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Practical Life

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents

Criteria for Montessori Album………………………………………………………………………3 Rationale for Practical Life…………………………………………………………………………….4 Practical Life Lessons …………………………….……………………………………………………..10 Grace and Courtesy…………………………………………………………………………..12 Control of Movement………………………………………………………………………..13 Care of Environment………………………………………………………………………….80 Care of Self………………………………………………………………………………………..124 Resources……………………………………………………………………………………………………..156

All rights reserved. Copyright ©2010 Dustin Kosek No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher: For information or permission contact: Dustin Kosek capndustin@gmail.com

August 2010 ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Criteria for Montessori Album

1. Each album shall be created electronically and submitted through eCollege and LiveText. 2. Each album shall contain the following: a. Table of contents b. Rationale statement c. Course syllabus d. Lessons with digital photos or illustrations 3. Each lesson shall be typed and follow the format listed below. a. NAME OF ACTIVITY b. AGES c. MATERIALS d. PRESENTATION e. DIRECT AIMS f. INDIRECT AIMS g. CONTROL OF ERROR h. POINTS OF INTEREST i. VOCABULARY j. VARIATIONS 4. The presentation of each lesson in the completed album shall have an illustration on the left side and the lesson itself on the facing page, as shown below.

Digital picture of the lesson

Lesson write-up

5. All albums will be evaluated on the points listed in your syllabus. Please note that aesthetics is as important as any other ingredient.

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Rationale for Practical Life

Dustin Kosek ED 632A August, 2010

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Practical life in the Montessori classroom is a great beginning for the young child. It contains everyday activities which the child chooses to do freely. Everything in practical life is meant guide the child into independence and also prepare them for work in future years. “If teaching is to be effective with young children, it must assist them to advance on the way to independence. It must initiate them into those kinds of activities which they can perform themselves and which keep them from being a burden to others because of their inabilities. We must help them to learn how to walk without assistance, to run, to go up and down the stairs, to pick up fallen objects, to dress and undress, to wash themselves, to express their needs in a way that is clearly understood, and to attempt to satisfy their desires through their own efforts. All this is part of an education for independence" (Montessori, 1967). The work helps to coordinate the young child’s body defining their fine motor and gross motor muscles. So much focus is also on concentration to help the young child prepare their abilities to focus in everything they do. The order of the lessons are the same for every shelf in the classroom as well as all the shelves and activities for the older age groups, so it really does guide them in the right direction for future learning. OCCI, (Order, Concentration, Coordination, and Independence), is consistently the direct aim of the activities found in practical life. It is a huge piece of the foundation to getting young children on their way in the Montessori Method. The activities found in the practical life area can be classified into four different groupings: Grace and Courtesy: More than any other area, Grace and Courtesy are learned through observation. It is important for the adult to model grace and courtesy for the child in and outside of the classroom. Grace and Courtesy are the foundation of classroom management and gives children the opportunity to be responsible and respectful. Some examples of Grace and Courtesy lessons include but are not limited to: 

shaking hands

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blowing nose

walking around the rug

washing hands

modeling good manners such as “please” and “thank you”

Control of Movement: Here the focus is on fine and gross motor muscle control. Mastery is usually seen in gross motor before fine motor and in the practical life we find activities focusing on each. The gross motor activities prepare the child for future lessons while the fine motor activities helps strengthen the hand muscles in preparation for writing. Some Control of Movement lessons include but are not limited to: 

walking the line

how to carry a chair

silence game

grasping

spooning

pinching

pouring

Care of Environment: Children learn how to do work for themselves that would normally be done by an adult under Care of Environment. The children become more independent and do not have to rely on adults for assistance. The environment is very important in the Montessori classroom and when the young child begins to take care of their own environment it creates confidence and initiative to clean up after themselves. Some lessons in Care of Environment include but are not limited to: 

sweeping

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mopping

window washing

care of animals

dishwashing

Care of Self: These activities give the children confidence to do things on their own without the assistance of an adult. These activities really help the child become independent and responsible. Some Care of Self activities include but are not limited to: 

dressing frames

hand washing

food preparation

fabric folds

shoe lace tying

Maria Montessori created these ideas and lessons by means of careful and thoughtful observation of children within her care. She was able to see that children learned in different ways then were previously thought. She noticed that he child learned through purposeful movement and within most schools at that time, students were meant to sit quietly and listen to the teacher. "When mental development is under discussion, there are many who say, 'How does movement come into it? We are talking about the mind.' And when we think of intellectual activity, we always imagine people sitting still, motionless. But mental development must be connected with movement and be dependent on it. It is vital that educational theory and practice should be informed by that idea" (Montessori, 1995). In creating purposeful movement in the classroom, she put activities up on shelves in order from most basic to more advanced. Not only was the child able to move about the

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room freely, but the activities Montessori created allowed the children to move multiple times during one lesson. Along with the ability to move, Dr. Montessori found that children will choose what they want to learn when they want to learn it. If she allowed the child to choose the lessons they wanted, then the children would have fun learning and better able to retain the information. There are also many activities that Maria created to fulfill the need of a sensitive period in the development of the child. She was well aware of child development and the sensitive periods for learning. Maria made it a point to teach certain things to children within their developmental range. The practical life area focuses on defining fine motor coordination so that when their sensitive period for writing comes, they have the muscle control to master it. At the time the young child is in practical life it is also a sensitive period for exploration of materials and their own body. Many of the lessons in practical life are focused on the child exploring shapes, textures, colors, and the movement of their body for this reason. Repetition and concentration are also a large focus of the practical life area. Children will choose the same lesson over and over again. Maria Montessori believes that if a child is still choosing the same lesson then they are still learning from it. Once the child has become bored with the material, they have learned everything they can from it. It also gives the child a sense of accomplishment and boosts their confidence to know that they can finish a lesson from start to finish without the help of an adult. Inherently, the young child is eager to learn. Maria Montessori, through her observations with young children, has given us the tools to help encourage children to learn for their own benefit. With OCCI, she created a system to ground children in the basics and lead them to independency. With the tools learned in practical life, the young child has the basic knowledge to lead their education and life.

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References Montessori, M. (1995). The Absorbent Mind. New York, Henry Holt and Company, LLC. Montessori, M. (1967). The Discovery of the Child. Fides Publishers Inc. Montessori, M. (1966). The Secret of Childhood. Fides Publishers Inc.

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PRACTICAL LIFE LESSONS Grace and Courtesy Control of Movement Gross Motor • Unroll a rug • Walking the Line • How to carry a chair • How to carry a bucket • How to carry a tray • How to put on an apron • Silence Game • Fetching and disposing of water Fine Motor • Grasping • Scooping • Dry Pouring • Spooning • Bottles and Caps • Nuts and Bolts • Screwdriver and Screws • Ratchet and Bolts • Pinching with fingers • Pinching into a narrow neck vase • Pinching clothespins • Pinching with tongs • Pinching with scissor tweezers • Pinching with tweezers • Wet Pouring • Whisking • Squeeze a baster Care of Environment • Squeezing a sponge • Sweeping • Mopping • Crumbing • Dusting • Window washing • Table scrubbing • Dishwashing • Washing clothes • Scrubbing a shell • Mirror Polishing • Silver Polishing ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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• • • • Care of Self • • • • • • • • • •

Care of Animals Plant Watering Sanding Wood Hammering

Napkin Roll Fabric Folds Dressing Frames Putting on Pants Sewing card Sewing a button Hand washing Table setting Food Preparation Doll washing

GRACE AND COURTESY ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Grace and courtesy is not directly taught to children. Instead, it is modeled by adults and children learn from what they see the adults doing. Therefore, adults need to demonstrate the types of grace and courtesy behaviors that they want to see the children do. Adults should always be graceful and courteous in their interactions with others. Their vocabulary and behavior should also be graceful and courteous. Adults should acknowledge children when they demonstrate grace and courtesy and intervene supportively when children are not being graceful or courteous. Grace and courtesy are the foundation of classroom management and gives opportunities for children to be responsible and considerate. Examples of Grace and Courtesy include: • Greeting every child in the morning and saying good-bye at the end of the day. • Shake hands or hugs. • Presenting lei. • Standing politely. • Opening and closing the door quietly. • Walking around the rug. • Using scissors or other sharp objects safely. • Putting things back where we found them and in a better way we found them. • Show kindness to each other. • Modeling good manners (“please”, “thank you”, “your welcome”, “I’m sorry”). • How to say “excuse me” when interrupting or passing through people. • Offering or asking for help. • Accepting or rejecting help. • Asking to join an activity. • Accepting or refusing a request to join. • Asking or giving permission. • Giving or refusing permission. • Passing or receiving objects. • Asking for a turn. • Granting or refusing a turn • Using one’s hand for a cough or sneeze. • Blowing nose. • Washing hands.

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Control of Movement Control of Movement is composed of Gross Motor and Fine Motor. Children typically master gross motor or large entire body movements before fine motor or small hand movements. Gross motor movements consist of activities that children would learn on the first day of school. These movements will help prepare the child for future lessons. The activities include: • Unroll a rug • Walking the Line • How to carry a chair • How to carry a bucket • How to carry a tray • How to put on an apron • Silence Game • Fetching and disposing of water Fine motor movements are very effective in developing eye-hand coordination and strengthening the hand muscles to prepare children for writing. Movements also train the eye to follow left to right and top to bottom to prepare for reading. The activities include: • Grasping • Scooping • Dry Pouring • Spooning • Bottles and Caps • Nuts and Bolts • Screwdriver and Screws • Ratchet and Bolts • Pinching with fingers • Pinching into a narrow neck vase • Pinching clothespins • Pinching with tongs • Pinching with scissor tweezers • Pinching with tweezers • Wet Pouring • Whisking • Squeeze a baster

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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UNROLL A RUG AGES: 18 months to 6 years MATERIALS: A rolled rug PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Pick up a rolled rug from the rug storage area. 3. Carry the rug vertically to the work area using two hands. 4. Lay the rug on the floor and unroll the rug by pulling the roll toward you with your fingertips as you slowly walk backwards. 5. Slowly and carefully walk around the perimeter of the fully unrolled rug, to demonstrate how to walk around a rug. 6. Re-roll the rug by pulling the roll toward you with your fingertips placed at the edges and gently pat the rolled edges to ensure that the rug is rolled evenly. 7. Return rug to the storage area. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Preparation for when they use rug for choosing activities 2. Defining one’s work space 3. Respecting the work space of others CONTROL OF ERROR: 1. Rug 2. Floor surface 3. Teacher demonstration POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. See the rug unroll smoothly. 2. Feel the rug get smaller under your fingers as you unroll it, larger as you re-roll it. 3. See the smooth, even ends when it is re-rolled. VOCABULARY: rug, unroll, roll, work space, smooth, even, edge VARIATIONS: Using rolled table mats

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Promoting Safety and Preventing Violence and Unintentional Injury

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.4

Describe barriers and situations that are safe, risky, or harmful to self and others

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Identifies safe behavior in a range of situations (e.g., fire, water, traffic, pedestrian, bike, home, medicine cabinet, school, recreation, or around strangers and animals).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Describe, in great detail, barriers and situations that are safe, risky, or harmful to self and others

Describe, in detail, barriers and situations that are safe, risky, or harmful to self and others

Describe, in some detail, barriers and situations that are safe, risky, or harmful to self and others

Describe, in minimal detail, barriers and situations that are safe, risky, or harmful to self and others

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WALKING THE LINE AGES: 18 months to 6 years MATERIALS: A one inch wide continuous line on the floor or ground PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Begin walking on the line, keep hands out and head down for balance, and concentrating on placing heel to toe. 3. Invite the child (or several children) to join you. 4. Encourage children to repeat the activity whenever they want. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Perfect walking skill 2. Inner control and centering 3. Awareness and control of body parts CONTROL OF ERROR: The line POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Keeping feet on the line 2. Balancing VOCABULARY: Line, balance, walk, head, eyes, feet, arms EXTENSIONS: 1. Keep head down, eyes to your feet, hands at side 2. Keep head up, eyes straight ahead, hands at side 3. Let a small or large group walk together and space themselves 4. Skip, march, jog, glide, tip-toe VARIATIONS: 1. Carry a flag in one hand, in two hands 2. Carry a cup of water 3. Carry a bell without letting it ring 4. Carry a ball in a spoon 5. Carry a bean-bag on the head, shoulder, back of hand 6. Carry something dangling from a string 7. Carry a tray 8. Walking in rhythm to music Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HOW TO CARRY A CHAIR AGES: 2 ½ to 3 years MATERIALS: Small Chair PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Walk to the side of the chair and place one hand at the top of the chair and other hand at the front of the seat. 3. Pick up the chair and hold it close to the body. 4. Carefully walk on the line holding the chair. 5. Return the chair. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning how to carry a chair POINTS OF INTEREST: The feel of the chair in the hands CONTROL OF ERROR: The child shall not hit anything with the chair while carrying it. VOCABULARY: chair, carry

