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El Vaquero Glendale College

Photo by Sumaya Mehai

Joshua Mc Cormick, who described his look as “Marine: Force Recon” got into the spirit of Halloween. See story, page 9.

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Volume 90 Number 4

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 03, 2006

Politics

Halloween

Theater

Top Democrats discuss education at PCC.

From Caracol Garden’s Day of the Dead to Child Care Center’s Trick or Treat

“Waiting for Lefty” delves into the socialist soul.

Page 4

Pages 8 - 9

Pages 10 - 11

Photo by Oliver Tan

Photo by Graig Agop

Photo by Graig Agop


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Friday, November 3, 2006

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NEWS

Provisional Trustee Introduced at Special Board Meeting By Alison Geller

EL VAQUERO FEATURES EDITOR

T

he search is over for the provisional member who was needed to fill the vacant seat on the Board of Trustees. Tony Tartaglia was sworn in on Monday after four out of five board members voted in his favor. The seat was the one left vacant by then president of the board, Kathleen Burke-Kelly, after she suddenly resigned at the end of September. “I am looking forward to working with my colleagues,” said Tartaglia. “This is a wonderful opportunity to utilize my skills and relationships in the community to help Glendale College continue to excel.” He also said that he feels excited and humbled for being chosen for the trustee position. A special board meeting was held Monday in Kreider Hall to

discuss and vote for the new trustee. The board members weighed the responses the three candidates gave during the open forum that took place on Oct. 24, the responses they gave to the board questions, asked at the special board meeting following the public forum, and audience feedback they received. “I want each of the candidates and the entire public to know how difficult a decision this is,” said Anita Quinonez Gabrielian a member of the board during the discussion process following her motion for Tartaglia to fill the vacant seat on the board, during the Monday special board meeting. “We have three incredibly capable and very skilled people from the community who’re come forward to say ‘here I am, here’s my time to serve you for hardly any pay but because I care about Glendale College.’” The two other candidates for the

El Vaquero Glendale Community College

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Olga Ramaz staff members

Graig Agop Susan Aksu Kara Aranas Emmanuel Belviz Michael Coleman Alison Geller Pauline Guiuan Stephen Hotchkiss Vartanoosh Kiourktzian Lenin Lau Sumaya Mehai Rachel Mills Diana Petras Jane Pojawa Jennifer Tinoco faculty adviser

Liane Enkelis lenkelis@glendale.edu (818) 240-1000, ext. 3185

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position were, Armond Aghakhanian, consultant to the Speaker of the California State Assembly Fabian Nunez and Rebecca Delfino, Esq., an attorney and adjunct law professor. During the discussion prior to the vote for or against Tartaglia, board members showed they were inclined to the motion for him to assume the post. “What impressed me most about Mr. Tartaglia was his sincere care for this institution,” said David Arakelyan, president of the ASGCC and the student representative on the board. “I think looking forward, not just for the next four or five months, not just towards April, but beyond, I think you [Tartaglia] would be the right person for this job,” said Vahé Peroomian, board clerk. Later, Tartaglia confirmed that he would be running for the position in the April elections. “This is a special college and I would like to continue to contribute to its success as a member of the Board of Trustees.” “It is a tough choice. But in terms of what I’m looking for, this is a very short period of time, I’m looking for someone who would really not need guidance, who would really not be told what is the next step. Someone who requires very little learning curve,” said Armine Hacopian, current president of the board. A few days later Hacopian said that there were three key things that made her disposed to vote for Tartaglia, “His learning curve would be so minimum, his level and success in contributions to the college has been immense and his knowledge in fundraising would be very helpful.” Victor King, board vice president, was the only one on the board who voted no during the vote for the appointment of Tar-

taglia. “I have served 10 years on the Board and strongly believe that we need to bring fresh faces and perspectives to the Board of Trustees and Glendale College,” said King later. “With the hiring of Dr. Audre Levy, the college, more than ever before, is full of new ideas to make the place better for students, and I want to encourage that forward moveTony Tartaglia ment.” He is not however, unhappy need to resign from the Foundawith the appointment of Tarta- tion and the Measure G Oversight glia. Committee. Also, I will need to “I am certainly content that resign from my seat on the GlenTony is now a Trustee,” said dale Parks, Recreation and ComKing. “Tony knows all the Trust- munity Services Commission. ees and most of the faculty, staff, This is due to a City ordinance and administrators. So he is well that indicates no elected official prepared for the job.” may serve on a commission unTartaglia is not offended by less specifically exempted. The King’s vote, “Mr. King was en- Parks, Recreation and Commutitled to vote how ever he saw nity Services Commission is not fit. He congratulated me after the exempt. swearing in ceremony and I look “I don’t see any others forward to working with him and that have a potential conall of the Trustees.” flict at this time,”he said. Tartaglia is a Public Affairs He was a member of the Board Manager with the Southern Cali- of Directors of the Glendale Colfornia Gas Company, and is cur- lege Foundation for over twelve rently involved in many other years as well as a past president committees, commissions and or- and he was the Chair of the Meaganizations. He was also one of sure G Oversight Committee. the members of the search com“I love this college,” said Tarmittee that helped to appoint the taglia as part of his closing statenew Superintendent/President ments at the special board meeting Audre Levy. on Sept. 24. “I’m very passionate However, due to his appoint- for this college. I think this inment as a board member Tartaglia stitution offers ability to students must resign from certain posi- that you really don’t get anywhere tions. else.” “I will have to resign from any on-campus committees, commissions and organizations,” said Alison Geller can be reached at Tartaglia. “For example, I will Alison_Geller@elvaq.com

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Charles Eastman El Vaquero accepts story ideas in news, features, profiles, sports and entertainment from the public. To submit an idea or an article, e-mail the editor at olga_ramaz@elvaq.com or call (818) 240-1000, ext. 5349. Send Letters to the Editor

Letters may be reproduced in full or in part and represent only the point of view of the writer, not the opinion of El Vaquero or Glendale Community College and its district. Letters must be signed and typed and include the full name and address of the writer. El Vaquero is a First Amendment publication.

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everal factual errors were made in the article “English Tutor Accommodates Deaf Students on Campus” by staff writer Michael Coleman, which was published in the Oct. 6 issue of El Vaquero. We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused. Katherine Firkins was 18 months old when her family

Correction discovered she was deaf. The family moved to Canada when she was 28 months old to be closer to other family members. The family lived in Canada for only a few years because her parents realized that deaf education was much better in Los Angeles than Toronto. Elizabeth Barrett did not take over the English department

or the Deaf Program.  She is a counselor and English instructor.  The GCC deaf program is not the only deaf program in Southern California, but is the only one in Los Angeles County. The community college district in San Diego also offers English classes and tutoring with instructors and tutors using American Sign Language.


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Friday, November 3, 2006

NEWS

ASGCC Discusses Several Issues, New Trustee on Board By Kara Aranas

EL VAQUERO STAFF WRITER

F

ormer GCC employee Tony Tartaglia was appointed as the new head of the Board of Trustees, announced AS president David Arakelyan. After a month long process of paperwork and interviews, Arakelyan explained that Tartaglia was filling in the vacant spot left by former chief Kathleen Burke-Kelly when she resigned in September. On top of that important announcement of the new board president, the student legislature discussed the academic

decathlon; student employment; international student issues and the various activities taking place on campus. The annual ASGCC Academic Decathlon will be on Nov. 17. The deadline to submit applications has been extended to Friday, Nov. 7. Buzzers have allocated for this event and $500 has been spent to create the plaques, trophies and awards for the occasion. To encourage participation, the student government will award $300 to any club that enters more than one team. The winner will receive $1000 if they are sponsored by a club.

The IOC (Inter Organizational Council) Olympics will take place between Nov. 7-9 on campus. It is a way for clubs to have fun and interact with the student body. The “olympics” will include an obstacle course in the Vaquero Plaza. There will be a variety of challenges participants compete in order to win. “We have a lot of active clubs this semester,” said Arakelyan, expecting much involvement from the club members. Beginning in January, the minimum wage for student workers will be increased to $7.50. AS will pay close attention to this,

making sure that student hours are not cut, and that the students will stay employed. This change aids those who are struggling and in need of financial assistance. This year, 541 international students are enrolled at GCC, which is six more than the previous year. With the amount of international students enrolled, the student government decided it would be beneficial to inform them about health insurance. The ASGCC noted that AB 1088, a new law, requires all students to answer whether or not they have been verbally abused, stalked or sexually harassed, when they fill

Cultural Diversity Program Presents Jazz Night By Stephen Hotchkiss EL VAQUERO STAFF WRITER

A

soulful night of music, poetry and imagery illustrated the struggles of African Americans in the 1960s Friday in Kreider Hall. The performance, “Ask Your Mama: Twelve Moods for Jazz,” was led by Dr. Ron McCurdy of the USC Langston Hughes Project. It featured poetry inspired by Langston Hughes from the Harlem Renaissance. “This poem helped me to connect with my own roots, said McCurdy. “With young people there’s a real disconnect historically with understanding the evolution of being African American,” said McCurdy. “Knowing the struggle, how we got out of slavery, that whole evolutionary process, he said. “If more people understood that history you would find more concern about trying to improve themselves scholastically, academically and becoming more knowledgeable about life.” McCurdy, a renowned musician, paced back and forth across the stage, disappearing behind the large video screen that featured images of the Harlem Renaissance—on one side he would play the trumpet as part of the quartet for which he co-composed the score, and on the other he would read the poem as written by Hughes. The project began with Dr. McCurdy in 1996 and has remained in its present format for the past three years but still remains a, “work in progress,” according to

Photo by Sumaya Mehai

Music director and composer Ron McCurdy performs for The Langston Hughes Project “Ask Your Mama: Twelve Moods for Jazz.”

