffered he is gentle, calm and still interacts with humans, but now it is on his terms – as it should be. Adopt Toto and recieve the Toto Goes Home DVD plus a short video update from 2010 (don’t worry if you already adopt Toto, this will be on the way soon!). Call 020 7630 3340 or email info@ad-international.org

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Preparations for Lab Monkey Release

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There’s been a rumble in the jungle at Lakeview Monkey Sanctuary during the intense preparations for the arrival of Tilin, the Hamadryas baboon from Bolivia (see p7) and the release from quarantine of the ‘3Bs’, our rescued lab monkeys. As well as building new facilities at this wonderful sanctuary ADI and NAVS are committed to funding the care of the 3Bs and Tilin for life. our HQ team has devoted spare time, and cajoled friends and family into becoming labourers, to help Lakeview with the construction; this includes a brand new quarantine facility for Tilin; a new outdoor enclosure for the 3Bs. After building the nighthouse for the monkeys, the ADI team slept inside it so that they could get an early start on the building work the next day – so it’s been tested on humans! Although Lakeview is not open to the public, there are plans for special visits by adopters of Tilin and the 3Bs at some time in the future. Please join our adoption scheme.

© R. Hill / ADI

© R. Hill / Animal Defenders International

Rescue News

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Stop Circus Suffering

A new undercover investigation by our field officers in South America has exposed more horrific abuse in circuses. As we released the horrific footage of the great British Circus elephants in the UK, our South America team were filming horrifying abuse of tigers during training in a circus in Chile. The team moved on to Colombia and Brazil, where we filmed more scenes of suffering and deprivation. The UK, Europe, USA and South America: animal abuse in circuses is endemic. It is part of the working culture in circuses, worldwide. The circuses are making it harder to get behind the scenes, but we continue to get the facts. Only a ban will stop the cruelty. Our latest evidence became the core of a new ADI film called ‘Unnatural Acts’.

This also utilised evidence from our previous South American investigations, making is the most comprehensive documentary about the South American circus industry ever made. We caught on film: ● Tigers beaten repeatedly and having stage props hurled at them during training. ● Elephants chained, punched, beaten. ● Tigers and monkeys living in trucks, in deplorable conditions. ● Disturbed, stereotypical behaviour in horses, camels, and a poor baboon called Maika pacing on a short chain. Our previous investigations and campaigns led to a ban in Bolivia and bans are being tabled in Brazil, Peru, Colombia and Chile. We hope that ‘Unnatural Acts’ will drive forward these bans. We have staged screenings of the new video in the Congresses of Peru, Brazil and Colombia. The video and

evidence specific to the circuses in Chile is being presented to the Chilean Government as we go to press.

Peru ban within reach… ‘Unnatural Acts’ was launched in the Peruvian Congress in May in support of Bill No.1917 and 2382 to ban animal circuses. The screening was followed by a press conference led by ADI’s South America Campaigns Coordinator, Juan Pablo Olmos, and addressed by members of Congress Alejandro Rebaza Martell (APRA party), José Urquizo Maggia (Nacionalista) and Luis Fernando Galarreta (UN). The event received widespread TV, radio and print coverage. By popular demand, two days later, it was shown again in the Congress attended by local Peruvian Groups. Following the screening, the Peruvian groups Amazon Shelter, UPA, and ORCA joined ADI in lobbying members of Congress asking them to support the Bill.

The Animal Defender & Campaigner

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Castro, presenting him with a giant postcard with over 3,000 signatures from members of the public. Although there is cross-party commitment to discuss the Bill, there was not time for the debate before the Commission closed for recess. However, we have the public support and there is cross party support for a ban; we therefore need to battle on to keep this issue in the public eye and on the political agenda. As we go to press, we are preparing for a demonstration in Lima in support of the Bill and producing a new video featuring Peruvian celebrities and their views on animals in travelling circuses.