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

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HOW TO CARRY A BUCKET AGES: 2 ½ to 3 years MATERIALS: Bucket of water PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Bend knees and grasp bucket handle using two hands. Lift body upright by pushing from the knees and not your back. 3. Hold the bucket with two hands and carry it in front of your body. 4. Carefully walk on the line holding the bucket. 5. Return the bucket. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning how to carry a bucket. CONTROL OF ERROR: The child shall not hit anything with the bucket while carrying it. Nor spill any water contained in the bucket or drop the bucket. POINTS OF INTEREST: The feeling of the bucket in the hands. VOCABULARY: bucket, carry, hold, grasp, handle

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

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HOW TO CARRY A TRAY AGES: 2 ½ to 3 years MATERIALS: An empty tray PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Walk to the shelf and grab the tray with two hands. 3. Carry the tray using both hands to the table. 4. Place tray on the table and pull out the chair and sit down. 5. Stand up from the chair, push the chair in. 6. Grab the tray using both hands from the table. 7. Carry the tray using both hands back to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning how to carry a tray. 2. Preparation for completing an entire work cycle. CONTROL OF ERROR: The child shall not drop the tray. POINTS OF INTEREST: The feeling of the tray in both hands. VOCABULARY: tray, grab, carry EXTENSIONS: 1. Carry a tray of materials. 2. Carry a tray while walking the line

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HOW TO PUT ON AN APRON AGES: 2 ½ to 3 years MATERIALS: Apron PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Walk to the apron holder and choose an apron. 3. Lay the apron on the floor with the open end facing up. 4. Unfasten the Velcro closure and remove the apron from the hanger and replace the hanger on the apron holder. 5. Place the right arm through the right arm hole, then the left arm through the left arm hole. 6. Fasten the Velcro closure or ask a friend to help if unable to reach the Velcro. 7. Unfasten the Velcro closure and place onto the hanger. 8. Hang the apron back onto the apron holder. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning how to put on an apron. 2. Preparation for future activities that require the use of an apron. CONTROL OF ERROR: The apron can only be put on one way, if worn incorrectly, then the child’s close may get dirty. POINTS OF INTEREST: The feeling wearing an apron. VOCABULARY: apron, hanger, Velcro, arm hole, fasten, unfasten, open, close

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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SILENCE GAME AGES: 2 ½ to 4 years MATERIALS: none needed, just a quiet body PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the children to play the silence game. 2. Have the group sit on the floor. 3. Tell them to make their whole body as quiet as possible and quiet their breathing, pretend to be a baby sleeping. 4. Have them close their eyes and listen to the sounds of the environment. 5. Once a child makes a noise, tell the group to open their eyes. 6. Ask them what they heard during the game. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Enhance senses. 2. Gain awareness of sound in the environment. 3. Control body movement. 4. Gain awareness of one’s body in relation to the environment. CONTROL OF ERROR: Being able to keep entire body as quiet as possible. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. The sound of silence. 2. The sounds we hear while we are silent. VOCABULARY: silence, quiet, sound EXTENSIONS: Call each child’s name one by one and have them tip-toe to where you are at.

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN II: PERSONAL AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT o Standard 5: Acquire behaviors and skills expected in school. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 6: Oral Communication: CONVENTIONS AND SKILLS: Apply knowledge of verbal and nonverbal language to communicate effectively in various situations: interpersonal, group, and public¾ for a variety of purposes

Topic

Critical Listening

Benchmark LA.K.6.4

Follow simple oral directions, instructions, and explanations

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Follows simple directions and instructions related to classroom routines and activities (e.g., lining up to go to lunch, putting toys away in their proper place).

Rubric Advanced Consistently follow multi-step oral directions, instructions, and explanations

Proficient Usually follow simple oral directions, instructions, and explanations

Partially Proficient Sometimes follow simple oral directions, instructions, and explanations

Novice Rarely follow simple oral directions, instructions, and explanations

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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FETCHING AND DISPOSING OF WATER AGES: 2 to 5 years MATERIALS: • 2 large buckets (one for clean water, one for dirty/used water) • 1 small pitcher for fetching water • 1 sponge for drying pitcher • a towel • a small shelf or tray for sponge & pitcher • apron PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Bring the pitcher from a water activity (ie. hand washing or dishwashing). 3. Fill water into the pitcher. Say, “This is where we get the water.” 4. Carry pitcher back to activity. Empty water into activity pail. 5. Grasp pail and carry to used water bucket. Say, “This is where we put water when we are finished using it.” 6. Dry and re-order materials. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: Learning to fetch and dispose of water for future activities POINTS OF INTEREST: • Pouring and watching the last drop • Movement of fetching water • Hearing the water as it is being poured CONTROL OF ERROR: The water should not be spilled on the floor VOCABULARY: Fetch, clean water, empty, wet, dry, pail, heavy, full, dispose, dirty water.

HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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GRASPING AGES: 2 to 3 years MATERIALS: • Wooden tray with three sectional parts • Grasping materials such as: shells, beans, marbles, or river rocks • Mat PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Carry tray with both hands and place tray on mat. 3. Grasp handfuls of the material from the first section and place them into middle section of tray, until the first section is empty. 4. Grasp materials from the middle section to last section. 5. Reverse the grasping exercise, by transferring the materials from the last section to the middle and first sections. 6. Replace tray on the shelf.

DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Preparation for writing (left to right movement) 2. Strengthening of the hand for writing CONTROL OF ERROR: Materials falling on the mat or floor should be minimal. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Appearance of the grasping materials used 2. Sounds heard from transferring the material VOCABULARY: name of grasping material used in activity, grasp, handful, empty, transfer, section EXTENSIONS: Use a tray with five or more sections

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

38


SCOOPING AGES: 2 to 3 1/2 years MATERIALS: • Tray • Scooping material such as: seeds, shells, or beans • 2 large bowls • Large scoop PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child 2. Select activity and bring to table using both hands. 3. Pick up the scoop and slowly transfer the material to the empty bowl. Use left to right order. 4. Reverse the scooping process (scoop right to left). 5. Return material to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning how to scoop 2. Preparation for writing POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. The feel and sound of the materials being transferred 2. Movement from left to right CONTROL OF ERROR: No material should be spilled on the tray or floor. VOCABULARY: Scoop, names of items, names of material being transferred

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

39


HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

40


Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

41


DRY POURING AGES: 2 to 3 years MATERIALS: • Tray • Two pitchers (one filled with beans, rice, or beads) PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Get a mat and place it in the table. 3. Carry the activity to the mat using both hands. 4. Hold the filled pitcher with both hands, and pour the contents into the empty pitcher. 5. Set the pitcher on the tray and repeat pouring so that the contents are returned to the original pitcher. 6. Return the activity to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning to pour CONTROL OF ERROR: Materials spilled on the tray or floor should be minimal. POINTS OF INTEREST: Hearing and seeing the material being poured. VOCABULARY: pour, name of grain used in activity, pitcher, spout, handle VARIATIONS: 1. Use more than one empty container. 2. Use containers without handles or spouts. 3. Use small or narrow containers 4. Have narrow-necked empty containers and use a funnel. 5. Vary the pouring material

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

42


HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

43


Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

44


SPOONING AGES: 3 to 4 ½ years MATERIALS: • Tray • Two bowls • Spoon • Objects to spoon such as beads, seeds or nuts PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child 2. Carry the activity with both hands to the mat. 3. Place bowl of beads to the left, and the empty bowl to the right. Place the spoon between the bowls. 4. Grasp the spoon and carefully spoon the beads from one bowl to the other bowl. 5. Repeat this process until all beads have been transferred to the second bowl. 6. Look for any beads that may have fallen on the tray, and place into the bowl. 7. Place spoon in between the bowls. 8. Return activity to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning how to hold a spoon 2. Strengthening the hand for writing. 3. Left to right sequence for reading. CONTROL OF ERROR: Beads falling out onto the tray or floor should be minimal. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. The sound of the spoon and beads clinking against the bowl as they are being transferred. 2. The feeling of holding the spoon. 3. The material itself VOCABULARY: spoon, grasp, transfer VARIATIONS: 1. Use different types of spoons. 2. Using different objects to spoon.

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

45


HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

46


BOTTLES AND CAPS AGES: 2 ½ to 3 ½ years MATERIALS: • Tray or basket for bottles • Four to six small bottles with caps PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Place basket on upper left corner of the mat 3. Take bottles out of the basket one at a time and place in a row. 4. Unscrew caps and place them in mixed array below the bottles. 5. Point to the first bottle. 6. Scan the caps and select the matching cap. Slowly twist cap to the bottle. 7. Continue until all bottles and caps are matched. 8. Return materials to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Strengthening the wrist to prepare the hand for writing POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Twisting caps 2. Sizes and shapes of bottles CONTROL OF ERROR: Matching of the bottles and caps VOCABULARY: Screw, match, bottles, caps VARIATIONS: Use similar bottles used in other activities.

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

47


HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

48


Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

49


NUTS AND BOLTS AGES: 2 ½ to 4 years MATERIALS: • Tray • Several different sizes of nuts and bolts PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Carry the container of nuts and screws to the table. 3. Take out one bolt, using thumb and first two fingers, unscrew the nut. 4. Place the nut on the top of the mat. 5. Place the bolt on the bottom of the mat. 6. Continue as above with remaining nuts and bolts. 7. Choose a screw and find the matching nut. 8. Screw the nut on the bolt and place the matching pair back in the tray. Continue matching all the nuts and bolts. 9. Return the tray to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Strengthening of the wrist to prepare for writing CONTROL OF ERROR: The nuts and bolts are different sizes so they have only one perfect match. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Screwing and seeing the matched pair of nut and bolt. 2. The feel and weight of the nuts and bolts. VOCABULARY: Nuts, bolts, twist, screw, match EXTENSIONS: Seriate the nuts and bolts by size.

