Page 1

8

HE ROUROU KÅŒRERO EASTERN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

Research Showcase 2018 research.eit.ac.nz


NÄ u te rourou, nÄ ku te rourou, ka ora te iwi With your food basket and my food basket the people will flourish


He Rourou Kōrero Research at EIT

Te Aho a Māui

2018


Published 2019 Eastern Institute of Technology 501 Gloucester Street Taradale, Napier, 4112 Hawke’s Bay New Zealand Copyright Š 2018 by Eastern Institute of Technology. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. ISBN 978-0-9951139-0-9 (print) ISBN 978-0-9951139-1-6 (electronic) Publisher: Eastern Institute of Technology 501 Gloucester Street, Taradale, Napier, 4112, New Zealand www.eit.ac.nz

Project Management: Louise Bevin, HR Advisor, EIT Editor: Dr Jonathan Sibley, EIT Text: Andrew Austin, Austin Media Cover illustration: Anthony Chiappin, Lecturer Design, EIT Designed & produced: Jerry Gull, Lecturer Design, EIT Photography: Ally Bell, Wingtip Communications Set in Calibre, designed by Kris Sowersby, Klim Foundry Ltd. Printing: Brebner Print, Napier, New Zealand


Contents Introduction

5

Community Health & Wellbeing

7

Innovative Education

15

Creativity Arts

25

Sustainable Futures

35

Listing of Research Outputs 2018

43


Introduction From our origins as the Hawke’s Bay Community College in 1975, we have grown to become the Eastern Institute of Technology. We are the tertiary provider for the Hawke’s Bay and Tairāwhiti regions. Our programmes span secondary school transition programmes through Master’s research oriented degrees. We provide training, education and research opportunities for over 10,000 students. Our focus over the past forty-four years has been unwavering: our programmes, and our research, have been developed in conjunction with, and are designed to enhance, the communities we serve. The focus of our research is explicitly community-centred. Across all Schools at our institution, we seek to engage in research in conjunction with our communities, focusing on projects of importance to our communities. Our research does not exist in an ‘ivory-tower’ but is undertaken on the ground in a wide array of community settings: homes, marae, schools, local and national institutions, and businesses across our region. We seek to place our skills at the service of our communities. Central to this approach are the principles of ‘community as client’ and ‘endorsement of the right of self-determination.’ 1 The development of our research capability began in 2002 with the recruitment of our first Research Director Professor Bob Marshall and Professor Kay Morris Matthews in 2007. We now have a team of over 150 researchers and an active and growing Professoriate. In 2017, we established a dedicated Research and Innovation Centre to support our researchers and to further develop our research capability.

Our focus over the past forty-four years has been unwavering: our programmes, and our research, have been developed in conjunction with, and are designed to enhance, the communities we serve.

1. Schensul S. Perspectives on collaborative research. In Collaborative Research and Social Change (Eds: Stull D. and Schensul J.), pp. 21-220. Westview Press, Boulder, CO, 1987, cited in Singer, M (1993) KNOWLEDGE FOR USE: ANTHROPOLOGY AND COMMUNITY-CENTERED SUBSTANCE ABUSE RESEARCH, Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 37, No. 1, pp. 15-25.

research.eit.ac.nz

5


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

In 2018, our researchers produced over 290 research outputs, spanning conference posters and presentations, journal articles, research reports, book chapters, books, exhibitions and recitals. Our researchers are recognised experts and invited key note speakers at conferences here in New Zealand and internationally. In 2019, we will host the annual Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics Research Symposium at our Hawke’s Bay campus in conjunction with Otago Polytechnic. Our conference theme is: Whanaungatanga - community-centred research. We are proud of our research and researchers, and our contribution to the development of our communities. Our objective in this edition of He Rourou Kōrero is to showcase the breadth and depth of research at EIT, and to give a brief insight into the lives and motivations of several of our leading researchers. We hope you enjoy this brief insight into research at EIT - Te Aho a Māui. Professor Natalie Waran, Professor One Welfare and Executive Dean for Research Professor Kay Morris Matthews, Research Professor

6

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Community Health & Wellbeing

Professor David Tipene-Leach and Associate Professor Rachael Walker, Professor Kay Morris Matthews The development of effective cultural competence skills that focus on client wellbeing in a bid to improve inequitable Māori health outcomes is at the heart of a number of research projects being undertaken by EIT academics. Cultural competence is defined as the ability of practitioners, providers and organisations to effectively deliver health care and services that meet the social and cultural needs of patients. EIT staff from a number of faculties have been researching where practitioner performance lapses and how to improve Māori and Pasifika health outcomes. The benefits of tailoring health services to suit Māori patients and increasing the acceptability and access to services has been a long-time research focus of EIT academic Dr David Tipene-Leach. He believes that the approach to cultural competence has been solely focused on teaching practitioners about what Māori believe and practice with the practitioners’ own cultural backgrounds and biases being largely ignored. “Well, actually that didn’t work. We’ve been doing that for thirty years in the medical profession and it hasn’t made a single shred of difference. Inequitable

research.eit.ac.nz

7


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

outcomes are still as bad as they ever were, if not getting worse. As the social determinants of health become worse, so do health outcomes.” “Cultural competence is really all about the practitioner. It’s moving towards a cultural safety approach, which is about making the whole thing good for the client.” Working alongside a unique mental health service in Gisborne that increases access for Māori whānau through a single point of entry (SPoE) and presents its service in a uniquely kaupapa Māori fashion has been the latest focus of David’s research. He is Professor of Māori and Indigenous Research at EIT and was made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to Māori and health in 2018. He is based at EIT’s Research and Innovation Centre and also teaches a postgraduate programme in Māori and Indigenous Health. A medical doctor by training, David is well known for the work he has done to prevent Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy (SUDI), working with weavers and Māori midwives in developing the wahakura, a woven flax bassinet, and later the plastic Pēpi-Pod, as safe-sleep devices. In 2017 the Ministry of Health announced that they would run the Safe Sleep project nationwide. His latest work has been on evaluating Te Kūwatawata, a SPoE mental health service in Gisborne. This project is a collaboration of primary and secondary mental health care providers in Gisborne including Hauora Tairāwhiti District Health Board (DHB) Mental Health and Addiction service and Pinnacle Midlands Health Network Primary Health Organisation (PHO), Te Kupenga Net Mental Health and Addictions Peer Support and the workforce training group, Te Kurahuna. The service has adopted a Te Ao Māori framework. Nationally, severe capacity problems are increasing in mental health services and stressed mental health workers are operating in a professional world demanding wider attention to the cultural and social context of distress. Tairāwhiti has one of the highest levels of mental health distress in the country and Māori have persistently inequitable outcomes. The evaluation approach is based on kaupapa Māori principles and comprises formative, process and outcome components. The study’s aims were to examine the successes and challenges of the implementation process (process evaluation) and to assess the impact of the intervention on service efficiency and responsiveness, service and mental health worker cohesion and collaboration, service and mental health worker cultural competency and mental health outcomes for whānau (process and summative evaluations). The primary evaluation question was: Will the building of a primary mental health care service around a framework based on Māori cultural values and knowledge successfully serve the Tairāwhiti community, both Māori and non-Māori, who are experiencing mental distress? Data was collected for the study using document review, participant observation and informal interviews, as well as interviews and focus group with 85 key people or stakeholders.

The development of effective cultural competence skills that focus on client wellbeing in a bid to improve inequitable Māori health outcomes is at the heart of a number of research projects being undertaken by EIT academics.

8

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

“Te Kūwatawata is a SpoE. One of the problems in mental health services is that there are lots of origins and referrals and lots of places that people refer. It’s a shemozzle of cross-referral, delay, long waiting times and busy services,” says David. “So, if you were designing an effective service, you would have a single point where they all came to and got assessed and then shot out to the appropriate places. That seems like a clever thing to do. And it’s called a SPoE and it’s well known in the mental health services.” David says Te Kāwatawata is an ambitious SPoE that included primary care and general practitioner services as well. The aim is to make the service fit the patient’s needs. Outcomes for clients are measured, as well as how they are feeling on the way through. Worker performance is also measured. This involves the patient giving feedback on the work of the health worker so that changes can be made if necessary. “The big objectives are to try and increase access to services; shorten waiting times; see if you can find community-based places where people can get seen where they’re comfortable. This is quite a different approach as it is prioritising distress rather than ‘illness’, whānau rather than individuals, and de-prioritising diagnosis, drugs and stigma.” The research had not only involved interviewing mental health workers, but also fourteen clients, as well as observational work. “The clients love it because they’re not stigmatised, and they’re involved in a conversation.” David said there had been hurdles to overcome to change the ways things were done. “This is a huge change management project. And change management projects are difficult.” But the results stemming from those changes have been dramatic. “Twenty per cent of people are seen on the same day that their GP does the referral. Another 10% are seen within twenty-four hours and 45% are seen within a week. So, this is revolutionary. This is huge.” Another research project that David has been involved in, which is led by his EIT colleague Associate Professor Rachael Walker, also examines services from the patients’ perspective, in this case kidney dialysis. Giving kidney patients the freedom and flexibility to have daily dialysis outside of a hospital environment is behind the success of community houses set up for patients who are unable to have treatment at home. Rachael has been researching the experiences of patients who have used one of four community houses across New Zealand. “Community haemodialysis houses are novel to NZ and at this time there are only four community haemodialysis houses in NZ. In this recent study we’ve been able to interview the majority of patients who are using the community houses, exploring the advantages and disadvantages of dialysing in a community house and whether it better meets cultural needs of Māori and Pacific people on dialysis.” This is the first study exploring patient experiences of community house dialysis. This research builds on Rachael’s previous “Home First” study that explored the factors that influence patients’ decision of whether to dialyse at hospital or home. research.eit.ac.nz