McCurdy. The campus performance, which was sponsored by the Glendale College Cultural Diversity Program, featured the debut of newly arranged, avant-garde, video footage. Not originally conceived by Hughes, the video element added another artistic layer to the overall performance while also serving as a means to attract the attention of younger audience members, according to keyboardist and co-composer, Eli Brueggemann.

“It’s there to assist you,” said Brueggemann. “And to help you feel the vibe of what’s going on in the text.” Another new addition to the presentation was bassist Edwin Livingston. “It’s good for me to be a part of this because I can bring something to the table,” said Livingston. “It’s kind of funny how things haven’t changed a whole [lot], some things have improved but we have a long way to go.” Drummer, Peter Buck, also ap-

plauded the performance in bringing life to the struggle of African Americans. “There’s such a strong social relevance [that] many of the things discussed in this poem have not been resolved,” said Buck. “Plenty of stuff [mentioned in the poem] that is still going on today that still needs to be discussed and still needs to be brought to the attention of as Stephen Hotchkiss can be reached at Stephen_Hotchkiss@elvaq.com

out their applications. For all the hard work the AS government has done this semester, Paul Schlossman, Dean of Affairs, commend them. “It’s the middle of the semester and you guys are performing at a peak level. You guys are doing a really good job,” complimented Schlossman to all the members. As the meeting came to a close, the weekly inspirational quote said, “You must be the change you see in the world.” Kara Aranas can be reached at Kara_Aranas@elvaq.com

w w w . e l v a q . c o m

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Friday, November 3, 2006

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NEWS

Democratic Party Nominees Visit Students in Pasadena

-Photography by Oliver Tan

A

public forum held at Pasadena City College stirred up some controversy, while at the same time giving students and faculty alike, a chance to listen to the promises of the democratic nominees up for election on Tuesday. Senator of Massachusettes John Kerry caused an uproar amongst Republicans with some remarks made during his speech. “You know, education, if you make the most of it, you study hard, you do your homework and you make an effort to be smart, you can do well. If you don’t, you get stuck in Iraq,” said Kerry. The senator has now gone on record to apologize for the comment. Mayor of Los Angeles Antonio Villaraigosa also made his pressence felt and showed strong support for Phil Angelides. Senator Boxer spoke in favor of Angelides, reiterating Angelide’s promise to put education first. Boxer also spoke in favor of immigrants and made reference to her immigrant ancestry. Angelides, the current state treasure and democratic nominee for governor, stressed the importance of public education. He promises to lower tuition fees as a first order of business if elected governor.


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Friday, November 3, 2006

5

NEWS

Professor Receives Distinguished Faculty Award By Pauline Guiuan

EL VAQUERO NEWS EDITOR

O

utgoing, active, energetic and a forward thinker: this is how Brett Miketta, this year’s Distinguished Faculty Award (DFA) recipient, is described by his colleagues and students. This computer science/information systems professor can often be seen pacing around a San Rafael classroom, peering over students’ shoulders as they work on their computers, instructing in his usual animated, enthusiastic manner. Miketta was chosen for the award by the college’s Academic Senate last semester, and was recognized at last June’s commencement exercises. He gave a DFA presentation titled “Invasion of Privacy: Digital Tracks in a Networked World” on Oct. 19. “We’re very excited and very grateful that someone in our division has been recognized,” said Linda Serra, chair of the GCC business division. “Brett is very well-deserving. He’s always been an absolute star performer and continues to be [one].” A former GCC student himself, Miketta has been teaching computer science classes for more than 16 years now. He is the coauthor of a top-selling textbook on information systems, “Understanding Computers Today and Tomorrow,” and was one of the first instructors to teach a fully online course at the college. Miketta was born and raised in the Glendale area. “I grew up in La Crescenta,” he said. “My wife grew up in Glendale, and we both went on to Glendale College.” Miketta said that he and his wife, who is now an elementary school teacher, met and hit it off during professor Joseph Puglia’s “wilderness adventure” class, a backpacking trip through several states. Puglia was later the best man at Miketta’s wedding. “My connection with the college has been here forever,” said Miketta. “It will never go away. My fondest memories during my educational experience were at Glendale College. “ The professor said that his instructors at GCC inspired him to become an educator himself. “There’s no doubt that the best professors I ever had were [also] at Glendale College. I had awesome teachers here.” One particularly influential teacher was art history professor emeritus Leonard de Grassi, who was also a Distinguished Faculty awardee. “When I took his class,

Photo by Emmanuel Belviz

Brett Miketta believes he won the Distinguished Faculty Award because of his “dedication, enthusiasm and use of technology.”

I still wasn’t sure if I wanted to continue in education,” Miketta said. “He brought life into the class. Everything he does was like multimedia before multimedia was cool. That’s what made me think, ‘Oh, education is the best.’” After GCC, Miketta went on to University of Southern California (USC), where he earned his Bachelor of Science degree in business administration. He later earned his master’s degree from Claremont Graduate School. He then worked for a few years in the aerospace industry. Miketta taught the second online course at GCC, taking his cues from real estate department coordinator Walt Huber, who taught the first online class and apparently warned Miketta that it would be “a lot of work.” At that time, only 12 students enrolled in Miketta’s class.

He said that in his experience, hybrid courses, which are classes that require students to spend some hours in the classroom and the rest of the time doing online coursework, have proven to be the most productive learning experience for his students. “[Purely] online classes are really not where a student needs to be,” he said. “Students need to be in a hybrid course, where they can do some of the learning better on their own, while at the same time there are some things that you really need to do with them in the classroom for them to understand better, and you can tell by their body language if they understand it.” He added that these classes, such as the introductory computer science course he currently teaches, are more convenient for working students and students who often get sick. He also said, smiling,

that these classes are helpful to students who have trouble finding parking space. The professor said that he was “totally humbled” upon receiving the award. “There are many instructors who I am sure are not only equally as deserving as me, but much more deserving than me.” He even laughingly joked that he won because he “took the [Distinguished Faculty Award nomination] letters out of other faculty members’ mailboxes. The only one left was mine. So I knew I was going to win.” On a more serious note, Miketta said he believes he was chosen because of his dedication, enthusiasm for teaching and use of technology. “I love teaching,” Miketta said. “I can’t imagine a better job…I worked for a few years in the aerospace industry, and though I made a lot of money, it was work.

Teaching is not work. It’s fun. I get to be in a classroom and teach students things, excite them about topics, energize them to learn about the material, get feedback from them…it keeps getting better.” His satisfaction comes from seeing “a student come back with a good grade on an exam, and you know [he/she] really understands the material.” Some of the other things he enjoys about working on campus are being able to play tennis and volleyball with students, go to “interesting lectures,” and attend student activities such as concerts. Serra said that Miketta is an “excellent instructor. He’s wonderful with students and a real motivator.” “He takes the time to help students,” said Jerry Park, one of Miketta’s CSIS 101 students. “He actually explains concepts and answers questions well. He tries to be funny. Whenever he comes to class, the first thing he says is, ‘Did anyone miss me?’” “He’s a great teacher,” agreed Jackie Izumi, another CSIS 101 student. “He’s very hands-on and very helpful.” Miketta said he makes the learning experience exciting for his students by “making it real.” One of his final projects for a class was for his students to decide on a job they would like to have after college, do online research on job openings, find a school where they can get the necessary education, and list the college classes they need to take to transfer and get the degree. All the information is collated onto a database; students then publish the document on their Web site and share a Powerpoint presentation with the class. “This makes students think, ‘Where do I want to be five years from now?’” he said. “This leaves them with an idea of what they want to do.” The professor is also extremely devoted to his family and spends most of his spare time with his four children, who, according to him, all love soccer. “We go to soccer games all day Saturday,” he said. “Then we have dinner from the folks from church.” “He’s an excellent, excellent division member,” Serra said about Miketta. “We all hope he stays until he retires.” “My most productive time is when I’m with the students,” Miketta said. “I’m here for the students.” Pauline Guiuan can be reached at Pauline_Guiuan@elvaq.com


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Friday, November 7, 2006

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NEWS

Deaf Students Benefit From Increase in Interpretors By Stephen Hotchkiss EL VAQUERO STAFF WRITER