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

50


HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

51


SCREWDRIVER AND SCREWS AGES: 3 to 4 years MATERIALS: • Tray • Wooden board containing four holes for screws • Four screws • Small screwdriver PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child 2. Carry activity tray with both hands to the mat 3. Grab one screw and place it in the first hole from the left. 4. Place the screwdriver tip into the groove of the screw. 5. Turn the screwdriver clockwise to tighten the screw. 6. Do the same with the rest of the screws. 7. Reverse the activity. Starting from the left again, loosen each screw. 8. Place the screwdriver tip into the groove of the screw. 9. Turn the screwdriver counterclockwise to loosen the screw. 10. Place the screw back into the dish. 11. Replace the screwdriver into the dish. 12. Return activity to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning to use a screwdriver. 2. Strengthening the fingers to prepare for writing. 3. Left/right order to prepare for reading. CONTROL OF ERROR: 1. The screw may not tighten if it is not place properly into the hole. 2. There is the same number of screws for each hole. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. The materials itself 2. The feeling of turning the screwdriver. 3. Seeing the screw tighten and loosen. VOCABULARY: screwdriver, screw, turn, hole, clockwise, counterclockwise, tighten, loosen VARIATIONS: Use different sized screws and screwdrivers. ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

52


HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

53


RATCHET AND BOLTS AGES: 3 to 4 years MATERIALS: • Tray • Wooden board containing four holes for bolts • Four bolts • Ratchet PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child 2. Carry activity tray with both hands to the mat 3. Grab one bolt and place it in the first hole from the left. 4. Hold the ratchet with thumb facing down towards the tip. 5. Place the ratchet tip onto the top of the bolt. 6. Turn the ratchet clockwise to tighten the bolt. 7. Do the same with the rest of the bolts. 8. Reverse the activity. Starting from the left again, loosen each bolt. 9. Place the ratchet tip into the groove of the bolt. 10. Turn the ratchet counterclockwise to loosen the bolt. 11. Place the bolt back into the dish. 12. Do the same for the rest of the bolts. 13. Replace the ratchet into the dish. 14. Return activity to the shelf and replace mat. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning to use a ratchet. 2. Strengthening the fingers to prepare for writing. 3. Left/right order to prepare for reading. CONTROL OF ERROR: 1. The bolt may not tighten if it is not place properly into the hole. 2. There is the same number of bolts for each hole. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. The materials itself 2. The feeling of turning the ratchet. 3. Seeing the bolt tighten and loosen. VOCABULARY: ratchet, bolt, turn, hole, clockwise, counterclockwise, tighten, loosen ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

54


VARIATIONS: Use different sized bolts and ratchets. HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

55


Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

56


PINCHING WITH FINGERS AGES: 18 months to 3 years MATERIALS: • Tray • A wooden block with holes or bathtub suction cup • A bowl containing the same number marbles or beads as for the holes in the block or suction • cups. PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child 2. Carry activity tray with both hands to the mat. 3. Place activity with bowl of marbles on the left and wooden block to the right. 4. Using the pencil grasp (thumb and two fingers), pick up one marble or bead from the bowl and place into a hole going left to right and top to bottom or counterclockwise, depending on the shape of the wooden block or bathtub suction cup). 5. Repeat this process until all the marbles or beads have been placed in a hole. 6. Reverse the activity. Using the pencil grasp, pick up one marble from the wooden block and place into the bowl (going left to right and top to bottom or counterclockwise). 7. Return activity to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Preparation for other pinching activities such as tweezing or clothespins. 2. Strengthening the pincher grasp to prepare for writing. 3. Left right sequence for reading. CONTROL OF ERROR: 1. There is the same number of marbles or beads as there are holes, so each hole will be filled. 2. The marble or bead fits perfectly into each hole. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. The materials itself 2. Placing each marble or bead in the hole. 3. Pinching with fingers. VOCABULARY: marble pinch, hole, place

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

57


HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

58


PINCHING INTO A NARROW NECK VASE AGES: 2 to 4 years MATERIALS: • Tray • A small narrow neck vase or jar • A bowl with beads PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child 2. Carry activity tray with both hands to the mat. 3. Place activity with bowl of beads on the left and vase on the right. 4. Using the pencil grasp (thumb and two fingers), pick up one bead and drop it in the vase. 5. Repeat this process until all the beads have been transferred to the vase. 6. Look for any beads that may have fallen on the tray, and place into the bowl. 7. Pour beads back into the left bowl. 8. Return activity to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Strengthening the fingers to prepare for writing. 2. Left right sequence for reading. CONTROL OF ERROR: 1. Beads falling out onto the tray or floor should be minimal. 2. Size of the vase neck should be big enough for beads to fall through. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. The sound of the bead as it falls into the vase. 2. Placing each bead in the vase. 3. Pinching the bead with fingers. 4. The materials itself VOCABULARY: bead, pinch, vase, drop, pour, hole VARIATIONS: 1. Use different kinds of pinching materials such as seeds or marbles. 2. Use different sized vases or jars. 3. Use tweezers, tongs, or chopsticks instead of fingers.

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

59


HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

61


PINCHING CLOTHESPINS AGES: 2 to 3 ½ years MATERIALS: • Box with colored tape or dots on each side (inside and outside) • Plastic tray • 8 clothespins (4 colors, 2 pins per color) PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child 2. Carry activity tray with both hands to the mat. 3. Take all of the pins from the box one by one and place them on the tray. 4. Grasp the end of one clothespin between the thumb and the forefinger and apply pressure until tips meet. 5. Holding the clothespin perpendicular to the edge of the box, slowly bring it down over the edge of the box on the side that corresponds to the color of that clothespin and release the pressure. 6. Do the same with the rest of the clothespins, matching the colored sides to the colored pins. 7. One by one, take the clothespins off the box and place them inside the box 8. Return activity to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Strengthening the fingers to prepare for writing. 2. Learning to use clothespins CONTROL OF ERROR: The colored tape or dot on the sides of the box should match the color of the clothespin clipped to it. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. The materials itself 2. The feeling of pinching the clothespins. 3. Seeing the clothespins clamped on the side of the box. VOCABULARY: clothespin, squeeze, pinch, release, grasp VARIATIONS: 1. Hanging clothes-use colored clothespins to match colored clothes. 2. Clamping papers together in packs. 3. Use different types of clips. ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

64


PINCHING WITH TONGS AGES: 3 to 4 ½ years MATERIALS: • Tray • Ice cube tray • Bowl • Small tongs • Pom pom balls (number depends on how many sections in the ice cube tray) PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child 2. Carry the activity with both hands to the mat. 3. Demonstrate how to use the tongs. Squeeze the tongs, slide the lock to the top to open. Squeeze the tongs, slide the lock to the bottom to close or lock in place. 4. Pinch one pom pom balls from the bowl and place in one ice cube section. 5. Repeat this process filling each ice cube section from the top row going left to right, then the bottom row going left to right, until the ice cube tray is filled. 6. Using the tongs, pinch and replace the pom pom balls back into the bowl going from left to right and top to bottom. 7. Return activity to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning to use tongs. 2. Strengthening the hand to prepare for writing. 3. Left-right, top-bottom sequence for reading. CONTROL OF ERROR: There are as many pom pom balls as there are ice cube sections. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. The material itself. 2. Placing each pom pom balls in an ice cube section. 3. The feeling of squeezing the tongs. VOCABULARY: pom pom balls, ice cube tray, ice cube section, tongs, pinch, squeeze, lock VARIATIONS: 1. Use different kinds of pinching materials such as nuts, seeds, or beads. 2. Use different kinds of tongs such as wooden tongs or chopsticks. ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

65


HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

66


PINCHING WITH SCISSOR TWEEZERS AGES: 3 to 4 ½ years MATERIALS: • Tray • Two bowls • One scissor tweezer • Pinching material- beads PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child 2. Carry the activity with both hands to the mat. 3. Place bowl of beads to the left, and the empty bowl to the right. Place the scissor tweezers between the bowls. 4. Demonstrate how to use the tweezers. 5. Pinch one bead from the bowl and place in the other bowl. 6. Repeat this process until all the beads have been transferred to the second bowl. 7. Look for any beads that may have fallen on the tray, and place into the bowl. 8. Place the scissor tweezers in between the bowls. 9. Return activity to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning to use scissor tweezers. 2. Strengthening the hand to prepare for writing. 3. Left right sequence for reading. CONTROL OF ERROR: Beads falling out onto the tray or floor should be minimal. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. The sound of the bead as it hits the bowl. 2. Placing each bead in the bowl. 3. The feeling of squeezing the scissor tweezers. 4. The material itself. VOCABULARY: bead, scissor tweezers, pinch, tweeze EXTENSIONS: Using the scissor tweezers, sort the beads by color. VARIATIONS: Use different kinds of pinching materials such as erasers. ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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PINCHING WITH TWEEZERS AGES: 2 to 3 ½ years MATERIALS: • Tray • Rubber suction cup • A bowl containing beads PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child 2. Carry activity tray with both hands to the mat. 3. Place activity with bowl of beads on the left and rubber suction cup to the right. Tweezers are placed in between the bowl and rubber suction cup foot. 4. Using the tweezers, tweeze one bead from the bowl and place into a suction cup hole (going left to right and top to bottom). 5. Repeat this process until all the beads have been placed into the suction cups. 6. Reverse the activity. Using the tweezers, tweeze one bead from the suction cup and place back into the bowl (going left to right and top to bottom). 7. Return activity to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning to use tweezers 2. Strengthening the fingers to prepare for writing. 3. Left right sequence for reading. CONTROL OF ERROR: 1. There is the same number of beads as there are suction cups, so each cup will be filled. 2. The bead fits perfectly into each hole. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. The materials itself. 2. Placing each bead into each suction cup. 3. Squeezing the tweezers. VOCABULARY: bead, tweeze, squeeze, suction cup, place VARIATIONS: 1. Use chopsticks instead of tweezers. 2. Use a different shaped suction cup material. ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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WET POURING AGES: 2 to 3 years MATERIALS: • Tray • Two small pitchers (one with water) • Sponge PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Select activity and carry to the mat. 3. Grasp the pitcher containing the water with two hands. 4. Pour slowly into empty pitcher. Use index finger (place just below lip of filled pitcher) to provide support. 5. Pause and watch the last drop fall. 6. Pour the water back into the first pitcher. 7. Wipe tray and pitchers with the sponge if needed. 8. Return materials to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning to pour liquids 2. Preparation for future lessons requiring pouring of liquids CONTROL OF ERROR: Water spilled should be minimal. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Sound of the water being poured 2. Watching the last drop fall VARIATIONS: 1. Use different types of cups, glasses, or pitchers with or without handles and lips. 2. Use a funnel 3. Use colored water VOCABULARY: Pour, grasp, pitcher

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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WHISKING AGES: 3 ½ to 5 years MATERIALS: • Tray • Sponge • Pail • Large bowl • Liquid soap in container • Apron • Whisk • Pitcher PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Fetch water using the pitcher. Pour slowly into bowl. 3. Place three drops of liquid soap in water. 4. Using the whisk, stir using a counterclockwise motion. 5. Increase the speed of the stirring. Watch as more bubbles form. 6. Empty the soapy water into the used water pail. 7. Dry the tray, bowl and pitcher with the sponge. 8. Return materials to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning how to use a beater or whisk for advanced lessons with food preparation 2. Strengthening the hand for writing 3. Developing the wrist movement CONTROL OF ERROR: Water spilled should be minimal. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Watching the bubbles being formed 2. Stirring the water with the whisk. VOCABULARY: Wrist, movement, soap, bubbles, fetch

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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SQUEEZING A BASTER AGES: 2 to 5 years MATERIALS: • Tray • Two containers (one filled with colored water) • Baster • Sponge PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Get the activity and place it on the mat. 3. Hold the baster bulb with both hands and place the baster tip into the water. 4. Squeeze the baster bulb. 5. With the tip still in the water, release pressure on the baster bulb. 6. Lift the baster out of the water and put the tip into the empty container. 7. Squeeze the baster until all the water is emptied out, watching the water fall into the bottom of the container. 8. Repeat until all the water has been transferred from the first container into the second container then back to the first container. 9. Use the sponge to wipe up any spills and dry the empty bowl. 10. Return the activity to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning to use a baster 2. Strengthening the hand for writing CONTROL OF ERROR: Water spilled should be minimal. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Watching the intake of liquid (colored water enables child to more easily see movement of water) 2. Hear the sound of water and air when the water container is emptied on the last squeeze 3. Seeing the transfer of liquid VOCABULARY: baster, suck, squeeze, bubbles, air VARIATIONS: 1. Use an ice cube tray and/or pitcher as a container. 2. Use a baby aspirator or eye dropper instead of a baster. ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o Domain I: Physical Development, Health and Safety o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles.

HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.1

Use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic locomotor skills (e.g., walking, running, jumping, hopping, leaping, sliding, galloping, skipping).

Rubric Advanced Consistently use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Proficient Usually use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Partially Proficient Sometimes use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Novice Rarely use basic locomotor skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Care of Environment Care of Environment includes activities that teach children how to care for their environment. Many of the activities are tasks that adults usually do, so children learn to be independent in their environment and do not have to rely on adults to complete the task for them. They gain confidence and initiative to clean up after themselves. Children also learn to care for the animals and plants that are in their environment. Sanding wood and hammering are great activities for boys that allow them to create things for their environment such as bird houses. Activities include: •

Squeezing a sponge

Sweeping

Mopping

Crumbing

Dusting

Window washing

Table scrubbing

Dishwashing

Washing clothes

Scrubbing a shell

Mirror Polishing

Silver Polishing

Care of Animals

Plant Watering

Sanding Wood

Hammering

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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SQUEEZING A SPONGE AGES: 2 ½ to 4 years MATERIALS: • Plastic tray • Two water • Sponge • Water PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Carry the activity with both hands to the mat. 3. Place bowl of water to the left, and the empty bowl to the right. Place the sponge in between the bowls. 4. Soak the sponge in the water by pushing it in the bowl with your finger tips. 5. Grasp the sponge and with both hands, squeeze (using all fingers) the water out of the sponge and into the empty bowl. 6. Place the sponge back into the water and repeat the process until all of the water has been squeezed into the second bowl and the sponge is dry. 7. Repeat the process by squeezing the water from the second bowl back into the first bowl. 8. Wipe up any excess water on the tray or bowl. 9. Place sponge in between the bowls. 10. Return activity to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Leaning how to clean up spills using a sponge. 2. Strengthening the hand for writing. 3. Left right sequence for reading. CONTROL OF ERROR: Water spilled should be minimal POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Seeing the sponge soak up the water. 2. Feeling the sponge when it is filled with water and when it is dry. 3. Seeing the water being squeezed out of the sponge.