9


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

The “Home First” research, which Rachael conducted for her doctoral thesis, identified a number of barriers to home dialysis including socio-economic factors and decreased nursing support. She also found that patients had negative experiences of the health care system and highlighted the importance of including family in all aspects of care and decision-making. Her latest study, called “Home away from Home – Community House Dialysis”, saw Rachael interview 25 patients using the community houses to undertake their daily dialysis. Rachael’s research has found that patients feel benefits of wellbeing dialysing in a community house compared to hospital haemodialysis. “Many patients considered themselves too well to be in hospital and reported a sense of wellness about dialysing in the community houses compared to feelings of “being sick” when you go to the hospital.” Rachael said that her previous research had shown that people on home dialysis reported better quality of life than those who went to hospital. The community houses “are like a home in that way”. “I am still analysing my data, but there looks like there are other benefits as well, other than freedom and flexibility which is expected. There are other benefits of peer support, of more of a sense of community and family.” Another positive factor is cost because they don’t have the dialysis (and associated costs) in their home. “There is also protection for their family and privacy for themselves. Rather than being at home, they can keep that side of themselves away from their family.” One of the key objectives of the research was how to make the patients’ experience of treatment better for them. It also focussed on getting equity for Māori and Pasifika, because the imbalance is still “huge”. The reasons for the imbalances were “due to multiple factors inclusive of social services, colonisation, every determinant of health, education, and social factors.” About 17 per cent of dialysis patients in New Zealand are on home haemodialysis and the community house patients fall into that category. This research is funded by a Lotteries Health Research Grant and was awarded to Rachael, along with David, another EIT colleague Aria Graham and other national collaborators. Another body of research that Rachael has been working on is a systematic review on literature about international indigenous patients’ experiences of kidney transplantation. “Again, there are huge disparities in the rates of kidney transplants not just for Māori and Pasifika in NZ, but also throughout indigenous communities. We don’t really know why, however there are a lot of assumptions as to why, but no evidence from the patient perspective, which is what we are trying to explore.” “It may be there are cultural issues with asking for a kidney or it may be that the system is not good at telling patients how to navigate the system in order to progress down the transplant process.” Rachael believes it is important for us to understand inequities from the perspective of those receiving the care if we want to address inequities.

10

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

“The services we deliver as health care professionals need to align more to the preferences of the people who access these. When inequities exist, our services are letting people down. We need to understand barriers and enablers to accessing health services, positive and negative experiences that influence future interactions with health care providers and we need to understand ways to improve the delivery of care particularly for Māori and Pacific people.” Another project Rachael has been working on, along with David, Aria, EIT colleague Anita Jagroop-Dearing and a colleague from Otago, explores research about indigenous women’s smoking in pregnancy. “We have just finished undertaking a systematic review that synthesises indigenous women’s experiences of factors that led to their smoking during pregnancy and factors that influenced smoking cessation. This review will help to understand potential interventions to support mums in smoking cessation.”

The Ngātahi Project Competency development for the vulnerable children’s workforce EIT researchers are also involved in the evaluation of Ngātahi, a three-year national pilot project aiming to identify and embed the additional competencies needed for the children’s workforce. The 500 Hawke’s Bay practitioners work with the most vulnerable children across the health, social services and education sectors including Kaupapa Māori, Government and non-Government organisations. Ngātahi is led Ngātahi Leaders Hui participants: EIT participants: Professor Kay Morris Matthews, Professor David-Tipene-Leach, Dr Anne Hiha; Dr Sally Abel; Pippa McKelvie-Sebileau; Charlotte Chisnell; Raema Merchant and Chris Malcolm

Ngātahi Leaders Hui, Pukemokimoki Marae, 2018. research.eit.ac.nz

11


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

by Dr Russell Wills and Dr Bernice Gabriel of the Hawke’s Bay District Health Board (HBDHB). The first phase of the project was carried out in Hawke’s Bay in 2017. The EIT research team reported in 2018 on the usability and effectiveness of the programme, the aim of which is to enhance practitioners’ core competencies and to thereby influence outcomes for children that relate to behaviour, health and learning. Professor Kay Morris Matthews says: “The three competency priorities the workforce identified and for which training is being provided are: engaging effectively with Māori, mental health and addictions and trauma-informed practice. These are linked to a rapidly changing environment whereby increasing numbers of children and adolescents, 70% of whom are Māori, are presenting to services with behaviour, mental health and addiction issues.” The EIT evaluation team comprises a experienced inter-disciplinary academics including Professor David Tipene-Leach, Dr Anne Hiha & Dr Sally Abel (Research and Innovation Centre), Charlotte Chisnell, Raema Merchant, Karlin Austin (School of Education and Social Sciences) and Chris Malcolm (School of Health Science). Oversight of the overall Ngātahi pilot project is led by Dr Russell Wills and Dr Bernice Gabriel of the HBDHB. “Ngātahi has strong collegial relationships across the organisations involved and we are very aware of our combined responsibility for the future health, education and welfare of children in our region”. Over the next two years, the EIT evaluation team will report on the second and third phases of Ngātahi, the impact of training in the three competency areas on practice change and, therefore the potential to improve outcomes for children and adolescents. Central to the philosophy of Ngātahi is intersectoral collaboration across 27 organisations who work with vulnerable children, adolescents and their families in the region. “There is great interest from other parts of New Zealand in this Hawke’s Bay initiative and its potential to effect large-scale change within the vulnerable children’s sector.”

The 500 Hawke’s Bay practitioners work with the most vulnerable children across the health, social services and education sectors including Kaupapa Māori, Government and nonGovernment organisations.

12

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Dr Anita Jagroop-Dearing Dr Anita Jagroop-Dearing may have been at EIT for only two years, but she has wasted no time in getting involved in academic life and research projects. She is a senior academic and is International Postgraduate Programme Coordinator in Health Science and Nursing. She is also Chair of the Health Research Committee (Te Komiti Rangahau Hauora) for the School of Health and Sport Science and the School of Nursing, as well as being a member of the Strategic Research Committee. Anita came to New Zealand from England with her Kiwi husband and their three daughters. In England she worked for more than 20 years at the major teaching hospital, University College London (UCL). She also attained her PhD in Health Science from UCL and worked as a senior academic in the field of vascular disease research. At present, Anita is involved in three main bodies of research. The first one, for which she received an EIT internal research grant, aims to determine prevalence, knowledge and attitudes towards cardiovascular disease in a tertiary education population. “One expects that a tertiary education population would be somewhat more knowledgeable about health and wellbeing. We will be assessing if this is true.” The study, which is a pilot to attract future external funding, will involve participants from across EIT. Nursing students will also be involved to record anthropometric measurements such as blood glucose, height, weight, Body Mass Index (BMI) and lipids from participants. Anita has also enabled research collaboration between EIT and the Hawke’s Bay District Health Board (HBDHB).

“The research is based on the Havelock North Campylobacter Outbreak (HNCO) in 2016, which affected about 5000 people.”

research.eit.ac.nz

13


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

“The research is based on the Havelock North Campylobacter Outbreak (HNCO) in 2016, which affected about 5000 people.” A research programme funded by the Health Research Council to the sum of $437,949 is currently being undertaken to provide an in-depth analysis of this outbreak. Anita is the Project Manager for the HNCO research programme. It mainly comprises six research studies which bring together experts from across the health and academic sectors in New Zealand to cover different aspects of the Campylobacter outbreak, namely HBDHB, University of Otago, Institute of Environmental Science and Research, Massey University and EIT. This outbreak of gastroenteritis shook public confidence as about 45 people were sent to hospital with a possible three deaths, and at present an unknown number of elderly residents who continue to suffer from health complications. Preliminary investigations have been conducted and reported to the Government Inquiry into the HNCO. However, there is considerable potential for further data analysis to gain the full benefit of collected data. The HNCO research programme includes, among other things, an assessment of the outbreak and the public health sector’s response to it; community prevalence and incidence of reactive arthritis following the Campylobacter outbreak; long-term health impacts; functional decline among aged residential care facility residents following Campylobacter infection; and an exploration of nontraditional early warning detection tools like social media feeds. Another body of research Anita is undertaking is a review of smoking cessation among an indigenous population. “I am currently working in collaboration with other academic staff across schools to write a quantitative systematic review.” Anita’s role in the study is to look at the numbers of smoking in pregnancy interventions and outcomes among indigenous Māori, Americans and Canadians, while her other colleagues including Associate Professor Rachel Walker and Professor David Tipene-Leach are looking at the qualitative aspects of the project. Research has been an important part of Anita’s academic career and she has a lot of experience in presenting her research at international conferences from her time as a Senior Research Associate/Scientist at UCL. “My passion is scientific writing and I have published extensively, with more than 70 PubMed entries. I hope to continue this at EIT.” She is also a Member of the Centre for the Advancement of Learning and Teaching (CALT) London, an Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (UK), and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Public Health. But now her focus is EIT and Hawke’s Bay. “My aim now is to contribute my experience and expertise to EIT and for me and my family to enjoy the great lifestyle that Hawke’s Bay has to offer.”