I

n a classroom with a teacher more animated than most, it is so quiet one could hear a pin drop. The teacher paces around the room, fielding individual queries from students while teaching the principles of a dependant clause -- all while not making a sound. If one were to close his eyes, the only remaining indication of being in a college classroom would be the squeak of the marker on the drawing board and the occasional good-hearted laugh. This class, although identical to many freshman English classes taught throughout the college, is unique as it is taught in American Sign Language (ASL) to hearingimpaired students. The Deaf Studies Program at GCC is paving new ground by taking unique approaches to teaching deaf students. As a result, the enrollment of deaf students has

increased from 8 students in 2000 to its current 40. Elizabeth Barrett, started at GCC as an interpreter for deaf students in 1998. She had previously spent her career as a school psychologist for deaf students. She noticed that deaf students at GCC required an interpreter when meeting with counselors and felt she could bridge the gap, given her qualifications for counseling and fluency in ASL. As a result, Barrett accepted a position as an English teacher to deaf students. Most colleges use signing English, also known as pigeon signing, which is a, “combination of English language structure with ASL signs thrown in,” said Barrett. “They way the classes were structured in the past were not working,” said Barrett. “I wasn’t happy doing it and they weren’t happy. There was no plan really.” With English being an auditory language and ASL being a visual

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tutor program. The college offers tutors for deaf students in both English and math who use ASL. Winston Bae, a student in the college’s Deaf Studies program, attended GCC before the addition of an ASL fluent tutor – a greatly beneficial addition, according to Bae. “When I first came to GCC there were no deaf tutors. We had to go with an interpreter and it was very difficult trying to deal with a tutor and look at the interpreter.” said Bae. “And now just recently, [the ASL-fluent tutor] has joined us and now it’s a lot easier.” Before his arrival at GCC, Bae explored his post-secondary education at community colleges in the area but found the uniquely personal and accommodating atmosphere for disabled students at GCC superior and crucial for his academic success. “I went around to different colleges and different programs but nothing really fit with GCC,” said Bae. “I have learned a lot of the English structure and basics. It has helped me for my major…and in getting a job and now I’m taking mainstream courses. GCC is my home.” This sort of appreciation for the deaf studies program among its students is not uncommon. Gabrielle Velasquez, a student in the deaf studies program and computer science major at GCC echoes Bae’s support of the program. “GCC is a nice place to get support if you’re disabled.” said Velasquez.

According to Barrett, “deafness cuts you off from people.” Barrett noticed in 2000 that the relatively small population of deaf students on campus were hesitant to use sign language in public. As an illustration of the importance of communal support, Barrett commented that times are changing. “But now with 40 of them, they have a force behind them,” said Barrett. “They stand around like everybody else signing to each other and not being embarrassed or self-conscious about it, so the social thing is the biggest for them and one of the reasons the program at GCC has grown so much.” Raymond Bejar, a freshman in the deaf studies program praised GCC for allowing him the opportunity to make friends as well as excel in the mainstream of academia. “I’ve made a lot of new friends.” said Bejar. “I’ve learned a lot of things that I didn’t learn in junior high and getting ready for my future.” Bejar plans for a career in architecture as well as teaching. Apart from the social success is the academic success offered from the unique program at GCC. “All the students that I started with 4 years ago are now in the mainstream, in regular English classes.” said Barrett.

Stephen Hotchkiss can be reached at Stephen_Hotchkiss@elvaq.com

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language, students are easily lost in translation. “When you try to throw a visual language in an auditory structure, it doesn’t make any sense to deaf people,” said Barrett. “Their learning is a cycle of trying to figure out what’s going on.” With ASL having little in common with English, Barrett examined the two languages and attempted to “tease out the similarities and differences and use ASL to teach English,” said Barrett. The English program for deaf students is structured with three components: a reading class and a grammar/writing class, all taught in ASL – a characteristic uncommon to many area community colleges. Also, GCC offers ASL-1 every fall, a class that teaches the grammatical principles and structural rules of ASL, enabling deaf students to acquire knowledge about their language in the same manner that English-speaking students learn their native language in English classes. Much of the success of the Deaf Studies program has been its ability to accommodate each student’s specific needs with an open-minded approach. “We’re always open to looking at what else we can do. We’re not afraid to think outside the box,” said Barrett, “we really do try and look at each student and what they need.” Another aspect of the program that has sparked attention in the deaf community has been GCC’s

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Friday, November 3, 2006

7

FEATURE

Transfer Center Facilitates Admission to Universities By Jennifer Tinoco

EL VAQUERO STAFF WRITER

I

t is possible to make your college dreams reality. More than half of GCC transfer students who applied to UCLA last fall were admitted. Kevin Meza, the new Transfer Center Coordinator, is happy to help students this year improve that percentage. During the 2005-2006 school year there were 181 GCC transfer students who applied to UC Berkeley, and 83 were admitted. Out of 366 GCC transfer students who applied for UCLA, 191 were admitted, a total of 46 percent of applicants admitted to UC Berkeley and 52 percent of applicants admitted to UCLA. “I received lots of help when I was in college and now I feel like I have the experience and the knowledge to give back to those students who need the help and information,” said Meza, “I feel that it is vital to help students with any information we can provide to them, because anything students do not know limits their opportunities.” Meza wants future

transfer students to be aware of the options and help that is available to them. At the transfer center students who are planning to transfer to a four-year university beginning fall 2008 can receive help with applications and information on important dates. Applications for Cal State’s and UC’s are due at the end of November. Students who are interested in USC as a transfer school have time to turn in the application by Feb. 1, 2008. Space is still available for a UCLA campus tour on Tuesday Nov. 4, students may sign up at the transfer center. A variety of workshops are available for all transfer students. There are general transfer workshops where students learn the basic plans of transfer information on CSU’s and UC’s, such as the IGETC. For transcript evaluation and more in-depth information about transferring, private workshops are available by appointment. Meza is also available for school club presentations. Catalogs for other colleges, universities, and private schools are

all available at the transfer center, and are also helpful when looking for a specific major. Students who have not chosen a major are also welcomed to talk to Meza or any available counselor for help

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and academic advice. Various college representatives are usually found in a booth in the Vaquero Plaza weekly. Students need to check with the transfer center when specific school representatives will be at GCC. Anet Aleksandryan, a student worker at the transfer center, said “If any students have a quick question, I can always help and we have lots of brochures and handouts about four-year schools and their transfer programs.” “We are sort of like mini-counselors, we help with the basic information students need to know,” said Garineh Demirijian who is also a student worker for the transfer center. “We love working here and we enjoy helping other students,” said Aleksandryan. Transferring from a community college to a four-year university is less stressful for some than going directly from high school. Most UC’s require a 4.5 GPA for freshman applicants from high school. Transfer students need a minimum 3.5 or 3.6 GPA to be admitted. Different majors may require a lower or higher GPA. Dinal Patel, a current transfer student, is majoring in business economics and said, “I have been to the transfer center many times this semester, especially this month, since I am getting assistance to transfer to UCI for fall 2008.” For other students who are planning to transfer next fall like Patel, it is not too late to go to the transfer center for transfer information.

Meza wants students to know that even for the competitive schools, it is realistic for them to actually attend. On average, every year about 741 community college students transfer to a Cal State, and 229 students transfer to a UC (the last year recorded being 2004-2005.) “Students who are willing to transfer to a four-year school should treat the transfer center as a class. If they follow through with the transfer center as they would in a classroom, chances are that they will succeed with their transfer 100 percent,” Meza said. The transfer center is located in SR 214 and is open Monday through Thursday from 8am – 7pm. And open from 8am – 1pm on Fridays. Kevin Meza may be contacted at (818) 240-1000 ext. 5820. Jennifer Tiinoco can be reached at Jennifer_Tinoco@elvaq.com

CLASSIFIED

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FEATURE

Community Garden Flourishes in Heart of East L.A. By Olga Ramaz

EL VAQUERO EDITOR IN CHIEF

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alking up to the entrance of Proyecto Jardin is like walking towards the open arms of a loved one. A sense of camaraderie permeates throughout the community garden, kissing every inch of the soil, plants, trees and the hands that help sow the future of Boyle Heights, one seed at a time. Looking around, one would never imagine that the garden, adjacent to White Memorial Hospital, was once a run-down crack house and a breeding ground for all kinds of debauchery. No remnants of illicit activities remain only tools, fertile soil and faces, like that of Daisy Tonantzin, who look to instill hope and advocate healthier lifestyles within the local community through gardening. “We’re a communal garden, we all plant together and we all harvest together,” said Tonantzin. “Yes, we recognize that our communities need food, but we don’t have the capacity to feed the whole community…we do have the capacity to train people on how to do it themselves.” Tonantzin is one of the five project coordinators that sit in the Proyecto Jardin committee. She has been involved with the project for almost four years and

continues to be one of the leading advocates for the garden. The committee is currently working on establishing the Peace for Tomorrow Foundation, a non-profit organization that Tonantzian hopes will acquire a year-to-year lease on the property where the garden sits, which is owned by White Memorial Hospital. “[The goal] is to secure the land lease,” said Tonantzin. “They [White Memorial Hospital] can decided to build a clinic...fortunately that hasn’t happened yet.” The garden counts with the assistance of several members of the community who turn-out regularly to keep the garden flourishing. Some of these members include vendors at the Caracol Marketplace, a grassroots economic movement intended to generate funding for the garden. Jesus Soto, a vendor at the marketplace, believes that the communal garden is also a great way for the community to learn about nutrition and the value of cultivating their own foods. “[The garden is a way] to share knowledge and a way of creating something yourself,” said Soto. “[To know] where it’s [the food] is coming from, to know the value of it because you had to take care of it...is a big thing.” Soto has been vending at Cara-

Photo by Graig Agop

A young boy looks on as a community member waters the aloe vera plants along with recently sowed produce. Proyecto Jardin is a communal project located 13 minutes away from where the GCC campus sits.

col Marketplace for almost two years. He became involved with the project when Lily Flor, a fellow vendor, introduced him to the idea of the marketplace. At the marketplace Soto sells homemade Kombucha tea, a tea whose distinct taste and medicianal benefits come from the symbiotic culture placed in the tea. A cup of Kombucha costs $1 donation, but the benefits are limitless, according to Soto.

Photo by Graig Agop

At the garden, top, one can find several vegetables like lettuce and squash. The garden also has its very own medicinal garden and greenhouse. An altar set-up at the Caracol Marketplace for Day of the Dead, right, commemorates loved ones who have passed. The altars showcase several offerings like fruit, bread and sugar skulls.

“It boosts energy levels, [serves as a] natural detoxifier... and it’s really helpful if you apply it to your skin,” said Soto. Soto is very active in the maintaining of the garden. On several occassions, he can be found with a shovel, digging up the soil and cleaning up weeds. Although it is not required for the vendors to be that hands on when it comes to the garden, most do their part and share in the responsibilites. The $25 it takes to set up a booth at the marketplace is a help itself. Lisa Rocha, another vendor at the marketplace and founder of Ilaments jewelry, said that the fee

to set up a booth is “minimal.” Rocha hopes that the continued success of Caracol Marketplace and the garden itself “will serve as an example for other cities.” “[I hope it] gives the message that it’s important to maintain places like this and support places like this,” said Rocha. “In the future, because of that [support], hoping that we have a future, that it [the garden] doesn’t end like the South Cental farm.” The South Central farm, located in Los Angeles on 41st and Alameda street, is a 14-acre urban garden that was established in 1992. The farmers were evacuated this [See Garden, Page 12]


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Friday, November 3, 2006

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FEATURE

Spirit Spreads Across Campus HALLOWEEN By Pauline Guiuan

EL VAQUERO NEWS EDITOR

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very imaginable character from Superman to Julius Caesar to Dick Cheney could be spotted on campus Tuesday. Students, staff, faculty and little children donned costumes that ranged from the cute to the frightening, all in the spirit of Halloween. Delta Sigma Omicron set up a booth in Plaza Vaquero that displayed a severed, but moving mystic’s head inside a “crystal” ball. The organization sponsored a Halloween costume contest for the campus community, offering a $40 BJ’s Restaurant gift certificate for the first place winner, a $30 AMC movie gift card for second place and a $20 Starbucks gift card for third. Member Michael Gilbert, dressed in medieval garb, said that the group had been planning the event for a month. Students in a wide variety of costumes, some of which they had made themselves, joined the contest. One contestant, photography major Kristy Walker, was dressed up as the children’s movie character Pippi Longstocking, complete with redhead braids and a patched dress. “She’s been my hero since I was a little kid,” said Walker when asked about her choice of costume. “I made this costume myself.” Another student, film editing major Phillip Marzouk, was dressed up as Vice President Dick Cheney. A cardboard sign bearing the words “Hello I am Dick Cheney. Don’t make fun of my lesbian daughter,” hung from his neck, drawing amused looks from people. “I originally wanted to be Osama Bin Laden,” Marzouk joked. Other eye-catching costumes were those of political science major Trevin Rivera, who was dressed up as Sora of Kingdom Hearts; Fernando Penello, as Julius Caesar; and Chris de Asis, as Santa Claus. “I’m the bad Santa,” de Asis said. “I had a Santa suit at home and I thought I might as well wear it to school.” Three- and four-year-old preschoolers from the GCC Child Development Center paid the campus a visit. In brightly colored costumes that ranged from

superheroes to Disney princesses, they went trick-or-treating at the different offices on campus and returned to their school with bucketfuls of candy. Four-year-old Gigi was dressed up as a Spanish flamenco dancer. “I like getting candy and Halloween stuff,” she said, beaming as she held up a plastic bucket filled with candy. “I like saying ‘Trick or treat!’” said 3-year-old Tommy, who had on a Thomas the Tank Engine costume. “My favorite [part of Halloween] is wearing costumes,” said 4year-old Lucas, who was proudly dressed as superhero Robin. “It’s been very exciting for the kids,” said teacher Debbie Frohmuth. “They enjoyed coming down to campus and going to the different buildings getting candy.” Members of the ASGCC joined in the Halloween spirit. “I wore this costume because it’s cute,” said Michelle Tehrani, Senator of Administration, referring to her red ladybug costume. Senator of Finance David Valdez wore a Superman costume because, “Superman is [my] favorite character” and also because he wanted to make a statement on his 21st birthday. Bookstore employee Patricia Bradley was dressed up as a scary clown. “[Students] just go ‘yeah, whatever,’ when they see me,” said Bradley laughing when asked if people were actually frightened by her attire.

Photo by Graig Agop

Lucas, dressed as Robin, goes trick-or-treating on campus with children from the Child Development Center.

The winners of the Delta Sigma Omicron costume contest in Plaza Vaquero were Mike Serot, as Peter Criss of Kiss, first place; Joel Lepe, as a cowboy, second place; and Phillip Marzouk, as Dick Chaney and Kristy Walker, as Pippi Longstocking, tied for third. Pauline Guiuan can be reached at Pauline_Guiuan@elvaq.com

Photo by Sumaya Mehai

Halloween reveler Mary Mitchler is dressed as a skeleton pirate.

Photo by Sumaya Mehai

Second place costume contest winner, Joel Lepe, poses in his cowboy costume, complete with inflatable horse.


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Friday, November 3, 2006

www.elvaq.com 11

FEATURE

‘Waiting for Lefty’ — Photography by Graig Agop

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he Glendale College Auditorium Mainstage Theatre opened its doors on Oct. 26 for Clifford Odets fans with the opening night of a dramatically charged play entitled “Waiting for Lefty.” The show revolved around a group of taxi drivers who decided to go on strike during in the 1930s. However, the cognitive meaning of the story was to inflict a debate towards the audience about the pros and cons of capitalism. “Students didn’t want to do it, [but] the characters are just trying to survive [off of] something we’ve taken for granted,” said Randel. “It’s hard to get [the] characters to commit to survival needs, [but] the students ction ke a ness a t o busi nd t usba a sly orker. h r tte,” s he er w urge , “Faye n anoth y l g o s ron Ligon pying ” st s dna, eagon er into E “ k M , . r l s l o Ha age be a w i nda ir w Ama st unfa pts to br n i m aga n, atte a wom

Royce Herron, “Dr. Barnes” and Derenik Keshish, “Dr. Benjamin” both express anger over the unfair job cuts at the hospital.

have really risen [up] to the material.” Director Melissa Randel successfully captured the ruthless lifestyle of Great Depression with sepia lighting and costume designs that highlighted aged photos that depict that historical era. The stage projected a sense of both theoretical and physical meaning of social class by placing upper class members on a higher platform with the working class beneath them. She also added a touch of Hollywood glitz to the play by including famous dancing duo, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, at the top of the stage as a contrast against the marathon dancers below who were usually people suffering from poverty. They would compete in endless “marathon” dances until the last one standing could claim the prize in the end. Even though the most of the lines in the play are intense, Randel jokingly said that Odet would have been happy with the students’ performances, but he may not be happen with what she did with his material.

“Waiting for Lefty” will be showing in the Auditorium Mainstage Theatre until Nov. 12, but there will be a special play performance Nov. 9 with Randel Theatre Faculty Coordinator, Jeanette Farr, to discuss and answer questions about Odets on the play’s themes and motifs.

“There was a lot of resistance. Students didn’t want to do it” — Melissa Randel

Members come together to fight the corrupt practices of their union.

Ryan Robbins lectures to the taxi union members.

Fatt and his henchman, Dominic Ladesma, above, take little interest in the woes of the taxi union members. Below, Mary Claire Garcia “Florrie” and Harmik Thomasian “Sid” experince the full effect of the Great Depression as it tears apart their dreams of being together.

Ryan Robbins plays Fatt. a corrupt taxi union secretary.