VOCABULARY: wet, dry, sponge, squeeze, grasp, wipe

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS:

o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.2

Explain the benefits associated with exercise

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Describes the health benefits of exercise (e.g., increased energy, a way to make friends, helps to maintain healthy weight).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Explain, in great detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Explain, in detail, the Explain, in some detail, Explain, in minimal benefits associated with the benefits associated detail, the benefits exercise with exercise associated with exercise

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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SWEEPING AGES: 2 ½ to 3 ½ years MATERIALS: • Child size broom • Basket with shreds of paper • Dustpan and brush • Taped square on floor PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Sprinkle the shreds of paper on floor near the taped square. 3. Using the broom sweep the paper into the square. 4. Using the dustpan and brush sweep the paper into the dustpan. 5. Empty the paper into the basket. 6. Return materials to shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning how to use a broom to clean floors. CONTROL OF ERROR: All of the paper should be swept up. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Using a broom 2. Seeing a clean floor VOCABULARY: Scatter, broom, dusting pan, hand broom, sweep, empty VARIATIONS: Sweep different materials on different surfaces

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS:

o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.2

Explain the benefits associated with exercise

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Describes the health benefits of exercise (e.g., increased energy, a way to make friends, helps to maintain healthy weight).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Explain, in great detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Explain, in detail, the Explain, in some detail, Explain, in minimal benefits associated with the benefits associated detail, the benefits exercise with exercise associated with exercise

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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MOPPING AGES: 3 to 4 years MATERIALS: • Mop • Pail PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Carry pail to the water source and fill. 3. Carry pail and mop to the work area. 4. Place mop in water. Lift. Watch the water drop. 5. Squeeze the water out of the mop using two hands. 6. Mop floor in a counterclockwise direction. 7. Repeat process as needed. 8. Rinse and squeeze out mop. 9. Return materials to the shelf DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning how to use a mop to clean up floors. CONTROL OF ERROR: Water left on the floor should be minimal POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Movement of the mop 2. Squeezing out of the water 3. Seeing a clean floor VOCABULARY: Mop, water, pail, sqeeze VARIATIONS: Use “Swiffer” mop

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS:

o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.2

Explain the benefits associated with exercise

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Describes the health benefits of exercise (e.g., increased energy, a way to make friends, helps to maintain healthy weight).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Explain, in great detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Explain, in detail, the Explain, in some detail, Explain, in minimal benefits associated with the benefits associated detail, the benefits exercise with exercise associated with exercise

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

89


CRUMBING AGES: 2 to 3 years MATERIALS: • Bowl with seeds, confetti, or flower petals • Hand sized broom with dustpan PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Scoop material with hand and scatter on table. 3. Sweep the material into small pile. 4. Sweep the material into the dustpan 5. Empty material into the bowl 6. Return materials to the shelf DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning how to sweep up crumbs and clean up messes. CONTROL OF ERROR: All the materials should be swept up. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Sound of the material being swept 2. Seeing a clean table VARIATIONS: Use different materials and different surfaces VOCABULARY: Crumb, scoop, sweep, broom, dust pan

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS:

o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.2

Explain the benefits associated with exercise

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Describes the health benefits of exercise (e.g., increased energy, a way to make friends, helps to maintain healthy weight).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Explain, in great detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Explain, in detail, the Explain, in some detail, Explain, in minimal benefits associated with the benefits associated detail, the benefits exercise with exercise associated with exercise

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

92


DUSTING AGES: 2 to 3 years MATERIAL: • Feather duster • Mat PRESENTATION: 1. Invite child to the activity. 2. Carry duster to shelf to be dusted. 3. Remove materials from shelf, one shelf at a time, from left to right, placing the materials in the same order on the mat. 4. Dust shelf moving duster in a top to bottom direction. 5. Check for dust by wiping the shelf with a finger to see if it is clean. 6. Replace materials on shelf 7. Return duster to its place. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning how to dust. CONTROL OF ERROR: There should be no dust on the shelves. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Using a feather duster 2. Seeing a clean shelf VARIATIONS: Cloth dusters such as “Swiffer”

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS:

o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.2

Explain the benefits associated with exercise

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Describes the health benefits of exercise (e.g., increased energy, a way to make friends, helps to maintain healthy weight).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Explain, in great detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Explain, in detail, the Explain, in some detail, Explain, in minimal benefits associated with the benefits associated detail, the benefits exercise with exercise associated with exercise

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

95


WINDOW WASHING AGES: 2 to 3 years MATERIALS: • Window washing liquid (such as vinegar, dish soap, and water mixture) contained in a spray bottle • Squeegee • Paper towels PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Place the materials in front of the window. 3. Spray the cleaner liquid on the top section of the window. 4. Use the squeegee and wipe the liquid off the window in a top to bottom and left to right direction. 5. Wipe any excess liquid with the paper towel over the window until the window is dry and clean. 6. Return materials to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning how to wash windows. CONTROL OF ERROR: The window should be dry and clean after it is washed. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Using the spray bottle and squeegee 2. Seeing a clean window VOCABULARY: spray bottle, paper towel, wipe, squeegee

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS:

o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.2

Explain the benefits associated with exercise

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Describes the health benefits of exercise (e.g., increased energy, a way to make friends, helps to maintain healthy weight).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Explain, in great detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Explain, in detail, the Explain, in some detail, Explain, in minimal benefits associated with the benefits associated detail, the benefits exercise with exercise associated with exercise

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

98


TABLE SCRUBBING AGES: 2 ½ to 4 years MATERIALS: • Table • Apron • Bowl • Scrub brush • Soap • Soap dish • Sponge • Towel PRESENTATION: 1. Invite child to wash a table. 2. Have child put apron on. 3. Place water into the bowl from the water source. 4. Dip scrub brush into the water. 5. Gently rub the brush over the soap. 6. Scrub the table in a left to right and top to bottom direction, creating counterclockwise circles. 7. Obtain more soap if needed. 8. Continue scrubbing entire table. 9. Place sponge in the bowl. Wipe off the soap from the table by moving the sponge left to right and top to bottom. Rinse and squeeze the sponge into the bowl of water as needed. Make sure to wipe any excess soap from the bottom edges of the table. 10. Dry the table using the towel. Touch the table with hands to feel the cleanliness. 11. Empty the water into the used water source bucket and dry the bowl with the sponge. 12. Return materials to proper place. 13. Hang apron. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning how to wash a table 2. Preparation for reading and writing CONTROL OF ERROR: 1. Water or soap spilled should be minimal. 2. Table should feel dry and clean when finished. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Seeing the soap bubbles 2. Hearing the sound of the scrub brush VOCABULARY: Soap, scrub brush, sponge, table, scrub, wipe, dry

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS:

o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.2

Explain the benefits associated with exercise

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Describes the health benefits of exercise (e.g., increased energy, a way to make friends, helps to maintain healthy weight).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Explain, in great detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Explain, in detail, the Explain, in some detail, Explain, in minimal benefits associated with the benefits associated detail, the benefits exercise with exercise associated with exercise

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

101


DISHWASHING AGES: 2 ½ to 4 years MATERIALS: • Two basins (one filled with soapy water, one filled with clean water) • Dishes (preferably dirty ones that were used from snack or food preparation) • Soap • Dish sponge • Dish rack • Apron • Towel PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Put on the apron. 3. Place a dish in the soapy water and wipe the dish in circular motion using the dish sponge. 4. Rinse the dish in the clean water. 5. Let the water drip from the dish, watch the last drop, then place it in the dish rack. 6. Continue the procedure for all dishes. 7. Dry the dishes using the towel. 8. Replace the dry dishes on the shelf. 9. Remove the apron. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning how to wash dishes. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. The feel of the soapy water. 2. Seeing the soap disappear from the dishes after rinsing them. 3. Scrubbing the dishes with the sponge. CONTROL OF ERROR: The dishes should be clean after they have been washed: VOCABULARY: lather, scrub, rinse, dry

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS:

o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.2

Explain the benefits associated with exercise

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Describes the health benefits of exercise (e.g., increased energy, a way to make friends, helps to maintain healthy weight).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Explain, in great detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Explain, in detail, the Explain, in some detail, Explain, in minimal benefits associated with the benefits associated detail, the benefits exercise with exercise associated with exercise

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

104


WASHING CLOTHES AGES: 3 ½ to 6 years MATERIALS: • Table • Apron • Two basins • Pitcher • Washboard • Soap • Soap dish • Sponge • Basket for wet clothes • Clothes pins • Clothes line PRESENTATION: 1. Put apron on. 2. Bring tray to table. 3. Fill the basins with water from the water source. 4. Place washboard in basin. 5. Immerse cloth in water. 6. Place wet cloth on washboard. 7. Place soap on cloth and fold around it. 8. Holding washboard securely with one hand, rub cloth and soap up and down on washboard once with the other hand. 9. Return soap to dish and scrub cloth on the wash board several times. 10. Rinse excess soap from cloth and squeeze excess water out from the cloth. 11. Place cloth in rinse water. 12. Lift cloth up and down a few times and then squeeze excess water out in the same manner as above. 13. Place cloth in basket. 14. Continue to wash all cloths in the manner, one at a time, as above. 15. Empty basins into the used water buckets and wipe dry with the sponge. 16. Hang cloths on clothes line. 17. Hang apron. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning how to wash clothes CONTROL OF ERROR: 1. Water spilled on the floor should be minimal. ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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2. Too much soap on washboard and cloths. 3. Clothes that are too wet. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Soap suds on washboard. 2. Sound of washboard. 3. Squeezing out the water from the cloth VOCABULARY: Washboard, soap, clothes, scrub, rinse, squeeze, hang HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS:

o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.2

Explain the benefits associated with exercise

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Describes the health benefits of exercise (e.g., increased energy, a way to make friends, helps to maintain healthy weight).

Rubric Advanced Explain, in great detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Proficient Explain, in detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Partially Proficient Explain, in some detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Novice Explain, in minimal detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

107


SCRUBBING A SHELL AGES: 3 to 5 years MATERIALS: A large shell Pitcher Soap dish

Small cloth for drying Basin Towel for the table Scrub brush Soap Apron

Bucket Sponge 2 trays

PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Put on an apron. 3. Scoop water from the clean water container using the pitcher and pour into the basin. Fill the water to the water line. 4. Place the shell in the basin. 5. Take the scrub brush and dip it in the water. Rub the scrub brush over the soap three times in counter clockwise direction. 6. Begin to scrub the shell in a circular counterclockwise motion, using the left hand on the shell to keep it from falling off the table. 7. Rinse the brush and let it drip in the basin before placing it on the tray. 8. Use the sponge to rinse the shell. 9. Dry the shell with the towel and return to tray. 10. Empty the basin water into the bucket. 11. Empty the bucket water into the dirty water container. 12. Wipe up any excess water from the table. 13. Hang up the apron. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Strengthening the hand for further exercises including writing. 2. Preparation to clean other objects. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Working with an interesting and beautiful shell 2. Sound of the brush against the shell CONTROL OF ERROR: 1. Water or soap on the floor or child. 2. Soap left on the shell. VOCABULARY: rub, scrub, dry, and the names of the materials: sponge, soap, scrub brush, shell

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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VARIATIONS: 1. Use stones or a large rock 2. Change the shell HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS:

o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.2

Explain the benefits associated with exercise

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Describes the health benefits of exercise (e.g., increased energy, a way to make friends, helps to maintain healthy weight).