Colombia: Legislation falters.... In March a new animal protection Bill including an article to ban animal circuses was discussed in Congress and in late April, the Fifth Commission of the Senate held a public hearing on this. We seized the moment to launch the Colombian version of ‘Unnatural Acts’. At the hearing, ADI’s Juan Pablo Olmos gave a presentation on animals in Colombian circuses and the viability of a ban, concluding with the new video. Despite widespread cross-party support in Congress, the Bill was subsequently shelved. However, ADI continues working together with Congress members to introduce legislation in the

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We stepped up our lobbying efforts again with new campaign materials including a new Spanish website in support of the bill (www.peruanimalista.com) designed to keep members of Congress up to date with any developments, leaflets, briefings and campaign materials. As a result, the leaders of the main political parties signed a request urging the Plenary of the Congress to discuss the Bill as a priority. However, because the session of Congress was coming to a close, the Bill was passed to the Permanent Commission (which replaces the Plenary during the recess). Our team therefore met with the majority of members of the Commission, and the President of the Congress, Luis Alva

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Scenes from our latest investigation: elephants beaten during training; elephants chained to the ground with bare chains; tigers beaten repeatedly during training; an elephant hit across the trunk with a stick.

actos antinaturales: Unnatural Acts begins with a series of scratchy sepia toned images, as if the viewer were watching scenes from days gone by. There is then the shocking revealation that these are all current day circuses - with some footage filmed during our investigation just weeks before the launches. The video goes on to contrast the lives of animals in the wild with sumptious wildlife footage set against the confinement and brutality fo the circus. To date three Spanish versions have been produced for Peru, Colombia, and Chile and a Portuguese version for Brazil – each version refers specifically to legislative moves in that country. We hope to produce an English language version in the near future. You can watch the videos on our YouTube site http://www.youtube.com/animaldefenders ADI & NAVS

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Stop Circus Suffering

Bolivia: ADI took part in the People's World Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth organised by President Evo Morales. We gave presentations on the circus ban, deforestation & animal trafficking. greece: Post election, our partners, GAWF, and others, met Minister Karchimakis. The Minister expressed an interest in the circus bill. More information has been provided. ADI supplied our Big Cat Rescue and Toto Goes Home DVDs as prizes for GAWF’s schools writing competition, which attracted over 5,500 entries.

Hope for Karla and Panchito

Spain: After reviewing evidence from ADI and AnimaNaturalis the City Hall Plenary of San Fernando de Henares in Madrid unanimously approved a ban of animal circuses. This is important progress for the Madrid region following a series of bans in Catalonia (including Barcelona, Iledia, Tarragona, Girona, Sant Adria del Besós, amongst others).

Many supporters will be familiar with the stories of the poor circus chimpanzees, Karla and Panchito. Our field officers filmed savage violence to these animals. Karla was punched in the face and beaten with a chain by her trainer, and Panchito was beaten in public by his trainer. Our video caused a storm of outrage across Colombia and the animals were quickly donated to zoos. Our efforts to save them, which included countless meetings with the relevant ministries, freedom of information requests, and a high profile publicity campaign, appeared to run into one dead end after another; but we kept going. Recently, the authorities announced sanctions against the owner of Circo Gasca, Martin Fuentes Gasca, and the representative of the company PROTEQUEM, Pedro Alfonso Villaraga, for not complying with environmental legislation relating to the transfer of the chimps to the zoos. A fine of nearly £6500 was imposed. The circus appealed the decision, based on an alleged breach of due process and claiming that the chimps had been handed over “in good faith.” However the decision was upheld, which means that sanctions will be executed promptly. Should the circus want to challenge the ministry’s decision, a long and expensive process in the administrative courts awaits. The latest decision provides a glimmer of hope for Karla and Panchito and ADI will continue to press for them to be handed over for us to rehome.

USA: Our leaflets have been updated. In July, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus arrived in Los Angeles, and were met by ADI protests at every performance. Leaflets were also given out before shows in Annaheim. In Austin, Texas, Stop Circus Suffering was screened at Counter Culture restaurant by Action for Animals Austin who also distributed our leaflets outside the circus. Sacramento City Council has empowered animal care officers to inspect travelling circuses. ADI contacted council members, urging support.