14

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Innovative Education

Left: Margaret Young, centre: Tuhakia Keepa, right: Deb Stewart

Dr Anne Hiha, Deb Stewart, Tuhakia Keepa, Dr Pii-Tuulia Nikula and Dr Kathryn McCallum “ Whāngaia te kākano kia puawai” “Nurture the seed and it will blossom” Developing a strategy to improve Māori student engagement and success across all programmes at EIT is at the heart of a significant research project started last year. Kia Angitu, which means success or to be successful, is a partnership between EIT’s Māori Directorate (overview and oversight); the Education Development research.eit.ac.nz

15


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Deb Stewart, Teacher Development Adviser

Centre (teaching and learning strategies) and the Research and Innovation Centre (evaluation). The project’s Mentor is Professor Kay Morris Matthews, Research Professor, based at EIT’s Research and Innovation Centre. The sponsor of the project, EIT’s Director Māori, Tuhakia Keepa, says the research is part of a bigger plan for EIT. “Fundamental to my role is to develop strategy across EIT that promotes improvement in Māori student success. This includes all schools, programmes, staff development and a whole range of things. It is a strategy that EIT can use to guide its activity.” “The idea is that through this project we would identify some initiatives that we think are useful and then some ways of practice or training components that we can train our staff in which would support them to be more confident in engaging students.” The project, which began in May last year, started out as a pilot, but was considered to be so successful by the staff participating in project, it became the first phase of the research. Seven lecturers and tutors from across Schools at EIT were participants in the study, regularly attending community of practice meetings (participant discussion forums). An interim report on the work was published late last year and the second phase of the research is being undertaken this year. Aside from the regularly held community of practice sessions and one-on-one sessions with participants, data collection processes included interviews with staff participants and students of each participant where possible, at the start of the project and then later in the year. The project coordinator, Dr Anne Hiha, said that because Kia Angitu was action research, there were no prior expectations of what the outcomes would be. The action research methodology was informed by several key kaupapa Māori principles: Whanaungatanga, Manaakitanga, Tino Rangatiratanga and Taonga Tuku Iho. “We went in hoping that we were going to work with people who really wanted to make a change in their practice with Māori. Our only expectation or strong desire was that each person was going to be able to make the change that they wanted to make,” says Anne. She said the student interviews, conducted by Kia Angitu researcher Margaret Young, had been an important part of the process because they had been “very honest”. “The final feedback was that the students felt a shift had been made from the beginning of the course when some things were not done so well, to the end of the year. They really appreciated that.” Deb Stewart, Kia Angitu’s teaching and learning strategy lead and a Lecturer/ Tutor and Teacher Development Advisor at EIT’s Education Development Centre

The project, which began in May last year, started out as a pilot, but was considered to be so successful by the staff participating in project, it became the first phase of the research.

16

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Margaret Young, Kai Whakuako Te Ūranga Waka

– Te Papa Ako, said the project was set up to identify strategies that lecturers and tutors could use in their teaching practice, as well as programme development and assessment design. “It was about actually getting a group of voluntary participants to explore new opportunities to implement strategies to enhance Māori learner success.” A key part of the research was the communities of practice model, with meetings facilitated by Deb. “A community of practice is about a group of people coming together with a common interest or common objective, sharing ideas and experiences, and developing their thinking and their practice through a process of social learning.” “Not only did we have tutors from different discipline areas, but we had tutors participating who have come with diverse levels of knowledge and experience of working effectively with Māori students. So, some of them are already more skilled or confident, while others were just starting to dip their toes into this territory,” she said. Tuhakia said it was important for EIT and its staff to understand the impact of what they were doing on Māori student success, as well as building the capability of staff to be confident when engaging with Māori students. He said he had found it “quite inspiring” to read Kia Angitu’s interim report. “It talks about how staff are engaging with the activities and the initiatives, how it makes them feel and how their confidence around this activity has changed. It also looked at how they feel about creating their own communities of practice in their own schools. So, you have some staff saying maybe I can set up a community of practice in my own school to support other staff in my school to go through a process like this,” he said. Anne says “our role as staff of EIT is to ensure that even though Māori students know they are coming into a mainstream environment, it is made absolutely clear to them that they are welcome, they are acknowledged and are honoured for what they bring with them in terms of knowledge, understanding and experience of the world.” She said an interesting learning to come out of the research was the important role that building relationships played in engaging Māori students. With the interim report written, Anne considers the research indicates that the ideal classroom environment to strive for is one where Māori learners can be successful in the education context, as Māori, rather than having to fit in to a system that does not quite fit for them. Such environments will foster engagement and participation, with Māori learners contributing, and having validated, examples from their own worldview. “They should feel comfortable enough to use examples from their own worldview in the same way that other people use examples from theirs.”

One example of this is research participants starting to introduce content-relevant te reo Māori into their teaching practice.

Tuhakia Keepa, Director Māori Poutahu research.eit.ac.nz

17


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Anne said there were some practical measures that came out of the communities of practice for participants to use in the classroom environment. One example of this is research participants starting to introduce contentrelevant te reo Māori into their teaching practice. When this happens they have found that Māori learners are encouraged to share their knowledge with others in this regard and all learners benefit from exposure to discussion incorporating a Māori perspective. Deb said the next phase of project would most likely involve engaging with some of last year’s participants. “The hope is that the participants will go back to their own domains, their own areas of work and they will foster and create something within their circle of influence.” The participants would be encouraged to facilitate their own communities of practice, which would add to the research undertaken. Another potential avenue this year is for research to be done at EIT’s Tairāwhiti campus. Another important part of life at any tertiary institution or school are international students and bringing them over to New Zealand has become a multi-billion dollar industry. It is one that has also been plagued by controversies in the way students have been recruited, as well as concern for their welfare once they are here. Dr Pii-Tuulia Nikula is a senior lecturer at EIT’s School of Business and her research focus over the past few years has been international education. With about

Dr Pii-Tuulia Nikula, Senior Lecturer, School of Business

18

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

one hundred thousand students from all over the world enrolled in New Zealand institutions, Pii-Tuulia has looked at the morality and ethical behaviour of participants in this booming industry. Of particular interest are offshore commercial third parties who are used by local education providers to help them recruit students. “I’m looking at how to use business and management theories to make better use of those agents and to control them.” She says that one of the key questions is how New Zealand ensures that this commercial arrangement is working in its best interest. “I’m looking at how we can monitor what they are doing offshore. What are the tools required for education providers to find out what agents are doing and what they are actually telling us that they do.” With about half of the international students coming to the country using agents, Pii-Tuulia believes it is important, and in the best interest of the students, that “we get it right”. “That’s one of the key areas I’m looking at and that’s really important.” Pii-Tuulia says that once the students get here, it is important for them to be supported in their academic acculturation. “A lot of these students come from very different types of environments and they don’t always have the skills we take for granted. They often come from environments where you’ve always been told what to do, and here we tend to expect them to be able to study and work independently as well.” The research evaluation involved innovating in her own classroom and then building research around that to find out if there are positive consequences. For two years now, Pii-Tuulia and her colleagues, business lecturer Dr Xyang Gao and Associate Professor Jonathan Sibley, have been researching online simulations in a study called “Transforming Learning Through Educational Simulations”. This involves students talking about the theory and then applying what they have learnt to a case. The case study for students are simulations that they play like a computer game. “Basically, what the simulation allows them to see is what happens as a result of their decisions.” An example is the business case for gaming consoles. In the simulation, they have a gaming console business that has a product that is very similar to the products of other businesses. They must work out how to compete in a cost-effective way. “They have to then decide on all their marketing and advertising and the product features around the strategy they have chosen. And then they must get more innovative. They actually have to build a new product.”

With about one hundred thousand students from all over the world enrolled in New Zealand institutions, Pii-Tuulia has looked at the morality and ethical behaviour of participants in this booming industry.

research.eit.ac.nz

19


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Students have a list of new features they can choose from and then they analyse interviews with customers to find out what new products are required. Analysis is also done on sales, customer perceptions and other factors. “We have found that it helps the international students to really become much more self-directed because they are learning with the simulation. We have also found that it has resulted in good student engagements. They say they understand the course content better because they used the simulations.” Pii-Tuulia said the simulation had been done for about two years and had involved up to two hundred students across EIT’s Hawke’s Bay and Auckland campuses. A paper on the first trial was published last year and the final research will be published this year. An earlier research project, undertaken in 2017, was innovation in assessments. “Quite often we forget what the objective of an assessment is, which is for students to demonstrate their learning.”