Rubric Advanced Explain, in great detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Proficient Explain, in detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Partially Proficient Explain, in some detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Novice Explain, in minimal detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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MIRROR POLISHING AGES: 3 to 6 years MATERIALS: • Tray • Mirror • Polishing liquid • Container • Cotton ball • Polishing cloth PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Place materials on the table. 3. Place the mirror in front of the child 4. Squeeze a small amount of polishing liquid into the container. 5. Dip cotton ball gently into the liquid. 6. Rub the cotton ball on the mirror from left to right, top to bottom if it is rectangular, or rub in a counter clockwise motion if the mirror is circular. 7. Rub until the mirror is covered with the polishing liquid. 8. Place polishing cloth in thumb and first two fingers and polish the mirror until the liquid is gone and the mirror is shiny. 9. Replace the materials on the tray. 10. Return the materials on the shelf. 11. Wash hands to remove any polish left on fingers. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning how to polish. 2. Preparation for writing. CONTROL OF ERROR: 1. There should be no polish left on mirror 2. Looking at self in a clean mirror POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Observing the differences between the area with polish and the area without polish. 2. Observing the mirror before and after the polishing. VOCABULARY: Mirror, cotton ball, polish, polish cloth, rub

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS:

o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.2

Explain the benefits associated with exercise

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Describes the health benefits of exercise (e.g., increased energy, a way to make friends, helps to maintain healthy weight).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Explain, in great detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Explain, in detail, the Explain, in some detail, Explain, in minimal benefits associated with the benefits associated detail, the benefits exercise with exercise associated with exercise

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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SILVER POLISHING AGES: 3 to 6 years MATERIAL: • Piece of silver to polish • Basket • Silver polish • Cotton ball • Polishing cloth • Mat PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Place materials on the mat. 3. Squeeze a small amount of silver polish on the cotton ball. 4. Gently rub the cotton ball on the silver using counterclockwise strokes. 5. Gently rub the polishing cloth on the silver to remove the polish. 6. Return materials to the shelf. 7. Wash hands to remove any polish on fingers. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning how to polish 2. Preparation for writing CONTROL OF ERROR: The silver should be shiny and no polish should remain on the silver when finished. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Rubbing the polish on the silver 2. Removing the polish 3. Seeing the polished shiny silver VOCABULARY: Polish, cotton ball, silver, polish cloth, rub, shine

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS:

o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.2

Explain the benefits associated with exercise

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Describes the health benefits of exercise (e.g., increased energy, a way to make friends, helps to maintain healthy weight).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Explain, in great detail, the benefits associated with exercise

Explain, in detail, the Explain, in some detail, Explain, in minimal benefits associated with the benefits associated detail, the benefits exercise with exercise associated with exercise

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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CARE OF ANIMALS 

Always consider children’s allergies to animals before bringing animals to the class.

Types of animals: 

Fish o Adult’s responsibility is to clean the fish tank and add more water. o Children’s responsibility s to feed. o Keep fish food out of reach from children. Place food in a small container so children have a measured amount to pour in the tank. o Cover the fish tank and keep on a higher table.

Birds o Adult’s responsibility is to clean the cage daily. o Children can feed using a small dish with leveled amount of food. o Cover cage at nap time.

Turtles o Feed lettuce and papaya. o Watch out for salmonella, always wash hands.

Mice o Nocturnal animals so they sleep most of the day. They are not ideal pets because children will bother them.

Guinea Pig o Adult’s responsibility is to clean cage. o Children can feed and water. o Needs vitamin C everyday. o Lesson:  Day 1: Teacher demonstrates how to pet the animal. Only teacher gets to pet.  Day 2: Allow children to pet using a flat hand.  Let animal run around. “If you scream she will be scared. So be very quiet. I will be the only one to catch her if she runs.”  Gradually, after you trust the children’s care, allow them to take the animal home.  Teach how to feed with carrots.

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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PLANT WATERING AGES: 2 ½ to 3 ½ years MATERIALS: • watering pitcher • water • plant PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Fill the watering pitcher with some water. 3. Carry the watering pitcher in both hands to the plant to be watered. 4. Move the leaves aside so the soil is exposed. 5. Pour water into the soil, say “Hello plant.” That should be sufficient amount of water as you say those words. 6. Discard any left over water. DIRECT AIMS 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning how to water a plant. CONTROL OF ERROR: Water spilled should be minimal. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Seeing the soil absorb the water. 2. Pouring the water onto the soil. 3. Using a watering pitcher VOCABULARY: absorb, soil, water, pour, pitcher

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN II: PERSONAL AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT o Standard 2: Begin to develop a sense of self. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 4: ANALYZING INFLUENCES: Understand the influences of culture, family, peers, media, technology, and other factors on health

Topic

Factors Influencing Health Across Topic Areas

Benchmark HE.K-2.4.1

Describe internal (e.g., one's own feelings, moods, curiosity, physical well-being) and external (e.g., family, school, media) factors that influence health behaviors

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Explains basic influences relevant to healthy behaviors and choices (e.g., commercials selling unhealthy snacks, overeating when feeling sad or depressed).

Rubric Advanced Describe, in great detail, internal and external factors that influence health behaviors

Proficient Describe, in detail, internal and external factors that influence health behaviors

Partially Proficient Describe, in some detail, internal and external factors that influence health behaviors

Novice Describe, in minimal detail, internal and external factors that influence health behaviors

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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SANDING WOOD AGES: 3 to 5 years MATERIALS: • Tray • 2 x 4 wood • Sandpaper PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child 2. Place wood on the mat. 3. Hold the sandpaper in one hand and place the other hand on the wood to stabilize it. 4. Rub the sandpaper back and forth in a left to right motion or a counterclockwise, circular motion. 5. Touch the wood after sanding. 6. Return the materials back to the tray. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Strengthening the hand for further exercises including writing. 2. Preparation for future exercises in woodworking. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Feeling the sandpaper. 2. Feeling the wood. 3. The act of sanding. 4. The sound of sanding. CONTROL OF ERROR: 1. There is one piece of wood and one piece of sand paper. 2. The size of each piece is proportionate to each other. VOCABULARY: wood, sandpaper, rub VARIATIONS: 1. Use different grades of sandpaper 2. Use different shapes of wood. 3. Use a kukui nut.

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles . HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.3

Use basic manipulative skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic manipulative skills (e.g., throwing, catching, striking, kicking).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Consistently use basic manipulative skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Usually use basic manipulative skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sometimes use basic manipulative skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Rarely use basic manipulative skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAMMERING AGES: 4 ½ to 5 years MATERIALS: • Tray • 2 x 4 wood clamped down to a bench • Small hammer • Bowl with 8 nails • Eye goggles • 3 x 5 note card • Pencil PRESENTATION: (To be introduced in steps over a few days) Lesson 1: 1. Show the parts of the hammer (head and claw). 2. Show how to carry the hammer (head pointed down and close to the body). 3. Show how to hammer safely (keep the claw towards you body because it is sharp and someone could get hurt. Bend at the elbows and don’t move your upper arms, keep it close to your body). We hold the hammer using two hands on top of each other. 4. Give each child a stick or a piece of wood and pretend that it is a hammer. Demonstrate hammering using the stick or wood. 5. Put the hammer away. Lesson 2: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Re-demonstrate how we hold the hammer with two hands. Show how to use the goggles. We put the goggles on whenever we hammer. Put the hammer away. Children can practice with the hammer and sticks.

Lesson 3: 1. Holding the goggles, ask, “What is this called?” And “what do I need to do before I hammer?” 2. “Here’s my nail, we used two hands last time, but we need to hold the nail in one hand. 3. While holding the nail in one hand, begin to hammer the nail slowly. 4. Continue until you’ve hammered the nail completely into the wood. 5. “Here’s the claw, I will use it to remove the nail.” Remove the nail and place in bowl. 6. Take off goggles. 7. Return materials to the tray. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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1. Strengthening the hand. 2. Preparation for future exercises in woodworking. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. The materials itself. 2. Seeing the nail go into the wood. 3. The sound of hammering. 4. Removing the nail. CONTROL OF ERROR: Teacher’s lesson on safety- children will loose privileges if the hammer is not used safely. VOCABULARY: wood, hammer, head, claw, nail, goggles, safety, remove, hold VARIATIONS: 1. Use coconut husk instead of a 2 x 4 wood. 2. Use a 3x5 note card if children are afraid of holding the nail. Place an “x” on the card. Poke the nail through the middle of the “x”. Place the card on the wood. Hold the edge of the card while hammering.

HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 5: Develop strength and coordination of small muscles . HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: MOVEMENT FORMS: Use motor skills and movement patterns to perform a variety of physical activities

Topic

Fundamental Skills

Benchmark PE.K-2.1.3

Use basic manipulative skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Demonstrates a variety of basic manipulative skills (e.g., throwing, catching, striking, kicking).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Consistently use basic manipulative skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Usually use basic manipulative skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Sometimes use basic manipulative skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

Rarely use basic manipulative skills in initial (immature) form alone, with a partner, and in small groups

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Care of Self Care of self activities teaches children the skills they need to care for themselves. Similar to the care of environment activities, these materials help children gain independence to do tasks for themselves giving them the confidence to not have to rely on adults to help them. Activities include: •

Napkin Roll

Fabric Folds

Dressing Frames

Putting on Pants

Sewing card

Sewing a button

Hand washing

Table setting

Food Preparation

Doll washing

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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NAPKIN ROLLING AGES: 3 to 4 ½ years MATERIAL: • Tray • Napkins • Napkins rings PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Select one napkin and place in center of mat. 3. Slide napkin ring out. Unroll the napkin. 4. Place napkin ring and unfolded napkin on the upper part of the mat. 5. Continue until all napkins are unrolled. 6. Roll the first napkin and slide the napkin ring to the center of the rolled napkin. 7. Continue rolling and placing napkin rings on the napkins. 8. Return rolled napkins to the tray and return to shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning to roll napkins 2. Preparation for writing CONTROL OF ERROR: If rolled improperly, the napkin will not fit in the napkin ring. POINTS OF INTERESTS: 1. Napkin ring 2. Seeing and feeling the napkin being unrolled and rolled VOCABULARY: Roll, unroll, napkin ring, napkin

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Personal Health and Wellness

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.5

Describe how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Explains how individuals can stay healthy by taking certain actions (e.g., choosing healthy foods, participating in daily exercise, getting enough sleep, brushing and flossing teeth, going to the doctor).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Describe, in great detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in some detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in minimal detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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FABRIC FOLDING AGES: 3 to 5 years MATERIALS: • Tray • Four square dish towels or fabric pieces with stitching in the following manner:

PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Carry the tray in both hands carefully to a table and place on the left of the mat. 3. Carefully unfold all pieces of fabric and place to the left of the mat, under the tray. 4. Trace the fold stitching on the fabric with your fingers. Then using your fingers again, point to the corners you will pick up and then point to the corners you will place the previous corners. 5. Fold the fabric according to the manner in which you pointed. 6. Follow the fold stitching from left to right and top to bottom sequence. 7. Return the fabrics to the tray from easiest to difficult (easiest one on the bottom of the tray, so that it will be the first fabric to be folded when all fabrics are removed). 8. Return the tray to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Homemaking skills 2. Enhancing visual perception CONTROL OF ERROR: 1. Stitching 2. Seeing that the sides do not meet 3. Seeing that the stitching is not where the fold is 4. Arrangement of material when finished (easy to difficult) POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Stitching 2. Folded piece of material VOCABULARY: trace, fold, corners ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Personal Health and Wellness

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.5

Describe how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Explains how individuals can stay healthy by taking certain actions (e.g., choosing healthy foods, participating in daily exercise, getting enough sleep, brushing and flossing teeth, going to the doctor).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Describe, in great detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in some detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in minimal detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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DRESSING FRAMES AGES: 3 to 6 years MATERIALS: Buttoning frame (small buttons) Buttoning frame (large buttons) Tying frame Lacing frame Hook and eye frame

Snap frame Zipper frame Velcro frame Shoe to lace Safety pin frame

PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Place the selected frame on the table mat. 3. Slowly demonstrate how to unfasten the fabric on the frame. 4. Open the unfastened fabric. 5. Re-align the fabric and slowly re-fasten starting at the top. 6. Re-order and return to shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning to dress CONTROL OF ERROR: Uneven appearance of the fabric when task is completed POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Fastening and unfastening the fabric on the frames 2. Joy of learning how to dress oneself VOCABULARY: The names of the frames, and fasteners.