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Ireland: ADI and ARAN’s campaign in Ireland has a new leaflet – our thanks to the Marchig Animal Welfare Trust who sponsored this.

addressed a press next months. During the ADI’s Juan Pablo olmos is conference. The event Presidential elections we interviewed during a public achieved considerable met the newly elected screening of Unnatural Acts in the Botanical gardens, Bogotá, publicity and was followed President, Juan Manuel attended by over 100 people in by the launch of a new Santos, and presented our August. range of Brazilian campaign report ‘Animals in Travelling materials. Circuses: the science on suffering’, and our ‘Stop Circus Suffering’ DVD. Following approval of the Bill in the Commission for Constitution, Justice and Brazil: Legislation moves forward Citizenship of the Chamber of Deputies, ADI has been meeting the leaders of the In May, ‘Unnatural Acts’ was screened in main political parties urging them to sign the Chamber of Deputies of the Brazilian an emergency request, in order to have Congress, in support of Bill the Bill discussed in the Plenary. It is No.7291/2006 to ban animal circuses. hoped that the Bill will move forward for Congressman Ricardo Trípoli, adoption in Plenary, later this year. From representatives of the environmental there, it would move to the Senate. authorities of the Brazilian Government, renowned Brazilian actress and activist If this legislation is passed into law, Luisa Mel, and ADI’s Head of Legislative Brazil would be the largest country in Affairs, Helder Constantino, and ADI terms of both landmass and population Brazil Campaigner, Antoniana Ottoni, to ban animal circuses.

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global Round-up

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Stop Circus Suffering

More than a year ago, ADI released video of the horrific abuse of elephants with the Great British Circus. It was business as usual – beatings, chaining and frightened animals. The abuse prompted the then government to launch a public consultation on the use of wild animals in circuses. In March, Defra announced the initial results of the consultation, with a staggering 94.5% of respondents backing a ban on wild animal acts. Defra Minister, Jim Fitzpatrick, announced that Labour would introduce a ban. An election was then called and by May, the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats had formed a new Coalition Government. During the General Election campaign, we contacted the political parties and every candidate, seeking their views on a ban on animal circuses. Labour, Liberal Democrats, and Greens strongly

© P. Taylor / ADI

I wish he’d jump – he’s been up there for years and it’s getting boring

ADI & NAVS

supported a ban, with the Conservatives neither supporting, nor opposing. Nick Herbert, then Shadow Secretary for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs and now a Minister at the Home Office, said, "We recognise the public concern about the use of wild animals in circuses and the issues involved. We would certainly want to address these issues if elected. …We are willing to consider the case for a complete ban and I certainly do not rule this out. At the very least, we would want to ensure a robust regulatory regime so that we can be confident that wild animals are being treated properly." Nick Clegg, for the Liberal Democrats, now Deputy Prime Minister, was more forthright: “Keeping animals in circuses has been known to lead to poorer welfare due to the travelling and harsh training regimes. The barren trailers and temporary enclosures do not and cannot provide wild animals with their needs. The All Party Parliamentary Group for Animal Welfare concluded that “circus animals do experience compromised welfare” and that “animals do show psychological, physical and physiological signs of stress. …“Liberal Democrats are therefore committed to prohibiting the use of all animals in circuses except domestic dogs and horses.” Former Minister, Jim Fitzpatrick, has tabled Early Day Motion 403, urging “..the Government to use its powers under section 12 of the Animal Welfare Act to make a regulation banning the use of all wild animals in circuses,” and notes “…the only thing stopping this ban from coming in place is a decision by Ministers.” Supporters can send the ADI postcard to their MP, asking them to sign this EDM. Please get supplies of our postcards for friends, family, school, college or work colleagues to the same. In July, ADI and other animal groups met with Defra’s new Parliamentary Under

© ADI

A promise of a ban from the government in March; a Coalition government in May; where does that leave circus animals?

© ADI

UK wild animal ban still under consideration

Secretary of State, Lord Henley. The groups reiterated the need for a ban and that regulation could not protect animals in circuses. ADI resubmitted an independent legal opinion confirming that this legal avenue is possible and pointed out that the Defra legal team had concluded last year, that a ban is legal under the Animal Welfare Act 2006. Lord Henley expressed that any action required would be based on the scientific evidence. ADI advised that a wealth of scientific evidence has already been submitted by the groups; also the flaws of the Defra Circus Working Group, which set bizarre parameters leading to the exclusion of much evidence, including that on training. It was further remarked that public opinion, ethical considerations, and empirical evidence had been the basis of much animal protection legislation. The elephants at the Great British Circus were abused by two individuals and were chained, barely able to move one step forward or backward, for 11 hours a day. While this may not have appeared in a science journal, the evidence of suffering is unequivocal and is one of many examples. Four years on from a promise of a ban made to public and parliament, the new Coalition Government has an opportunity to end this suffering and take decisive action, with massive public support.