Dr Kathryn MacCallum, Associate Professor, School of Computing

20

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

The case study was based on international students enrolled at EIT in 2017. Previously in this course, students were required to submit all their assessment work in a written format. For this research, students were offered three alternatives to choose from: a written report, a video presentation and an in-class presentation. The changes were introduced to give students choice. Using technology to enhance learning and to help students of all ages in a classroom setting has been at the core of Dr Kathryn MacCallum’s research since her PHD. Kathryn is an Associate Professor and Programme Coordinator of the Postgraduate Programme within the School of Computing. Kathryn’s research has focused on integrating a range of innovative technologies which focus on how they can enhance the learning experience. She is an elected executive member of the International Association for Mobile Learning and she has recently been exploring a wider range of new and emerging technologies. “I think my research draws on my passion for education and researching but also the technology side. It has always been about being able to use technology but using it properly with education.” “I have been working with Pakuranga College in Auckland – their students are developing virtual reality. It is not quite mobile, but using virtual reality as a way to engage their programming students.” The students have been making virtual reality games and Kathryn’s research looks at how to take these newer types of “emerging innovative approaches” to be able to better engage and teach students. A new project Kathryn is hoping to undertake this year is around augmented reality (AR). “Some of my research has been looking at how we apply augmented reality into education, to support cross curriculum learning goals. I have been working with my colleagues John Jamison and Daniel Dang to see how we can utilise AR as a way for students to explore their own environments and create their own learning objects. At the moment, it is fairly conceptual.” “The project will explore how technologies like this would actually create an environment where learning can be drawn from different subjects to help support the integration of the new digital curriculum (Hangarau Matihiko) to support students’ use and understanding of digital technologies and how they can be embedded in the teaching of different subjects.” “The focus is not on the tool, but how it can enhance the learning of the subject. It will look at how the different subjects could use technology to better improve student outcomes.”

Using technology to enhance learning and to help students of all ages in a classroom setting has been at the core of Dr Kathryn MacCallum’s research

research.eit.ac.nz

21


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Another project Kathryn is working on is redeveloping a few of the classrooms as innovative learning spaces. This year EIT will be rolling out four new classrooms, where technology will play a central role in helping facilitate better collaboration of students. “We have got the pedagogy and we are bringing in the technology to support that pedagogy and even then, as an institutional project there are still a lot of things that need to line up and support those things.” In another project, not related to digital technologies but still related to the field of technology, Kathryn has co-edited a new book, which will be published this year. The book – Agile and Lean Concepts for Teaching and Learning: Bringing Methodologies from the Industry to the Classroom is co-edited by Dr David Parsons, the National Postgraduate Director at the Mind Lab by Unitec. The subject of the book is the application of agile and lean techniques into various aspects of education. “The book looks at how we bring in new methodologies to invigorate how we teach and how we connect in the classroom.”

22

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Dr Emily Nelson Innovative learning a focus for research Finding new ways to better equip educators and to enhance the learning experience for students has been a strong focus in the academic life of Dr Emily Nelson. Emily is the programme co-ordinator for the Bachelor of Teaching (Primary) at EIT and sees research as an important tool to discover innovative learning and teaching methods. Emily has been in her role for just over two years but has been part of the EIT team for six years. Originally from Whakatū, she went to teachers’ training college in Palmerston North at the tender age of 16. She was a primary school teacher, mostly in Auckland, for nine years. “One day I saw this dream job at Auckland College of Education, lecturing on their primary programme. I thought I would go there and sort those student teachers out.” “My focus was quite practice-based but then I fell in love with the academic side.” A common theme in Emily’s research over the years is the educator/learner dynamic and ways to improve that relationship for better outcomes in the classroom. “My Masters was on student voice and how teachers can be better teachers if they learn to listen to their kids. Photography was my methodology and students were taking photographs of things that were important to them about school, learning and life. How they were thinking about things.” The emphasis of this research was to position students to be teaching their teachers, while her doctorate was an extension of that, looking at power relationships between students and teachers.

research.eit.ac.nz

23


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

It was love that eventually saw Emily move from Auckland to join her orchardist husband in Clive. Time in the advisory service at Massey University and then a stint in her own business, along with having two boys, eventually saw her move to EIT. Equipping candidate teachers for their practicum in primary schools with innovative learning environments (ILEs) has been a research focus since 2015. The work that Emily and her colleague Leigh Johnson have done in this area has been extended. “We just started to notice that our candidate teachers were spending more time in their schools’ ILE context for practicum and other school-based activities.” “They were going into classrooms that were no longer classrooms. So, instead of your traditional one teacher for 25-30 kids you were starting to see collaborative two-teacher or threeteacher learning hubs and the spaces shifting and changing.” The research involved focus groups with current students and some graduates and was aimed at better preparing candidate teachers for their time in new learning environments. Initial findings show that the big change for student teachers is moving from the traditional classroom setting with one supervising teacher, to a collaborative environment with two or three teachers and direct responsibility for more learners. Another research project involved a case study of Richmond School and was done in collaboration with the then principal Maurice Rehu. The whole school was set up as an ILE underpinned by kaupapa Māori and focused specifically on practices to support Māori learner success drawn from Te Ao Māori. Emily also sits on a number of committees at EIT. She has been on the Research Ethics and Approvals Committee since 2013 and is on the Strategic Research Committee, as well as being Chair of the combined Education & Social Sciences and Te Ūranga Waka School Research Committee.

A common theme in Emily’s research over the years is the educator/learner dynamic and ways to improve that relationship for better outcomes in the classroom.

24

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Creativity & Curation Delving into the past to inspire creativity in the future Professor Derek Lardelli, Associate Professor Steve Gibbs, Wellesley Binding and Nigel Roberts A desire to find local taonga lost from memory led Toihoukura Māori Visual Art and Design School Associate Professor Steve Gibbs on an inspirational European trip of discovery. The taonga in question were hoe (waka paddles) and a woven cloak acquired by James Cook at a meeting with local Māori on board the HMS Endeavour, while it lay becalmed off Whareongaonga, south of Young Nick’s Head on the East Coast south of Gisborne. The exchange in 1769 was captured by the ship’s artist Sydney Parkinson and 248 years later Steve began researching those very same paintings. The hoe he saw in those paintings were the beginnings of his PhD research, which he is just completing. “The reason I was researching painted paddles was that the oldest existing examples of our traditional painting systems were found on a number of paddles that were exchanged in that first peaceful encounter.” “We thought there were about three or four, only because we saw some paintings done by Parkinson. Since then we have located about 18. There are actually a large number of them scattered throughout Europe.” An important person in the process was renowned New Zealand anthropologist, environmentalist and writer, Dame Anne Salmond, who was involved in a research project called “Artefacts of Encounter”. This research was tracing all the items Captain Cook collected throughout the South Pacific and which now reside in museums.

“Research into the hoe or hoe kōwhaiwhai as they were known, show they were highly regarded as tradable items amongst our people prior to the arrival of Europeans. They are also a voice from the past as they talk about our prowess and the way we were able to navigate around our shores.”

research.eit.ac.nz

25


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Steve Gibbs, Associate Professor Toihoukura

“We got a message from Anne Salmond to say that they might have something that is of interest to us. So, she was a quite important part of the process. This was something that happened by chance.” Steve said he was able to locate most of them, document them and build his thesis around them. As a result, he was invited to participate in an exhibition of iwibased artists at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, London. It was an important and emotional journey to establish a taonga database of items and memories lost to the people of Tūranganui-a-Kiwa. “They have all come from the same place, the same source. There are lots of other ones, but I have actually tracked down a particular style - a carved style, a

26

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

painting style. The shape of the hoe is from this region. The style is the actual indicator and these are the oldest existent examples of our traditional painting systems we now call kōwhaiwhai.” The European trip was an emotional one because he was visiting taonga that “I knew had been lost from our memories and not been seen for 249 years”. “My mother never saw them when she was a child and she was born and bred here. Her grandparents would not have seen them, but their great-great grandparents would have known that these things existed.” “Research into the hoe or hoe kōwhaiwhai as they were known, show they were highly regarded as tradable items amongst our people prior to the arrival of Europeans. They are also a voice from the past as they talk about our prowess and the way we were able to navigate around our shores.” “You realise that these were made by the minds and hands of our ancestors and they are quite stunningly beautiful.” Steve is realistic about the challenges of getting the taonga back to the land it comes from. “I don’t think anyone is going to be ready to hand them over. There are two things, starting the conversation and creating opportunities to interact. It is about relationships.” Helping this process is a worldwide move to acknowledge indigenous culture and heritage. “The world has changed in the last 20 years quite dramatically.” Indigenous voices are now giving more weight to the treasures stored in museums. “One of the tragedies of the taonga stuck in museums in Europe is that no one sees them.” As for his own experience, Steve Gibbs feels the research has had an impact on him as a Māori and as an artist. “It has made me more aware of the significance and importance of retaining our art forms as a visual language for the future. I am an artist and an art educator and have been involved in art for most of my professional working life. It is really good to find stuff that pre-dates a lot of the thinking that happened with the post-colonial phase that we are currently working our way through.” “Our taonga tuku iho – cultural treasures - have the ability to carry our dreams and aspirations form the past into the future.” “As an artist and a creative person, it is easy to fall into the trap of replicating something from the past. The challenge for us is to create new works that encompass that narrative.” Steve has created a substantial body of work and curated two major exhibitions based on this research to date. The recent installation at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, London, which was opened by Sir David Attenborough, was a highlight. His students at Toihoukura and his iwi of Ngāi Tāmanuhiri and Rangiiwaho have been the lucky recipients of this new but old knowledge.