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Personal Health and Wellness

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.5

Describe how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Explains how individuals can stay healthy by taking certain actions (e.g., choosing healthy foods, participating in daily exercise, getting enough sleep, brushing and flossing teeth, going to the doctor).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Describe, in great detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in some detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in minimal detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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PUTTING ON PANTS AGES: 2 ½ to 3 ½ years MATERIALS: A pair of pants PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child 2. Hold up the pants and show the front and back of them twice. 3. Lay the pants on the mat. 4. Sit down and slip one foot through the legs and then the other. 5. Pull the pants up to the tops of your thighs 6. Stand up, grab the front of the pants and pull it to your waist. 7. Turn around, grab the back of the pants and pull them up. 8. Grab the sides of the waistband and work them into place upon your waist. 9. Pull the front of the waistband down. 10. Turn around and pull the back of the waistband down. 11. Pull the pants down to your ankles. 12. Sit down and pull the pants off your legs. 13. If needed, turn the pants right side out. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning to put pants on, thus beginning to learn to dress oneself. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. The feel of the pants material. 2. Putting on and taking off the pants. CONTROL OF ERROR: The child should have the pants properly on the waist. VOCABULARY: waist, pull VARIATIONS: Use different articles of clothing

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Personal Health and Wellness

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.5

Describe how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Explains how individuals can stay healthy by taking certain actions (e.g., choosing healthy foods, participating in daily exercise, getting enough sleep, brushing and flossing teeth, going to the doctor).

Rubric Advanced Describe, in great detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Proficient Describe, in detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Partially Proficient Describe, in some detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Novice Describe, in minimal detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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SEWING CARD AGES: 3 to 6 years MATERIALS: One sewing card with holes One knotted lace or yarn in a basket PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Bring activity to the mat. 3. Grasp card in one hand and hold the lace in the other hand. 4. Push unknotted end of lace through a hole from the back of the card. Grasp and pull lace until the knot stops at the hole. 5. Show the child the “whip stitch” by pushing the lace through each hole from the back of the card and pulling through. Sew through about 4-5 holes. You may use the word "up" as you push the lace up through each hole to emphasize the pattern. 6. Unlace card, return materials to shelf and give child a turn. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning how to sew. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Seeing the pattern the lace makes. 2. Feeling the final tug as the lace is pulled all the way through. CONTROL OF ERROR: The knotted lace and the lace is long enough to sew through all holes. VOCABULARY: whip stitch, running stitch, sew, lace, hole EXTENSION: Demonstrate the "running stitch" which forms a line as the lace is pushed up and down through alternate holes. You may use the words "up, down" as you emphasize the pattern of the running stitch. VARIATIONS: 1. Sew buttons on to fabric held on an embroidery hoop. 2. Sew yarn around metal inset drawn shapes.

©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Personal Health and Wellness

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.5

Describe how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Explains how individuals can stay healthy by taking certain actions (e.g., choosing healthy foods, participating in daily exercise, getting enough sleep, brushing and flossing teeth, going to the doctor).

Rubric Advanced Describe, in great detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Proficient Describe, in detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Partially Proficient Describe, in some detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Novice Describe, in minimal detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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SEWING A BUTTON AGES: 3 to 6 years MATERIALS: • Tray • Fabric • Needle • Thread • Buttons • Scissors • Pin cushion PRESENTATION: 1. Carry tray to table. 2. Measure a piece of thread. 3. Cut the thread from the spool. 4. Thread the thread into the needle eye. Pull thread to meet the other loose and. Tie a knot with both loose ends to secure. 5. Hold cloth in one hand 6. Push the needle through with the other hand and pull needle from the front. 7. Align the button hole with the point of needle. 8. Slide button down the thread to the cloth. 9. Put the needle in the second hole from the top of the button. 10. Pull the needle out from the back of the fabric. 11. Turn the cloth over. 12. Put needle flat on the cloth. 13. Push needle through the cloth to knot thread. 14. Cut the thread close to the cloth with scissors. 15. Reorder the tray and return materials to the shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learn how to thread a needle. 2. Learning how to sew a button CONTROL OF ERROR: Buttons fall off of the fabric if not secured or sewed properly. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Button sewed to the cloth 2. Colorful cloth and button. 3. Use of a needle and thread 4. Different sizes and colors of buttons. ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Personal Health and Wellness

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.5

Describe how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Explains how individuals can stay healthy by taking certain actions (e.g., choosing healthy foods, participating in daily exercise, getting enough sleep, brushing and flossing teeth, going to the doctor).

Rubric Advanced Describe, in great detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Proficient Describe, in detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Partially Proficient Describe, in some detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Novice Describe, in minimal detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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HAND WASHING AGES: 2 to 5 years MATERIALS: • Plastic mat • Basin • Pitcher • Pail • Soap in soap dish • Sponge • Hand towel • Apron PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Put on apron. 3. Fetch water using pitcher and pour slowly into basin. 4. Place both hands into water to moisten. 5. Lift both hands from water. Watch last drop from fingertips. 6. Using slow movement rub soap over backs of hands, palms of hands, and with circular movement each finger and wrist. 7. Put both hands into water and rinse off soap. 8. Lift both hands from water. Watch last drop from fingertips. 9. Dry hands with towel. 10. Empty basin of water into the pail and empty the pail into used water container. 11. Dry materials with sponge and reorder them. 12. Replace towel with fresh towel. 13. Return material to shelf. 14. Return apron to appropriate area. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning to wash hands. 2. Preparation for eating. CONTROL OF ERROR: There should be no water spilled or soap left on the hands. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Feeling the water, soap, and lather 2. Making bubbles 3. Watching the last drop fall from fingers ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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4. Clean feeling on hands VOCABULARY: Lather, scrub, bubbles, dry HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Personal Health and Wellness

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.5

Describe how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Explains how individuals can stay healthy by taking certain actions (e.g., choosing healthy foods, participating in daily exercise, getting enough sleep, brushing and flossing teeth, going to the doctor).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Describe, in great detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in some detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in minimal detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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TABLE SETTING AGES: 4 to 6 years MATERIALS: • Tray • Plate • Basket • Placemat • Fork • Glass cup

• • • • • •

Napkin Knife Small Vase Napkin Holder Spoon Flowers

PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child to set the table. 2. Place the tray on the above the mat. 3. Take placemat out, place it in the center of the mat. 4. Place plate in center of mat and place napkin above the plate: 5. Place fork on left side of plate, knife on right side of plate, and spoon on right side of knife. 6. Place cup on right corner of mat, above and on right side of knife. Place vase in left corner and place flower in vase. 7. Re-order materials in the basket and return to shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning how to set a table and prepare for meals. CONTROL OF ERROR: 1. Each piece has it's own place 2. Visualizing the pattern of the table setting 3. Using a control placemat with outlines of table items POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Learning correct placement of table setting 2. Sense of confidence and accomplishment VOCABULARY: Placemat, plate, cup, fork, knife, spoon, vase flower, table setting

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Personal Health and Wellness

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.5

Describe how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Explains how individuals can stay healthy by taking certain actions (e.g., choosing healthy foods, participating in daily exercise, getting enough sleep, brushing and flossing teeth, going to the doctor).

Rubric Advanced Describe, in great detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Proficient Describe, in detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Partially Proficient Describe, in some detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Novice Describe, in minimal detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

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BANANA SLICING AGES: 3 to 6 years MATERIALS: • Apron • Knife • Fruit • Bowl/tray with fruit • Sponge • Tray for serving • Toothpicks • Cutting board PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Wash hands and put on apron. . 3. Choose a banana from the fruit bowl (bananas cut in half). 4. Peel banana and discard the peels in the trash or compose bin. 5. Slowly slice the banana with the knife. 6. Put the toothpick in each slice and place the slices on serving tray. Serve or offer to friends. 7. Wash cutting board and knife. 8. Wash hands. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning how to slice bananas 2. Joy of food preparation CONTROL OF ERROR: All of the skin is peeled off. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Peeling the skin 2. Serving the food 3. Eating food VOCABULARY: Names of food, prepare, serve, slice, names of utensils

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HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Personal Health and Wellness

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.5

Describe how individuals can promote and protect their own health The student: Explains how individuals can stay healthy by taking certain actions (e.g., choosing healthy foods, participating in daily exercise, getting enough sleep, brushing and flossing teeth, going to the doctor).

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

Rubric Advanced Describe, in great detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Proficient Describe, in detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Partially Proficient Describe, in some detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Novice Describe, in minimal detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

.

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CUCUMBER PREPARATION AGES: 4 to 6 years MATERIALS: • Apron • Cutting board • Small knife • Vegetable peeler • Dish for serving the cut vegetables • Dish of water for washing vegetables • Brush for cleaning vegetables • Sponge for cleaning up • Mat for the table • Paper towels for scraps • Toothpicks PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child to the food preparation table. 2. Put on the apron and wash hands. 3. Show the child how to get enough water in the bowl to scrub vegetable and carry it to the table. 4. Clean the cucumber in the bowl of water using the brush. Use a downward stroke and rinse the brush often. 5. Place cucumber on the cutting board and cut off the ends placing these on the paper towel. 6. Holding the cucumber in one hand and the peeler in the other hand, peel from the top to the bottom stroking away from the body. 7. Place the peelings in the towel. 8. Lay the cucumber down on the cutting board and press knife down to slice, making thick but not overly thin slices. These slices may be halved or quartered according to the size of the cucumber. 9. Place a toothpick in each slice, then place on the tray 10. When the entire cucumber is sliced and in the serving bowl, the child may go around the room and serve the pieces to the other children. 11. Empty the water and make sure all the scraps are in the towel before throwing it away. 12. Use sponge to clean off board and mat. 13. Dry the bowls, knife, peeler, and mat. 14. Wash hands and hang up the apron. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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INDIRECT AIMS: 1. Learning how to slice cucumbers 2. Joy of food preparation. CONTROL OF ERROR: All skin peeled off. POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Having the pleasure of preparing food for others and serving it. 2. Peeling the cucumber skin 3. Eating the food 4. Using the utensils VOCABULARY: cucumber, cutting board, knife, vegetable peeler, brush, scrub, peel, slice, scraps, serve VARIATIONS: 1. Use other vegetables or fruits. 2. Use different peelers. 3. Use a holder for slicing. HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Personal Health and Wellness

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.5

Describe how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Explains how individuals can stay healthy by taking certain actions (e.g., choosing healthy foods, participating in daily exercise, getting enough sleep, brushing and flossing teeth, going to the doctor).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Describe, in great detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in some detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in minimal detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

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DOLL WASHING AGES: 18 months to 6 years MATERIALS: • Apron • Basin • Pail • Pitcher • Soap in dish • Sponge • Towel • Doll wrapped in blanket • Doll basket PRESENTATION: 1. Invite the child. 2. Put on the apron. 3. Fetch water using pitcher and slowly pour water into basin. 4. Unwrap doll from the blanket and place in basin. 5. Rub soap over front and back of doll. 6. Rinse off soap from the doll’s body. 7. Lift doll out of water. Watch the water drip off. 8. Lay the doll on the towel and dry the doll. 9. Return dry doll to doll basket and wrap in the blanket. 10. Empty basin of water into the pail and empty pail into used water container. 11. Dry materials and re-order. 12. Replace wet towel with a dry one. 13. Return materials to shelf. DIRECT AIMS: 1. Order 2. Coordination 3. Concentration 4. Independence INDIRECT AIM: Learning to wash a doll POINTS OF INTEREST: 1. Feel of the water, soap suds and sponge 2. Hearing the water 3. Washing the doll

CONTROL OF ERROR: 1. Water spilling on floor should be minimal. ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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2. All the soap should be washed off of the doll. VOCABULARY: Lather, wash, body parts, rinse, dry HAWAII PRESCHOOL CONTENT STANDARDS: o DOMAIN I: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY o Standard 3: Acquire basic self help skills. HAWAII CONTENT AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention

Topic

Personal Health and Wellness

Benchmark HE.K-2.1.5

Describe how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Sample Performance Assessment (SPA)

The student: Explains how individuals can stay healthy by taking certain actions (e.g., choosing healthy foods, participating in daily exercise, getting enough sleep, brushing and flossing teeth, going to the doctor).

Rubric Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Describe, in great detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in some detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

Describe, in minimal detail, how individuals can promote and protect their own health

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Resources

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GOALS AND OBJECTIVES FOR MONTESSORI LEARNING I. Montessori Objectives A. To assist the child as he constructs his personhood in all dimensions. B. To assist the child in becoming an effective and involved member of the human community. Goals for Activity Areas in a Montessori Classroom Practical Life To assist the child in the development of emerging mental faculties; i.e. ability to attend, to organize a task and pursue it to completion To develop gross and fine motor control and coordination To develop independence in care of self, choice of activities and behaviors To develop positive social behavioral skills and an attitude of respect for persons and things To develop eye-hand coordination Sensorial Materials To bring to the child’s consciousness the functions of his senses and their role in his exploration in the environment To develop and refine sensory acuity and perceptual skills To assist the child in developing mental strategies such as observation, comparison, discrimination, seriation, association, generalization To serve as indirect preparation for subsequent mathematical activities To prepare and develop the child’s physical and mental faculties for independent learning in all other areas of the environment To develop comparative skills as used to distinguish qualities or characteristics of things To develop skills for analyzing properties of objects

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Mathematics To allow the child to sensorially apprehend, through manipulation of concrete materials, sequentially arranged mathematical concepts To let the child unconsciously experience through his manipulation of materials, the orderly relationships in quantities To prepare the child for subsequent conscious learning experiences with mathematics To develop the ability to group by likeness and differences and manipulate those groups To develop abilities to separate parts in a bigger group as in parts of family, community, plant groups, animal groups or environment To develop abilities to distinguish the passage of time in terms of before and after To develop abilities to distinguish the organization of space (spatial relationships) as in top/bottom, inside/outside/on/under To develop the ability to grasp the concept of numeral to number; symbol representation to denote objects all together in a group To develop abilities to distinguish number order 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.

Language To assist the child in building an enriched vocabulary based on meaningful concepts and related to the real world and life in it To assist the child in the development of his ability to communicate with his world in a mutual exchange To give the child the foundations for the expression and reception of language through the sounds and symbols of his language To allow the child opportunities for exploring language as he is ready, through listening, writing, reading and speaking experiences To expose the child to the beauty of his language through poetry, stories and dramatization To develop abilities to reason and thus solve problems by comprehending and then initiating steps of acknowledged cause and effect Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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To aid child in attaching meaning to his perceptual and sensorial experiences through development of a rich vocabulary To develop abilities to pretend, imagine, dramatize or role play; to allow for free creative expression

Cosmic Area To expose the child to the richness of the world through an exploration of its basic concepts and order as experienced an observed in plants, animals, inanimate objects and peoples of the world To develop in the child an awareness, appreciation and respect for the peoples of the world and their diverse life-styles To assist the child in developing an aesthetic appreciation of his world and to acquire the mental and physical skills to creatively express his experiences To develop in the child an awareness and respect for the ecology of this world, physical, animate and social To develop abilities to distinguish difference between real and seeming change, as in breaking a whole into its parts To give children the opportunity to experiment with concepts such as transformation, change, cause and effect To develop children’s capacity to nurture and care for the earth and its living creatures

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FUNDAMENTAL BELIEFS AND VALUES AS MONTESSORI EDUCATORS Children learn best through Purposeful movement Self-chosen activity Activity that fulfills the need of a sensitive period Repetition and concentration Experiencing order or organization We must remember to Observe the child’s movement and the coordination necessary to complete a task Analyze the sequence of steps involved and give just the necessary help a child needs Be careful not to substitute our activity for theirs Ways of giving direct help Organize objects (simplify) Matching Seriation Organize space Provide boundries Rugs/mats Containers Taped lines Placement of furnishings Gesture Touch Guiding a child’s hands or body Imitation through modeling Reciprocal interaction We follow the child’s interest! Whenever real learning has taken place there will be a distinct and observable change in the learner’s behavior Learning is an active process. Children learn most easily through repeated exposure, consistent role modeling from others around them and from repeated opportunities to apply and practice. They learn by doing, not simply by seeing or listening to others Education should begin with the learner and extend outward. It should be linked step by step with the present reality of her experience. Most children under the age of 12-and many adults-have difficulty in grasping abstract concepts. It is essential that the prepared environment make wide use of carefully designed and presented ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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‘concrete’ models and experiences which have been developed to help them visualize he principle or concept being taught. When children first begin school they enter as more effective learners than they will normally be in two years. By first or second grade, most will have forgotten how to learn, but will know how to memorize and play the game of ‘school’. As infants and toddlers. Children spend their first years of life following the scientific discovery method. They touch, taste, smell, manipulate and investigate everything around them. They ask endless questions. They are spontaneously motivated and curious. Good education builds upon this fact of childhood, and works to keep the spark of intellect and self-confidence alive. Children need to develop sensitive reality testing skills; observation, a sense of order, and an awareness of logical cause and effect. They must learn to trust their mind’s ability to think logically and to solve problems on their own. Children learn in different ways at different paces. No single approach can possibly meet the needs of all learners. Therefore an effective school must remain highly flexible and be prepared to individualize and adapt education to the learner. In today’s world, frantic social change makes it hard to understand and creatively adapt to our environment. Because we cannot predict the skills needed tomorrow, the single most socially important thing to teach our children is how to remain open to change, constantly ready and willing to learn new things and master new technologies. Whenever possible, the learner should know in advance the learning expectations that the teacher has set, stated in terms of clear objectives. Whenever possible, evaluation and reports of learning progress should be expressed to the family and learner in terms of these pre-established learning objectives. Their content should be specific and information laden-rather than superficial generalizations. According to Dr. Montessori, every child had within him the person he or she will become. Each child is capable of developing her or her own unique personality.

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THE SIX COMPONENTS OF THE MONTESSORI ENVIRONMENT “THERE ARE SIX BASIC COMPONENTS IN THE MONTESSORI CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT. THEY DEAL WITH THE CONCEPTS OF FREEDOM, STRUCTURE AND ORDER, REALITY AND NATURE, BEAUTY AND ATMOSPHERE, THE MONTESSORI MATERIALS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY LIFE” The Montessori Method-Maria Montessori

1. FREEDOM 2. STRUCTURE AND ORDER 3. REALITY AND NATURE 4. BEAUTY AND ATMOSPHERE 5. THE MONTESSORI MATERIALS 6. DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY LIFE

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EDITORIAL

Thought for the Month

“A rajah once gathered together twelve blind but wise men. They were each commanded to feel a different part of an elephant. When asked to tell what they felt, each described the elephant in a different way. The one who had touched the ear said the elephant was like a basket. The one who had touched the tail said the elephant was like a reed. The one who touched a leg said the elephant was like a strong column. Hearing the answers each was amazed at the others inability to “see” the truth.” Buddha

What Is Montessori?

Many parents are drawn to Montessori education as they have heard that academically, it is the most effective method of instruction. Others attracted by the child-centered environment. Some like the structured materials, while others appreciate the freedom the children are given. I was first attracted by the respect and dignity with which Montessori dealt with the child. Another teacher at the Academy was drawn by the philosophy of auto education (the child as his own teacher.) All of these elements are accurate descriptions of Montessori, but alone none of them is Montessori, which is like the elephant of the Buddhist parable…very big. We, the parents and teachers are like the blind but wise men. We have the choice of accepting our first impressions of Montessori, or going further and experiencing the whole philosophy. Last week our school hosted an IMP meeting at which we spoke rather militantly. We said that children are born brilliant and that our job is to watch in wonder as they flourish. We said that by exposing children to this philosophy of education we could change the human condition. We said that Montessori is more than just education…it is a way of living in harmony and respect of nature, others and of oneself. Some of our parents opened their minds to the “big” picture we tried to paint. Others can only see that small part of it that is easy for them.

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The things that Montessorians believe are not new concepts. Since time began, wise men have tried to enlighten the people of the world. The message has not been lost. Freedom still reigns in many countries. No longer most countries, but many. The people of this country are still free to make their own choices. At least adults are, Maria Montessori’s goal was not to teach children to read at age four, but rather to help us see that children can read at age four and that they can live in freedom. Her goal was to improve the world condition. She was a social reformer and her followers must remain so, or the philosophy is lost.

Dr. Montessori told us these things and so much more in a way that only she could state a message. She told us that after fifty-three years of research her answers were simple and plain. The human child is on a journey, a trek. He has within him a plan of action so vital and so clear that it leads him from that moment of birth at which he is a small, fragile infant incapable of speech or movement beyond feeble grasping and sucking, into the most intelligent and powerful force to walk this earth. Powerful, you question? Many say that man alone has no power. We tend to think of governments and large corporations as powerful. Money wields power, we believe. The atom bomb has come to be referred to as “the ultimate power”. Well, governments are established by men Corporations are the work of people like you and me. Money is made in mints by human hands and bombs don’t grow on trees. They are manufactured in factories. It takes people to make them kill. The growing sense of powerlessness that we see and feel in our society is a direct result of a lack of Montessori philosophy. It is a direct result of the belief that man is no more than a “clean slate” ready to be written upon. This belief was planted in our society like a seed of dissension. And doesn’t everyone feel it their duty and obligation to write on that slate? Parents, teachers, employers, politicians, husbands, wives. The list is endless. Mold the clay, create the man. When all the while we missed her message, “The man grows from within.” He is on a mission, and that mission is to externalize all that lies hidden in the human essence. Creativity, human potential, these are the tools of that fragile infant. With them he constructs a man.

If one accepts these premises, how does one apply education? Indeed, what need would there be to educate the human child that Montessori described? What teacher would consider interfering if he truly believed, as Dr. Montessori did, that the child educates himself? The answer is shocking to ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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many, beautifully clear to a few, but always a gift to the recipient child. The wise teacher does not interfere, does not teach. The wise teacher truly believes in the child’s ability. He believes the message of Dr. Montessori because as she did, he has watched the child and he has seen that it so. I have been re-reading an old book, How Children Fail, by John Holt. Allow me to quote a wise teacher… “We don’t have to make human beings smart. They are born smart. All we have to do is stop doing the things that make them stupid.”

What are the things that make children stupid? Forgive me, please, but say it I must…sitting at desks, staring at chalkboards and memorizing times tables are among the top ten. Following in the list are prohibiting freedom of movement, prohibiting speech, prohibiting freedom to choose one’s own work and finish that work at one’s leisure in a non-competitive atmosphere of love. And perhaps the greatest insult to the human intellect is that when the work is finally finished, the teacher has the nerve to grade it. Who would dare to judge the work of another? All of this is counterproductive to the development of the human intellect. To add insult to injury, many teachers are now judging behavior as well. Rather than a grade, children are given happy-grams and other such external rewards, for acting human? What is given out for non-human behavior? At its worst non-human behavior brings on a non-human punishment of the physical variety. Other punishments are more subtle and deal more specifically with self-esteem, such as “standing out”. Sometimes a whole class “stands out” for the faults of one or two. Not only do these methods inhibit creativity and breed stupidity, they also perpetuate that sense of powerlessness I mentioned a moment ago.

How does all of this stack up to a Montessori approach? If we don’t teach, what do we do? We offer the world. We bring all the facts of life to the feet of our students in concrete, tangible and realistic clarity. We order and prepare the classroom. We make careful observations (never judgments) of the work of each child we assist when needed and only when needed. We support them in their mission. We are their co-workers. We expose the student to his world and then we wait and watch. What we are privileged to witness is no less than a miracle, the creation of the man within the child. Just as once the infant developed from the germinal seed, observed only by a privileged few scientists. Working with the child, we now observe the development of the man from the child. Would the genetic scientist dare to interfere in the process he studies? Would he attempt to “tech” ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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these cells to become a child? Could he in any way grade or judge this natural process? No, he only watches and with precision, records his observations. His aim, to learn of nature’s inherent plan. Just as we, who are privileged scientists of education, watch in wonder and reverence as these children fulfill their own destinies, their own dreams.