Photos from left: Despite chronic arthritis Annie the elephant continues to tour with Bobby Roberts’ Super Circus; a zebra, needs a coat to tour the UK with Circus Mondao; “No photography or video” at the Great British Circus – hard to imagine why!

Take Action! ● Please write to: The Lord Henley, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State Defra, Nobel House, 17 Smith Square, London SW1P 3JR. Ask him to ban the use of non-domesticated animals in circuses. ● Write to your MP (House of Commons, London, SW1A 0AA), and ask them to support a ban on the use of non-domesticated animals in circuses; ask them to write to Lord Henley urging them to take action. ● Contact us today and order our FREE campaign postcards, posters and leaflets – call 020 7630 3340.

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Order leaflets

Order postcards


Supporters Please buy cards and gifts from our catalogue. Take orders from friends, family and colleagues – perhaps someone would just like to try a pack of cards. Multiple orders save postage. Shop online at www.ad-international.org or request a catalogue (let us send a copy to a friend), call 020 7630 3340.

ADI Book Worm For your chance to WIN a copy of these books looking at our relationship with dogs, enter our competition! Good luck and happy reading! Rescuing Sprite A compelling story of how the Levin family adopted a dog called Sprite, and the effect he had on their lives. Even through poor health, Sprite continued to inspire the family and the local community in a way they could never have imagined. For info contact: www.simonsays.co.uk. To win one of two copies answer this question: Can you name two of our Bolivian pride of rescued lions? Dog Days in Andalucía, Tails from Spain A heart-warming story of a British couple who’s holiday was transformed by fostering dogs in the sleepy village of Andalucía, and went on to make a mighty impression on the village, its people and animals along the way. Info: www.mainstreampublishing.com. To win a copy answer this question; What EDM do we want MPs to sign on Wild Animals in Circuses? For all entries please state the book title, your answer and your full contact details, (name, address, telephone number and email). Post: ADI, Millbank Tower, Millbank, London, SW1P 4QP, or by email: info@ad-international.org.uk Entry deadline is 15th November 2010, win a nice Christmas present!

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The Animal Defender & Campaigner

How you can help animals this autumn New eU rules on animal experiments: The UK Government is to decide how to implement the EU lab rules (see p14), create awareness about animal experiments now – distribute our Huntindon Life Sciences Exposed leaflets. Stop the space experiments: Write to the US and Russian Embassies (p24) Help kick animal testing out of the house: Give out our leaflets and write to your MP asking that the promised test ban be implemented immediately (p9). Stop Circus Suffering: Write to Lord Henley urging him to back a ban on wild animals in circuses; write to your MP asking them to sign EDM 403; ask friends to send in our EDM 403 postcards; distribute our leaflets – order them free. (see p21) Help an animal rescue: Hand our adoption leaflets to friends, family and colleagues, ask them to adopt an animal or send a donation; ask your local vets, pet food shops and restaurants if they will take a few copies. Order free copies. Don’t let the fur trade back this winter – order our leaflets

For orders or more information call 020 7630 3340 or info@ad-international.org

Life after death: Animals, like our rescued laboratory monkeys, are given a future by the kindness and forethought of supporters who include us in their Will.

A lasting legacy for animals Did you know that over half of our annual income comes from gifts left by our supporters in their wills? Making a Will is the single most important thing you can do to help animals by investing in the issues that matter to you, after you’re gone. Legacy income from those who have so thoughtfully remembered animals in their plans has benefited our campaigns enormously, together we have: ● Rescued animals in distress ● Exposed animal cruelty through undercover investigations ● Achieved the first national ban on the use of both domestic and nondomesticated animals in circuses in Bolivia ● National bans in Costa Rica, Singapore, Austria and several other countries

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© R. Hill / Animal Defenders International

Shopping that saves lives!