“One of the tragedies of the taonga stuck in museums in Europe is that no one sees them.”

research.eit.ac.nz

27


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Derek Lardelli, Professor / Ahorangi Toihoukura & Rose Lardelli

28

It was this same desire to draw inspiration from Māori heritage that led Professor/ Ahorangi Derek Lardelli to research and write six songs, as well as the associated histories around those songs, which was performed at this year’s Te Matatini festival – “the biggest calendar event in Māoridom”. Derek Lardelli is Pouwhirinaki/Principal Lecturer at Toihoukura at Tairāwhiti and is well-known for his role as cultural advisor to the All Blacks and the composer of their Haka, Kapa O Pango, which was performed at the Rugby World Cup in 2011. Derek’s kapa haka team has been national champion out of 47 teams, which made preparations for this year’s festival important. “The research of it all comes under the arm of what we call wānanga, which is coming together and working together to prepare for a national event.” “I think it is part and parcel of our sense of who we are as Māori, but I think it is also good for New Zealand. If you look at the amount of time involved, then you could cross credit that into health and looking after one’s body as well as the spiritual angle of it. It cuts across all that you are outlining in terms of physical health, mental health, spiritual health and overall well-being of the people.” An important part of the process is choosing the right songs for performance and making sure they are current and relevant to people today. “It is important to have things that matter to our people at present with regards to water and events that are now beginning to fall into place with regards to the arrival of Cook.”

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

He said that other topics also included health and, in particular, mental health in the Tairāwhiti region. One of the songs is a traditional chant which allows performers to look back into the past and utilise the writings of the ancients to help embellish that performance. “It is an ancient chant that comes from your ancestors so there must be longevity for it to be alive today. It is really the language and how our ancestors were using the language at that particular time and how the language has changed so dramatically.” An important part of the process is having an open mind and, more importantly an open heart. A fundamental principle to Derek’s work, be it visual, Te Matatini festival or kapa haka, is that it must be true to what he believes in. “Everybody has their own truths so it must be true to what you believe in and from your perspective, where you have unearthed your particular stories from, from your part of the earth. That is what makes it so indigenous.” “That is what makes it special and the way you utilise the language and the means in how you portray it is very much an important part of showing who you are in the picture.” His approach to this research may be viewed as different to the norm. For Derek Lardelli, the main thing about research, particularly if it is from a cultural perspective, is that it comes from a place of knowing. “The difference there is that we live our lives knowing this stuff and that we have to write it in some form is very Eurocentric in its approach.” “I think the academic exercise fulfils a certain role, however the main role is the actual performance. I think even in the modern use of film and the recording of that information is as valid a means of indicating what it is all about as the written word.” There is also a visual aspect to Derek Lardelli’s research which takes the form of tāi moko, painting and three-dimensional sculpture. Particularly pleasing for him is the Ko Rongowhakaata exhibition which is currently at Te Papa Tongarewa, The National Museum in Wellington. “I had a role to play there in creating some artworks that were on display on behalf of our people of Rongowhakaata and I thoroughly enjoyed creating those art pieces for Rongowhakaata.”

Particularly pleasing for him is the Ko Rongowhakaata exhibition which is currently at Te Papa Tongarewa, The National Museum in Wellington.

research.eit.ac.nz

29


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Wellesley Binding, Art lecturer IDEAschool

For Wellesley Binding, senior lecturer in Visual Arts at EIT Hawke’s Bay’s IDEAschool, a philosophical approach to art is an important part of the creative process. His recent fundamental research interest is in Phenomenology. Drawing from French theorist Maurice Merleau-Ponty and taking up contemporary North American thinkers, Wellesley adopts a different approach in the way he investigates the ontology of the studio setting. “It is not looking at things like the meaning of art or any of those larger issues, but the actuality of the engagement with materials and the studio itself as a phenomenological machine.” German philosopher Martin Heidegger, who influenced Merleau-Ponty, called the artwork “the thing plus” and what interests Wellesley is the “plus”. An important part of this process was changing the way he viewed himself with respect to his work and the studio. The traditional model of the artist as the creator and the art as the creation was replaced so that he was one element – the human element - of the studio activity, interacting with the materials and the space. “This goes against the idea of the romantic creator who is the total generator of all that happens. I am part of a mechanism operating that allows a feeling and a sense to the work as it is unfolding. Therefore, that leads to inevitable questions, which I am still investigating, as to what art is.” The reward for this paradigm shift has been a freeing up of one’s relationship to the studio process. It has been a move away from the artist leading with an idea and using the medium to express it.

30

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

“For me, ideas are simply another element of found object or found circumstance in the studio. The ideas don’t dominate what the work is about, the ideas are elements of a complex interaction in the studio.” This approach to his work was showcased at an exhibition, In the Study, as part of last year’s Harcourts Hawke’s Bay Art Festival, which also involved Wellesley conducting a floor talk on his work. During this time, he outlined the process he has been through to make works and hopefully to encourage the audience to think of art practice in a different way. “One of the things about people going to exhibitions is that they feel that they have to understand the work and make a correct interpretation as if there is a god of arts sitting on their shoulder whispering in their ear.” As to whether this change of focus has had any impact on the quality of his work, Wellesley believes it is hard to assess. “I wouldn’t say that it isn’t relevant, but I would say that it has enabled me to feel convicted in a new way about what I am doing at this time.” For Nigel Roberts (MFA), the programme coordinator for EIT’s Bachelor of Creative Practice, last year was a chance to upskill technically and focus on moving images and sound generation, but he also found time to embark on new research. His current research focus is on premonition and how myth and faith deal with it on the one hand and how logic and reason deal with it on the other hand. “I did a piece on the act of déjà vu. Premonition is about forethinking, déjà vu is invariably something that has happened, and you are thinking that you have been there before. Then looking at what myth and faith say about it and what logic and reason say about it.” The key for Nigel is finding a way to take these ideas and concepts and express them visually using sound and vision. He role-plays most of the different scenarios himself, but occasionally will use other people.

During this time, he outlined the process he has been through to make works and hopefully to encourage the audience to think of art practice in a different way.

research.eit.ac.nz

31


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Nigel Roberts, Programme Coordinator IDEAschool

A starting point is having a narrative or a story to guide him and for him it is his interpretation. It is then a case of taking that interpretation and capturing it on film. “If you take déjà vu, it is trying to evoke the idea of a situation where that could happen. So, something that happens, possibly from multiple angles and times and trying to evoke that connection to something that is believed in by faith or something believed in by reason.” He says he had a frame of reference when he started, but it was the research that guides the whole story. Whatever he finds, creates the whole story. “With a lot of these intersections between faith and science, it is more interesting to go back in time. With the beginning of scientific exploration, a lot of it was quite horrendous when they tried to prove or disprove something.” His Premonition work has been his main focus this summer with the intention this year to submit it for consideration in various experimental video / sound exhibitions worldwide. “I am sure out of that will come a series of works but I don’t have titles to those yet, but it will all be under the heading of premonition or the lie of premonition.” “I am always targeting the experimental edge of video and sound and that is where you get a lot more grey areas to what people are submitting.”

A starting point is having a narrative or a story to guide him and for him it is his interpretation. It is then a case of taking that interpretation and capturing it on film.