I would like to share another quote in closing. Norman Cousins said, “The tragedy of life is not death, it is what we allow to die within us while we live.” The human child is inherently great. Intelligence, creativity, freedom, these are at stake. The price is too great. Let us heed the message. Carmen E. Adams

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Twenty Best Practices of an Authentic Montessori School The Montessori Learning Environment 1. A Child-Centered Environment: The focus of activity in the Montessori setting is on children learning, not on teachers teaching. Generally student will work individually or in small, self-selected groups. There will be very few whole group lessons. 2. A Responsive Prepared Environment: The environment should be designed to meet the needs, interests, abilities, and development of the children in the class. The educators should design and adapt the environment with this community of children in mind, rapidly modifying the selection of educational materials available, the physical layout, and the tone of the class to best fit the ever changing needs of the children. 3. A Focus on Individual Progress and Development: Within a Montessori environment, children progress at their own pace, moving on to the next step in each area of learning as they are each ready to do so. While the child lives within a larger community of children, each student is viewed as a universe of one. Montessori Learning Activities 4. Hands On Learning: In a Montessori learning environment, students rarely learn from texts or workbooks. In all cases, direct personal hands-on contact with either real things under study or with concrete learning materials that bring abstract concepts to life allow children to learn with much deeper understanding. 5. Spontaneous Activity: It is natural for children to talk, move, touch things, and explore the world around them. Any true Montessori environment encourages children to move about freely, within reasonable limits of appropriate behavior. Much of the time the children select work that has been presented to them individually and which captures their interest and attention, although the Montessori educator also strives to draw their attention and capture their interest in new challenges and areas of inquiry. And even within this atmosphere of spontaneous activity, students do eventually have to master the basic skills of their culture, even if initially they would prefer to avoid them. 6. Active Learning: In Montessori learning environments, children not only select their own work from the choices presented to them, but also continue to work with tasks, returning to continue their work over many weeks or months, until finally the work is so easy for them that they can demonstrate it to younger children. This is one of many ways that Montessori educators use to confirm that students have reached mastery of each skill.

7. Self-motivated Activity: One of Montessori’s key concepts is the idea that children are driven by their desire to become independent and competent beings in the world to learn new things and master new skills. For this reason, outside rewards to create external motivation are both unnecessary and potentially can lead to passive adults who are dependent on others for everything from their self-image to permission to follow their dreams. In the process of making independent Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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choices and exploring concepts largely on their own, Montessori children construct their own sense of individual identity and personal judgment of right and wrong. 8. Freedom Within Limits: Montessori children enjoy considerable freedom of movement and choice, however their freedom always exists within carefully defined limits on the range of their behavior. They are free to do anything appropriate to the ground rules of the community, but redirected promptly and firmly if they cross over the line. 9. Self-disciplined Learning: In Montessori programs, children do not work for grades or external rewards, nor do they simply complete assignments given them by their Montessori educators. Children learn because they are interested in things, and because all children share a desire to become competent and independent human beings. Montessori Learning Communities 10. Mixed age groups: Montessori learning environments gather together children of two, three, or more age levels into a family group. Children remain together for several years, with the fully developed students moving on to the next age grouping when they demonstrate readiness to do so. 11. A Family Setting: Montessori learning environments are communities of children and adults. As children grow older and more capable, they assume a great role in helping to care for the environment and meet the needs of younger children in the class. The focus is less on the educators and more on the entire community of children and adults, much like one finds in a real family. 12. Cooperation and Collaboration, Rather Than Competition: Montessori children are encouraged to treat one another with kindness and respect. Insults and shunning behavior tends to be much more rare. Instead we normally find children who have a great fondness for one another, and who are free from needless interpersonal competition for attention and prestige. Because children learn at their own pace, Montessori educators refrain from comparing students against one another. To Awaken and Nurture the Human Spirit 13. The Child As A Spiritual Being: Montessori saw children as far more than simply scholars. In her view, each child is a full and complete human being, the mother or father of the adult man or woman he or she will become. Even when very young, the child shares with the rest of humanity personal hopes, dreams, and fears, emotions, and longing. From Montessori's perspective, this goes beyond mental health to the very core of one’s inner spiritual life. Montessori educators consciously design social communities and educational experiences that cultivate the child's sense of independence, self-respect, love of peace, passion for self-chosen work done well. 14. Universal Values: Montessori educators deliberately develop in children not only appropriate patterns of polite behavior, but seek to instill basic universal values within the core of the child's personality. These values include self-respect, acceptance of the uniqueness and dignity of each person we meet, kindness, peacefulness, compassion, empathy, honor, individual responsibility, and courage to speak from our hearts. Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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15. Global Understanding: All Montessori schools are to a large degree international schools. They not only tend to attract a diverse student body representing many ethnic backgrounds, religions, and international backgrounds, but they actively celebrate their diversity. The curriculum is international in its heritage and focus, and consciously seeks to promote a global perspective. 16. Service to Others: Montessori's spiritual perspective leads Montessori schools to consciously organize programs of community service ranging from daily contributions to others within the class or school setting, to community outreach programs that allow children and adults to make a difference in the lives of others. The fundamental idea is one of stewardship. The Montessori Educator 17. Authoritative: The Montessori educator is firm at the edges and empathetic at the center. The Montessori educator is never punitive but is the kind of adult who responds empathetically to children's feelings, while setting clear and consistent limits. 18. Observer: The Montessori educator is an observer of children’s learning and behavior. These careful observations are recorded and used to infer where each student is in terms of his or her development, and leads the Montessori educator to know when to intervene in the child’s learning with allowing more practice time, making a presentation of a new lesson, a fresh challenge, or a reinforcement of basic ground-rules. 19. An Educational Resource: Montessori educators facilitate the learning process by serving as a resource or caring mentor to whom the children can turn as they pull together information, impressions, and experiences. 20. Role Model: Like all great educators, the Montessorian deliberately models the behaviors and attitudes that he or she is working to instill in the children. Because of Montessori's emphasis on character development, the Montessori educator normally is personally attractive, exceptionally calm, kind, warm, and is always polite to each child. Summation The Montessori educator recognizes that his or her role is not so much to teach as to inspire, mentor, and facilitate the learning process. The real work of learning belongs to the individual child. Because of this, the Montessori educator remains conscious of his or her role in helping each child to fulfill his or her potential as a human being and therefore knows that the primary educational responsibility is one of creating an environment for learning within which children will feel safe, cherished, and empowered. Montessori educators are trained to identify the best response to the changing interests and needs of each child as a unique individual learner. Because they truly accept that children learn in many different ways and at their own pace, Montessori educators understand that they must “follow the child”, adjusting their strategies and timetable to fit the development of each individual child. ©2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Montessori educators organize appropriate social settings and academic programs for children at their own level of development. They do this to a large degree through the design of the learning environment, selection and organization of learning activities, and structure of the day. Montessori educators are filled with hope in the development of each child’s full human potential as a person of learning and virtue. Š 2006 The Montessori Foundation All Rights Reserved l Site developed by Go Montessori

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99 Ways to Say 'Very Good' by Arzella Dirksen Start off the new year on the right foot. Choose -- and use -- one of these 99+ ways to say "Very Good" to your students. You're on the right track now! You've got it made. Super! That's right! That's good. You're really working hard today. You are very good at that. That's coming along nicely. Good work! I'm happy to see you working like that. That's much, much better! Exactly right. I'm proud of the way you worked today. You're doing that much better today. You've just about got it. That's the best you've ever done. You're doing a good job. That's it! Now you've figured it out. That's quite an improvement. Great! I knew you could do it. Congratulations! Not bad. Keep working on it. You're improving. Now you have it! You are learning fast. Good for you! Couldn't have done it better myself. Aren't you proud of yourself? One more time and you'll have it. You really make my job fun. That's the right way to do it. You're getting better every day. You did it that time! That's not half bad. Nice going. Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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You haven't missed a thing! Wow! That's the way! Keep up the good work. Terrific! Nothing can stop you now. That's the way to do it. Sensational! You've got your brain in gear today. That's better. That was first class work. Excellent! That's the best ever. You've just about mastered it. Perfect! That's better than ever. Much better! Wonderful! You must have been practicing. You did that very well. Fine! Nice going. You're really going to town. Outstanding! Fantastic! Tremendous! That's how to handle that. Now that's what I call a fine job. That's great. Right on! You're really improving. You're doing beautifully! Superb! Good remembering. You've got that down pat. You certainly did well today. Keep it up! Congratulations. You got it right! You did a lot of work today. Well, look at you go. That's it. I'm very proud of you. Marvelous! I like that. Way to go! Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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Now you have the hang of it. You're doing fine! Good thinking. You are really learning a lot. Good going. I've never seen anyone do it better. Keep on trying. You outdid yourself today! Good for you! I think you've got it now. That's a good (boy/girl). Good job, (person's name). You figured that out fast. You remembered! That's really nice. That kind of work makes me happy. It's such a pleasure to teach when you work like that. I think you're doing the right thing. Permission to reprint this article was provided by CareerLab.

Education World® Copyright © 2003 Education World Originally published 10/22/2001; updated 12/07/2004 Michael's Collection of Montessori Books

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The Three-Period Lesson Š2010 Dustin Kosek. All rights reserved.

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A general definition: A 3-period lesson is a way of teaching nomenclature (vocabulary) to children using 3 stages that gradually increase in difficulty. It is not used with math material except to teach the names of numbers (both quantity and numerals). The 3-period lesson is most commonly used in preschool (3-6) but may occasionally be used in elementary (6-9). Some preliminaries to keep in mind: 1. Make sure the work is complete before bringing it to the rug 2. Make sure you are familiar with the vocabulary words involved 3. Make sure you are presenting to a child who is ready for the work 4. Choose a place and time that is free of distractions Bring the work to the rug and set out the map/nomenclature cards/sandpaper numbers or letters that you’d like to work with. For a young child, 3-4 new items at a time may be enough. Better to do too few at first than too many. The three-period lesson is a fundamental approach to introducing a new concept (not just vocabulary) to children. It is used to move the child from basic understanding to mastery. For this discussion, I will use the largest and smallest cubes with the Pink Tower material while teaching the terms big and small. Period 1: Introduction (This is…) During the first period, it is important to always isolate the desired nomenclature*. Pick up the biggest cube. Say to the child “This is big…big.” Set it down and move it out of the way. Pick up the smallest cube and say to the child “This is small…small”. It is always good to repeat the words several times while pointing to the appropriate item or card. Letting the child handle the Montessori materials is also a good idea. There is no need to rush; there is beauty in the calm serenity of the lesson. Period 2: Association/Recognition (Show me…) The second period is often a separate lesson, done after the first period lesson. Its purpose is to

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extend the handling and action presented in the first lesson. It is not a time to ask the students to verbalize the names of the Montessori materials. Unfortunately, most adults want to rush through this period and prematurely ask students to verbally identify materials without enough practice. This is the most critical period and should last the longest. During the second period the Montessori teacher has the opportunity to review and reinforce vocabulary as well as see what connections the child made. In this lesson, the Montessori teacher calls upon the students to show the appropriate materials. Place both cubes together on a mat. Begin with the last item named in period one. Ask the child to show you the small cube. Repeat small and big several times in different contexts: “Point to small. Hand me big. Place small on the tray. Return big to the shelf.” If the child is unable to correctly identify the correct item, return to the period one lesson, stating the word and pointing to the correct item. Period 3: Recall (What is this…?) This is the first time the Montessori teacher asks the child to name the object or idea. The teacher should only move to the third period when she is sure that the child will succeed. This may come some time after the second period lesson as mastery often takes time. Since the ultimate goal is to help the child master the information for himself, moving to the third period too soon, puts the teacher into the mode of correcting the child. Begin by isolating the objects, starting with the last object shown. Ask the child to name the object. While pointing to the object, say to the child “What is this?” Continue until child has named all of the objects. It is important to understand that the knowledge gained during these lessons becomes the starting point for the child’s next quest for knowledge. Every time a child masters a skill or idea, he or she becomes stronger, more competent and more independent and wants to learn more. Resource: © 2005-2009 Montessori for Everyone. Retrieved from http://www.blog.montessoriforeveryone.com/montessori-basics-1-the-3-period-lesson.html on June 20, 2009.

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Practical Life Album-Jodie Unten