Page 1


Little Fires Everywhere ­ Celeste Ng ­ Book Club Guide1    Major Themes    PRIVILEGE COMMUNITY FRIENDSHIP VOCATION     RACE PRIVACY AUTONOMY ADOPTION     Quotes + Plot Points    Mrs. Richardson wakes up to a house fire. She looks for all of her children except for Izzy who  she already knew was to blame. Pg 3    Lexie said: “The firemen said there were little fires everywhere… multiple points of origin.  Possible use of accelerant. Not an accident.” Pg 7    Shaker Heights is a real neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio with the underlying philosophy that  everything should be planned out. Pg 10    Mrs. Richardson sublets a duplex in Shaker Heights: “Because they did not need the money  from the house, it was the kind of tenant that mattered to Mrs. Richardson. She wanted to feel  that she was doing good with it.” Pg 12    Mia and her daughter, Pearl, end up subletting from Mrs. Richardson. Pearl befriends Moody  Richardson and right away. Pg 19    “But Shaker Heights had been founded, if not on Shaker Principles, with the same idea of  creating a utopia. Order ­ and regulation, the father of order ­ had been the Shaker’s key to  harmony. They had regulated everything: the proper time for rising in the morning, the proper  color of window curtains, the proper length of a man’s hair, the proper way to hold one’s hands  in prayer… If they planned every detail, the Shakers had believed, they could create a patch of  heaven on earth, a little refuge from the world…” Pg 22­23    Moody asks Pearl why her mother doesn’t get a real job. She responds and tells him that she  does have a real job as an artist. Pg 24    Mia and Pearl pick up and move after Mia finishes her photography projects: “Pearl always  knew, they would pack up the car again and the entire process would repeat. One town, one  project, and then it was time to move on.” Pg 30  1

Little Fires Everywhere ­ Celeste Ng ­ Penguin Press ­ September 12th 2017 ­ 338 Pages 


“Pearl had started new schools often enough, sometimes two or three times a year, to have lost  her fear about it, but this time she was deeply apprehensive. To start a school knowing you’d be  leaving was one thing; you didn’t need to worry what other people thought of you, because soon  you’d be gone. She had drifted through every grade like that, never bothering to get to know  anyone. To start a school knowing you’d see these people all year, and next year, and the year  after that, was quite different.” Pg 39    Pearl asks her mother is she was wanted. Mia pauses, lost in thought. She eventually responds  that yes, she was very much desired. Pg 44­45    “Lexie was used to people wanting her opinion, to the point where she often assumed they did  and just hadn’t quite said so.” Pg 47    Lexie invites Pearl to a party for high school seniors. Her boyfriend Brian and her sneak away,  ditching Pearl: “In the time they’d been dating, they’d done some stuff, as Lexie had coyly put it  to Serena, but it, the big it, had sat between them for awhile, like a deep pool of water in which  they only dipped their toes… Lexie had had visions about her first time. She’d planned it out:  candles, flowers, Boyz II Men on the CD Player.” Pg 61­62    “From then on, it would seem to Pearl that everything Lexie did was tinged with sex, a kind of  knowingness in her laugh and her sideways glances, in the casual way she touched everyone,  on the shoulder, on the hand, on the knee. It loosened you, she would think, it lightened you.”  Pg 64    “Mrs. Richardson had, her entire existence, lived an orderly and regimented life. She weighed  herself once per week, and although her weight did not fluctuate more than the three pounds  her doctor assured her was normal, she took pains to maintain herself… She had been brought  up to follow rules, to believe that the proper functioning of the world depended upon her  compliance.” Pg 68­69    Mrs. Richardson stops by to visit Mia. She offers Mia a job cleaning and cooking at her home,  so she has more time to work on her art. Mia didn’t want to take the job but knew that protesting  would make things worse: “She had learned that when people were bent on doing something  they believed was a good deed, it was usually impossible to dissuade them.” Pg 70    Izzy is outraged when a fellow orchestra student is picked on in class. Mia asks her what she’s  going to do about it: “It was not a question Izzy had been asked before. Until now her life had  been one of mute, futile fury… Izzy had the heart of a radical, but she had the experience of a  fourteen­year­old living in suburban Midwest.” Pg 79­80   