32

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Professor Matthew Marshall Taking NZ guitar music to the world The classical guitar is not just a musical instrument to Matthew Marshall, it is an integral part of his life. He first learned to play the guitar when he was six years old and by 17 was a paid recording artist for Radio New Zealand. A renowned international performer now, the head of EIT’s IDEAschool had an experience at 14 that, unbeknownst to him at the time, would give him a glimpse into his future. Matthew came down from his hometown of Hamilton to attend a guitar summer school at the then Hawke’s Bay Community College, now EIT in Taradale. “My dad, my sister and I drove down from Hamilton where I am from. We pitched a tent in a paddock where the Business School is now and I had guitar lessons in J Block for a week.” Little did he realise that decades later he would be back on campus as Head of IDEAschool. It was his first stint as a recording artist as a teen that “kind of steered me into studying music at University because I knew that it could be a career”. Early influences in his formative years were classical greats Julian Bream, John Williams and Andres Segovia. A Bachelor of Music at Victoria University in Wellington led to an opportunity to study at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester, thanks to winning an AGC Young Achievers’ Award.

research.eit.ac.nz

33


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

He returned to do his Masters’ degree and, ironically, his thesis was “A composer’s guide to the guitar”. A Professor of Music now, he worked at Wellington Polytech/Massey University for 20 years as Head of Music and had a stint in the UK as Director of Music at Dartington College of Arts. After eight years working at universities in Queensland and New South Wales, he decided to return home and found his way to EIT. A recent focus for Matthew has been publishing, performing and recording the works of New Zealand classical guitar composers to international audiences. “The research focuses on collaboration with New Zealand classical guitar composers who I have commissioned and specifically asked them to write for me. I then perform and record their music in New Zealand and overseas.” To achieve his publishing goal, Matthew set up a company called Hatchet Music, which is part of the New Zealand Guitar Foundation. All the design is done in-house at EIT and it has allowed Matthew to publish eight books of compositions last year. He has another 8 planned for this year. Matthew has no doubts that the quality of classical guitar music composition in New Zealand is of a very high standard and he is driven by a need to create a sense of identity for guitar music from New Zealand. This idea was formed when a teacher of his in England told him that he needed to find a niche for himself that separated him from other talented young guitarists. With the Spanish sound all the rage, Matthew was determined to support guitar music from New Zealand. He reckons the identity of the local composer is still evolving and while there is nothing in the music to identify it as being from New Zealand, local composers often capture an element of the New Zealand landscape in their music. But the real joy for Matthew is playing the compositions to worldwide audiences and it has taken him from New York to Russia and Iceland to Easter Island. A highlight was collaborating and playing with some of the world’s best at the New York Guitar Festival last year.

A recent focus for Matthew has been publishing, performing and recording the works of New Zealand classical guitar composers to international audiences.

34

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KĹŒRERO 2018

Sustainable Futures

Professor Natalie Waran and Asssociate Professor Jonathan Sibley Developing a sustainability strategy that infuses all activities has been set as a major goal for EIT - one that is expected to have positive benefits for the institute, its staff and students, and the wider community. The push to integrate sustainable activities across EIT - in practice, teaching research and relationships - is being led by Professor Natalie Waran, the Executive Dean for the Faculty of Education, Humanities and Health Science and Chair of One Welfare along with Jo Blakeley who is the Director of Academic and Student Services. For Natalie, it is the smart way forward and will allow EIT to play a leadership role in sustainability in the region. “Our approach will be to develop an over-arching strategy, objectives and activities to transition EIT to a position where sustainability infuses our curricula, research activities, physical campus and the institutional culture, as well as influencing research.eit.ac.nz

35


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

and contributing to the work of our stakeholders and communities in the wider region.” “This will allow us to work in an interdisciplinary way, breaking down traditional silos, provoking debate and discussion that will disrupt the norm to provide new approaches and ways of thinking that will contribute to the development of a healthy, productive and sustainable region.” There are some good examples of previous sustainability projects at EIT including a project led by a staff member in the IDEAschool who embarked upon an ambitious project to retrofit an existing log cabin that had formed part of the old arts and design school on EIT’s Hawke’s Bay campus. Dr Mazin Bahho, who teaches spatial and 3D design, used the project at Ōtātāra as the basis for his PhD and as an exemplar for sustainable building practices. “Mazin has really shown some leadership around sustainability, which led us to thinking about how we could broaden his vision to include the whole site.” “Our focus has expanded so that we are now looking at how both external and internal stakeholders can help develop ideas for making good use of a site on the land where the cabin is situated above the main campus, which at the moment had the working title of the Ōtātāra Environmental Learning in Nature Space or outdoor learning space.” Natalie says the teaching, learning and research possibilities are endless and cover a wide range of programmes from early childhood, primary teaching, art and sustainable building design to horticulture. “We are also having an outdoor natural amphitheatre for performances and spaces where students, schools and community groups can come and learn in nature and absorb knowledge about the local culture, heritage and importance of the site. We are really excited about all of the possibilities this will offer.”

36

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

“The Schools at EIT are committed to working with each other and various external groups to develop kaupapa that embraces all aspects of the environment including the important connection with Waiohiki Marae.“ To support the work required to shape up the site, funding has been generously supplied through the Air New Zealand Environment Trust. The Trust has supported EIT’s collaboration with Cape to City, including the Department of Conservation, Hawke’s Bay Regional Council and Enviroschools in a larger-scale programme of work aimed at ‘teaching the teachers’ to help develop more environmental awareness and confidence. The funding, lasting three years, will aid the development of a number of environmental education initiatives across the East Coast from Central Hawke’s Bay to Tairāwhiti. Ōtātāra is not the only project site, with an outdoor learning space being planned for development in Wairoa and a partnership with Wild Lab in Gisborne to develop teacher education programmes. A big goal is for this project to help encourage inter-disciplinary approaches to research at EIT. The development of the Sustainable Futures research theme is one which will stimulate initiatives that draw upon the expertise available at EIT across a range of disciplines that will encourage a greater focus on sustainability across the region. Natalie says: “We will also look to enhance awareness of sustainability and ecointelligence at EIT through embedding this as a component of programme design and delivery (existing and new), institute operation, key research initiatives, partnerships and community/business engagement.” A further objective is to provide knowledge and expertise to facilitate the incorporation of relevant Sustainable Development Goals in the operation of regular activities and industry in the region. “We see this as an exciting opportunity for creating new knowledge and new thinking, where, when many different disciplines share a space, they will discover inter-disciplinary possibilities - and that’s when the magic happens. For example, where horticulture, the art school and trainee teachers come together in the outdoor classroom, to develop innovative educational approaches, new research questions and possibilities for students “ “Out of that collaboration comes new subjects and new ways of thinking. By providing opportunities for staff to work together in one space, whether that is one’s head space or one’s physical space, you will get that.” “This goes further than what you do with your waste and is not just about green spaces, but is about being a sustainable business, being a sustainable student,“ she says. Natalie said the aim was to “take those 17 sustainable development goals and actually think how each of our schools might be bringing life to different things and how they do it”.

The development of the Sustainable Futures research theme is one which will stimulate initiatives that draw upon the expertise available at EIT across a range of disciplines that will encourage a greater focus on sustainability across the region.

research.eit.ac.nz

37


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Dr Jonathan Sibley, Associate Professor, School of Business

Sustainability in business and increasing economic growth in Hawke’s Bay have been a long-term research focus for Associate Professor Jonathan Sibley, Director of EIT’s Research and Innovation Centre, and Postgraduate Programme Coordinator for the School of Business. The School of Business has been working with the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE), Business Hawke’s Bay (BHB), local industry and local authorities on a Growth Study since 2016. “The study is seeking to develop an understanding of the demand for skill and the likely new patterns of skill and skill gaps in key industries in Hawke’s Bay,” says Jonathan. With Matariki, the Hawke’s Bay Regional Economic Development Strategy and Plan, firmly in place, BHB and MBIE wanted to develop a better understanding of the requirements of the region’s growth industries. They were especially keen to look at those industries which, typically, did not feature in discussions of regional labour requirements, as well as key trends having an impact on future employment and skill requirements. Of particular interest were industries that often “fly under the radar”, for example the high-growth digital sector. For EIT, the study was an opportunity to identify potential skills training and academic programmes and courses to meet the changing needs of the Bay’s industries.

“The study is seeking to develop an understanding of the demand for skill and the likely new patterns of skill and skill gaps in key industries in Hawke’s Bay,” says Jonathan.

38

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

The first phase saw researchers, led by Jonathan and School of Business’s law lecturer Conrad Schumacher, using the Infometrics regional data set for Hawke’s Bay to identify growth industries over the past 15 years. The second phase involved 180 business leaders, identified by EIT and BHB, who were asked what they thought the future of their industry was in Hawke’s Bay and if there was a likelihood of skill change. The findings of this phase of the study were presented at the end of 2017. The big surprise for Jonathan was that the majority of people interviewed did not see their industry as having significant potential for new investment or for change. “They saw growth, but it was growth doing what they were currently doing. They didn’t see their industries attractive to new investment. Some industries like pip fruit, retirement and the digital industries had a very different perspective, but for the rest it was quite sobering that people saw more of the same.” Part of the reason for this may be that most businesses in Hawke’s Bay are small and the owners tend to “reach a plateau”. “And if you’ve spent ten years slogging it out, and you get to a point where your business is doing okay, it is understandable that you might want to step back and do four days per week.” “It could also be that it’s really difficult to break through. It is difficult to get labour and get capital for expansion. Getting to markets is tough and we don’t have an ecosystem in Hawke’s Bay for innovation and entrepreneurialism.” The third phase of the study, which began in 2018, is a detailed survey of businesses across Hawke’s Bay. “We started with the food industries in Hawke’s Bay, looking at a broad range of sectors because these are so important to Hawke’s Bay and the transport sector because that’s the glue that binds the steps in the value chain.” “There are also the rapidly growing digital industries which represent a lot of the new skill requirement in Hawke’s Bay.” So far nearly two hundred interviews have been completed and are set to continue this year, with the aim being to interview approximately 600 people. “The initial indications from the work to date are that a broad array of skills shortages is pervasive across all of these key sectors.” Jonathan said that one of the significant local food producers said there were shortages “in every level in every company in the industry”. One issue arising from the study is the pervasive concern by food producers about the aging domestic workforce and the ability to attract young people into the food industries. “We don’t know why, and it was unexpected that these comments have come from people in different food production systems, both pastoral and horticultural.”

