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Volume 1. Issue No. 7

OCTOBER 2020

AKICITA PROGRAM

BRINGS DIVERSITY TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE

POWER of MENTORS

Bev Warne comes full circle to inspire a new generation of nurses.


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OCT. 2020 Volume 1. Issue No. 7

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BUILDNG BRIDGES Akicita program works to break down barriers and help students interested in the Criminal Justice field.

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THE POWER OF MENTORS

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CULTURAL CENTER COMES TO LIFE

Beb Warne comes full circle to inspire a new generation of nurses.

Learn skills from master artists through Living Treasures program.

HONOR LIFE

A young Lakota woman gazes down Art Alley in downtown Rapid City. This recent addition by artists Sadat and Collins Jordan is a tribute to honoring life.

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ELEVATE RAPID CITY SEPTEMBER 2020 ECO N O M IC IN D IC ATO RS POPULATION 142,524

UNEMPLOYMENT RATE 6.8%

AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES $ 844

EMPLOYMENT NONFARM 66,300

LEISURE AND HOSPITALITY 10,200

RAPID CITY GROSS SALES $ 687,911,522

AIRPORT PASSENGERS 48,502

EDUCATION HEALTH SERVICES 11,600

PRIMARY SECTOR 13,600

ECONOMY HOTEL OCCUPANCY 71.6%

BUILDING PERMITS 889

REAL ESTATE ACTIVE LISTINGS 349

MEDIAN LISTING PRICE $ 325,050 Increase over last period Decrease over last period

Advancing the frontier of innovation sdsmt.edu

elevaterapidcity.com

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CEO NOTE Elevate is a monthly publication produced by Elevate Rapid City. It is the premier business magazine for the Black Hills region telling the stories that make our area unique and vibrant.

PO Box 747 Rapid City, SD 57709 605.343.1744 elevaterapidcity.com PRESIDENT & CEO Tom Johnson DIRECTOR OF INNOVATION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP Mitch Nachtigall DIRECTOR OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AND INVESTOR RELATIONS Brandis Knudsen

Tom Johnson // Elevate Rapid City CEO

Every hero needs a mentor. Luke Skywalker had one. So did his mentor. And his mentor’s mentor. In the stories of the Lakota, mentors also abound, and they show up right when they are needed. There’s the creation of Devil’s Tower, for instance, where the Great Spirit helps to save six young girls from the clutches of a bear. Think of your own life — the successes you’ve had, the obstacles you’ve overcome. Was there a mentor there for you? Did someone help you along the way? If you’re like me (a human being), the answer is probably yes. Everything I’ve managed to accomplish usually included the help or guidance from someone. And when I’m doing my best work, I’m still reaching out for the guidance of mentors, even from afar. The research also backs this up. The chances of success, in any endeavor, increases with a mentor, coach, or even just a friend to lean on. That’s because we are social creatures who rely on the knowledge and help of others. It’s the way it’s always been. And, until artificial intelligence replaces every one of us, it’s the way it’s going to be. In this issue of Elevate, you’ll be reading a lot about mentors, in all walks of life, from community service to business to health care. There’s the story of humility from new Police Chief Don Hedrick. The story of giving back from Dawn Sherman, CEO of Native American Natural Foods. And finally, our cover story, on the truly amazing and beautiful soul of Bev (Stabber) Warne. It is perhaps one of the most amazing stories we’ve ever featured in these pages. If you want to restore your faith in people (and come away a changed person) in these trying times, spend just one minute with Bev. One last note. Native American Day is October 12th of this month. I would be remiss (and a fool) if I didn’t acknowledge the lasting and continued cultural and economic impacts of Native Americans on our community here in the Black Hills and beyond. We will continue to rise and fall together, as one, mentoring one another. Stay safe and god-speed

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EVENTS & TRAINING MANAGER Rachel Day PUBLIC POLICY DIRECTOR Anna Hays ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Matt Brunner WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT & TALENT ATTRACTION MANAGER Samantha McGrath COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR Shiloh Francis CREATIVE SERVICES Andy Greenman FINANCE DIRECTOR Dana Borowski FINANCE MANAGER Debbie Leber HR COORDINATOR/ OFFICE MANAGER Liz Highland EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Becky Knox ADMIN & DATA SERVICES COORDINATOR Loni Reichert PUBLISHED BY THE RAPID CITY JOURNAL Matt Tranquill, Publisher PRINTED BY SIMPSON PRINTING Dan Simpson, Printer ADVERTISE mtranquill@gmail.com // 605-394-8301

ON THE COVER Bev Warne is helping increase the number of Native American Nurses in the Black Hills. Photo by Shiloh Francis


COMMENTS REDISCOVER DOWNTOWN You are truly inspiring my friend! You will no doubt lead Downtown to great things!

Great article. Way to level up and be an outstanding pillar for the community. Melissa Jenson-Kogel

Sara Rankin

DOD SKILLBRIDGE Outstanding Elevate Rapid City! Thank you for supporting our #TransitioningMilitary! I'd love to learn more about the opportunities you have! David Schantz

GOV. CONTRACTING So excited to be a part of this awesome collaboration. These webinars will be crucial to growing our support community, fostering growth and helping navigate expansions. Get ready for flight South Dakota! Hannah Sage

SBA VISITS RAPID CITY Great trip out to Rapid City this last week to promote SD small business opportunities and resources. @Elevate_ RC is crushing it in the entrepreneurial and small business space! Jaime Wood

CONNECT WITH US! Follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/ElevateRapidCity), Instagram (@elevaterapidcity), LinkedIn (/company/elevate-rapid-city) Twitter (@Elevate_RC), and YouTube (https://bit.ly/2ABRByL). Share your thoughts and help us Elevate Rapid City together!

Just want to send a rant? Email: magazine@elevaterapidcity.com

CALENDAR SEPTEMBER 29

Virtual Training: Blind Trust is Not an Approach

We want to trust everyone, right? Especially our employees. That's why it's so hard when you get that letter from the Department of Labor noting an investigation of employment practices brought on by one of your "best" employees. Here's the deal, we've mixed up the concepts of trust, authority, accountability and control over the years as leaders. So, when I say stop trusting your people I mean to say, start holding them accountable, then you can trust them. Register at elevaterapidcity.com.

OCTOBER 1

Government Affairs Connection ft. SOS Steve Barnett

Elevate Rapid City is excited to welcome Secretary of State, Steve Barnett for October’s Government Affairs Connection. The General Election will be here before we know it. As you make your plans to vote absentee or head to the polls, consider tuning in to have your questions answered and get the need-toknow updates. Elevate invites you to join SOS Barnett on October 1 at 8:00 a.m. for an engaging webinar. Register at elevaterapidcity.com.

OCTOBER 1-NOVEMBER 5

Is Your Business Ready to Sell to the Government?

Businesses are invited to attend free, weekly webinars to learn about what is needed to sell to government agencies. These workshops will provide insight and the opportunity to ask questions from the experts. Learn more at elevaterapidcity.com/govcontracts.

OCTOBER 3

10th Annual Cruiser Car Show

Shop the street fair and eat from one of our delicious downtown restaurants and food vendors. Learn more at mainstreetsquare.org.

OCTOBER 4-10

Living Treasures: Roger Broer

Hill City artist Roger Broer will demonstrate burnishing techniques with printmaking during his week-long workshop at The Native American Educational and Cultural Center®. The workshops begin at 2:30 and more info is listed at crazyhorsememorial.org.

OCTOBER 8-10

West River History Conference

The 28th Annual West River History Conference is October 8-10, 2020 in Deadwood. This year’s theme is 'The Double Eagle Year: Faces, Places of the West.' For presenter information and program details visit westriverhistoryconference.org.

OCTOBER 10

10th Annual Bierbörse Festival

Joins us for the 10th annual Bierbörse, a favorite of local craft-beer enthusiasts. View a list of breweries attending at mainstreetsquare.org.

NATIVE AMERICAN DAY - OCTOBER 12 -

South Dakota was the first state to declare Native American Day in 1990. The holiday is celebrated annually on the second Monday in October. elevaterapidcity.com

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WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Building Bridges Through Mentorship

Police Chief Don Hedrick

Story by Shiloh Francis

A

s a senior officer, Don Hedrick had the pins to prove his years of experience in the Rapid City Police Department. One night he answered a call for service with a new, rookie partner. The two walked into the home and the people instantly went to the other officer. A rookie deescalating the situation faster than a senior officer, how could that be? “He had an immediate level of trust,” the now police chief reflects as he tells the story. That rookie officer was Native American, as were the people at the call. This was one of many moments throughout Hedrick’s career he would come back to throughout the years. He assumed the role as police chief in August, and is committed to continue the efforts of building a department that better reflects the community it serves. “Historical trauma is a real issue for our community,” he acknowledges. “Some Native Americans might be hesitant to join our department due to law enforcement being a symbolic representation of generational mistrust. Building bridges is something we are continuously working on.” elevaterapidcity.com

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WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Cameron Moser-Asbjeld

One way they’ve been working to address the shortage of Native American officers has been through the Akicita program. The program began in 2018 with more than a dozen participants each year. Western Dakota Tech students with an interest in pursuing a career in law enforcement are paired with a mentor from the Rapid City Police Department or Pennington County Sheriff's Office. It introduces students to various fields throughout the justice system and allows them to network with professionals in the field. At the same time, the RCPD hopes that it helps to break down the walls keeping someone from applying to the force by getting to see behind the scenes and meet the faces in uniform. Cameron Moser-Asbjeld is a quiet, humble, hard-worker. He worked two jobs from the time he was 18. He currently serves in the National Guard in addition to his career in the department. At the same time he is also working toward his Bachelor’s degree at Black Hills State. He is dedicated to his work. But more than that, he has a desire to serve his community. “I grew up in Rapid City. I know how rough it can be for kids here. I wanted to be a person who could be a part of the solution.” For him, the mentorship experience was a foot in the door.

"I grew up there. I know the stigma that comes with it and how hard it is to be surrounded by people making poor decisions.” Cameron Moser-Asbjeld

Unlike many students, he went into the criminal justice program already knowing he wanted to be a police officer. Through Akicita he was not only able to meet other police officers, but also gain experience with some of the specialty departments, an opportunity not available to most. In the nearly two years since joining the department, Moser-Asbjeld has been a part of some headline-worthy calls. Two of which included active shooters. And while those get the adrenaline pumping, that’s not what the job is about for him. “It’s the everyday calls that matter,” he explains. Like the opportunity help a victim of domestic violence, with the hope their interference was able to save a life. Or going back to his childhood neighborhood where he can engage with kids and encourage them along the right path. This is why he wanted to serve that specific neighborhood. “I grew up there. I know the stigma that comes with it and how hard it is to be surrounded by people making poor decisions.” Being a familiar face gives him the advantage of an “immediate level of trust” that Hedrick recalls. elevaterapidcity.com

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WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

RAPID CITY POLICE DEPARTMENT MISSION

"I simply want them to see me and know they can choose a different path in life…but at the end of the day it is their path.” Cameron Moser-Asbjeld

Question: What is mediation? Answer: Mediation is one of the most popular methods to settle disputes. It is different than arbitration which actually renders a decision. Why MEDIATION WORKS? 1. The mediator acts as a guide and the parties participate in their own settlement alternatives. 2. Any communication in mediation cannot be used as evidence in any proceeding and a court appointed mediator may not be a witness. Her notes are not subject to discovery. SDCL§ 25-4-60. 3. A mediator has no stake in the outcome and may not make a recommendation to the court concerning the matter. SDCL § 25-4-62. What can be mediated? Well, Anything!!!!.

While he has not signed up to be a mentor through Akicita, Moser-Asbjeld is one in his own right, though his humility would keep him from admitting it. There are several kids from his former neighborhood he “keeps an eye on,” hoping to keep them out of trouble. “I simply want them to see me and know they can choose a different path in life…but at the end of the day it is their path.” He has helped connect one with resources, and even encouraged him to return to school. In a time where tensions between the public and police departments are high throughout the country, it can be even more difficult to recruit officers. But Hedrick also credits the work of the department for the positive relationships in Rapid City. “Trust is fragile,” Hedrick admits. Because of that fragility, he knows they cannot take anything for granted. They work hard to not only train officers, but to develop a positive culture. “We want people who do the right things, for the right reasons.” Which is why officers are given the flexibility to solve a problem rather than simply enforce a law. For example, discovering a mother has no car seats, an officer was able to go to the store and buy car seats rather than ticketing. Or showing up to a petty theft call only to find a parent was stealing formula to feed their baby. The officer was able to connect them with community resources. These are only two examples of how the Rapid City Police Department works to live out its mission. They are more than words on a wall. It is at the very core of the work they do: Community First. Service Above Self. Integrity-Driven. One Interaction At A Time. Chief Hedrick will admit there is still work to be done. As a former mentor of the Akicita program he knows that “learning goes both ways.” Through intentional work to build bridges, his hope is to continue to bring diversity to the criminal justice field throughout the region. It’s not about the heroic calls that make headlines, it’s about making a positive difference with every encounter.

Lorie D. Melone 1107 Mt. Rushmore Road, Suite #3A Rapid City, SD 57701 Phone: 605-791-4950 Lorie D. Melone • Family Law Attorney & Certified Mediator

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MAIN STREET

Prairie Edge:

Preserving Traditions

Story by Main Street Square l Photos by Andy Greenman

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or the past 36 years General Manager, Dan Tribby has been working with the Hillenbrand family, regional artists, and staff at Prairie Edge to preserve multiple traditions. Prairie Edge has been a conduit for Native American culture, regional artists, and Rapid City to showcase the Northern Plains, its people and everything they have to offer. Prairie Edge was founded by both Dale Lamphere and Danny Chapman, both of Sturgis. An aged chicken coop was the beginning of Prairie Edge and we still think often of those days of such humble beginnings. Ray Hilenbrand got involved about 1980 and with his leadership and financing, Prairie Edge began the journey that it is still on today. Since expanding their current location on the corner of 6th and Main Street in

1993, Prairie Edge has been a place where regional artists can showcase their culture and artwork while acting as a conduit for the Native American culture and Rapid City.

"Ray always wanted us to do what is right and that included ensuring these artists could get a fair price for their work.” - Dan Tribby, General Manager, Prairie Edge

“Fairness is the key to everything,” stated Tribby. “Ray always wanted us to do what is right and that included ensuring these artists could get a fair price for their work.”

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POW

WOW What was the biggest “break” for Prairie Edge? Dances With Wolves was littered with footage from Prairie Edge and when that movie came out everyone wanted a part of the culture which helped regional artists. What is the biggest accomplishment for the business? We are a conduit for the reservations, artists, Rapid City and the state. This is showcased during cultural events like Pow Wow and LNI. We get to host people from all walks of life to come here and break bread. What is the biggest misconception about Prairie Edge? That Prairie Edge makes a lot of money. Ray’s vision was to reinvest any money made back into the business; whether it was reinvested in our employees, the artists, or the business. He was, and we are very proud of that! Mimi Hillenbrand, Ray's daughter, has been a huge part of Prairie Edge for about 10 years. She is the owner now for about 6 years and shares the same love for Native culture. Mimi is also very busy with running the Triple Seven Bison Ranch in Hermosa.

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While showcasing the culture of the region, Prairie Edge, the Hillenbrand Family, Tribby and staff have created a culture of their own inside of the store that has brought the business acclaim from around the world. “Over half of the staff has been here 10 years and we have a lot of staff that has been here for 20 years including one of the original founders Danny Chapman and his wife Lynelle who have been here every step of the way.” When asked what he attributes to the ability to keep staff for such a long time he explained, “It’s about balance like a three legged stool, each leg needs to be strong to hold up and when

"Preserving traditions is a must in the Native American culture and Ray started that here at Prairie Edge and the staff has been able to carry that on.” - Dan Tribby

all three aspects, employees, customers and artists are all treated fairly we will be successful. Because we have employees that have been here so long, they can teach the new employees the traditions that have made us successful,” added Tribby. “Preserving traditions is a must in the Native American culture and Ray started that here at Prairie Edge and the staff has been able to carry that on.” That mindset and culture helped Prairie Edge be selected as the 2020 Retailer of the year by the South Dakota Retailers Association.


ECONOMY

Estimates of the Impact of Native American Spending in Rapid City ESTIMATES OF THE NATIVE AMERICAN IMPACT IN RAPID CITY

52 MILLION

$

IN PAYROLL

1,391 JOBS

8 MILLION

$

IN LOCAL TAXES

6.5 MILLION

$

IN STATE TAXES

Story by Elevate Rapid City Staff

While it’s difficult to calculate the impacts of Native American spending from surrounding reservations on the local economy, there’s no doubt about one thing: spending by Native Americans in Rapid City is a major lifeline. To estimate the impact, we pulled 2020 retail spending estimates (known as leakage) from ESRI and Infogroup for the combined seven reservation counties in South Dakota: Bennett, Carson, Dewey, Jackson, Oglala Lakota, Todd, and Ziebach. This total was $139.2 million. We then made a big-picture guess as to how much of that spending ends up in Rapid City, as some of this spending ends up in other communities (like Bismarck, Chadron, Pierre, and even Sioux Falls), and other surrounding areas. Given the size of Rapid City’s retail trade area (often 2.5 hours of drive time), we thought an estimate of 60% was appropriate. So that meant about $83.52 million of spending annually in Rapid City.

It's estimated Native Americans spend $83.52 million annually in Rapid City.

From here, we plugged in the $83.52 million of sales into our fancy software (which calculated economic impacts) to show the direct and indirect impacts on the Rapid City economy: • $52 million in payroll • 1,391 jobs • $8.0 million in local taxes • $6.5 million in state taxes Is this a perfect and precise estimate? Not exactly. But it does demonstrate that Native American spending is a huge contributor to the local economy.

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THE POWER OF MENTORS At only nine years old, Bev (Stabber) Warne was walking down Rapid City’s Main Street and read a sign: “No Indians Allowed.” She did not understand why she and her family would be treated in such a way. “I grew curious about why people would view me so differently,” Bev explains. “Where did they come from that they could feel that way?”

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STORY AND PHOTO S BY SHILO H FRANC IS

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Today, at the age of eighty one, Bev has curious but inspired. She wanted to see the a calm, nurturing spirit about her, but she world. keeps the same curiosity she had all those But how would a poor girl, living in a tent years ago. She credits much of her success camp along Rapid Creek, be able to travel? to her grandfather, who would using songs Even attending school seemed improbable to teach the 7 Lakota values: fortitude, due to cost. wisdom, courage, generosity, honor, Fortunately, another mentor would respect, and humility. “He would sing us enter Bev’s life: Sister Benedict. Having met stories,” she reflects. “The drum, matching through the industrial relations course at our heartbeat would Rapid City High School, engrain those lessons Sister Benedict saw Bev’s into our hearts.” These dream of becoming a “I walked in and I did values helped to root Bev nurse and helped her to not know what a into the confidence of secure a scholarship. This library was. All I knew knowing who she was. allowed Bev to attend St. So that when she would John's McNamara School was that I wanted to face adversity, she would of Nursing and graduate read, to learn." respond with curiosity in 1962. -Bev Warne rather than anger. While the scholarship Following that incident was important, Sister on Main Street, Bev found herself in the Benedict helped Bev in other ways as well. library, speaking with the librarian who While studying in the Industrial Relations Bev would now credit as being an early program, Bev went to check on a patient mentor in her life. “I walked in and I did only to be kicked out of the room because not know what a library was. All I knew she was Native American. was that I wanted to read, to learn.” The Sister Benedict would not let that stand. librarian was patient. She explained what a She spoke to the patient and shared words library card was and helped her find books that would still inspire Bev more than on “other people” – the best way 9-year60 years later: “You must shore up your old Bev could explain those who looked courage and get back in there.” A gentle different from her and her family. reminder of the values her grandfather had From that moment Bev was not only been teaching her since she was young.

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CHANGING ROLES Following graduation, Bev and her husband traveled to Arizona, Thailand and Mexico where Bev would continue to experience moments of impact and find mentors along the way. The majority of her time spent in Arizona where they raised their two sons. In 2009, Bev had retired from her career teaching at ASU’s College of Nursing and returned home to South Dakota. But retirement was short lived. It was time for Bev to pass on the lessons she had been learning along the way. She received a call to lead the creation of the SDSU Native American Nursing Education Center (NANEC). Walking in to the NANEC on Mount Rushmore Road, you cannot help but feel a sense of calm. The subtle smell of sage fills the air. Staff are warm and inviting. There is a min-library with nursing books and closets full of study material to grab as you settle into a private study pod. But the favorite room of all? Wicozani Otipi – the welcoming room. Snacks donated by the faculty and community are free and available for the students. There’s a plush couch encouraging you to relax and settle in. It truly feels like a home away from home. Having a calm, welcoming place can make all the difference for a student stressed out about an upcoming exam. A place to take a deep breath and escape the worries of the world for a moment. While also knowing there is a listening ear and partner in problem solving, from chemistry and anatomy to getting groceries to survive the weekend. THE WHY When the NANEC program began in early 2014, Oglala Lakota College conducted a survey. 200 students had expressed a desire to become a nurse. Only four would eventually graduate. Poverty is a significant hardship these students face. But more than that, they lacked opportunity and mentors. That staggering statistic is only compounded when looking at Rapid City’s labor force. Currently, only 2.5 - 3.7% of nurses identify as Native American. Compare that to the 12% of our city’s population and the racial disparity is clear; people are not entering the workforce at the same level as they live in this world. And moreover, these high demand occupations would most likely help to lift them out of poverty. We need more nurses that reflect the population being served. And NANEC is here to help.

The Wicozani Otipi (welcoming room) at the SDSU Native American Nursing Education Center offers snacks to students at no charge.

2.5 - 3.7%

OF RAPID CITY NURSES IDENTIFY AS NATIVE AMERICAN

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MAKING PROGRESS Today, there are 30 students in the NANEC program, working toward their dream of becoming a nurse. Some, even setting their sights beyond the RN program, at graduate school and becoming nurse practitioners. NANEC provides mentors, like Bev, who find innovative ways to retain students. For example, using donated funds, in the form of gift cards, to support a student with gas or grocery money. Or teaching students to be advocates for themselves. “We cannot keep pain tucked away,” explains Bev. As she encourages students to address conflict rather than shy away from it. A lesson she had learned from Sister Benedict. Or the time a student was getting ready to take an important exam, only to find her car had a flat tire. While the stress was certainly high, she did not lose all hope.

“We cannot keep pain tucked away." -Bev Warne

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STUDENTS ARE CURRENTLY ENROLLED AT THE SDSU NATIVE AMERICAN NURSING EDUCATION CENTER

FIND OUT MORE

about Bev's life on the Elevate Rapid City YouTube Channel.

She had a support system she could rely on. With one call to Bev, better known as Unci (oonchee, Lakota for grandmother), she not only made it to her test on time. She passed. And found herself with a brand-new tire. This is the heart and soul behind the SDSU Native American Nursing Education Center. Its mission is to provide a nurturing and collaborative environment where intentional mentoring inspires Native American nursing students to thrive and flourish. But if you ask Bev, it’s about more than making sure these aspiring nurses get good grades. It’s about finding moments of impact to help them discover who they are; to be successful both in and out of the classroom. “It is about instilling hope,” she adds, and helping them to do even the smallest of things with joy. The team at NANEC is small, with six staff members, several of which are only part time. But ask any student, they will tell you their impact is mighty. One even asked Bev why it seemed she was always there. Bev could only smile as she explained, “I’m here, because you’re here.”

elevaterapidcity.com

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CULTURE

Living Treasures Program Brings Native American Center to Life

A carving of an Eagle Kachina dancer on display at The Native American Educational and Cultural Center®. An Eagle Kachina dancer takes part in ceremonies to appease their supernatural beings and offer the goods they possess. Photo by Andy Greenman.

W

by Andy Greenman

hile tourists leave the hills for the season, there’s no better time to explore The Indian Museum of North America® at Crazy Horse Memorial. The museum holds a permanent collection of over 11,000 art objects and artifacts representing indigenous peoples from all over the world. Within the museum, The Native American Educational & Cultural Center® (NAECC) is more than just an exhibit hall. Built from the rock blasted from the memorial itself, the center serves to preserve native culture, heritage, and history. The NAECC® is where history comes to life. Artisans from all backgrounds and disciplines come to share their craft with the public and provide a hands-on cultural exchange that is unique for every visitor. “It is the chance to see some one-of-a-kind things,” says Curator Andrew Dunehoo. 28

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It takes a local business owner to protect one.

Andrew A Ainslie Ins Agcy Inc Andy A Ainslie, Agent 1839 West Main Street Rapid City, SD 57702 Bus: 605-348-3338

As a small business owner in our community, I understand what it takes to protect your small business. Let me help you get insurance for your business at a great value. Stop in or give me a call.

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INSURANCE

Online: www.bankwestinsurance.com By Phone: 605-399-4200 In Person: 333 Omaha St. Ste. 5 Rapid City

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"An Oasis in the Bad Lands" by Edward Curtis shows a glimpse into the 19th century American West. Photo by Andy Greenman.

Daniel Jim, a Navajo (Dine) artist and silversmith, presented during August Living Treasures. Photo by NAECC.

- Living Treasures presents -

Roger Broer

Hill City Artist Burnishing techniques with printmaking

Oct. 11-17 // 2:30 p.m. Learn more: crazyhorsememorial.org

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The center offers an ongoing Living Treasures program that brings artists from all over the continent to South Dakota to teach their craft. A daily one-hour workshop allows the public to converse and learn directly from the artists. “That’s where you get to be immersed with the arts. And you can be close and personal with Native American artists,” Dunehoo added. “You can be close and “It’s a chance for personal with Native people to do hands on activities with American artists. It’s a master native chance for people to do artists. They travel from all over.” hands on activities with The program master native artists." has featured - Andrew Dunehoo, basket weaving, Museum Curator and Director of silversmithing, Cultural Affairs leatherwork and many other skills. Award winning artist Roger Broer of Hill City will become the next artist in residence through the Living Treasures program. From October 11-17, Broer will conduct demonstrations of his burnishing techniques with printmaking at the NAECC. The workshops begin at 2:30 each afternoon and the public is encouraged to learn the indigenous culture.


EPIC

New Service Allows Businesses to Flourish with Comprehensive Data by Elevate Rapid City

“When we help businesses make informed, data-based decisions, their businesses will grow, more jobs will be created, and that helps the entire region."

- Tom Johnson, CEO and President, Elevate Rapid City

Operating a business is not easy. Making decisions can sometimes feel like a gamble. The desire to grow and innovate brings tough questions such as: • Should you offer a new service or product? • Should you hire more staff? • How do you find the right customers? • Who is my competition? • Where is my industry going? Sometimes the struggle isn’t as much deciding whether or not to hire. It is finding the right people to recruit and hire to a specialized industry. The price of taking such a gamble is often too high and could cost an entrepreneur a 2nd mortgage. It forces business owners to continue doing business as usual, limiting their growth. This is exactly why Elevate Rapid City created the Elevate Prosperity Insight Center (EPIC). While not a crystal ball that can foresee the future, EPIC is the next best thing. Startups and existing businesses will be able to work with Elevate staff to get answers on markets, trends, competitors, and the trade area, which can then be turned into a custom report. This will help businesses make better decisions about markets and in conjunction with their advisors and teams. “Our mission is to elevate the region for all,” says Tom Johnson, President & CEO of Elevate Rapid City. “When we help businesses make informed, data-based decisions, their businesses will grow, more jobs will be created, and that helps the entire region.” To get started working with EPIC to solve a problem and grow your business, call 343-1744.

*Depending on the situation and business, there may be an expense for reports for non-investors in Elevate Rapid City.

elevaterapidcity.com

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AGRICULTURE

Tanka Bar CEO Elevates Company's Profile by Andy Greenman

D

awn Sherman didn’t envision the impact she would make becoming the CEO of Native American Natural Foods’ Tanka Bar. As a second generation Lakota woman, she brings both her understanding of the food industry and a deep connection to enacting change in Indian Country. After growing up in Rapid City, Sherman then spent 25 years in the automotive industry before returning to South Dakota and her Lakota roots to head Native American Natural Foods’ (NANF) Tanka bar line of products. Founded in 2007 by Karlene Hunter and Mark Tilsen, Tanka Bar quickly rose to prominence in the healthy snack market as the first commercial meat and fruit bar. Their goal was to bring traditional Employees from Niman Ranch join Dawn Sherman, CEO of native foods into the wider marketplace, completely Native American Natural Foods, and her team at the Pine sourced and supported by Native peoples. The bar’s Ridge Reservation. Photo provided ingredients were based on wasna, a traditional meat and berry food that goes back hundreds of participating in the annual Niman Ranch Resiliency years. Hunter and Tilsen worked with community Panel with author Michael Pollan. members to create the Tanka brand, which was a Tanka Bars, along with the Tanka Fund, has commercial success, prompting inspired and supported a new many imitators. generation of entrepreneurs, “The more people eat As their success began to strain all centered back at the heart them, the more we can the cash-strapped startup, they of the Native community, realized that a larger picture was bison. Pushed toward the bring them back. They necessary to support the growing brink of extinction, the help with the great plains, movement to conserve these enterprise. Their three tier approach includes the Tanka Food they help with the carbon animals, especially on the Pine Co-Op, Native American Natural Ridge reservation, has many sequestration" Foods, and the Tanka Fund, a benefits, both culturally and - Dawn Sherman, non-profit supporting producers. economically. “Because they CEO, Native American Foods These three avenues help to build are keystone [species], the a sustainable business model more people eat them, the more that in turn invests in its people. Additionally, a we can bring them back. They help with the Great new innovative partnership with Niman Ranch, a Plains, they help with the carbon sequestration” says network of more than 700 independent farmers Sherman. The winning combination of regenerative across America, allows NANF access to technical agriculture’s impact on the environment and support, while providing Niman Ranch access to economy is dependent on the bison. producers of high quality meats. This partnership Food sovereignty has always been important to gives NANF the potential to add other Native food Native Americans, and Sherman’s work at NANF products to their offerings. represents the modernization of what the Lakota Sherman is a founding member of the have practiced for thousands of years — the use Regenerative Agriculture Alliance and has elevated of knowledge to be resilient and provide a vibrant Tanka Bar’s profile through the Niman Ranch future for the Pine Ridge community. With Sherman partnership. This new collaboration has led to at the helm, there are many good things on the her rise in the regenerative food movement, horizon for NANF.

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elevaterapidcity.com

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Large, Luxury Lots From Minnesota Street to Highway 16

At the end of Minnesota Street, off 5th, Scotland Hills features large, luxury lots with Canyon Views.

Private Access | Covenant Controlled | Canyon Views 5 Minutes from Monument Health Hospital

Use this winter to design your beautiful, custom home and start building next June. Lots are going fast, call Dream Design at 605-348-0538 to reserve yours today! www.dreamdesigninc.com/scotlandhills | 605-348-0538 | info@dreamdesigninc.com

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YOUNG PROFESSIONAL GROUP

Talk about your job. I work at Vitalant, the local blood donation center at 2209 W. Omaha St., as a Donor Recruitment Representative. It’s my favorite place I’ve ever worked, because I love the fact that I’m making a difference in the community every single day. We have a consistent need for whole blood, platelet and plasma donations, and we require all blood types to meet patient needs. Vitalant is open seven days a week, and walk-ins are welcome.

MOLLY BARARI Donor Recruitment Representative // Vitalant

Where did you grow up? I was born and raised in Kearney, Nebraska, where I graduated from University of Nebraska at Kearney with a journalism degree. After visiting the Black Hills a few times and falling in love with the area, I moved to Rapid City in 2008. Now, after 12 years here, Rapid City feels like home. My husband David and I enjoy hiking and exploring the beautiful Black Hills in our free time.

What's important in your personal life? It’s important to me to never stop learning. I have an MFA from Wilkes University in creative writing, and I’m working on a doctorate from University of South Dakota in Adult & Higher Education. I teach a life story writing class for adults, and helping them craft their stories is incredibly fulfilling.

When you draw blood from people, does it get sent to a local hospital? Vitalant is part of a national network of blood centers, which is great because we can send blood wherever it’s most needed. We send blood to local hospitals, as well as hospitals across the nation. Many people don’t know that one blood donation can save up to three lives.

What YPG events have you participated in? I have only participated in a few YPG mixers so far, because then the pandemic hit. What I loved about the mixers was getting to meet a variety of people from different fields. I learned something new from each person I met! I also got to meet more YPG members when they donated blood as a group here at our Rapid City Center in June. YPG members are selfless, and we really appreciated them giving back to the community and helping us save lives. I look forward to meeting new people through the Young Professionals Group, and I’m always up for a cup of coffee and conversation. Cheers!

GET CONNECTED: rapidcityoungprofessionalsgroup Stay up-to-date with upcoming events and connect with other young professionals from the area. elevaterapidcity.com

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SMALL BUSINESS

Small Business Administration

Honors Black Hills Businesses by Andy Greenman

Photos by Brandis Knudsen

“Every step of the way, we’ve collectively been there for these businesses and their success is a win for the entire ecosystem"

- Jamie Wood, SBA South Dakota District Director

Two businesses in the Black Hills received awards from the South Dakota Small Business Administration (SBA) on September 22. The awards are presented during National Small Business Week — an annual celebration of small business owners. Rob Hrabe, co-founder of VRC Metal Systems, received the Veteran-Owned Small Business of the Year. The metal company has added 20 jobs since relocating to Box Elder over a year ago. They are continuing to expand and expect to have over 100 employees next summer. Laura A. Bonsness, founder of About You Physical Therapy in Rapid City, was awarded the Woman-Owned Small Business of the Year. Bonsness opened her business in 2011 and is one of the most specialized physical therapy clinics in the region. “In addition to the tenacity and grit of these businesses, much of their success has been navigated by leveraging local, state, and federal resources like the Small Business Development Center, SBA guaranteed lending, Elevate Rapid City and the Ascent Innovation Center, Small Business Innovation and Research funding, federal contracting assistance, and more,” said Jaime Wood, SBA South Dakota District Director. "Every step of the way, we’ve collectively been there for these businesses and their success is a win for the entire ecosystem,” Wood added. For additional information on National Small Business Week, please visit sba.gov/NSBW. elevaterapidcity.com

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ASCENT INNOVATION

Novum Oil preparing to release innovative additive By Andy Greenman

If you call Dr. Craig Bailey a ‘Snake Oil Salesman,’ he won’t take offense. Not that Bailey is profiting off a fake cure to heal your ailments, but he’s about to release a groundbreaking oil additive dubbed Snake Oil. Bailey, CEO of Novum Oil, has been working with his team to produce a oil additive that improves performance using 100% nano venom, or simply nanomaterials. The nanomaterial combination of carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanosheets “moves thermal energy faster than anything else.” In fact, it’s faster than a rattlesnake chasing a tourist.

“We’re doing stuff no one’s ever done before." -Dr. Craig Bailey

Dr. Craig Bailey

THIS OR THAT 1 Grease Oil Daytona Bike Week Sturgis Rally2 Bulletin Board Dry Erase Board North Dakota South Dakota3 Boron Carbon4 Packers Vikings4 Sport Coats5 Suits Forest Trails Freeways Cobra Rattlesnakes6 Snow Ski Water Ski Summer Winter

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1) We're going to sell a lot more oil than grease. 2) Daytona has one or two really cool things for about a half hour. We have about 100 times that. Devil's Tower, National Parks, you name it. 3) We have more temperate weather. 3) Carbon has more applications for commercializing new technology. 4) Skol Vikings. 5) I wore ties every day in my work life for decades. Now I wear them once a year. 6) I'll take Rattlesnakes over any other deadly snake and spider.

The benefits of the additive are more torque, horsepower and better fuel economy. It reduces friction and gives your engine a longer life expectancy. That’s something those HOG riders are willing to try. Last February, Black Hills HarleyDavidson offered to test Bailey’s Snake Oil. They ran 102 dynamometer tests on five previously owned bikes and the numbers were astounding. Every motorcycle increased torque and horsepower by at least 5%. The results were so impressive the employee conducting the tests asked if he could use it in his cycle. Oil additives have been around for nearly a century but none with this new technology. “We’re doing stuff no one’s ever done before,” states Bailey. Novum Oil is in the process of marketing and getting the Snake Oil on shelves of national retail stores. And it doesn’t stop there. Other products are in the works such as greasers, energy absorbing coatings and more. The ‘snake oil salesman’ has no qualms with his new title, “I’m either going to be the hero or the goat. I’ll take one for the team. I’m gonna see what the market thinks and [so far] it’s been very positive.”


elevaterapidcity.com

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ELEVATE RAPID CITY BOX 747 RAPID CITY, SD 57709

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In 1941, we started with a belief that if we could help each other, we’d all be better off. And that is never going to change.

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