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FEATURE

Community Garden Vendors Celebrate Day of Dead [Garden, from Page 8]

past summer after receiving a notice from the city, informing them that the property was being sold to a private developer. Rocha has been participating at Caracol Marketplace for almost two years. She sells hand made jewerly made out of jade, silver and other precious materials.The inspiration behind the jewerly designs spawn from Aztec folklore. “Ilaments philosophy is to incorporate designs that reflect our cultural history...By fusing our cultural history into our handmade pieces, we in turn educate the masses and keep oral tradition alive,” said Rocha. Rocha’s jewelry went hand in hand with last month’s Day of the Dead festivities. She has a special collection devoted to Day of the Dead, which she claims to be one of her most popular collections. During the celebration, children got the chance to make their own sugar skulls, a tradition that has been around for almost 3000 years and was established by the indigenous people of Mexico. Children’s faces were half painted with black and white pigments, depicting skulls and the attitude of the living toward the dead. For the most part, the children ran around the garden carefully, making sure not to step on plants. Refugio Ceballos, a regular at the garden and the marketplace, sees the garden as a place where children can roam free.

“[It’s a place] where young people can come and learn,” said Ceballos. “Even though they are not particularly learning how to plant, it’s still a run around place that’s different from the park...it becomes a good social gathering for them as well.” Ceballos is a dancer for a group called Danza Azteca. He became familiar with the community garden through his own grandchildren who attend Bridge Street Elementary School, located across the street from Proyecto Jardin. His grandchildren were taken to the garden to learn about plants and how to care for them. A community meeting held at the garden struck curiosity in Ceballos and ever since then he has been involved by officiating opening and closing ceremonies for events like Caracol Marketplace. Ceballos also uses the garden as a space for him and his sons to practice Aztec dance. Every square inch of the garden is rich, with not just soil, but with culture and hope. Vendor Javier Orozco hopes to someday see more community gardens throughout L.A. County. “In a city like L.A., what’s really missing is community,” said Orozco. “And something like this at least helps build it. You get to meet children and if you keep coming, you get to see them grow.” “I think [the garden and Caracol Marketplace] is definitely what’s needed in L.A. where it’s not just you go, you buy, you pay,

Photo by Graig Agop

A vendor tends to her booth while taking in the festivities of Dia de Los Muertos (Day of the Dead).

you leave. There’s a convivencia (coexistence).” Tonantzin agrees with the notion to create more urban gardens. But, she reiterates that the core of the project is to create a food security for the community. “We don’t have real food and the food given to us in the market is not organic,” said Tonantzin. “We want organic and the only way we can do that is by creating it ourselves.” Olga Ramaz can be reached at Olga_Ramaz @elvaq.com

Photo by Graig Agop

Refugio Ceballos, top, participates at Caracol Marketplace and other events at the garden through dance and ceremonies. Jesus Soto, left, pours homemade Kombucha tea into bottles, up for sale at the monthly marketplace.


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Friday, November 3, 2006

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She Wants Revenge, Placebo Rock the Greek became more excited. The highest point of the set was when Molko EL VAQUERO STAFF WRITER and his band mates Stefan Olsdal he Wants Revenge and Pla- and Steve Hewitt, began to play cebo kicked off the first of a “Every You Every Me,” a song series of co-headline concerts at from the soundtrack for “Cruel the Greek Theater on October 22. Intentions.” A DJ trapped in a trance spun All the fans then began singmusic to the eager fans while they ing the lyrics and showing their waited for the bands to play. Just a love for the band. Placebo gave little past 8 p.m, the mischievous the crowd nothing short of the Brian Molko of Placebo took the best. They made sure that they stage and began to strum lightly connected with their fans. Folon his guitar. He let the hypnotic lowing some of their high paced lyrics of “Infra-Red” fill the out- songs, Placebo played a selection door theater complex. of heart felt slow songs, which Colorful lights helped set the connected with the long time, dehigh paced, thrilling music pre- voted fans. sented by Placebo that night. The The house lights came on and lights scanned the audience and the crowds changed. The Placebo flickered on and off on stage. fans took leave while the dieel vaquero Novplayed, 2006 generic.qxd 11:55 AM Page With every song the fans hard10/30/2006 fans of She Wants Revenge

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slowly, but surely, filled the seats of the theater. The anxious energy from the crowd ended as soon as the theater went dark. A surge of amber club lights began to break through the darkness as the bizarre looking duo of Justin Warfield and Adam Bravin entered and began to strum a haunting steady beat. As Warfield’s deep voice serenaded the crowd during “Red Flags and Long Nights,” the fans began to cheer Warfield and Bravin on. The duo fed off the energy and apparently were not about to let the people down who had gotten them to where they are. An interesting change occurred when a group of traditional in1 strumentalists including a violin-

ist and cellist came on stage. The mellodic and beautiful tunes from these musicians helped provide a nice contrast to the rock sounds usually heard at a rock concert. The violin and cello each provided a more fluid sound. Bravin caught the crowd’s attention with his amazing synthesizer abilities. It did not take too long for the

band to gain the energy from their fans, as they began to play upbeat songs in the next set. The songs “I Don’t Wanna” and “Tear You Apart” were expertly played for a strong memorable finish to a night of great music. Rachel Mills can be reached at Rachel_Mills@elvaq.com

Do you want to complete your Bachelor’s degree while still working? The University of La Verne’s regional campus in BURBANK serves working professionals who wish to continue their education. Apply Now for Winter 2007. Classes begin on January 8, 2007. Degrees Offered: Bachelors in Business Administration, Organizational Management Master of Business Administration, MBA New Groups Being Formed for: Bachelors in Child Development and Liberal Studies (Teacher preparation)

The University of La Verne is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC)

• Accelerated schedule; Classes meet one night a week for ten weeks • Experienced Faculty who incorporate their work experience into the classroom • AA Degree Not Required • Financial Aid is available

For More Information Call: 1.877.GO.TO.ULV Visit us Online: www.ulv.edu/welcome

University of La Verne San Fernando Valley Campus 4001 W. Alameda, Suite 300, Burbank, CA 91505

Knowledge • Service • Vision

Photos by Graig Agop

Placebo (above) preformed songs such as “Special K,” “Meds” and “Every you, Every me.” Bassist Stefan Olsdal , She Wants Revenge (below) gave home town fans what they wanted with an amazing set list.


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scene is a television set with a VCR. When Kerry switches on the set, an impish looking pupman alone in a dark room pet comes on the screen. “I want screams as he struggles to to play a game with you,” said a free his foot from iron shackles. menacing voice emerging from Left only with his handgun and a the distorted figure. It was apsmall flashlight he scans the area parent that this was the work of looking for something to use as a the sadistic criminal mastermind, tool of escape. His light touches John Kramer (Bell) better know a severed corpse, with a gasp he through his alias “Jigsaw”. Havcontinues his search frantically ing avoided capture from the aufinally stopping as his light hits thorities again, Jigsaw with his what he is looking for, a saw. new apprentice Amanda (Smith) This is the opening scene in continue to wreak havoc, makthe new thriller “Saw III”, which ing Jeff (Macfayden) and Doctor came out in theatres Oct. 27, star- Lynn Denion (Soomekh) the latring Tobin Bell (“The Firm”), est players in their vicious and Shawnee Smith (“Who’s Harry intricate game. Crumb”), Angus Macfayden The movie goes on to give (“Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya background information on the Sisterhood”), Bahar Soomekh lives of these victims. Jeff is a sin(“Mission: Impossible 3”), Don- gle father and a victim of a tragic nie Wahlberg (“Saw II”) and Dina car accident which resulted in the Meyers (“Starship Troopers”). death of his son. Obsessed with The premise of the movie is the avenging his loss, he aimlessly investigation of a series murders goes through life and neglects his by Detective Kerry (Meyers). The only daughter. In his daily routine remains of an unfortunate victim of role playing, he is abducted are scattered in an eerie “class- by a figure in a pig-mask. A few room.” A few feet from the crime minutes later, he wakes up inside

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Jigsaw played by Tobin Bell prepares his aprrentice, Amanda (Shawnee Smith) for their latest kill.

a crate that is hanging at least 10 feet above the ground. In another part of town, Dr. Lynn Denion, cannot focus on her work as marital problems plague her mind. Unable to perform an

emergency surgery, she decides to take a break in the doctors’ locker room, unaware of the horror awaiting her. She is knocked unconscious and wakes up in a room filled with torture devices, coming face to face with Jigsaw himself. Both Jeff and Lynn are in for the biggest nightmare of their lives. For most “Saw” fans, the scenes and plot provide a familiar setting like its predecessors. With a twist that is more heinous than

any “SAW” movie ever seen, the last of the trilogy provides hair raising scenarios and graphic visuals that will appall its viewers. Although there were no breakthrough performances, “Saw III” comes packed with so much gore, raising the intensity level and imprinting fear and disgust into its viewers. Kara Aranas can be reached at Kara_Aranas@elvaq.com

El Vaquero News Features Editorial Entertainment Opinion Sports Art Hot off the Press


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Friday, November 3, 2006

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Coppola’s Take on Life of Legendary Monarch Flops By Vartanoosh Kiourktzian el vaquero staff writer

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arie Antoinette” is visually beautiful and as shallow as a two foot pond, unfortunately the film falls very short. Director, Sofia Coppola’s latest film focuseson the begining of Marie’s marriage to the start of the revolution. Coppola tries to paint a picture of a young woman who means well and is desperate to please those around her and not as the legend who allegedly said “Let them eat cake” in regards to the starving people of France. Instead Marie comes across as completely airheaded, self-indulgent and spoiled. The film is stunning to watch and it clearly has the director’s own spin on the life of the infamous monarch. Set in the Palace of Versailles, Lance Acord’s cinematography seems to paint three dementional portraits of 18th century France. Beautiful backdrops, brightly colored costumes and pastries that seem to be out of this world are constantly on camera. It seems as though the focus is on what they ate and wore instead of what they felt and did. Kirsten Dunst does a good job of showing Marie’s innocence. When Marie is separated from her mother in Austria and sent to France she is only 14. She is naïve and is showing her friends pictures of Louis (Jason Schwartzman) and giggling like a school girl. When she arrives at the border she is greeted by the Comtesse de Noailles, played by a stern, but likeable Judy Davis. Marie, having no idea of French customs, hugs the Comtesse who seems uncomfortable, but pleased at the same time. In order to become a true French woman she is stripped naked of her Austrian clothing and given new French clothing. Everything Austrian about her must be left behind, her clothing, her friend and even her dog, named Mops, as she embarks on her new life as the Dauphine of France. In France there is a small glimpse into Louis XVI’s life as a young man. Louis is portrayed as a shy, insecure teenager who is just as nervous about his marriage to Marie as she is.

When Marie finally arrives she is introduced to King Louis XV, her future grandfather-in-law, played by an intimidating Rip Torn. She then meets her future husband Louis XVI for the first time. Within hours of her arrival to Versailles, she is whisked off and she and Louis are married in a lavish ceremony in the Chapel Royal, attended by hundreds of people. The morning after their wedding, Marie wakes up with Louis nowhere in sight and is greeted by Comtesse de Noailles once again along with twenty or so women of the royal court. Marie is informed that she will no longer dress herself; in fact, she does not have to do anything for herself ever again. After this scene Dunst seems to give up any attempt to be sympathetic to the audience. She talks, but she does not seem to be saying much. The charismatic and talented actress that was seen in her other film with Coppola, “The Virgin Suicides” has disappeared. Dunst plays the role of the poor little rich girl. Venting her sexual frustrations with Louis who would not have sex with her, Marie begins shopping excessively, buying wigs and dresses and hundreds of pairs of shoes to a soundtrack consisting of Bow Wow Wow, New Order and the Strokes. When King Louis XV dies, instead of Marie becoming more mature she seems to regress. She shops, drinks and eats more. Her life is pure excess. Her character is not someone to identify with and it is not because of lack of dialogue in Coppolas’ script. Dunst fails to give a performance that connects with the audience. One is not aware of how she feels or what she thinks and when things begin to go wrong, it is impossible to feel for her. At a masquerade ball, Marie meets a Swedish army official, Count Fersen, played by Jamie Dornan who does nothing more than fit the role of the pretty boy womanizer. This was an opportunity for Coppola to show Marie’s emotional side as she develops an affair with the Count. Coppola unfortunately seems to pass up on this chance. The passion

Jamie Dornan and Kirsten Dunst flirt during a lavish dinner party at the Palace of Versailles.

and chemistry is lacking between Dunst and Dornan and their scenes together are lukewarm at best. Ignoring the birth of Marie’s first child, Coppola instead chooses to focus on the beautiful scenery that Marie and her daughter are in, instead of their relationship. The birth of her second child, a boy, is also largely ignored with Coppola chosing to focus on the characters posing in lavish costumes for a painting instead of motherly bonding. Coppola is in love with color and background, which is evident in “The Virgin Suicides” and “Lost in Translation”. With this film she focuses on the background instead of developing her characters. When the Bastille is stormed by an angry French mob, Marie walks out and bows her head to the crowd. This seems to be Coppola’s attempt at giving the audience something to connect with. Unfortunately, it is too late. The film ends abruptly with no emotional understanding or connection with Marie. Beautiful and vapid, like much of the characters, the film is all fluff, color and no substance. Vartanoosh Kiourktzian can be reached at Vartanoosh_Kiourktzian@elvaq.com


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Friday, November 3, 2006

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OPINION

Acts of Kindness Are Not Difficult to Carry Out By Michael Coleman EL VAQUERO STAFF WRITER

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aying hello to someone as you walk by them may brighten their day just as opening a door for a person in a wheelchair may do the same trick. Why not allow a person to cut in front of you in line? Showing a little human kindness to one another does not cost a dime yet kindness seems to be fading away to a certain degree. One of the contributing factors of kindness fading away is the media. The media seems to always depict human beings acting violent and displaying chaotic behavior. For example, the 5 o’clock news displays a car chase, cops and robbers are running through traffic lights only to have a tragic ending. It is rare to hear about someone doing good deeds for another. Mass Communication and Political Science professor, Mike

Eberts, believes that media’s portrayals are more likely to focus on crude behavior because it is more entertaining (particularly to young males) than kind behavior. International student Donato Bragagnolo agrees. “Because the media tends to show mostly violence, people become scared and shut themselves off thinking that the outside is a jungle,” said Bragagnolo. Many people in society today rely on the media as a guide to what is acceptable behavior. The media has a responsibility to their audience. When the movie “Pay It Forward” was released, it had a positive impact on a lot of people. There were reports of people displaying random acts of kindness in the media. According to Catherine Ryan the author of the novel “Pay It Forward,” she was not expecting a social movement, from the movie.

She developed a website to bring people together to share their “Pay it Forward” stories. The purpose of the site is to bring recognition to those doing good work and to put their efforts out in the open so that other people could be inspired. It is a good source to good news and a way to renew faith in human kindness. “I think the media’s portrayals give the audience cues on how to act,” said Eberts. “I think the media is very powerful in setting social norms, especially among audience members who may not know how to act in a particular situation,” added Eberts. The media influences us to be more selfish as well. People are becoming more selfish and impatient with one another. Reality shows such as “Survivor,” “Elimidate” and “The Real World” are there for our entertainment, but they tend to display selfish behaviors. There is evidence of this ev-

erywhere. For instance, lunch hour in the cafeteria can get pretty crowded at times and seating is limited, some students sit at a table monopolizing it by chatting with their friends or doing their homework, while other students are looking for a table to eat at. It is pretty sad to see students rushing to put their book bag at a table when they see another student with a tray of food heading for that same table. It is very rare that a student will get up from the lunch table and allow someone else to sit down so that they can eat. Where is the kindness? It is interesting to note that in classrooms a lot of students do not interact with one another. They do not speak to one another unless they want something. They may pass their classmates outside of the classroom and regard them as total strangers; not a hello nor a smile. It is a cold feeling. It is a surprise that some teachers do not initiate a warmer environment for their students. Granted, some classes have more students than others, but one would think that if teachers initiate some kind of ice breaker the first day of class, things might be a little different. “It’s hard to keep a friendly relationship that is more than hi and bye,” said Bragagnolo. Bragagnolo also believes that people are afraid to get to know new people. He said that no one helps eachother just for the pleasure of helping anymore. According to CIGNA Behavioral Health, the psychological effects of kindness can give someone personal satisfaction, a sense of exhilaration and joy that can lead to a sense of well-being. The physical effects of kindness are that one may feel a sense of calmness and relaxation, which may also ease pain from headache and back pains. Showing kindness could even reduce high blood pressure. CIGNA also states that giving kindness could increase

one’s energy level. There are still shimmers of kindness that light among people. Student Jacob Lopez, who is also the president of the dance club on campus said, “I witness kindness quite often from the Government of Student Affairs.” “They set the mark of how we should be more social and get along with our fellow classmates which also makes me feel more comfortable at times than my own acquaintances,” he added. Many times we witness students opening doors for those who are disabled and for those who are not, just to be kind. This is a good thing. People need to be aware of others around them and be considerate. Mindfulness is the key to our future, according to Laura Matsumoto, professor of Adapted Computer Technology and Adapted Physical Education. Matsumoto, who has been teaching at GCC since 1999, said that being connected to the world, caring about how your actions and reactions are related is vital. “I think it could be contagious if more people really focus their energy on being thoughtful and kind,” said Matsumoto. Sometimes people take life and the people in their lives for granted and that should not be the case. We should not rely so much on the media as a guide for social acceptance and behavior. The world does not revolve around you. Think of others before thinking of yourself, it is a great feeling when you have done something nice for someone else. It is imperative that each person took three minutes out of their own lives to know another person. Remember being kind to one another does not cost a thing; it is priceless. Michael Coleman can be reached at Michael_Coleman@elvaq.com

Classified            


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Friday, November 3, 2006

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SPORTS

Vaqueros Establish Offense, Blow Out West L.A. 45-21 By Lenin Lau

EL VAQUERO STAFF WRITER

A

fter a heartbreaking 10-8 loss to Citrus College on Oct. 21, the Vaqueros re-grouped for a stunning 45-21 victory against the West L.A. Oilers Saturday night at Sartoris Field. The Vaquero offense scored six touchdowns and a field goal for their best offensive performance of the season. Leading the offense in yards and scoring were quarterback Brendon Doyle and tailback Anthony Cullors. Doyle completed 18 of 22 passes for 187 yards, and two touchdowns. Cullors rushed for 125 yards in 21 carries and scored two touchdowns, for only the second 100yard plus rushing performance of the season. “First of all I’d like to thank God for this opportunity,” said Cullors, who led the team in rushing. “I tried to stay focused and calm and just do my best. I followed my blocks and the [offensive] line worked hard. Our whole offensive unit worked hard.” The defense also made big plays. On the first offensive drive

Defensive back Eliot Jones tackles an Oiler receiver for a loss Saturday night during a 45-21 Vaquero victory at Sartoris Field.

for West L.A., the defense forced a fumble near the Vaqueros’ red zone, which was recovered by Matt Patterson. The offense capitalized on the ensuing drive with a touchdown. Patterson made another big play when the Oilers’ offense entered deep in to Vaque-

ro territory. On the goal line, Patterson intercepted the ball and ran it back 51 yards to set up another Vaquero touchdown. The Vaquero run defense also proved successful, allowing only 22 yards rushing. In the third quarter, the defense

again came up with a big play when the Oilers encroached on the Vaquero red zone. Josh Nesbitt hit the Oilers’ quarterback to force a fumble which was recovered by defensive tackle Brian Lynch. The first touchdown of the game

Vaquero Sports Summaries CROSS COUNTRY The Vaquero women won the Western State Conference championship last Tuesday at Cuesta College while the men finished fourth. Tove Berg led the women to the title by winning the 3.1 mile race in 18:36 as the Vaqs won with 44 points. Bakersfield was second with 62 and Ventura was third with 97. Lili Hernandez was third in 19:52, Ana Rodriguez was eighth in 20:14, Brenda Santana was 13th in 20:39 and Desiree Ruiz was 21st in 21:24. Rosario Castaneda was 24th in 21:54 and Sandra Martinez was 27th in 22:04. Berg and Hernandez earned first-team all-WSC honors by virtue of their finishes. Rodriguez and Santana were second-team choices and Ruiz made the third-team Castaneda and Martinez were named to the fourth team all-conference. Chris Lopez finished third over the four mile race in 21:51 to pace the men to their fourth place finish with 127 points.

Jose Valencia was 26th in 23:22, Mike Flowers was 28th in 23:31, Manny Ramirez was 31st in 23:36 and Ruben Hernandez was 40th in 24:08. Lopez was named to the all-WSC first-team and Valencia and Flowers were selected to the all-conference fourth team.

and Josh Nesbitt, Matt Patterson and John Young all had five tackles each and Patterson intercepted a pass.

Glendale hosts Pierce Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. at Sartoris Field and play at Bakersfield Friday at 3:00 p.m.

The Vaqueros hit the road this week with a 4 p.m. WSC clash at Santa Monica City College.

The Vaqueros play at Citrus Tuesday at 4:00 p.m. and play at Mission Friday at 3:00 p.m. Glendale fell to 0-14-2 overall and 0-6-2 in WSC after falling to Canyons 3-0 Friday.

VOLLEYBALL Glendale dropped a pair of matches last week to fall to 1-3 in WSC and 5-11 overall started. Glendale fell to Pierce in three games last Tuesday 3016, 30-13 and 30-20 and fell to Bakersfield in three games Friday 30-23, 30-23 and 3022. In the loss to Bakersfield, Susie Marco had 12 kills and Lourdes Loyola had 10. Alyssa Rosca had 32 assists, Vanessa Escobar had 12 digs and Christine Hyman had three aces.

The Vaqueros host Santa Barbara Tuesday and Oxnard Friday at Sartoris Field. Both games start at 7:00 p.m.

The Vaqueros play at Citrus Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. and host Santa Monica Friday at 7:00 p.m.

WOMEN’S SOCCER The Vaqueros had a tie and a loss last week to drop to 10-5-5 overall and 3-2-3 in WSC. They lost Defensively, Alonzo Meinfield to Santa Monica 2-1 last Tuesday led the charge with six tackles and tied Canyons 0-0 Friday.

Alex Leon Sports Information Director can be reached at (818) 240-1000, ext. 5764 aleon@glendale.edu

FOOTBALL Glendale improved to 7-1 overall and 4-1 in the WSC South after beating West Los Angeles College 45-21 Saturday at Sartoris Field. The Vaqs scored six offensive touchdowns against the Oilers and had 439 yards of total offense. Running back Anthony Cullors earned WSC Player of the Week honors after running for 127 yards on 21 carries and scoring twice and he also had three tackles on special teams. Quarterback Brendon Doyle completed 18 of 29 passes for 206 yards and two touchdowns and Juan Magallon caught five passes for 57 yards and one touchdown.

MEN’S SOCCER Glendale is 1-15-2 overall and 17-2 in WSC after beating Santa Monica 4-2 last Tuesday and losing to Oxnard 4-2 Friday.

Photo by Emmanuel Belviz

was a 5-yard rushing touchdown by Cullors. Then Doyle hooked up with wide receiver Abraham Venegas for a 6-yard touchdown. After an Oiler turnover, Cullors ran 39 yards for a touchdown. The half was capped off by a Esteban Moreno field goal to give the Vaqueros a 24-7 lead going into the half. In the second half , the offense got back to work with a 25 yard touchdown pass from Doyle to Juan Magallon to raise the score 31-7. A 1-yard Jason McNeil touchdown run at the beginning of the fourth quarter gave the Vaqueros a 38-13 lead. Then the starters came off the field. Shaun Kermah scored the final touchdown from the 2 yard line, thanks to a key block by second team O-lineman Eric Aquino, to put the game out of reach for West L.A. Kermah finished the night with 70 yards rushing on 14 carries and a touchdown. The offense totaled 423 yards of offense, including 236 yards on the ground. “The keys were that our defense played well,” said Coach Cicuto. “Offense controlled the ball. We had three turnovers on defense, and we did a great job against the pass.” The Vaqueros, who are 3-1 on the road, will travel to Santa Monica Saturday, where they hope to continue their success. Lenin Lau can be reached at Lenin_Lau@elvaq.com


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Friday, November 3, 2006

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SPORTS

Marco Serves Up a Hot Plate of Success By Susan Aksu el vaquero staff writer

U

C Riverside graduate, Susie Marco did not expect to take on the roles as a full time employee, student and athlete when she enrolled at GCC this summer. Marco graduated from UC Riverside in 2005 as a psychology and dance major. Since receiving her bachelor’s degree, she has been working at a non-profit organization in South Central, Los Angeles in child development as a full time social worker for over a year. The non-profit, Drew Child Development Center is a place where children from abusive families could receive counseling with their parents to prevent any more child abuse from taking place. It helps keep the children out of foster care. “It gets really challenging. We deal with cases of abuse or rape victims that have fallen through the cracks even though we’re not really supposed to deal with those cases,” said Marco, “It gets a little stressful.” Marco is currently working on receiving her master’s degree to become a therapist through GCC. She wants to be involved with working with the Many Family Therapy. MFT are family therapy sessions conducted by psychiatrist, social workers, psychologists and mental health nurses at the same time. The professionals are able to discuss and analyze the family sessions with one another to obtain a better understanding of the situation. She is attending GCC to educate herself more on the effects of drug and alcohol use. The courses will help her in her line of work since she sometimes deals with drug or alcohol related situations. After long stressful and challenging days at work Marco said she finds release when stepping onto the volleyball court. “It feels good leaving work and coming to the court and hitting the ball. It just feels good getting it [the stress] out,” she said. Marco first began to play volleyball in the 6th-grade, but said she did not get serious until the 8th-grade. She continued on to play volleyball for her local high school. During her freshman year at Flintridge Prepatory School she was already a team captain of her J.V. team, as well as being the captain of the Varsity team during her senior year.

Middle blocker Susie Marco guards the net at Friday’s game against Bakersfield.

During both her freshman and senior years on the team she was named MVP as well as receiving the Coach’s Award. Aside from her high school team, she played on a club team, Club Long Beach. “It’s hard not to play volleyball, it makes me feel better,” said Marco. Marco began to play volleyball in a conditioning class over the summer just for exercise and workout purposes. When coach Yvette Ybarra approached her and asked if she wanted to join the team Marco agreed. “She’s basically a really good player,” said Ybarra, “She has great leadership abilities and good skills.”

Volleyball is more than just a game for Marco. She said she enjoys playing volleyball because it’s different from most sports. Playing on a court with five other people requires everyone to work together and not many other sports have that same kind of relationship with the teammates, according to Marco. Marco is the middle blocker for the Vaqueros. At 5’10” she blocks serves and spikes from the opponents. “You get such an adrenaline rush when you’re able to push back [the ball],” said Marco. “Its rally scoring so everything counts and it makes it [the game] really intense. It depends on a lot of team and graceful passes.” She

is ranked 11 in the Western State Conference. Every fault in the game is a point for the team, reaching up to 30 points per game. The winning team is the one which wins three out of five games per match. This scoring method is called “rally scoring.” “Our team has so much potential of winning. When we communicate we can win,” said Marco. “We are the best conditioned team in our conference.” “They need to work on being consistent,” said Ybarra, “They’re like a roller coaster, and they go up and down during the games. They need to be consistent and not have judgment lapses during games”

Photo by Graig Agop

The Vaqueros have not been so successful this season. So far they stand at 5-12. Marco says that their loss against Pierce College was not because they are better than the Vaqueros, but because the Vaqueros did not communicate with each other as well as they could have. “Pierce [College] has a lot of good players, but they just do what they’re supposed to,” said Marco. “If we pull together we should be able to push through and win, if we play the best we know.” Susan Aksu can be reached at Susan_Aksu@elvaq.com


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Friday, November 3, 2006

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Calendar On Campus exhibition ‘Rocktobersurprisefest’ — An art exhibition which features the works of Suzanne Adelman, Dewey Ambrosino, Roger Dickes, Janet Jenkins, Karen Lofgren, Daniel Mendel-Black, Mitchell Syrop and Andrea Teodorescu, “Rocktobersurprisefest” is a collection of diverse and obliquely seditious artworks which aims encryptic resistance at structures that have intensified and denied human and socio-economic rights to international populations. The exhibition is currently on display in the art gallery and runs through Nov. 18. Admittance is free. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday from noon to 6 p.m. For more information, call (818) 240-1000, ext. 5663 or visit www.glendale.edu/artgallery

theatre ‘Waiting for Lefty’ — The Theatre Arts Department presents “Waiting for Lefty” by Clifford Odets. Tickets are $10

for general admission and $6 for students and seniors. Groups of 10 or more, and children under 12 pay $4 each. Tickets may be purchased at the door or reserved in advance. Call (818) 240-1000, ext. 5618.

partment will be performing various scenes from selected plays The showcase will take place at the Auditorium Sudio Theatre at 8 p.m. from Nov. 16 through the 18. Seating is limited and there are no late reservations. Admission is free.

performances

sports

‘Phanatics’ — The Dance department presents “Phanatics,” tomorrow at 8 p.m. The show will take place at the Sierra Nevada Dance Room and consists of student choreographed dance routines. Admission is free and on a first come, first serve basis.

Women’s Volleyball — The lady Vaquero’s face College of the Canyon’s at home on Tuesday. The match gets underway at 7 p.m.

Rock Concert — The Martial Arts Club will be holding a rock concert/event at Kreider Hall on Nov. 11. The doors open at 5 p.m. and the show starts at 6 p.m. Presale tickets are $5 and $7 at the door. Only 140 tickets will be available. For presale information or questions about the show, email Jason Saboury at psychclubgcc@yahoo.com Fall Student Showcase — Students from the Theatre Arts De-

Men’s Soccer — The team takes on Hancock at home on Tuesday. The game starts at 7 p.m. The Vaquero’s face Moorpark on Friday at Sartoris Field. The game gets underway at 7 p.m. Men’s Basketball — GCC hosts The Vaquero Tip-Off Tournament Nov. 10 and 11. Football — The Vaquero’s take on East Los Angeles College Nov. 11 at Sartoris Field. The game starts at 7 p.m.

screening ‘Arlington West’ — The Justice Coalition presents a screening of “Arlington West” on Nov. 14 in remembrance of of all those who have fallen, both soldiers and the countless civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan. The screening will run in conjunction with the actual display that will be installed in Vaquero Plaza. The screening will be held at 1:15 p.m. in SC 212. Admission is free.

other ‘Dating Relating: What’s Normal? What’s Not’ — Peace Over Violence presents tips on how to worry less, get more comfortable and be smart about relationships in their lecture titled, “Dating Relating: What’s Normal? What’s Not?” The lecture will take place on Wednesday from noon to 1 p.m. at SR 116. Philosophy Club Movie Night— The Philosophy Club cordially invites you to movie night, tonight from 5:45 p.m.

to 9:30 p.m. Go to SC 212 for screening information. There will be pizza, drinks and chips. Ethnic Food Luncheon Sale— The Cultural Diversity Program invites you to eat and learn the history of ethnic foods and get copies of recipes too. The sale takes place at Plaza Vaquero on Nov. 16 from 11:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. Students pay $5 with ID, $6 with water. Non-students pay $6, $7 with water. Evening Transfer Fair — Representatives from several colleges and universities will be at San Rafael Plaza on Nov. 14 from 5 to 7 p.m. For more information call (818) 240-1000, ext. 5442.

reminders Winter 2007 — Priority registration for the Winter 2007 session is from Nov. 13 through the 17. Armenian Student Association — ASA is holding its general membership meeting on Thursday at LB 220 from noon to 1 p.m. Everyone is welcomed to attend.

Around Town theatre ‘Catch Me If You Can’ — Back for the 60th anniversary season, the Glendale Centre Theatre presents “Catch Me If You Can,” one of the most suspenseful and fun-filled comedies. The play runs through Nov. 18. Tickets are $17.50 on Wednesday, Thursday evenings and on Saturday for the matinee. Friday and Saturday evenings, tickets can be purchased for $20. Students and Seniors pay $16.50 on seleceted evenings. The Glendale Centre Theatre is located at 324 N. Orange St., Glendale. For additional information visit www.glendalecentretheatre.com or call (818) 244-8481. ‘Pheadra’ — Based on Euripides’ “Hippolytus,” Jean Racine’s “Pheadra” reveals devestating potential of love and the brutality of human nature. The show runs through Nov. 19. Ticket

prices range from $34 to $38. A Noise Within is located at 234 S. Brand Blvd., Glendale. For more information call (818) 240-0910. ‘As You Like It’ — William Shakespeare’s “As You Like It” takes center stage at A Noise Within through Dec. 2. The story of love struck refugees pack Arden’s forest like ripe apples in this glorious comic tribute to the transformative triumph of love. For more information visit www.anoisewithin.org

screenings ‘The Ground Truth’ — The Burbank Neighbors of Peace and Justice are presenting a special free screening of “The Ground Truth” on Nov. 12 at 1:30 p.m. The event will take place at McCambridge Park Recreational Center, room 4. A discussion will follow the film. McCambridge Park is located at 1515

N. Glenoaks Blvd, Burbank. For more information call (818) 842-5055 or send an email to burbankpeace@sbcglobal.net ‘Behind Every Terrorist There Is a Bush’ — The film, “Behind Every Terrorist There Is a Bush” starts with 60 minutes of political comedy and songs performed by David Rovics, Will Durst, Renne Hicks, Bill Santiago, Drew Delinger, Carol Brouillet and others at a benefit, held for the 2004 “San Francisco International Inquiry into 9-11.” The film then goes on to focus on the 9-11 Commission Report. The screening takes place on Nov. 18at the Montrose Library. The film starts at 2:05 p.m. Montrose Library is located at 2465 Honolulu Ave., Montrose. ‘The Notorious Betty Page’ — Dinner and a movie at Cinespace November 7. Cinespace will be showcasing “The Notorious Betty Page” at 8 p.m. Cine-

music House of Blues — Bouncing Souls with special guests Street Dogs and Whole Wheat Bread. The show is tonight and it starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15. The Sippy Cups take the stage on Saturday at noon. The doors open at 11 a.m. and the tickets are $15. All ages welcomed. The House of Blues on the Sunset Strip is located at 8430 Sunset Blvd., L.A. For more information call (323) 848-5100. Knitting Factory — On Saturday, Indie 103.1 presents The Briggs, with special guests Blood or Whiskey. Tickets are $5. The Knitting Factory is located at 7021 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood. For more information call (323) 463-0204. The Wiltern —

Rise Against and Thursday play a show tonight at The Wiltern with guests Circa Survive and Billy Talent. The show starts at 7 p.m. and tickets are $23.50. Modest Mouse rocks the stage on Monday. The show starts at 9 p.m. and tickets are $30. The Wiltern is located at 3790 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. For more information call (213) 3805005. Troubadour — The Apext Theory takes the stage at the Troubadour, Nov. 11 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15. The Troubadour is located at 9081 Santa Monica Blvd., W. Hollywood. Hollywood Bowl — The Who play the Hollywood Bowl on Monday. The show starts at 7 p.m. Tickets range from $56.50 to $50.75. The Hollywood Bowl is located at 2301 N. Highland Ave., L.A.


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Friday, November 3, 2006

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VAQUERO VIEWS

Placebo & She Wants Revenge Co-headlining tour at the Greek Theater on October 22.

Justin Warfiled revs up the crowd with“These Things.”

Stefan Olsdal of Placebo rocks out to the song “Infa-Red.”

Justin Warfield of She Wants Revenge kicks off their set with “Red Flags, and Long NIghts.”

Placebo front man Brian Molko, performs at the Greek Theater after touring outside the United States for six years. Photos by

Graig Agop

Fans are on their feet while She Wants Revenge plays to their hometown of Los Angeles.

Stefan Olsdal, Placebo bass player, delivers a high-energy performance.


Nov 3, 2006