One issue arising from the study is the pervasive concern by food producers about the aging domestic workforce and the ability to attract young people into the food industries.

research.eit.ac.nz

39


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

“People will give an opinion and their opinion can be critical of young people. However, it may well be that the way the jobs are structured, or the way work is organised, or the way people are managed may be a disincentive. We don’t know.” He says that it is possibly a natural reaction to blame young people who may be perceived to not want to start at the bottom and work hard. “But, if the roles are not structured in order to be provide an attractive career path for young people, or an attractive work environment, then they might just not want to do the job.” “Studies globally indicate there can be an expectation of millennials that they can simply bash on the door to see the Managing Director if they want to and that being told off is not something that should happen to them.” “But that’s likely to be a function of the family and educational environment they’ve grown up in. If everyone’s a winner, then everyone is a winner. It doesn’t mean young people don’t work hard. It’s important to remember many millennials work multiple jobs, longer hours with less security globally than their Baby-boomer and Gen Y parents.” Jonathan considers that this is something that needs investigating as there is “a major concern that we have such a high NEET* rate in Hawke’s Bay and yet we have a high demand for labour.” “A number of the people we’ve talked to so far, have made the point that they’re going to have to change, potentially including automation, because they don’t have people to do the jobs.” “I didn’t think this work would take as long as it has” Jonathan says. “But we will keep doing it until the project is finished.” The role EIT must play in the changing face of local business is clear for Jonathan. “EIT’s interest in being involved in this study, is because the study informs what we as an institution need to be training for. The reason EIT exists is because we are part of this community and we support the provision of skill for the community. Our role, from our beginnings as a community college through to our growth into an institute of technology is to provide the skill that our communities need.” He says that a key part of Hawke’s Bay’s requirements is also to have a skilled Māori workforce. “The often-implicit Eurocentric view of work has to be replaced by a different worldview. We have to be able to operate comfortably within Te Ao Māori, not just Te Ao Pākehā. An organisation like ours has to know what skill is required and must understand those who we are supporting to develop that skill. That’s the primary purpose of the Growth Study.”

1

40

Not in Education, Employment or Training

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Dr Mazin Bahho From designing houses for Iraq’s ex-president Saddam Hussein to renovating a dilapidated old log cabin on EIT’s Hawke’s Bay campus, Mazin Bahho’s life has certainly been eventful. Mazin, who left Iraq with his family to immigrate to New Zealand, has had a 20year academic career teaching spatial design at EIT’s IDEAschool. It is a long way from Iraq and a different lifestyle from working as an architect in Baghdad. Life was good for Mazin and his family after the Iran-Iraq war ended in 1980s. Iraq was doing well, economically and the future looked good. He had been commissioned to design residence projects for Saddam Hussein and even met him twice. But then, in the early 1990s, Iraq invaded Kuwait and Mazin came to a sobering realisation – there would be no peace in his beloved homeland for the foreseeable future. “I could see how people’s attitudes changed because of the Iran-Iraq war and then the Kuwait invasion. It was time to leave.” The original plan had been to take up a scholarship to study in Nottingham, England in 1994, but plans changed while working as an architect in Jordan. “I thought the Middle East was not going to be safe for some time and I wanted to come to a country that spoke English. The options were Australia and New Zealand and we chose New Zealand.” Since then, Hawke’s Bay and EIT have become home. Mazin’s most significant work in New Zealand was his PhD study, which completed over a six-year period on research.eit.ac.nz

41


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

a part-time basis through Victoria University of Wellington. His research focus was investigating various aspects of sustainable activities through buildings. His research had a practical element to it as he retrofitted an existing building on the hill at Ōtātāra, which is part of EIT’s Hawke’s Bay campus. The site has strong historical, cultural and spiritual associations with the local Māori community and was chosen by Mazin to become an exemplar for sustainable building practices. “The building was up at Ōtātāra and it was left for years to rot basically. The site was where the Arts Programme started, so it has history. I was at EIT over 20 years and that place was buzzing – the students loved it.” “But in about 2008, these buildings were all removed, they were deemed to be unfit, except for the log cabin because of the nature of it being logs.” With support from EIT and local sponsorship, Mazin set about retrofitting the building by introducing sustainable building practices, hence creating an eco-friendly, sustainable building with insulation, double-glazed windows, solar panels, water storage and a wastewater treatment system. His aim was to refit the building to be a demonstration building that could be an inspiration for sustainable building and living. Not only did the building see him get his PhD, but he was able to get his students involved in the design and building process. It was a labour of love that saw him put in many hours of hard labour. “I came to the conclusion that I had to lead from the front on the project and as it progressed, people got more excited about it.” Mazin’s vision of sustainability has become the catalyst for EIT’s broader focus on sustainability across all programmes, using the Ōtātara site as an outdoor learning in nature space. Mazin’s current research project, which he is doing in conjunction with colleague Roger Kelly, is about entrepreneurship and the new ways of marketing creative work. They are interviewing selected businesses who don’t follow the traditional way of marketing or thinking of business as supply and demand. Other research he is doing is focused on product design and finding ways of minimising waste.

His research had a practical element to it as he retrofitted an existing building on the hill at Ōtātāra, which is part of EIT’s Taradale campus. The site has strong historical, cultural and spiritual associations with the local Māori community and was chosen by Mazin to become an exemplar for sustainable building practices.

42

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KĹŒRERO 2018

2018 Research Outputs Book Erturk, E. (Ed.). (2018). Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference of Computing and Information Technology Education and Research in New Zealand incorporating the 31st Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications Wellington, New Zealand 11th - 13th July 2018. Retrieved from https:// www.citrenz.ac.nz/2018-proceedings/ Horwood, M. (2018). Sharing authority in the museum: Distributed objects, reassembled relationships. London, England: Routledge. Marshall, M. (Ed.). (2018). Autumn moods for cello & guitar by Anthony Ritchie [Music score]. Pirongia, New Zealand: Hatchet Music. Marshall, M. (Ed.). (2018). Melancholia by Anthony Ritchie [Music score]. Pirongia, New Zealand: Hatchet Music. Marshall, M. (Ed.). (2018). Rhapsody on a riff by Michael Calvert [Music score]. Pirongia, New Zealand: Hatchet Music. Marshall, M. (Ed.). (2018). Suite for violin and guitar by Kenneth Young [Music score]. Pirongia, New Zealand: Hatchet Music. Marshall, M. (Ed.). (2018). Tense melodies for flute & guitar by Philip Norman [Music score]. Pirongia, New Zealand: Hatchet Music. Marshall, M. (Ed.). (2018). Three sad waltzes for solo guitar by Kenneth Young [Music score]. Pirongia, New Zealand: Hatchet Music. Parsons, D., Power, R., Palalas, A., Hambrock, H., & MacCallum, K. (Eds.). (2018). Proceedings of 17th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning, 11-14 November 2018, Concordia University Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. Retrieved from http://www.learntechlib.org/j/MLEARN/v/2018/n/1/