Won hundreds of town and city bans in the UK and several other European countries, as well as the USA and many countries in South America ● Pioneered the largest campaign to revise European rules on animals in experiments ● Funded over £3 million in cutting-edge non-animal scientific and medical research ● Helped to protect animals, and save lives The vital campaigns of ADI, NAVS and the Lord Dowding Fund for Humane Research are bringing us closer to the end of animal suffering. Legacies are a very important part of our future planning and expansion of our work. If you would like information on making a Will, or how to amend your Will to benefit animals, contact tel. 020 7630 3340 or info@ad-international.org. ●

NAVS & ADI


Space Experiments Decisions by NASA and the Russian space agency to perform experiments on monkeys as part of plans for manned missions to Mars have brought a global response from ADI. Consequently, several high profile voices from the industry have now been raised against the cruel experiments. ● Umberto

guidoni, former eSA and NASA astronaut and member of the european Parliament, has condemned the tests.

● The

european Space Agency (eSA) has told ADI that it considers monkey tests unnecessary.

● April

evans, an awarded NASA aerospace engineer, has resigned from her role on the International Space Station (ISS) program as a result of NASA’s primate irradiation experiments, citing the need for radiation shielding technology, rather than animal experiments. Read her exclusive interview in this issue and watch our new video online.

● Celebrated

Russian cosmonaut and world record holder for time spent in space, Valentin Lebedev, has added his voice in protest.

● even

President Barack obama has stressed the need for NASA to focus on developing appropriate shielding.

So why on earth are NASA and the Russians pressing on with these experiments?

Jane Velez Mitchell interviews ADI President Jan Creamer on CNN Issues about the NASA monkey experiments.

© T. Phillips / ADI

See how can YoU help stop them.

In the last issue, we exposed the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) plans for radiation experiments on thirty squirrel monkeys. The monkeys will endure a massive dose of radiation and then, isolated, their ability to perform tasks will be studied for 3-4 years – at a cost of $1.75 million (approx £1.1 million) of public money. Yet the test is scientifically flawed. Squirrel monkeys were chosen because of their large brains. Their high intelligence means they will certainly comprehend their torment as, sick with radiation poisoning, they are strapped into restraint chairs and made to perform tasks. However, the results cannot be extrapolated to humans with any degree of confidence, due to problems with the experimental design, as well as species differences. There is already an enormous amount of human data available on the effects of radiation: fallout from atomic bombs; nuclear power; X-rays; radiotherapy. There may be differences in the radiation sources, but these remain a more viable source of data from which to extrapolate to humans, rather than another species. As one science paper noted recently, “Some animal studies suggest radiation increases longevity” but that “there is virtually no support for a life expanding hypothesis for A-bomb survivors and other exposed subjects”. The experimental design is also fundamentally flawed. The objective is to examine the impact of three years of cumulative radiation exposure during a return mission to Mars. Yet the monkeys will receive one massive dose. After exposure to the radiation the monkeys will be individually caged for 3 to 4 years, during which time they will be periodically restrained and forced to perform tasks to test incapacitation of their cognitive skills. The social isolation of these animals will cause immense suffering, which will in turn, further distort the data obtained. NASA has not yet developed the shielding technologies that will be required for such a mission, making these experiments both premature and scientifically flawed. The tests are being conducted by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), New York, in collaboration with McLean Hospital, Belmont, Massachusetts.

Space experiments on animals:

A giant leap backwards ADI & NAVS

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© V. Lebedev

Astronauts back campaign In 2008 Russia announced a series of radiation experiments on monkeys in preparation for a mission to Mars. A year later NASA followed suit. ADI launched a campaign in 2008, opposing the Russian Mars500 experiments on macaque monkeys. Umberto Guidoni, a former ESA and NASA astronaut and then a Member of the European Parliament, wrote to the Russian Federal Space Agency, saying that he “fully support[s] the position of organizations such as ADI that are asking to develop effective alternative[s] to experiments with animals,” and stressed “any effort should be made to use technologies that can replace experiments on animals and, therefore, avoiding their cruel sacrifice”. ADI and Belgium’s Anti Dierproeven Coalitie (ADC) demonstrated, and lobbied the headquarters of Mars500 partners, the European Space Agency (ESA) in Holland. In April 2010, Director Jean-Jacques Dordain, wrote to ADI stating that the European Space Agency “declines any interest in monkey research and does not consider any need or use for such research results.” In August, Valentin Lebedev, one of the mostly highly awarded Cosmonauts in Russia, added his voice to the campaign. Lebedev twice received the Hero of the Soviet Union medal for his service to space exploration; a planet has been named in his honor, and he is currently Director of the Scientific Geoinformation Center in Russia. The Cosmonaut describes the experiments on monkeys as “inadmissible for humane reasons” adding that “the existing knowledge received from past experience of longtime space flights is quite enough right now to predict their influence on people even regarding radiation issues.”

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The Animal Defender & Campaigner

Former eSA & NASA astronaut Umberto guidoni opposes the tests.

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Harrowing scenes from the Russian Mars500 experiments.

Action Alert:

© U. Guidoni

Record breaking cosmonaut Valentin Lebedev has condemned the tests.

ADI and our supporters have written to NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, Jr. and US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton urging them to stop the tests. Mr. Bolden has defended them as “very strongly peer-reviewed” and “very humane.” Neither claim appears credible. We have also written to President Obama, referring to his Presidential map for NASA, outlined earlier this year, which does not include primate testing. This urges that the focus should be on creating new technologies, including radiation shielding to enable deep-space exploration. A NASA engineer has now broken ranks to oppose the experiments, believing that developing effective shielding is the way forward. This spring, NASA aerospace engineer April Evans contacted ADI saying that she had resigned as a space architect on the International Space Station as a result of NASA’s decision experiment on monkeys. Ms. Evans is an accomplished nine-year veteran of the Human Spaceflight Program, and a recipient of the NASA Space Flight Awareness Honoree award. In a letter to Samuel Aronson, director of the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Ms. Evans explained, “after much deliberation, I resigned from NASA because I could not support the scientific justification for this monkey radiobiology experiment.” April has since appeared in the media with ADI calling for an end to the experiments and appears in a new campaign video.

Autumn/Winter 2010

● Watch our new video and get involved at www.ad-international.org/NASA ● Please write to the US Ambassador: Mr Louis B. Susman, US embassy, 24 grosvenor Square, London, W1A 1Ae. ● Please write to the Russian Ambassador: Mr Yury Fedotov, Ambassador of the Russian Federation, 13 Kensington gardens, London W8 4QX. ● We are sending a copy of our DVD to every member of the US Congress, and we will continue to try and attract more support from the aerospace community – please send a donation to help this campaign.

NAVS & ADI


The NASA Engineer who resigned over the monkey tests In an exclusive interview with ADI, April evans explains why she gave up a dream career at NASA in order to oppose the monkey experiments.

Working for NASA I worked at NASA for nine years, on the International Space Station (ISS), and on ISS assembly. That consisted of over 50 missions to the ISS; we assembled it piece by piece. We worked with international partners all over the world, including Japan and Canada, Russia, and 18 countries from the European Space Agency. So I have extensive experience with the on-orbit operational aspects of working with the safety and health of astronauts. I resigned from NASA because of the decision to begin testing on primates. It was the first time that we have done this in approximately 30 years. That’s also about my age, so primate testing has never been a part of my memory of NASA. I had seen some archival photos of monkeys being used in experiments but I really believed that chapter of NASA was in the past. I worked very hard to try to convince NASA to reevaluate that decision while I was there, and unfortunately, we weren’t able to come to an agreement.

They try to dress it up as science....

The NASA monkey experiment © P. Taylor / ADI

Actually we’re secretly trying to mutate them into superheroes capable of flying to Mars – we’ve already made the cape.

ADI & NAVS

The approach of primate testing is to develop countermeasures in space medicine to help the astronauts combat the space radiations sickness, and so the approach with the primate testing is really treating the symptoms instead of

going directly to the source of the problem, which is the space radiation exposure. Once they are irradiated, they’ll be brought back into individual cages and be restrained into a chair mechanism where they’ll be forced to do task performance tests on touch screen computers for a period of three to four years.

Safety without suffering When I was at NASA I worked in the same building as the astronauts, so the safety and health of the astronauts is extremely important to me. As an aerospace engineer, I felt that it was very important to focus on enabling technologies, which include space radiation shielding. I think it’s a much better approach engineering-wise to not allow this space radiation to enter into the vehicle and to prevent exposure of the astronauts to space radiation. Space radiation comes from two primary sources: the first, our own star, the sun, and those are typically relatively lower energy radiations unless you have a solar flare; the second source is from outside of our solar system, and those are the extremely high energy radiations coming from supernovas and black holes – these are the energy levels that we currently do not have the technology to shield against. This is where we need to focus on the enabling technologies for space radiation shielding. © ADI

© A. Evans

Space Experiments

Developing safer space travel I think that it says a lot that two-thirds of the international space community involved in the space station has said that they don’t see a need for primate testing. President Kennedy gave our nation under a decade to send a man to the Moon and return him safely to Earth and at the time that decision was made

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NASA aerospace engineer April Evans is interviewed in the new ADI space experiments DVD which is available free to supporters to send to members of Congress.


Research Without Animals

ADI & the European Space Agency I was very excited when I heard about Animal Defenders International’s work with the European Space Agency (ESA) who said that they did not support experiments on monkeys and they didn't see the use in the science. I had already resigned, but ADI really helped me because I went from feeling one person, to understanding that I had 18 countries from the European Space Agency that felt the same way that I did.

What NASA must do We are supposed to be building enabling technologies for space exploration. I believe that saying that space radiation shielding is something that engineers cannot accomplish, and so we have to work on helping the astronauts with medication to help them with their radiation sickness, is not the right approach. I would ask NASA to re-evaluate whether primate testing is the right direction for NASA in the long term given our direction for space exploration and the fact that our international partners no longer think this is the right direction to go.

Watch more of this interview at www.ad-international.org/NASA See page 24 for how you can help.

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The Animal Defender & Campaigner

This unnescessary suffering and death in the classroom must stop. There are alternatives.

Š Animal Defenders International

engineers had very little idea of how we were actually going to accomplish that great task. I really believe that my generation should be allowed the same opportunities for interplanetary space travel. Currently the only technology that we have is material shielding, which can only shield the astronauts from the lower energy radiation environments. So it is important to develop the enabling technologies to shield the astronauts from the radiation environment, not only for the astronauts themselves, but also for the space vehicle hardware that they operate. I also believe that if we accomplish space radiation shielding there would be spin-off technologies and applications that would benefit mankind.

European survey on alternatives in education underway, as we step up drive to end the use of animals in higher education The survey to ascertain the use of animals in higher education in ten countries in Europe is well under way and is showing great promise. Since its inception in September last year, the survey, which has been developed by researchers at Edinburgh University, has been translated into nine different European languages. Using the resident language was felt to be very important, especially when dealing with academics who may receive many e-mail messages each day. It was hoped that this would maximise the number of responses and reduce the number of e-mails that might be deleted un-opened. The survey has been sent to universities and academic faculties which provide either physiology or pharmacology courses with practical laboratory classes. These practical classes could either be animal based, computer based, or both. The replies thus far, have enabled an interim analysis to be conducted on the types of teaching in the target countries and the technologies that are in use. In addition it is also important to ascertain the actual or perceived barriers to the replacement of animals in these courses; the first step to overcoming barriers is to

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Autumn/Winter 2010

identify them. It is also useful to know when Our team discusses with David computer programmes Dewhurst a strategy to replace are being used to animals in education. replace animals, and also, where these programmes are obtained. It is hoped that the final report from the survey will make the replacement of animals in higher education an easier and more attainable goal.

Super computer for European Researchers In June this year a supercomputing infrastructure for European researchers was welcomed by the European Commission. The â‚Ź500 million project, called PRACE (Partnership for Advance Computing in Europe) is a collaboration between the Commission and 20 European countries which will result in researchers having access to super fast computers in other countries, which they can use for their research projects. These computers will have the potential to make up to 1000 trillion calculations per second. This will enable researchers to tackle problems which were previously thought to be too large or too complex. The project could be used in order to investigate biological processes such as 3-D protein folding which would show how drugs interact, at the cellular level, in the human body. This is a perfect example of how advanced technology could be used in creative ways to replace animals in research.

NAVS & ADI


British Science Festival Regular readers of ADI/NAVS and LDF publications, and visitors to our website, will be familiar with Aston University, where we fund Professor Paul Furlong, a leading expert in neuroimaging. This year, Aston will host the British Science Festival. The Festival is one of the largest in Europe and will be held from 14 to 19 September. The festival will see events taking place on the university campus and at different venues throughout the city, including museums, libraries, bars and shopping centres. Activities include workshops, hands-on events and debates. The LDF has taken an exhibition stand to present our humane research projects which advance science, improve human health and work to bring an end to unreliable, unethical and unnecessary animal experiments. There will be information about the Aston Brain Centre, also known as the “ABC” which will put Aston University at the forefront of neurological research. The ABC, a new building extension and development, will encompass the MRI scanner funded by LDF for research using human volunteers and for patient studies.

1st floor of the proposed Aston Brain Centre

ADI & NAVS

© T. Phillips / Animal Defenders International

© T. Phillips / Animal Defenders International

Research Without Animals

Promoting Alternatives to Animal Testing in the REACH framework While the European regulation on chemicals and its safe use, known as REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemical Substances), is being implemented, which will likely cost the lives of about 8-9 million animals over several years (after an initial estimate of 38 million), the National AntiVivisection Society continues to promote an increase of the use of alternative nonanimal testing methods to the European Chemical Agency (ECHA). REACH’s first deadline for the registration of a high volume of chemicals is 30th November 2010, which means that manufacturers and importers will have to document their management of risk chemicals in order to continue their production and marketing. The European Commission estimates that 9000 substances are covered. The NAVS will continue to push for the development and adoption of non-animal methods throughout the process, but there are some positive signs. Antonio Tajani, Vice-President of the European Commission, highlighted earlier this year the importance of registration via SIEFs (Substance Information Exchange Forums), as this method will avoid duplication, a point on which NAVS has insisted. Additionally, the OSIRIS project, which aims at developing Integrated Testing Strategies fit for REACH, and thus, reducing animal testing, continues to bring positive results. It was presented to ECHA this year. In July, OSIRIS reported that ECHA is interested in their In Silico tools, their new database on mammalian toxicity and more importantly, in testing the gamma-version of the OSIRIS web tool later in 2010. From Britain, the InChemicoTox project, which is funded by DEFRA and aims to develop non-animal toxicity testing methodologies for the risk assessment of chemicals, will present its first set of results in late September 2010. The REACH framework is one which will cause terrible suffering for animals and the NAVS has heavily criticized it: but now it is in place, we will continue to work to reduce suffering wherever possible.

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© R. Hill / Animal Defenders International

Less than a year ago she was in a laboratory. Now she is safe in our care. Your donation enables us to expose suffering, to campaign for change, and to save lives. We cannot do it without you.

Help us to help them. Make a difference. Please send a donation today

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■ I would like to give on a regular monthly basis, please send me more information. ■ Please send me more information about ADI, NAVS, and LDF. ■ Please send me more information about Animal Adoptions. Please send me ■ 5 ■ 10 ■ 25 ■ 50 .......... (other) Stop Circus Suffering leaflets. Please send me ■ 5 ■ 10 ■ 25 ■ 50 .......... (other) Huntingdon Life Sciences EXPOSED leaflets. Please send me ■ 5 ■ 10 ■ 25 ■ 50 .......... (other) Kick Animal Testing Out of The House leaflets. Please send me ■ 5 ■ 10 ■ 25 ■ 50 .......... (other) Fur Stop leaflets. Please send me ■ 5 ■ 10 ■ 25 ■ 50 .......... (other) Rescued Animal Adoption leaflets. ■ Please sign me up for ADI and NAVS email alerts! My email address is ................................................................................................................................................. Animal Defenders International UK: Millbank Tower, Millbank, LONDON, SW1P 4QP, UK. Tel: +44 (0)20 7630 3340 e-mail: info@ad-international.org US: 6100 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1150, LoS ANgeLeS, CA 90048, USA. Tel: +1 323-935-2234 e-mail: usa@ad-international.org South America: Apartado Postal 359888 BogoTÁ, Colombia. info@ad-international.org www.ad-international.org • www.navs.org.uk • www.ldf.org.uk • www.savetheprimates.org


Magazine Winter 2010  

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