Page 1

Mariagrazia Bertarini

Martha Huber

STORY 1 G ARDEN Teacher’s Book The


The Story Garden – Teacher’s Book 1 di Mariagrazia Bertarini and Martha Huber © 2021 – ELI S.r.l. CP 6 – 62019 Recanati – Italia Tel +39 071 750701 Fax +39 071 977851 info@elionline.com www.elilaspigaedizioni.it Editorial Manager Simona Franzoni Project manager Maria Letizia Maggini Editorial dept Catrin Elen Morris, Francesca Seracini Art Director Letizia Pigini Page Design and Layout Alessia Zucchi Production manager Francesco Capitano Illustrations Elisa Enedino, Matteo Gaggia, Alessia Girasole, Ilaria Guarducci, Giovanni Lombardi, Giovanni Pierfranceschi, Elisa Rocchi, Marisa Vestita Photos Shutterstock, Danilo Maceratesi

The publisher would like to thank all the teachers who have commented on the course at various stages of its development. ISBN 978-88-536-3283-8 No unauthorized photocopying All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of ELI. This book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be circulated without the publisher’s prior consent in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published Printed by Tecnostampa – Pigini Group Printing Division Loreto - Trevi 21.83.176.0


INDEX Presentation The Teacher’s Book The Flip Book Audio CD Posters Flashcards Methodology Course features

p. p. p. p. p. p. p. p.

Welcome Unit: Welcome to The Story Garden

p. 22

Unit 1:

Hello, Little Red Riding Hood!

Photocopiable worksheet

p. 28 p. 42

Unit 2:

Pinocchio at school

Photocopiable worksheet

Unit 3:

Happy Birthday Sleeping Beauty!

Photocopiable worksheet

Unit 4:

Hansel and Gretel’s Lunch

Photocopiable worksheet

Unit 5:

The Bremen Band

Photocopiable worksheet

Unit 6:

Goldilocks and the Bear Family

Photocopiable worksheet

5 5 6 7 7 8 9 14

p. 48 p. 62 p. 68 p. 82 p. 90 p. 104 p. 112 p. 126 p. 134 p. 148

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INTRODUCTION Presentation The Story Garden is a new primary school English course based on social and emotional learning. The course has five levels and fully adheres to the requirements of the Ministry of Education for school textbooks. • Equipped with the essential digital support, it conforms to the laws on digital and blended textbooks, effortlessly lending itself to both traditional and IWB classes. • It follows the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, guiding pupils to competence level A2. • It offers inclusive learning, mindful of the issues for pupils with Specific Learning Disorders (SLD) & Special Educational Needs (SEN).

The Teacher’s Book The Teacher’s Book, which is full of teaching ideas and suggestions, is intended to give real and consistent support to the teacher and includes: • A list of course components and indications about how to use them in class • An introduction to the methodology and how to apply it • Course features • Unit-by-unit competence planning, with specific learning objectives and cross-curricular links • Page-by-page instructions: each page in the course book corresponds to a page in the Teacher’s Book, which shows the Student’’s page Book’s and highlights the skills, vocabulary and grammatical structures developed, as well as the materials needed to carry out the activities in class • Teacher’s notes for all the activities in the course book, together with suggestions for additional games and activities • Audio scripts • Photocopiable worksheets for extension activities • Tips, language, grammar and cultural points of interest, as well as games and rhymes • A model letter to parents at the end of each unit, which aims to inform and involve families in their children’s progress in the English language enabling parents to participate in their children’s learning, a vital resource if appropriately targeted • Tests which teachers can access when they go online to the Teacher’s Resource section of The Story Garden.

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INTRODUCTION The Flip Book The Flip Book can be used in class on an IWB or on a projector, or at home for homework and extra practice. It is also an essential support for blended learning. Each Flip Book contains: • • • • • • • •

A browsable version of the whole Student’s Book A browsable version of the whole Teacher’s Book Digitalised activities Course audio scripts Songs, chants and their musical accompaniments Videos from the openers of each unit, the animated cartoons and the Living English sections Interactive revision paths with Mr Green Liquid book, the accessible, easy-to-read book

To activate the Teacher’s Digital Book, go to www.elionline.come/digitalbooks, follow the instructions and use the access code at the front of the Teacher’s Book. To activate the Student’s Digital Book, go to www.elionline.com/digitalbooks, follow the instructions and use the access code at the front of the Student’s Book.

ELI LINK ELI LINK is an application that can be downloaded for free from the AppStore (for iOS) or GooglePlay (for Android) on a smartphone or tablet. Thanks to ELI LINK, the material you see is enriched with multimedia elements that can be activated directly from a smartphone or a tablet. After downloading and launching the app, you can frame the page of your book and immediately access the connected video and audio content and the interactive exercises. Thanks to its technology, the ELI LINK tool is designed to increase productivity in class or at home, while saving time, as well as keeping students’ attention and involvement high. All the multimedia content of the course is in fact available at all times with one simple click from your mobile device.

Download the free ELI LINK App on a smartphone or tablet.

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Launch the app, frame the video or audio icons on the paper page of your book.

Immediately access to audio and video content.


INTRODUCTION Audio CDs Each Teacher’s Book is supplied with 2 Audio CDs, which contain all the recordings of the listening texts, songs and chants. The audio texts are all recorded by native English speakers and the songs are sung by English-speaking pupils. Each Student’s Book is supplied with an Audio CD with MP3 tracks. STORY GA RDEN The

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Each level of the course comes with two educational posters, designed with pupils’ interests in mind. The Story Garden 1: Classroom Language The Story Garden 2: The Animal Kingdom, The Crossing Game The Story Garden 3: The British Isles, Free Time Activities The Story Garden 4: Time and Weather, Let’s Speak! The Story Garden 5: In Town, What I Want to Be The Story Garden 6: Time and Weather, Let’s Speak!

CLASSROOM LANGUAGE 2 Poster included in the ELI courses

14.83.107.0

www.elionline.com

OPEN YOUR BOOK

CLOSE YOUR BOOK

READ

WRITE

THINK

DRAW

COLOUR

CUT

GLUE

STICK

SHOW ME

PLAY

WORK IN PAIRS

WATCH

TYPE

PIC TAKKE UP A APEN PENC CILIL

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INTRODUCTION FLASHCARD

8

1 red

33 bike

2 blue

34 scooter

3 yellow

35 kite

4 green

36 train

5 orange

37 sandwich

6 pink

38 hamburger

7 purple

39 pizza

8 brown

40 crisps

9 black

41 cake

10 white

42 orange juice

11 one

43 ice cream

12 two

44 apple

13 three

45 banana

14 four

46 milk

15 five

47 cat

16 six

48 dog

17 seven

49 rooster

18 eight

50 donkey

19 nine

51 fish

20 ten

52 rabbit

21 school bag

53 hamster

22 pencil case

54 tortoise

23 rubber

55 grandad

24 pencil

56 grandma

25 pen

57 dad

26 book

58 mum

27 sharpener

59 brother

28 felt-tip pen

60 sister

29 car

61 bedroom

30 ball

62 bathroom

31 doll

63 living room

32 video game

64 kitchen


INTRODUCTION

Methodology “There are only two lasting bequests we can hope to give our children. One of these is roots; the other, wings.” William Hodding Carter II This powerful quote from Carter encapsulates the spirit and the idea behind The Story Garden. Tradition dictates that our roots are in the stories which give form to our social being and our cultural identity, and that in essence they provide us with the solid base from which to fledge our wings. The English language represents the wings which enable us to encounter and discover what is new in academic, scientific, artistic and social spheres. Not providing roots for our pupils is depriving them of a safe haven, clipping their wings and stopping them from realising their dreams and ambitions. The competing pull of tradition and novelty is evident throughout this course through devices such as the juxtaposing of illustrations and photos, imaginary characters and real children, cartoons and the Living English culture section. • In The Story Garden 1 most units present fairytales, well-known in many cultures, with very few variations, so that they can be recognised by pupils from all over the world. • In The Story Garden 2 and 3, in addition to traditional fairytales and stories, there are some classic novels. The pupil’s development and personal growth are accounted for: those who need more time and those who are changing their reading tastes and are starting to hone their skills in reading the messages behind a story. • In The Story Garden 4 and 5 the units take inspiration from great classics: novels, epic poems and legends. From the enormous choice available, an attempt has been made to vary the setting of the stories, so in each volume, from the first to the fifth year, there are some English stories or stories by British writers. • In level 1: Goldilocks and the Three Bears • In level 2: Jack and the Beanstalk • In level 3: The Lost World, Robin Hood, The Jungle Book • In level 4: Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens, Gulliver’s Travels, Treasure Island, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes • In level 5: Frankenstein, King Arthur

The Heart and Mind Approach The Story Garden is based on the Heart and Mind Approach, or emotional learning which creates synergy between cognitive and emotive aspects, both for pupils and teachers. The conviction that emotions and thoughts are contrasting phenomena comes from a long philosophical and scientific tradition which holds that emotions are linked to sentiment and physical sensations, whilst thought is linked to logic and the mind. However, thanks to sophisticated technology such as functional MRI scans, it has been scientifically shown that things are not at all like that. Emotions and thoughts are dynamically intertwined both from a neurological and a psychological point of view. Emotions and thoughts don’t only interact, their integration is vital to learning. The activities in The Story Garden have a meaning and an aim, so that pupils can learn to view the English language for what it is in reality: a system of signs and sounds which is required to communicate emotions, needs, information, and not simply a group of grammar rules and words to be memorised. The pupil is gradually guided to undertake tasks, which not only focus on a language sphere, but also on a cultural and social sphere. This process requires both knowledge and know-how, and brings a sense of realism to what has been learnt.

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INTRODUCTION Competences in The Story Garden Teaching competences is considered vital in today’s school system. Competences are defined as “the proven ability to use personal, social and/or methodological knowledge, skills and abilities, in work or study situations and in professional and personal development”. The Story Garden effectively applies these guidelines on the development of competencies set out in the national curriculum, offering a learning pathway orientated towards critical thinking, collaboration and autonomous and creative personal expression. In particular: 1 Communication in first language (L1): In The Story Garden, L1 aids in the comprehension of the stories presented. In fact, it is considered useful to tell the story to the pupils in the original version (in L1) before diving into the retelling of the stories presented in each unit. 2 Communication in second language (L2): The course fully develops this competence, guiding the pupils to reach the final CEFR level A1+. 3 Mathematical competences and basic competences in science and technology: The course provides activities to develop logical-mathematical skills and, through the CLIL pages presents the themes of environmental, food, science and technology education. 4 Digital competence: This competence is activated through the Flip Books and through their digital contents both in terms of Internet research and the Real Task sections. 5 Learning to learn: The activities in the units, the pages in the Learning to Learn section and the self-evaluation pages, all aim to help pupils gain a gradual awareness and autonomy in the process of learning English. 6 Social and civic competences: These competences are practised through the many different social interaction activities in pairs and in groups in each unit. 7 Sense of initiative and inventiveness: These are developed during the execution of Real Tasks, when carrying out Make & Play tasks. 8 Knowledge and cultural expression: The Living English pages offer pupils the chance to discover the culture and traditions of English-speaking countries, encouraging intercultural dialogue and understanding. In each unit of the course, this knowledge is transformed into skills through guided exercises and competences gained through semi-structured and freer activities, up to the Real Tasks, which enable teachers and pupils to evaluate the competence levels reached. Competences developed in each unit are not however self-contained, but are amplified in concentric circles until they form a solid base of competences.

Evaluating competences The evaluation of competences achieved can be undertaken through: • The Real Tasks, which make it possible to use knowledge and activate skills to develop competences. • Continuous assessment of the process that a pupil uses to demonstrate his/her competences. • These aspects of evaluation are considered in specific activities in The Story Garden and are described in the section on course features.

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INTRODUCTION

Objectives for the development of competences The objectives for the development of competences by the end of primary school, established in the the national curriculum 2012, equivalent to the Common European Framework of Reference for languages of the European Parliament and Council (2006) are as follows: • Pupils can understand short oral and written messages about familiar subjects. • Can describe orally or in writing, in simple terms, aspects of their everyday lives, their environment and their immediate needs. • Can interact through play, communicate in a clear way, also with learnt expressions or sentences, in simple or routine information exchanges. • Can undertake tasks following instructions given by the teacher in a foreign language, asking for explanations if needed. • Can identify some cultural elements and understand the relationship between language forms and use of a foreign language.

Educational objectives at the end of year 3 KNOWLEDGE Basic vocabulary about everyday life. Correct pronunciation of common words and phrases learnt. Simple and everyday communication structures.

SKILLS Listening (oral comprehension) Can understand words, instructions, expressions and sentences of everyday use, pronounced slowly and correctly about self, friends and family. Speaking (oral production and spoken interaction) Can produce significant sentences referring to familiar things, places, people and situations. Can interact with a friend for presentations and/or in games, using learnt expressions and phrases, adapted to the situation. Reading (written comprehension) Can understand postcards, notes, short messages, preferably accompanied by visible or auditory support, understanding words and sentences already learnt orally. Writing (written production) Can write words and simple sentences for everyday use, relating to classroom activities and personal or group interests.

SPECIFIC COMPETENCES Can understand sentences and expressions of frequent use, relating to immediately relevant spheres, in spoken interaction, when watching multimedia content, or reading texts. Can interact orally in everyday situations, exchanging simple and direct information about familiar topics or routines, also using digital tools. Can undertake written interaction, also in digital form and online, to express information and feelings, simple aspects of everyday life and the environment, and immediate personal needs.

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INTRODUCTION Educational objectives at the end of year 6 KNOWLEDGE Basic vocabulary about everyday life. Use of a bilingual dictionary. Basic grammar rules. Correct pronunciation of words learnt or used everyday. Simple writing of short messages, notes, informal letters. Basic aspects of society and culture of countries in which the language is spoken.

SKILLS

SPECIFIC COMPETENCES

Listening (oral comprehension) Can understand short dialogues, instructions, expressions and sentences and can identify the general theme of a conversation when talking about familiar topics. Can understand short multimedia texts, identifying key words and the overall sense.

Can understand frequently used sentences and expressions of immediate relevance in spoken interaction or by watching multimedia content, or reading texts.

Speaking (oral production and spoken interaction) Can describe familiar people, places and things. Can refer to simple information relating to a personal sphere. Can interact in a comprehensible way with a friend or a known adult, using expressions and sentences suitable for the situation. Reading (written comprehension) Can read and understand short and simple texts, preferably accompanied by visual support, getting the overall gist and understanding familiar words and sentences. Writing (written production) Can write in a clear and comprehensible way simple and short messages to present yourself, wish somebody happy birthday, thank or invite someone, ask or give information. Reflect on the language and on the learning process Can distinguish between pairs of words with similar sounds. Can look at words and expressions in context and understand their meaning. Can observe the structure of sentences and relate form with communicative intention.

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Can interact orally in everyday situations, exchanging simple and direct information about familiar topics or routines, also using digital tools. Can interact in writing, also in digital form and online, to express information and feelings, simple aspects of everyday life and the environment, and immediate personal needs.


INTRODUCTION

Inclusive learning Inclusive learning enables and facilitates pupils to develop their full potential and abilities. Inclusive learning does not discriminate against, but accepts and values difference, creating learning environments suitable for everyone. The Story Garden uses strategies to ensure inclusive learning by reinforcing: • Differentiation of style, form and spacing • Peer mentoring • Different intelligences and learning styles • Logical-visual strategies • Metacognitive development • Proactivity and self-confidence

U n it

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LISTEN AND PLAY

WHAT COLOUR IS IT?

LE EYE GAME.

THE EAG

IT’S PURPLE.

2

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IT’S A PEN!

3

HAPPY BIRTHDAY SLEEPI NG BEAUT Y! 1

NO.

1

3

IT’S A RUBBER!

YES!

Un it

LISTEN AND SAY.

CAR

DOLL

2

7

21

28

Activity Time page

90

2 3

The Story Garden 1

BIKE

KITE

BALL

4

VIDEO GAME

6

SCOOTER

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TRAIN

GREAT!

5

3

29

LISTEN AND FIND .

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LISTEN AND SING .

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INTRODUCTION Course features Vocabulary

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HELLO, LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD!

1

1

Each unit opens with the first lexical group, presented in the context of a scene from the chosen story, aimed at stimulating pupils’ interest in the topic and promoting emotional learning. From level 2 onwards, there is a second lexical group presented in each unit, with links to the first lexical group.

Songs

LISTEN AND SAY THE NUMBER.

BLACK

2

WHITE

3

YELLOW

4

GREEN

5

ORANGE

6

PINK

PURPLE

4

Activity Time pages 78-79

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RED

2

LISTEN AND FIND.

3

LISTEN AND SING.

1

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BROWN

1O

BLUE

5

6-7

5

The Story Garden 1

Songs enable pupils to produce a wide range of structures and a rich variety of words in a natural and spontaneous context. The music also aids memory, teaches pupils to use both cerebral hemispheres and is adaptable to different learning styles (visual, auditory, kinaesthetic). Music also helps create an atmosphere in which it is possible both to relax and concentrate, and enables pupils to express emotions and feel a sense of belonging to the group, thanks to the participation of all pupils in the activity. It is well known that songs also enable us to feel positive energy and a sense of harmony and serenity, which promotes a positive environment for learning. The songs were written with the singing and language ability of pupils from different year groups in mind. In the first year, the singing range required is limited to reflect their ability. Each year the singing range required for The Story Garden songs is increased, to reflect the changes in the pupils’ speaking ability, according to age and development. Particular care was given to the choice of the musical arrangement: we wanted to avoid ‘babyish’ songs; on the contrary, the sounds and rhythms chosen for the course songs directly echo the kind of music that today’s pupils listen to themselves. The song at the beginning of each unit is presented in two versions: with singing, or as karaoke. In the latter case, the melody will help pupils to sing.

Cartoons Cartoons involve all the senses and are, therefore, effective with pupils of any learning style: visual, auditory, kinaesthetic or verbalvisual. The cartoons are inspired by the stories presented in each unit, adapted to create modern reading. They aren’t extracts taken from the original stories or total retelling, but variations on a theme, which maintain the main sense of the works they are inspired by. The reason for this choice is a desire to encourage pupils to read the classics and create their own

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HELLO, LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD!

10 LISTEN TO THE STORY.

11

WATCH OUT FOR THE WOLF!

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9

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ROAR!

OUCH!

THUMP! 11 LISTEN AND SING. 10

12

12 ACT OUT THE STORY. 11

The Story Garden 1


INTRODUCTION personal knowledge that they will be able to look at again, until they become proficient in relating to others (life skills), predicting events (critical thinking) and reacting (emotional intelligence), and above all proficient in communicating in English and become a citizen of the world. With carefully graded language, the stories in The Story Garden have several layers of meaning: they are funny, but they also convey moral values beyond their language content. How to get the most out of the cartoon stories From the first volume onwards, immediately after the story is the instruction: Act out the story. This implies a precise methodology, avoiding the usual translation of the stories presented from English into the pupil’s own language: translation takes place from the English language to the ‘acting out’ combined with the English sounds. Pupils learn the meaning of what they hear and see written down, not through the literal translation of words or sentences, but by assimilating the sentences and sounds association within a particular communicative context. To get the most out of the stories linguistically, it is suggested that teachers follow these steps in this order: • Listen to and watch the video • Act out the story • Go back to the text to learn the written form (from year 2 onwards) The procedure generally follows these phases: 1 Warm up • Ask the class to look at the pictures and predict the cartoon story. • Ask pupils to identify the key words in the cartoon, to gain overall understanding of the text, write them on the board and highlight them to the class. 2 Listen • Invite the class to follow the story in their books, watch the story on the IWB video, or listen to it on the CD. • Read the story from the book, miming the different scenes, changing your voice to model the correct pronunciation of the words and the intonation of the sentences in English. • Show the video again and ask pupils to focus on what they see: the characters’ expressions, backgrounds and colours. • Invite pupils to listen to the story with their eyes closed and imagine as many details as possible of what they have seen and heard. 3 M r Green’s tip • Stimulate pupils’ critical thinking by asking what the cartoon means: what it is trying to say to us. • Read the guide’s advice or saying. Ask pupils: Do you agree? Can you think of an alternative? 4 Listen and sing • The song after the cartoon in the first three levels retraces the story highlighting the listening mode. This will suit auditory learners who will enjoy this activity. Pupils with different learning styles, largely visual, visual-verbal or kinaesthetic, will be able to experiment in an enjoyable way. 5 Act out • Watch the video for a third time and ask the pupils to repeat the dialogues. You can monitor whether you need to repeat and model the lines or to let pupils say the lines spontaneously. • This is the ‘translation’ phase of the story, as previously mentioned: it is a translation of the English language into the language of gestures, avoiding the usual translation into pupils’ L1. • This translation model aids comprehension of the story at a deeper level than simple translation from one language to another could provide, as it involves the pupil’s entire body and emotions. • At this point invite pupils to speak, using their books. You can choose one of two methods: either all the pupils can say the lines of all the characters, changing their voices as appropriate (choral reading) or each pupil can choose a character to voice (selective reading); in the latter case you should invite them to make gestures, and assume the appropriate expressions and intonation. • An extension activity could be to divide pupils into groups, learn the story by heart and act it out for the class. It is a good idea to encourage pupils to make improvised props or masks to contextualise the story in a more realistic way.

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INTRODUCTION The four skills

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS

19 Listen to the weather forecast and complete.

LI ST

The learning path of The Story Garden integrates all the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. In year 1, reading is intuitive and largely supported by images, and writing is copying words to give pupils a sense of achievement. The skills work progresses in subsequent levels and at levels 4 and 5 the final two pages of each unit are totally dedicated to developing skills.

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G EN IN

RE AD

IN G

and

England

and

Wales

and

Northern Ireland

SP EA

KI NG

and

days in autumn! I can’t ride my bike, but I can read books. Oh… and I love winter, too. I love Christmas time and in December I can write my present list!!!

20 Do a class survey. Interview your friends and complete the chart.

When’s your birthday?

Is it in June?

Is it in August?

It’s in summer.

he’s

No, it isn’t.

September

he can

Yes, it is!

fa

he can’t

Colin NAME

SEASON

MONTH

1

Hi, my name’s Colin. I’m nine. I love autumn! My birthday is in September and I like birthday parties. I like monsters and at the end of October I can wear my Halloween costume. of I like warm colours and in autumn the colours nature are red, yellow, orange and brown. foggy I like foggy days and in November it’s usually and cold. I don’t like rainy days, but there are lots of rainy

MONTH Scotland

U n it

21 Read and complete the map.

he likes

onths e m rit vou

weath

er

sp ec ial da ys

he doesn’t like

CLIL

22 Write about the boy. Start with His name’s… W RI

14

TI NG

Then make your own map.

Activity time page 107

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The Story Garden 4 In all the units of each volume of The Story Garden (one page per unit in the first two levels, two pages in subsequent levels) there are CLIL sections, dedicated to 3 intercurricular links between English and it My snack diary HEALTH AND NUTRITION fruit U n ack is ur ite sn vo fa Healthy snacks other subjects. These can serve as support My a pples ! I or extension activities to the course or can 1 be used independently. The topics covered use specific vocabulary and are in line with 2 the ministerial curricula for each school year. 1 2 The aim of the CLIL section is to introduce the idea of a foreign language as a vehicle to learning in a simple and natural way, guiding the pupils along a pathway which 3 4 will take them from describing things using a new instrument and really living the experience, whilst redefining, re3 5 48 49 establishing and reorganising knowledge, thanks to the internalisation of a different The Story Garden 3 point of view, which gives a global dimension for each individual. The sections present short intercurricular pathways, using English as a functional vehicle for everyday experiences, stimulate curiosity, research and discovery, which interact with other types of education and with particular subjects, widening and improving the quality of the learning process for the pupil. In these pages pupils will also find Mr Green’s messages, which form the value pathway in which pupils are given advice on how to be happier with themselves and live happily with other people. I like healthy food.

Listen and say.

AL RE

Keep a snack diary for one week. Record all the things you eat and drink. Then compare your snack diary with your friends.

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rice cakes

popcorn

crackers

yoghurt

vegetables

fruit

muffins

biscuits

muesli bars

sweets

crisps

fruit juice

fizzy drinks

milkshakes

smoothies

Which are the healthy snacks? Tick and discuss with your friend.

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SK

59

A

Listen and read.

We usually eat three meals a day: breakfast, lunch and dinner. A snack gives you energy between meals. You can have snacks in the morning or in the afternoon. It is not a good idea to eat snacks at night.

Here’s my snack diary!


INTRODUCTION Make & Play

SOCIAL SKILLS

U n it

In the lower level books, these pages are presented as a laboratory THE WOLF which conclude the CLIL pathways and aim to activate creative processes and provide new input to enhance and deepen the motivation to use English inside and outside school. This activity puts into play, strengthens and develops not only creativity, but also pupils’ informal knowledge and skills, contributing 1 2 greatly to their knowledge of the world. Making and building, or producing a graphic-manual composition require an intense metacognitive effort, or a reflexion on one’s own thinking processes, which reflects in a concrete and tangible way to 4 5 the metacognitive phases of language interaction. The manual task visibly reflects a process which involves: • Comprehension of an oral or illustrated text (instructions) • Forming hypotheses (if I do it this way, I will achieve this result) • Designing projects 7 • Planning 1 MAKE AND PLAY • Organising THE BIG BAD WOLF SAYS GAME. • Reorganising your skills and knowledge • Testing if the creation works (Does it work? If if doesn’t, where did The Story Garden 1 I go wrong?) • Self-evaluation of the outcome in terms of how much enjoyment, personal satisfaction and gratification there is (Am I happy with what I’ve achieved?) • Self-evaluation of the process

Living English

GIANTS

in the English-Speaking World

1

MASK

3

6

13

1 2

3 Listen and match.

U n it

82

The Statue of Liberty is the symbol of the USA. It is a gift to the United States from the people of France. The French sculptor is Frederic Bartholdi. The Statue is on Liberty Island in New York. The torch represents freedom. The statue is holding a tablet in her left hand. The date of the American Declaration of Independence (July 4th, 1776) is on the tablet. The Statue is 46 metres tall and visitors climb 354 steps to reach the crown. There are 25 windows in the crown. The seven rays in the crown represent the seven seas and seven continents of the world.

4

Living English is the section on culture and 1 society, which is presented from the start of the learning pathway. In the first two levels of The Story Garden the Living English pages present situations that pupils are familiar with and transpose them into English-speaking cultures. The culture pages at this level offer an 2 awareness that the English language isn’t only a game, fantasy or school activity, but a world language that other children use to express and share their daily lives, feelings and themselves. The English language crosses the borders of 62 63 the school and becomes an instrument to communicate and make friends with the world. The Story Garden 4 In the last three levels of The Story Garden, the Living English pages broaden their horizons, as pupils, interests and curiosity grow, and they start to take in the whole world. Living English becomes a starting point to learn about British traditions and at the same time, shows how a little knowledge can bring people from different cultures and ethnicities together, and how important and incredible it is to use this to become a citizen of the world. This can only happen through English, shared throughout the world. Pupils are stimulated to find out about things which they are curious about and are motivated to use English to find answers. Listen and complete.

80

name

tower

London

bell

Big Ben is a symbol of

plump

steps

and Great Britain.

It is a part of the Palace of Westminster on the River Thames. The

is 96 metres high and there are 334

to reach the top. Its official name is

‘Elizabeth Tower’.

.

Big Ben is the name of the giant

It is 2 metres high and weighs about 14 tons. The

3

4

Big Ben probably comes from the Commissioner of Works, man.

Benjamin Hall, a very tall and

Listen and choose.

81

On the tower there are four / forty clock dials. At the base of each tower / clock dial there is a Latin inscription. In English it means ‘O Lord, keep safe our Queen Victoria the First’. The hour foot / hand is 2.7 metres long and the minute / second hand is 4.3 metres tall / long. Every year, the minute hand travels for about 190 kilometres. SK

AL RE

A

T

5

6

Surf the Internet and find out the tallest bell tower in your country. Where is it? How tall is it? How old is it?

17


INTRODUCTION The Sound Game

THE WIZARD OF OZ

The Sound Game is a phonetic section in each unit of the course, from year 2 onwards. It is a collection of phonetic activities and exercises with phonemes and common sounds in the English language. The consonants p, b, d, h, n, t, d, j, s, sh, th, the monopthongs and diphthongs are presented in minimal pairs, through games and tongue twisters, allowing pupils first to imitate and then to consciously internalise the L2 sounds. Particular attention is given to sounds which are difficult to tell apart for pupils with different L1s and SEN pupils.

8

Complete with Yes, I am. / No, I’m not.

Are you happy?

Are you scared?

Are you hot?

Are you thirsty?

9

Life Skills

29

Listen and say.

hot

happy

THE SO hamburger

UND

GA M

hungry

10 Listen and circle the pictures with the sound H.

Linked to competence-based learning are the life skills, or the psycho-social skills, defined by the Department of Mental Health of the World Heath Organisation (WHO) in 1993, as “the abilities for adaptive and positive behaviour that enable individuals to deal effectively with the demands and challenges of everyday life”. Techniques to promote health education, workable in a school environment include: • • • • •

Decision-making skills Problem-solving skills Creative thinking Critical thinking Effective communication skills

• • • • •

E

30

24

The Story Garden 2

Interpersonal skills Self-awareness skills Empathy Coping with emotions Coping with stress

The list has been updated with more precise subdivisions, to identify key competencies and skills for the 21st century.

Real Task There are different types of Real Tasks in the course book. They are simply tests when they only involve English, but are truly ‘real tasks’ when they involve other subjects. You can recognise a real task by the fact that pupils are asked to deal with challenging, complex or new situations, as close as possible to real life, using knowledge and skills already gained and applying procedures and thought processes to contexts and environments which are different from those they are used to facing in class. Tasks may sometimes be based on only one subject, but in general they tend to invite pupils to integrate different lessons learnt to find solutions in an independent way. The solution to the problem (real task) represents the pupil’s final product on which the teacher can base his/her evaluation.

18


INTRODUCTION 1

U n it

Living Grammar

LIVING GRAMMAR She’s in England.

Where’s Aouda?

THE PREPOSITION IN

It’s in November.

When’s her birthday?

Time

Place

in spring in April in the morning

in the kitchen in London in England

1 Put the words in order. 1 cake • is • a • fridge • the • There • in

In the first couple of years of studying English, the communicative structures are used intuitively. For this reason from level 3 of The Story Garden there is a Living Grammar section, with simple and clear tables and examples of grammar structures followed by fun activities for practice.

2 April • is • weather • cool • The • in 3 lives • Rome • grandmother • My • in 4 go • school • summer • don’t • to • I • in 5 India • see • in • You • can • elephants 6 play • in • afternoon • usually • the • I • football

WH

questions

2 Complete.

A cake? Where’s the cake?

Who…? What…? Where…? When…? Why…? How…?

1

are you scared?

2

’s the weather like?

3

’s your birthday?

4

’s your bike?

5

are you?

6

’s that girl?

ACTIVITY TIME

2

96

TRUE

OR FALSE

U n it

6

? COMPLETE THE SMILEYS.

HE IS MY GRANDAD.

SHE IS MY GRANDMA.

HE IS MY DAD.

SHE IS MY SISTER.

The Story Garden 4

Activity Time In each volume of the course there is a workbook with revision, reinforcement and consolidation activities for the language presented in the corresponding unit. The activities are graduated, functional and often presented as games, which give pupils scope for experimentation and self-study.

U n it 1

6

EASY ENGLISH

Say and colour the words.

WORKBOOK

a

g fro

an

in

g bi

igu

humm

The Story Garden 1

rd

par

to r t

rot

Animals

bat

rf

liz

ua

r

ta

uit

jag

oise

spider

ly

mosq

b

te ut

pi

103

ar

Easy English At the end of each Student’s Book there is an Easy English section with activities dedicated to inclusive learning paths for SLD and SEN pupils.

d

r

o

140

The Story Garden 4

19


INTRODUCTION Video In the first two levels there are 3 videos for each unit: an opener presenting vocabulary; the animated cartoon and the animated Living English video. In the last three levels there are 2 videos per unit: an opener presenting vocabulary; the animated cartoon.

Graphics, illustrations and icons Graphics, illustrations and icons are three essential elements that help or hinder learning projects. Just as it is true that an attractive book without contents has no value, it is even truer that nobody would grapple with the contents of an unattractive book, especially not a child of six to ten years old, used to the high quality dictated by society and the media. The Story Garden graphics are designed with clarity, accessibility and above all agility in mind, to make using the book as easy as possible. The main aim of a good graphics project is that regardless of the obstacle of the English language, a pupil is clear about which subject they are going to study and what type of activity they will be involved in. More than 30 illustrators were involved in The Story Garden graphic project and carefully selected to best fit the story they illustrated in order to transmit the appropriate style, atmosphere, narrative and creative passion. The challenge of involving and coordinating so many illustrators stems from the decision to work on stories with strong and unique identities, which need to be respected and expressed through different visual styles. The icons were specifically and meticulously designed with the target pupils in mind. Each photo is interesting and motivating, without detracting from the importance of the language activity.

HEL LO, LITTLE RED RIDI NG HOO D!

RDEN! THE STORY GA WE LCOME TO 1

. LISTEN AND SING

7

READ AND DRAW .

9

2-3

EN. HELLO, MY NAME’S MR GRE

FIVE

SIX 76-77 Activity Time pages

3

8

K.

Easy English pages

5

1 2 3 4 5 6

1

U n it

ONE TWO THREE

1

2

FOUR 3

FIVE 4

SIX SEVEN

8 9 1O

EIGHT

5

6

6

COMPLETE AND SAY.

NINE 1

TEN 2

6

Activity Time pages 83, 84-85

Activity Time pages 80, 81-82 Easy English pages 106-107

The Story Garden 1

20

K! OC KN CK! O KN

WHO IS IT?

IT’S GRANDMA.

HELLO, GRANDMA

.

9

8

LISTEN AND COLOUR.

BYE-BYE, BIG BAD WOLF!

108-109

HELLO, LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD! COLOUR, TRACE AND READ.

Un it

10

IT’S THE BIG BAD WOLF!

SEVEN

LISTEN AND CHEC

8

CK GAME.

THREE

TWO

4

THE KNOCK KNO

K! OC KN CK! O KN

ONE

2

LISTEN AND PLAY

WHO IS IT?

7

9

1


INTRODUCTION

Classroom language In this Teacher’s Book, there are some suggested sentences that teachers can use during the lesson when presenting an individual activity. On this page, there are sentences and expressions useful for classroom management and organisation in general. They can be used in connection with those presented in the specific teacher’s notes for each unit. Greetings Good morning, everyone. Good morning, girls and boys. Asking about health/wellbeing How are you today? Are you all OK? Taking the register Who’s missing today? Is (Mark) ill? No, he’s coming. (Mark) is late today. Basic instructions Look at the board. Look at me. Listen to me. Listen and repeat. Listen to the song. Say it after me. Say it with me. Let’s all say it together. Watch the video. Listen and check. In the middle of a lesson. Take out your (English books). Open your book on page... You need your (pencil case). Put all your other things away. Hurry up. Wait a moment, (Val). It’s your turn. It’s not your turn. How about you, (Alex)?

Reassuring or correcting That’s OK, don’t worry. It isn’t a big problem. It doesn’t matter. Try again. Can you try again, please? Please say it again. Can someone help (Martha), please? Positive reinforcement Very good! Very nice! Excellent! Well done! That’s good! To get the pupils’ attention Quiet everyone. Listen, please. / Please listen. Calm down, please. Stop talking. After a break Break’s over. Let’s start again. Go back to your seats. Please sit down. At the end of a lesson The lesson is over. Can you collect the (books), please? Pack up your things. Let’s clean the board. Tidy up the room. Line up at the door, please. Line up, please.

21


wel

come

WELCOME TO THE STORY GARDEN!

U n it The big day is here: the first English lesson with year-one pupils at the beginning of a big adventure featuring fairytales and stories, which will help them grow just like the flowers in Mr Green’s garden. Take them by the hand and introduce them to the friendly gardener who will be your assistant for the next year in his amazing garden: The Story Garden! By listening to his presentation, pupils will learn how to introduce themselves, say hello to their peers and to adults, say goodbye and cheer. At the same time they will have a real-life experience, interacting through English language games and becoming part of the class group, establishing themselves as unique and special individuals, able to acknowledge and respect other people. They will learn about the value of words and gestures in establishing positive and proactive relationships and the importance of giving and receiving.

Learning objectives Knowledge

Greetings Expressions for saying and asking for names Simple classroom instructions

Skills

Greeting and responding to greetings Introducing yourself and saying your name Understanding and following simple instructions Recognising and reproducing L2 sounds and rhythms Affirming, refusing, cheering Expressing feelings

Vocabulary name garden, school listen, point, sing, clap, smile

Communicative structures Hello! Bye-bye! Good morning! What’s your name? My name is… See you later!

Intermediate goals in the development of competences Basic competences (English language skills axis)

Understanding and replying to informal greetings Knowing how to say your own name Understanding and following simple instructions in class

Key competences

Communicating: understanding spoken and non-verbal messages

Life skills Developing self-confidence

22

Approaching new experiences positively


welcome U n it Activity Singing and miming a song

Subject links Music: recognising and reproducing musical rhythms Technology: making a finger puppet

Physical education: using the body and movements to represent real and imaginary communicative situations; understanding gestures

Support Materials

The Story Garden 1 pp. 2-3 Audio CD Photocopiable worksheet n. 1

Equipment

Usual daily classroom kit

23


WELCOME TO THE STORY GARDEN! We learn to

• Say hello and goodbye • Recite a rhyme

Vocabulary and structures • Hello! • Goodbye! • Good morning!

Equipment and materials

• Photocopiable worksheet n. 1 on page 42 • Scissors • Glue Bring some gardening equipment into the classroom such as a watering can, a small hoe, a rake or a sun hat. Put them on your desk, show them to the pupils and ask what they are for. Try to stimulate their curiosity about Mr Green, the character who will guide them in learning English throughout the year. Put the Mr Green finger puppet on (from photocopiable worksheet n. 1) and greet the pupils, say: Hello! Explain that Mr Green will tell them lots of stories throughout the year. It is vital to create empathy between the pupils and Mr Green before turning to the course book. Tell the pupils that this friendly character is a very special type of gardener because he grows words, fairytales and stories in his garden. Ask the whole class questions such as: Do you like fairytales? When do you listen to them? Who reads them or tells them to you? Which is your favourite fairytale? Create a happy and relaxed atmosphere. You will need to photocopy worksheet n. 1 on page 46 to get pupils to create their finger puppets. Go around the class encouraging pupils, with expressions like: Great! Beautiful! Well done! Put on the first finished puppet that they make and say: Hello, Mr Green! or: Good morning, Mr Green! Invite the pupils to repeat the greeting.

24

When all the finger puppets are ready, ask the pupils to put their own on, saying: Put on your puppet, then invite them to walk around the class saying hello to each other, pretending they are Mr Green.

Life skills: Developing self-confidence

It is always important to reward pupils when they understand and follow instructions, and when they complete a task. Use expressions like: Great! Well done! Very good! I’m very proud of you! End each lesson with a rhyme: It’s time to say bye-bye, bye-bye, bye-bye. It’s time to say bye-bye, see you later.


welcome U n it We learn to

• Say hello and goodbye • Introduce yourself • Sing a song

RDEN! THE STORY GA WE LCOME TO 1

. LISTEN AND SING

2-3

EN. HELLO, MY NAME’S MR GRE

Vocabulary

• garden, school • listen, point, sing, clap, smile

Structures • • • • • •

Hello! Bye-bye! I’m Mr Green. My name is Mr Green. What’s your name? Clap and smile!

2

Equipment and materials • • • •

Student’s Book 1 Classroom language poster Finger puppet IWB if available

Activity Time pages 76-77

3

Pages 2 and 3 Greet pupils with a rhyme that you can use at the beginning of each lesson. Hello, hello, how are you, I’m so happy to see you! Present the words listen, point and sing to the class, showing them the meaning on the classroom language poster and setting up the mime game. Ask pupils to: Open your book at page 2. Get up and show the class the book open on page 2 so that they can all find it. Let pupils look at the page and comment on it. Then say: Oh look: a beautiful garden and a school! Look! Mr Green. Hello, Mr Green! Ask the class to say hello to Mr Green.

1 Listen and sing.

2-3

Ask pupils what is happening in the scene, who the people or the animals are and what they are doing. After you have elicited the pupils’ ideas using the IWB

or holding up the book so that they can all see it, put on the Mr Green finger puppet and say: Hello, I’m Mr Green. Invite pupils to say hello to Mr Green: Hello, Mr Green. Place the puppet away from you on your desk, say: Bye-bye, Mr Green and invite pupils to repeat. Invite pupils to listen to the song, by saying: Let’s listen to a song. While they listen, ask pupils to wave every time they hear hello in the song and to clap their hands and smile every time they hear clap and smile. Accompany the words by miming the action. Do a few trial runs to check they have understood, with a sequence of words such as: hello, clap and smile, hello, clap and smile, and ask them to mime the actions. After listening to the song, say: Let’s sing and ask the class to sing the song along with the audio. Accompany the song again with the mimes and gestures and invite pupils to reproduce the words and movements with you. When the pupils are familiar with the text, they will be able to sing along with the karaoke base.

25


WELCOME TO THE STORY GARDEN! Hello, hello

2-3

Hello, hello My name is Mr Green This is my garden Come and sing with me! What’s your name? Clap and smile at me! What’s your name? Clap and smile at me! Hello, hello My name is Mr Green This is my garden Come and sing with me! What’s your name? Clap and smile at me! What’s your name? Clap and smile at me!

Activity Time - Welcome Unit Pages 76-77

Use the IWB if available to watch the song video as a class. The presentation of the song as an animated cartoon in the Flip Book will have a great impact on pupils.

Key competences: Communicating

Pupils understand spoken information and translate it through mime.

Life skills: A positive approach to new experiences

The teacher’s mime is very important for pupils when first encountering L2. Clearly there will be terms and expressions used that the class doesn’t know yet. You should try to accompany each expression, instruction or term with mime and gestures. This will help pupils not to feel disorientated and will aid comprehension.

E AC TIV ITY TIM OME WELC Unit AND READ. 1 TRACE THE WORDS I’M SAM.

ME? WHAT’S YOUR NA

E! MY NAME’S KAT

1 Trace the words and read. Invite pupils to trace the words in the speech bubbles on page 76 and read them. Then pupils can role play the dialogues with their classmates, asking and answering each other’s names.

I’M MAX! ME? WHAT’S YOUR NA

2 Complete. Pupils work alone. They choose the correct greeting from those introduced and complete the speech bubbles. You can check pupils answers as a class, by reading out the greetings.

! MY NAME’S BEN

2

ACT IVITY TIME COMPLETE.

HELLO

76

WOR KBOOK

_____ KATE!

___-___ KATE!

Welco Unit

BYE-BYE

BYE-BYE

HELLO _____ MAX!

___-___ MAX!

WOR KBOOK

26

77

me


The Story Garden • Letter to parents

welcome U n it

Can we work together? English is no longer the language of the future, but the language of the present. Nowadays, it is unthinkable for a pupil to fulfil their dreams and ambitions without knowledge of the language which enables them to communicate with the whole world. Furthermore, the ideal time to learn a second language is up to the age of eight and it is a positive addition to their learning. Teaching English to your children is a great pleasure and we are excited at the thought that they will be able to learn so quickly. That said, we should stress that although they learn very quickly, they also forget equally quickly. For this reason collaboration is invaluable! During the first few days of school, we begin a great adventure exploring fairytales and stories in English, which will nurture your children just like the flowers in our friendly gardener, my teaching assistant, Mr Green’s garden. We have entered his amazing garden, The Story Garden, and we have learnt to say hello and say who we are, by singing a song.

Hello, hello Hello, hello My name is Mr Green This is my garden Come and sing with me!

Hello, hello My name is Mr Green This is my garden Come and sing with me!

What’s your name? Clap and smile at me! What’s your name? Clap and smile at me!

What’s your name? Clap and smile at me! What’s your name? Clap and smile at me!

The Story Garden, your children’s course book, has a digital version with clear instructions on how to download the audio tracks. It contains all the materials that we will use in class, so please take the time to play with your children through the medium of English. We would ask only that you don’t rush ahead to contents that we haven’t covered in class yet. Please feel free to look at the whole book, but only use the materials already completed in class with your children. This is to avoid confusing them or curbing their enthusiasm for learning at school. Have fun and see you soon! .............................................................................................................................................................................................. and Mr Green

The Story Garden | © ELI | Photocopiable


U n it

1

HELLO, LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD!

Pupils immediately encounter a familiar character, possibly the first protagonist of a traditional fairytale that they have ever met through the stories their parents and grandparents have told them. This choice further promotes the conviction that you learn a foreign language just as you do a first language, in a natural way, by listening, repeating, playing and getting a feel for it. The cartoon presented throughout this unit is Little Red Riding Hood, who is no longer eaten by the wolf but comes back to tell children of her own age how she recognises danger, and that when she meets the wolf, the only sensible thing to do to run away! She is very bright and will teach the class lots of things, like how to recognise and name numbers up to 10, learn the words for colours and play games with colours and numbers together. Little Red Riding Hood will teach the class how to say no, and to express their true feelings about this new means of communication: the English language. You can treat Unit 1 like an entry test to observe and evaluate the previous knowledge of pupils who may have already played games in English in infant school.

Learning objectives Knowledge

Vocabulary

Skills

Communicative structures

Numbers 1 to 10 Colours Simple classroom instructions

Identifying numbers and colours Listening to and understanding instructions given through mime and in games Understanding and following instructions and procedures Recognising and reproducing L2 sounds and rhythms Asking and responding to simple questions Developing manual dexterity

one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten black, white, yellow, green, orange, pink, purple, brown, red, blue

Look at… Who is it? It’s… Yes! No! Hello! Goodbye! Great!

Intermediate goals in the development of competences Basic competences (English language skills axis)

Understanding and responding to an informal greeting Knowing how to say your name Understanding and following simple instructions in class Identifying colours Counting to ten Listening to and understating an illustrated story read out loud by the teacher or on multimedia Singing and miming a song or a chant

28

Key competences

Communicating: understanding verbal and non-verbal messages Collaborating and participating: maintaining positive relations with classmates; respecting established rules in individual and group work; recognising the elements and characteristics of other cultures Problem-solving: using logic to work out what you need to do Learning to learn: reusing what you've learnt in new contexts Planning: creatively transferring language learnt into actions


U n it

1

Life skills Self-awareness Developing critical thinking Managing feelings: winning, losing, competing

Approaching new experiences positively Interpersonal skills Creative thinking

Activities Singing and miming a song Distinguishing language elements when listening Using the language learnt through games

Listening to and understanding a short story Acting out a story

CLIL Social skills: following spoken instructions

Make & Play The Wolf Mask: following procedures to make fun things

Living English Using the English language in real, authentic and emotionally-inclusive tasks

Subject links Music: recognising different voices and matching them with different characters; recognising and reproducing musical rhythm; reproducing intonation History: understanding whether actions and situations happen in succession or simultaneously Art and images: reusing things creatively; depicting an animal graphically Maths: matching alphanumeric symbols and

quantities; completing a sequence; making hypotheses and predictions Physical education: remembering and reproducing a sequence of movements; using the body and movements to act out real and imaginary communicative situations; moving to a rhythm; understanding gestures

Support Materials

The Story Garden 1 pp. 4-15 Activity time pp. 78-85 Easy English pp. 106-109 Audio CD Flashcards Photocopiable worksheets n. 2-4 Classroom language poster

Equipment

Usual daily classroom kit For Make and play The Big Bad Wolf Says Game: paper plates, tissue paper, cardboard, elastic

29


HELLO, LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD! We learn to • • • •

Interpret an image Follow oral instructions Name numbers and colours Sing a song

U n it

1

OD! RED RIDING HO HEL LO, LITTLE

1

1

Vocabulary • • • •

flower one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten black, white, yellow, green, orange, pink, purple, brown, red, blue Bye-bye!

Structures

LISTEN AND SAY THE NUMBER.

3 5 4

Activity Time pages

• Look! • Point to...

2 3

2

BLACK

4

YELLOW

6

ORANGE

PURPLE

78-79

Un it 4

9

RED

LISTEN AND FIND . LISTEN AND SING .

8

WHITE

GREEN

PINK

BROWN

1O

BLUE

5

6-7

5

Equipment and resources • • • • •

Student’s Book Audio CD Flashcards of numbers and colours IWB if available Photocopiable worksheet n. 2

Pages 4 and 5 Greet the class with the rhyme at the beginning of the lesson: Hello, hello, how are you, I’m so happy to see you! Continue, saying: Hello, boys and girls! Point to the boys when you say boys and to the girls when you say girls.

Life skills: Self-awareness

Name the girls, too, when you greet them. Inclusive language is extremely important in English-speaking countries, as it is here. Tell the class that today, Mr Green is taking them into the world of Little Red Riding Hood, where they're going to meet... the Big Bad Wolf!

30

Don´t worry, Little Red Riding Hood is going to teach them how to recognise him and stay away from him! Using the IWB or holding the book up so everyone can see, show the image on page 4 of Little Red Riding Hood and the wolf. Ask the class to open their books at page 4, saying: Open your book at page 4. Go around the class to help pupils to find the correct page. Then ask them to look at the scene and tell you what is happening. Ask who the little girl is, where she is and what she is doing. Say: Look: a girl! Who is she? She’s Little Red Riding Hood.

1 Listen and say the number.

4

Use the flashcards to present all the number and colour vocabulary. Often pupils will already know numbers and colours in English. However, you can revise and practise them by putting the colour flashcards around the class and saying: Point to yellow! Point to red!... Now turn to the activity in the book. Ask pupils to: Listen and say the number. The pupils listen to the colour on the first audio track and say the corresponding number. Do the first one to check the pupils know what to do. 4 Audio script black – white – yellow – green – orange – pink – purple – brown – red – blue

1


U n it Key competences: Communicating Pupils can understand oral messages.

Use the IWB if available to show the scene in the Flip Book. The pupils will find the presentation in the form of an animated cartoon engaging.

2 Listen and find.

5

Mime the actions for listen and find and say: Listen and find. Play the audio track. Pupils should point to the flowers of the colour they hear in the Little Red Riding Hood scene on page 4. Check the pupils understand the activity and praise them. Audio script yellow orange pink green

5

Tell the class: Look at me and say. Hold up one flashcard at a time and ask: What number is it? What colour is it? Elicit replies from pupils.

Language tips

Colours and numbers

1

6-7

1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – 5 (point to the numbers) Hello, hello, hello! (say hello) 6 – 7 – 8 – 9 – 10 Hello, hello again! (twice) Black and white (point to the flashcards around the class) Yellow and green Orange and pink Purple and brown Red and blue Lots of flowers Red and blue Flowers for you! 1–2–3–4–5 Bye-bye, bye-bye, bye-bye! (turn to wave goodbye) 6 – 7 – 8 – 9 – 10 Bye-bye, bye-bye again! (twice) Watch out, Little Red Riding Hood The big bad wolf is in the wood! (put your hands over your mouth as if you were afraid) As reinforcement, hand out photocopiable worksheet n. 2, so that pupils can trace the words and colour the flowers in the correct colours.

Pupils often have difficulty pronouncing the sound r in English as it is very pronounced in many languages, whereas it is often a barely perceptible vibration in English. Attention should be paid to the pronunciation of: morning /ˈmɔːnɪŋ/ colour /ˈkʌlə/ number /ˈnʌmbə/

3 Listen and sing.

6-7

Before listening to the song, put the flashcards around the classroom and say: Now, listen and look at me! Play the song and accompany it with mime and gestures. When the colours are named, point to the corresponding flashcard in the class. After listening once, invite pupils to sing along with the audio track, then you can use the karaoke track with pupils singing along to the musical base.

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HELLO, LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD! We learn to

• Colour things according to the numbers • Trace a word in English • Read by intuition

HELLO, LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD!

4

1 2 3 4 5 6

Vocabulary

• one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten • black, white, yellow, green, orange, pink, purple, brown, red, blue

Structures

• Point to... • How many?

Equipment and resources • Student’s Book • IWB if available • Photocopiable worksheet n. 3

COLOUR, TRACE AND READ.

ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE SIX SEVEN

8 9 1O 6

EIGHT NINE TEN

Activity Time pages 80, 81-82 Easy English pages 106-107

Page 6 Before doing the activities in the book, greet pupils with the rhyme you have already used in previous lessons, and which could become the theme song for opening each lesson. Hello, hello, how are you, I’m so happy to see you! Pupils can recite the rhyme in pairs to their friends.

Key competences: Collaborating and participating Pupils maintain positive relationships with classmates.

4 Colour, trace and read. Show pupils page 6 on the IWB, or hold up the book for everyone to see, and say: Open your book at page 6. Go around the class, helping pupils to open their books at the correct page if necessary. Before starting the activity, quickly revise the numbers and colours, asking questions like: What colour is number 2? What colour is number 8? Elicit pupils’ replies.

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Repeat this procedure for all the colours. When you think pupils are ready, you can progress by introducing the questions: How many blue flowers are there? How many red flowers are there? Elicit replies from pupils showing the line of flowers and counting with them either on the IWB or in the book. Now invite the whole class to do the activity, only colouring in the number of flowers indicated, then tracing the words and reading them intuitively. Hand out photocopiable worksheets n. 3 as reinforcement for fast finishers.

Teaching tips

To help pupils learn the colours, you can recite and mime this simple rhyme: One, two (counting on your fingers) hello to you (wave hello) three, four (counting on your fingers) close the door (mime closing the door) five, six, seven, eight (counting on your fingers) hurray, hurray (jump up with your arms in the air) nine, ten (counting on your fingers) hurray again! (jump up again)