Book Chapter Gibbs, S., Lythberg, B., & Salmond, A. (2018). Hoe whakairo: Painted paddles from New Zealand. In L. Carreau, A. Clark, A. Jelinek, E. Lilje & N. Thomas (Eds.), Pacific presences: Volume 2. Oceanic art and European museums (pp. 315-328). Leiden, The Netherlands: Sidestone Press. Retrieved from https://www.sidestone.com/ books/pacific-presences-vol-2

research.eit.ac.nz

43


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Hanna, S., & Lyons, K. (2018). The experience of transnational social workers in England: Some findings from research. In A. Bartley & L. Beddoe (Eds.), Transnational social work: Opportunities and challenges of a global profession (pp. 73-88). Bristol, England: Policy Press. Horwood, M. (2017). Going digital in the GLAM sector: ICT innovations & collaborations for taonga Māori. In H. Whaanga, T. T. Keegan & M. Apperley (Eds.), He whare hangarau Māori: Language, culture and technology (pp. 149-164). Hamilton, New Zealand: University of Waikato. Retrieved from https://www.waikato.ac.nz/fmis/ research-practice/te-reo-hub/he-whare-hangarau-maori Morris Matthews, K. (2018). Organisations concerned with girls, women and education [2018 update]. (Original essay by Ruth Fry, 1993). In A. Else (Ed.), Women together: A history of women’s organisations in New Zealand/Ngā Rōpū Wāhine o te Motu [Online edition]. Retrieved from https://nzhistory.govt.nz/women-together/theme/ education-girls-and-women Nelson, E. (2018). Teachers and power in student voice: ‘Finger on the pulse, not children under the thumb’. In R. Bourke & J. Loveridge (Eds.), Radical collegiality through student voice: Educational experience, policy and practice (pp. 197-216). Singapore: Springer. Nielson, B., Appleby, M. C., & Waran, N. K. (2018). Physical conditions. In M. C. Appleby, A. Olsson & F. Galindo (Eds.), Animal welfare (3rd ed., pp. 253-270). Wallingford, England: CABI. Parsons, D., & MacCallum, K. (2018). Mobile learning curricula: Policy and potential. In D. Herro, S. Arafeh, R. Ling & C. Holden (Eds.), Mobile learning: Perspectives on practice and policy (pp. 45-64). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Journal Article Refereed Bahho, M., & Vale, B. (2018). Buildings that teach: Developing sustainable building design criteria. The International Journal of Sustainability in Economic, Social, and Cultural Context, 13(4), 21-39. doi:10.18848/2325-1115/CGP/v13i04/21-39 Bennett, P. N., Walker, R. C., Trask, M., Claus, S., Luyckx, V., Castille, C., . . . Richards, M. (2018). The International Society of Nephrology Nurse Working Group: Engaging nephrology nurses globally [Editorial]. Kidney International Reports. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ekir.2018.10.013 Carstensen, C., Papps, E., & Thompson, S. (2018). When a child is diagnosed with severe allergies. Nursing Praxis in New Zealand, 34(2), 6-16. Chou, J.-Y., D’Eath, R. B., Sandercock, D. A., Waran, N., Haigh, A., & O’Driscoll, K. (2018). Use of different wood types as environmental enrichment to manage tail biting in docked pigs in a commercial fully-slatted system. Livestock Science, 213, 19-27. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.livsci.2018.04.004 Davis, R., Sheriff, K., & Owen, K. (2019). Conceptualising and measuring consumer authenticity online. Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, 47, 17-31. https:// doi.org/10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.10.002

44

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Drown, C., Harding, T., & Marshall, R. (2018). Nurse perceptions of the use of seclusion in mental health inpatient facilities: Have attitudes to Māori changedā The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, 13(2), 100-111. doi:10.1108/ JMHTEP-12-2016-0055 Forbes, V., Harvey, C., & Meyer, A. (2018). Nurse practitioners in aged care settings: A study of general practitioners’ and registered nurses’ views. Contemporary Nurse, 54(2), 220-231. doi:10.1080/10376178.2018.1484258 Forrest, R. H. J., Henry, J. D., McGarry, P. J., & Marshall, R. N. (2018). Mild traumatic brain injury in New Zealand: Factors influencing post-concussion symptom recovery time in a specialised concussion service. Journal of Primary Health Care, 10(2), 159-166. https://doi.org/10.1071/HC17071 Hall, C., Randle, H., Pearson, G., Preshaw, L., & Waran, N. (2018). Assessing equine emotional state. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 205, 183-193. https://doi. org/10.1016/j.applanim.2018.03.006 Hanna, S. (2018). [Review of the book Bereaved parents and their continuing bonds: Love after death, by Catherine Seigal]. The British Journal of Social Work, 48(8), 24072408. doi:10.1093/bjsw/bcy031 Harvey, C. L., Baret, C., Rochefort, C. M., Meyer, A., Ausserhofer, D., Ciutene, R., & Schubert, M. (2018). Discursive practice – Lean thinking, nurses’ responsibilities and the cost to care. Journal of Health Organization and Management, 32(6), 762778. doi:10.1108/JHOM-12-2017-0316 Harvey, C. L., Thompson, S., Willis, E., Meyer, A., & Pearson, M. (2018). Understanding how nurses ration care. Journal of Health Organization and Management, 32(3), 494510. doi:10.1108/JHOM-09-2017-0248 Jayasena, C. N., Luo, R., Dimakopoulou, A., Dearing, C., Clarke, H., Patel, N., . . . Dhillo, W. S. (2018). Prevalence of abnormal semen analysis and levels of adherence with fertility preservation in men undergoing therapy for newly diagnosed cancer: A retrospective study in 2906 patients. Clinical Endocrinology, 89(6), 798-804. doi:10.1111/cen.13851 John, S., Larke, R., & Kilgour, M. (2018). Applications of social media for medical tourism marketing: An empirical analysis. Anatolia, 29(4), 553-565. doi:10.1080/13032917.20 18.1473261 MacKay, J. R. D., Paterson, J., Sandilands, V., Waran, N. K., Lancaster, B., & Hughes, K. (2018). Lessons learned from teaching multiple Massive Open Online Courses in veterinary education. Journal of Perspectives in Applied Academic Practice, 6(2), 22-40. https://doi.org/10.14297/jpaap.v6i2.353 Maclaren, O., Mackay, L., Schofield, G., & Zinn, C. (2018). Novel nutrition profiling of New Zealanders’ varied eating patterns. Nutrients, 10(1), 1-13. doi:10.3390/nu10010030 Manhire, K. M., Williams, S. M., Tipene-Leach, D., Baddock, S. A., Abel, S., Tangiora, A., . . . Taylor, B. J. (2018). Predictors of breastfeeding duration in a predominantly Māori population in New Zealand. BMC Pediatrics, 18(1), 1-10. doi:10.1186/s12887-018-1274-9 Morris Matthews, K., & Nikula, P.-T. (2018). Zero fee policy: Making tertiary education and training accessible for all? New Zealand Annual Review of Education, 23, 5-19.

research.eit.ac.nz

45


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Nikula, P.-T., & Kivistö, J. (2018). Hiring education agents for international student recruitment: Perspectives from agency theory. Higher Education Policy, 31(4), 535557. doi:10.1057/s41307-017-0070-8 Peter, S., & Park, L. S.-C. (2018). Changing research methodology: Two case studies of critical realism informing social work doctoral research. Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work, 30(1), 65-70. http://dx.doi.org/10.11157/anzswj-vol30iss1id426 Postlewaight, G. (2018). Effective transition to school: Integrating philosophy, pedagogy and curriculum. NZ International Research in Early Childhood Education Journal, 21(1), 62-75. Rangihuna, D., Kopua, M., & Tipene-Leach, D. (2018). Mahi a Atua: A pathway forward for Māori mental health? New Zealand Medical Journal, 131(1471), 79-83. Rangihuna, D., Kopua, M., & Tipene-Leach, D. (2018). Te Mahi a Atua. Journal of Primary Health Care, 10(1), 16-17. https://doi.org/10.1071/HC17076 Robinson, L. M., Coleman, K., Capitanio, J. P., Gottlieb, D. H., Handel, I. G., . . . Waran, N. K., & Weiss, A. (2018). Rhesus macaque personality, dominance, behavior, and health. American Journal of Primatology, 80(2), e22739. doi:10.1002/ajp.22739 Shambrook, P., Lander, P. J., & Maclaren, O. (2018). A study into the reliability of the data flow from GPS enabled portable fitness devices to the internet. International Journal of Exercise Science, 11(7), 1184-1193. Taylor, L., & Lander, P. (2018). Adolescent netball players normative data and physical performance profiles. Physical Educator: Journal of Physical Education New Zealand, 51(1), 19-24. Tipene-Leach, D., Baddock, S. A., Williams, S. M., Tangiora, A., Jones, R., McElnay, C., & Taylor, B. J. (2018). The Pēpi-Pod study: Overnight video, oximetry and thermal environment while using an inābed sleep device for sudden unexpected death in infancy prevention. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 54(6), 638-646. doi:10.1111/jpc.13845 Vernon, R., Chiarella, M., & Papps, E. (2018). Investigating the relationship between continuing competence and insight in nursing and midwifery practice. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 9(3), 36-52. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2155-8256(18)30152-2 Vernon, R., Chiarella, M., Papps, E., & Lark, A. (2018). Assuring competence or ensuring performance. Collegian. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1016/j. colegn.2018.10.004 Walker, R. C., Naicker, D., Kara, T., & Palmer, S. C. (2018). Children’s experiences and expectations of kidney transplantation: A qualitative interview study. Nephrology. Advance online publication. doi:10.1111/nep.13405 Wallace, E., & Morris Matthews, K. (2018). The partnering of museums and academics: Working together on history that matters. History of Education Review, 47(2), 119130. doi:10.1108/HER-12-2017-0028

46

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Non-refereed Creagh, T. (2018, Autumn). Be wary of ‘Gan Bei’. WineNZ, 16-18. Dunkerley, S., & Erturk, E. (2018). Understanding gamification and its benefits. Journal of Applied Computing and Information Technology, 22(1). Retrieved from https://www. citrenz.ac.nz/jacit/JACIT2201/2018Dunkerley_Gamification.pdf Field, S., King, P., Saunders-Vasconcelos, C., & