Kid 01 2021-2022

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Kid

Your English Monthly

B1/B2

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®

Year XLII - N. 1 - September / October 2021 - Imprimé à Taxe Réduite

Kid Travel Blog

Canada Report Hidden secrets of the world’s most famous monuments

Around Britain

Interview with…

Emoticon ed Unusual emoji: contests l’invasione delle faccine!

Anya Taylor-Joy

www.elilanguagemagazines.com


ario Somm Contents Hi boys and girls J Welcome to the first issue of Kid for this year. After the long, lazy days of summer are you ready to start practising your English again? In order to help you with your English learning, we have a fun-packed issue with lots of interesting and stimulating articles and activities. If you like travelling then you’ll have to read our articles Around Britain and Kid Travel Blog for some suggestions for your next trip. You can also find out some interesting facts about famous monuments around the world in our Report so you’ll be ready for your next trip abroad. If you like the cinema or reading books then we also have some interesting articles for you to read about famous authors, a famous actress and even the latest films on the big screen. Happy reading! Angela info@elimagazines.com

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Quadro Comune Europeo (B1 – B2) Intermedio LivelloEuropean Common Framework Intermediate (B1 – B2)

Have you ever wondered…? Kid Lit | Two great authors Report | Hidden secrets of the world’s most famous monuments Around Britain | Unusual contests Interview with… | Anya Taylor-Joy Kid Travel Blog | Canada Films on release Fun and games!

In this issue of Kid you’ll come across: - superlatives - past simple - passive forms - present perfect - infinitives and gerunds - prepositions - nouns - adjectives

Audio A subscription to the magazine allows you to download for free, in MP3 format, the audio of all the magazines in the resources section of our website www. elilanguagemagazines.com

Teacher’s guide For teachers, the subscription to the magazine allows you to download for free the audio material in MP3 format, as well as the teacher’s guide for all* the magazines available in PDF format.

Train your Brain

Who am I?

You always take me with you but you leave me everywhere. I am… Answer: ........................................

Sisters

There are four sisters. All of them are busy doing something. Anna is reading a book, Chiara is playing chess and Marta is making a cake. What is the fourth sister, Beatrice, doing? Answer: ........................................ ......................................................

Hotel doors

You have to paint numbers on 100 room doors in a newly built hotel. How many times will you write number 7? Answer: .............................................................................................. The answer is on page 15.

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NO PART OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE REPRODUCED IN ANY FORM OR BY ANY MEANS OR FOR ANY PURPOSES WITHOUT PRIOR PERMISSION. THE PUBLISHER IS PREPARED TO MAKE PAYMENT FOR ANY COPYRIGHT OF PHOTOGRAPHS WHERE THE SOURCE HAS BEEN IMPOSSIBLE TO TRACE. ALTHOUGH WE CHECK THE CONTENT AND SUITABILITY OF THE WEB SITES FEATURED OR REFERRED TO IN OUR MAGAZINES AT THE TIME OF GOING TO PRESS, WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY CHANGES TO WHICH MAY HAVE OCCURRED SINCE, AS THESE WEB SITES ARE IN NO WAY ASSOCIATED WITH ELI.

ELI srl, C.P. 6, 62019 Recanati, Tel. (071) 750701, Fax (071) 977851 Direttore responsabile: Michele Casali. Realizzazione testi: Angela Tomkimson. Autorizzazione Trib. di Macerata N. 153/83 del 31 maggio 1983. Realizzazione: Tecnostampa, Loreto © ELI Italy 2021

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Have you ever wondered…?

past simple/prepositions/superlatives

The Big Apple is not the only nickname New York has. There are many more e.g The City So Nice They Named it Twice, The City That Never Sleeps, The Empire City, The Five Boroughs, The Melting Pot, The Center of the Universe.

Why is New York called the “Big Apple”?

The first person to use the term “Big Apple” was the sports reporter J.J. Fitzgerald, at the beginning of the 1920s. It was the name used to mean the New York racecourse. “Big Apple” was used to refer to a big win at the horse races. The expression was used again about 10 years later by musicians who played in jazz clubs in Harlem and Manhattan. The payment for a concert was almost always a red apple and that’s why everyone began to nickname New York the “Big Apple”.

When was Google born?

The most used search engine in the world and our biggest source of information, celebrates its birthday on 27th September. Its two inventors, Sergey Brin and Larry Page, met each other in 1995 at the University of Stanford in California. The name Google derives from a play on words. ‘Googol’ is a term used in mathematics to indicate a 1 followed by 100 zeros and the two of them chose it to communicate the objective of their site, that is to catalogue an infinite quantity of information on the internet. Brin and Page founded their business on 7th September 1998. On 27th September they described the search engine in a publication for the first time and this became the date of birth of the most visited site in the world.

SOLVE THE ANAGRAM In 2006 the word “Google” appeared in the dictionary. The verb “to google” has now become a synonym of…

G O L

I

K O N

....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... .......

Do you know anyone who looks exactly like you?

Is it true we all have 7 lookalikes*?

Exactly! Everybody has 7 doubles, 7 people that look exactly like us and that could live nearby* or at the other side of the world. Considering that on Earth we’re 7.5 billion people, how many possibilities do we have of meeting our ‘carbon copy*? Maybe more than we think! 55% of the world’s population has brown eyes, 1 out of 10 people have a round face and 24% has a round R O F nose. For people who have these characteristics, it seems like a less ....... ....... ....... difficult task.

M I G S E H O T N

N O

....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... .......

....... .......

H E T

B E W

....... ....... .......

....... ....... .......

The answer is on page 15

Glossary carbon copy: an exact copy of something lookalikes: people who look similar to you nearby: near to you

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Kid Lit

imperatives/passives/nouns

Two great writers Do you like reading? Do you like discovering facts about authors past and present? Then this is the page for you. Read on to find out more about two very famous writers who are both celebrated in the months of September and October. Jane Austen

Jane Austen is a very important author from the past. She was born on 16th December 1775 and died on 18th July 1817. She’s best known for her 6 most important novels: Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814),

Emma (1816), Northanger Abbey and Persuasion (1818). Jane Austen is also well known on the big screen*. Many of her books have been made into films and TV series such as the latest one starring Anya Taylor-Joy as Emma (2020). Have you seen any of these films? If not, then check them out.

As well as being a writer, Roald was also a fighter pilot during the Second World War and a diplomat and intelligence officer. Roald Dahl Day is celebrated every year on 13th September.

Roald Dahl

Another more recent but still very important writer is Roald Dahl. He was born 13th September 1916 and died on 23rd November 1990. He was born in Wales but both his parents

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were from Norway. He started writing from a young age and his books are very creative and written with imagination. His book have sold more than 250 million copies all over the world and been translated into many different languages. During his life he wrote many books for both children and adults as well as film scripts. His most important works include James and the Giant Peach, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Fantastic Mr Fox, Matilda, The Witches, The BFG, George’s Marvellous Medicine and the film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.

Glossary

big screen: cinema champ: champion dressed up: wear a costume

Don’t be surprised if you happen to be in the city of Bath during the 2nd week of September and see lots of people dressed up* as Jane Austen characters. This is because it’s the Jane Austen Festival that takes place 10th - 19th September. There are lots of different events and talks as well as the Grand Regency Costumed Promenade where visitors and local people wear costumes from the Jane Austen period and walk up and down the streets of the city. Jane Austen’s books were published anonymously, that’s to say she didn’t put her own name on her novels, as female writers weren’t well considered at the time. It was only after her death in 1817 that her name first appeared on her books.

Over to you

Do you agree with these Roald Dahl quotes. Why? Why not? What do you think each quote means? - Great things often start off small (James and the Giant Peach) - Try to be optimistic even when things look hopeless (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory) - Don’t forget to believe in yourself (Matilda) - Inner beauty is more important than outer beauty (The Twits) - Always try to give 100% (Matilda) - Take constructive criticism like a champ* (Fantastic Mr Fox) - A little magic can take you a long way (James and the Giant Peach) - Somewhere inside all of us is the power to change the world (Matilda) - It doesn’t matter who you are or what you look like, so long as somebody loves you (The Witches) - Having power is not nearly as important as what you choose to do with it’ (Roald Dahl)


Report

Hidden secrets of the world’s most famous monuments The Eiffel Tower (Paris, France)

Symbol of the city of Paris, and without a doubt the most well-known tower in the world and one of the most visited monuments. It was inaugurated on 31st March 1889 and it was officially opened on 6th May for the Universal Exposition. With its 312 metres height (today 324 with the TV antenna), it remained the tallest building in the world until 1930, when it was overtaken* by the Chrysler Building in Manhattan (and in turn was overtaken in 1931 by the Empire State Building).

The Eiffel Tower, the Statue of Liberty, Brooklyn Bridge… who doesn’t know these world famous monuments? Maybe what you don’t know is that the history behind each of these monuments is rich with curious and fascinating facts. Let’s go on a journey to discover them together!

The Eiffel Tower was designed and built by Gustave Eiffel, a French engineer specialised in the construction of metal bridges. Some years before he had worked on building the internal structure for the Statue of Liberty. At the beginning Parisians didn’t like the iron tower and for this reason, in 1909, it risked being demolished*. Luckily this didn’t happen.

The Eiffel Tower is made up of* 18,038 pieces of iron and 2.5 million bolts*. To reach the top, you can climb the 1,665 steps or use the two transparent lifts. On the highest level there’s a ‘secret’ apartment, that was used to host important visitors. Recently it has been opened to the public and visitors are welcomed by a wax statue of Eiffel and the inventor Thomas Edison.

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Report

The Statue of Liberty (New York, United States)

More than 46 metres tall (93, if we consider the pedestal) this majestic statue was the first American monument that travellers could see from the sea - even 40km away! It was built in Paris by the sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, and was a present from the French to America to celebrate the 100 years of the Declaration of Independence.

The Brooklyn Bridge (New York, United States)

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superlatives/past simple/gerunds

As we know, Gustave Eiffel contributed to this great work by designing a flexible steel skeleton to allow the statue to sway* in the wind, without getting damaged. In addition to not breaking, the statue can also withstand lightning. Incredible, but true, every year it gets struck around 600 times!

In 1885, all the parts, contained in 214 boxes, crossed the Atlantic Ocean and were transported by ship to New York. The original colour of the Statue of Liberty was a golden red. The green colour that it has today is due to the oxidation of the copper, caused by exposure to the weather.

Its complete name is Liberty Enlightening the World, but Americans call it simply “Lady Liberty”. On its head, which is 5.26 metres in length and 3.05 metres wide, there’s a crown with 7 points that represent 7 continents to underline that liberty is a universal concept. Also the torch represents the eternal flame of freedom.

Do you know that…

the Statue of Liberty and the Eiffel Tower are probably the most “copied” monuments in the world? There are hundreds of copies of different sizes and materials all over the world.

Let’s stay in New York to get to know better one of the most famous bridges in the world and another famous landmark of New York. The first suspension bridge in history was inaugurated in 1883. The revolutionary project was designed by the German engineer John Augustus Roebling. It was the grandest engineering work of its era.

The big freeze during the winter of 1866-67 caused the East River to freeze over for the umpteenth* time, blocking transit between Manhattan and Brooklyn. And so to try to resolve the problem, Roebling decided to build a bridge between the two areas of the city, supported by massive steel cables.

OVER TO YOU

To show New Yorkers that it was stable and safe, Brooklyn Bridge was “put to the test” with a parade of 21 elephants (each of them weighing around 7 tons), 10 dromedaries and 7 camels, all from the famous Barnum circus. On 17th May 1884 they crossed the whole 1,800 metres of the bridge (which in that moment was also the longest suspension bridge in the world).

Eiffel Tower, Statue of Liberty or Brooklyn Bridge? Choose your favourite monument and write down all the information that you remember - without reading the text again!

......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... .........................................................................................................................

Glossary bolts: a long metal object used to fasten things together demolished: destroyed made up of: consists of overtaken: went past sway: move from side to side umpteenth: has happened many times before

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