Mrs. Richardson uses her journalism background and looks into the photo of Mia as the  Madonna. She isn’t able to get any information from Anita, the art dealer. Pg 105    Mrs. Richardson reflects on her career: “A part of her wanted to stay home, to simply be with her  children, but her own mother had always scorned those women who didn’t work. 'Wasting their  potential,' she had sniffed. 'You’ve got a good brain, Elena. You’re not going to sit home and  knit, are you?'” Pg 108    “In all her years of itinerant living, Mia had developed one rule: Don’t get attached. To any place,  to any apartment, to anything. To anyone.” Pg 121    Mia’s coworker Bebe was struggling as a young mother and drops her baby off at the fire station  in the hope of a better life for the little one: “I make a mistake… now I have a good job. I have  my life together now. I want my baby back. These McCulloughs have no right to adopt my baby  when her own mother wants her. A child belongs with her mother.” Pg 129    The McCulloughs tried to conceive for many years and experienced miscarriage after  miscarriage. They eventually moved on to adoption but ran into red tape during that process as  well. Pg 132    Mrs. Richardson realizes that her tenant, Mia, works with Bebe: “So it was her tenant, her quiet  little eager­to­please tenant, who had started all of this. Who had, for reasons still unclear,  decided to upend the poor McCulloughs’ lives.” Pg 137    Mrs. Richardson continues her investigation into Mia’s past and finds Pearl’s birth certificate: “  Under “Father” the word NONE had been neatly typed. Mrs. Richardson pursed her lips in  disappointment. She felt it would be unlawful, allowing someone to conceal the name of a  parent. There was something unseemly about it, this unwillingness to be forthcoming, to state  your origins plainly.” Pg 149    “All her {Mrs. Richardson} life, she had learned that passion, like fire, was a dangerous thing. It  so easily went out of control. It scaled walls and jumped over trenches… Rules existed for a  reason: if you followed them, you would succeed; if you didn’t, you might burn the world to the  ground.” Pg 161     Pearl and Trip start seeing one another in secret. Pg 166    Lexie finds out that she’s pregnant: “Inside her, there was a speck of Brian, a spark of him  turning over and over within her... Something she was going to have anyway, so why not now?”  Pg 174   


Lexie asks Pearl to escort her to the abortion clinic: “She tried to reconcile what Lexie was  saying with the Lexie she knew. Lexie wanted an abortion? Baby­crazy Lexie,  quick­to­judge­others Lexie, Lexie who’d been so unforgiving about Bebe’s mistakes?” Pg 178    Mrs. Richardson finds Mia’s parents and goes to visit them. There, she discovers Mia was a  surrogate for the Ryan family but decided to flee after her brother’s funeral. They have had no  contact with her since then. Pg 185    While pregnant with the Ryan’s baby, Mia is asked not to attend her brother’s funeral: “We just  don’t want anyone getting the wrong idea.” Pg 228    Mia and Lexie discuss her abortion: “You’ll always be sad about this… But it doesn’t mean you  made the wrong choice. It’s just something that you have to carry.” Pg 245    The Bebe ­ McCullough’s custody battle was frequently covered in the news before and during  the trial. Some portray Bebe as a hardworking immigrant while others refer to her as an unstable  mother. Pg 252    “In her month and a half of turbulent motherhood, Bebe did not once seek help from a  psychological or a doctor… she had no idea where to turn… She did not know how to find the  social workers who might have helped her… she did not know how to file for welfare.” Pg 254    “What made someone a mother? Was it biology alone, or was it love?” Pg 258    Bebe’s lawyer, Ed Lim, questions Mrs. McCullough. He asked her exactly what she plans to do  to keep May Ling connected to her birth culture, what color hair and eyes her dolls have, why  she doesn’t have any Asian dolls, what cultural books they read to May Ling, etc. Pg 260­264    Moody finds out Pearl and Trip have been seeing each other: “I thought you were smarter than  the sluts who usually agree to do it with him… but I guess not.” Pg 275    Mrs. Richardson thinks Bebe may have recently had an abortion and thinks this information  could swing the custody case in favor of the McCulloughs. She decides to look into it and  convinces her friend at the clinic to help her confirm this information. Pg 284    Mrs. Richardson confronts Mia about the Ryans. Mia responds with: “It bothers you, doesn’t  it?... Why anyone would choose a different life from the one you’ve got. Why anyone might want  something other than a big house with a big lawn, a fancy car, a job in an office. Why anyone  would choose anything different than what you’d choose.” Pg 302   


Izzy is upset Lexie used Pearl’s name at the abortion clinic and that Moody tattled to Mrs.  Richardson about Pearl and Trip’s relationship. She wonders what Mia would do: “Sometimes  you need to scorch everything to the ground and start over. After the burning, the soiler is richer,  and new things can grow. People are like that, too. They start over. They find a way.” Pg 324    Bebe takes drastic measures after losing the lawsuit. She breaks into the McCulloughs and  kidnaps May Ling fleeing to Canton. The investigators told her they would burn all their money  before finding Bebe. Pg 330­331    After Izzy sets the fire, she disappears: “Everything that had infuriated her {Mrs. Richardson}  about Izzy, even before she’d taken her first breath, had been rooted in that one fear that she  might lose her. And now she had.” Pg 336    Discussion Questions    Shaker Heights was founded with regulation, order, and harmony in mind:  On page 72, Shaker  Heights is referred to as, “The first planned community, the most progressive community, the  perfect place for idealists.” How have they succeeded and how have they missed the mark?    Why do you think Little Fires Everywhere was set during the Clinton administration? What were  the first clues you noticed regarding the stories time period?    How did Shaker Heights influence Mrs. Richardson’s activism and life view?     We first meet Izzy on page 75. Why do you think we meet her so far into the narrative? How  does that affect the story and timeline?    We encounter many unlikely friendships throughout the novel: Izzy and Deja, Lexie and Pearl,  Izzy and Mia. What do you make of these unlikely friendships and what do they teach us?    Mrs. Richardson views and treats Izzy differently from her other children. Mia notices the  difference and thinks, “Truth be told, her mother was harsher on Izzy: always criticizing her  behavior, always less patient with her mistakes and her shortcomings.” Pg 91 Discuss the  relationship between Mrs. Richardson and Izzy. How did Izzy’s premature birth affect Mrs.  Richardson’s actions towards her?    What did you make of Bebe’s situation? Did you find yourself taking any specific side in the  custody battle?    How did the Clinton sex scandal influence  and change the discourse about sex in America?   


Shaker Heights teaches sex education five times throughout a student’s education. Discuss  their sex education strategy in comparison to your own.     Has Little Fires Everywhere changed your views on adoption, interracial adoption, or surrogacy?    Discuss Ed Lim’s questioning of Mrs. McCullough during the May Ling custody hearing and the  outcome of the custody hearing.    Publisher Provided Discussion Questions    Shaker  Heights is almost another character in the novel. Do you believe that “the best  communities are planned”? Why or why not?    There are many different kinds of mother­daughter relationships in the novel. Which ones did  you find most compelling? Do mothers have a unique ability to spark fires, for good and ill, in  us?    Which of the Richardson children is most changed by the events of the novel? How do you think  this time ultimately changes Lexie’s life? Trip’s? Moody’s? Izzy’s?    The debate over the fate of May Ling/Mirabelle is multilayered and heartbreaking. Who do you  think should raise her?     How is motherhood defined throughout the book? How do choice, opportunity, and  circumstances impact different characters’ approach to motherhood?    Mia’s journey to becoming an artist is almost a beautiful novella of its own. Mia’s art clearly has  the power to change lives. What piece of art has shaped your life in an important way?     Pearl has led a singular life before arriving in Shaker, but once she meets the Richardsons, she  has the chance to become a “normal” teenager. Is that a good thing?     What ultimately bothers Elena most about Mia?     The novel begins with a great conflagration, but its conclusion is even more devastating. What  do you think happens to Elena after the novel ends? To Mia and Pearl? To Izzy? Do you think  Izzy ever returns to Shaker and her family? Why or why  not?     Celeste Ng is noted for her ability to shift between the perspective of different characters in her  work. How does that choice shape the reader’s experience of the novel?    We see how race and class underline the experiences of all the characters and how they  interact with each other. In what ways are attitudes toward race and class different and the  same today as in the late 1990s, when the book is set?   


Izzy  chooses “This Be the Verse” to sum up her life. Is what the poem says accurate, in the  context of Izzy’s experience?    What does the title mean to you? What about the book’s dedication?    Related Links    The Atlantic ­  Celeste Ng on What Writers Can Learn from  Goodnight Moon    The Guardian ­  Celeste Ng Interview: “It’s a novel about race, and class and privilege”     NYT ­  Celeste Ng: By the Book    Celeste Ng ­  Book Club Kit         

Little Fires Everywhere Celeste Ng Book Club Guide Discussion Questions, Quotes, Themes, Related Lin  

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng Book Club Guide With Discussion Questions, Quotes, Themes, Related Links.

Little Fires Everywhere Celeste Ng Book Club Guide Discussion Questions, Quotes, Themes, Related Lin  

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng Book Club Guide With Discussion Questions, Quotes, Themes, Related Links.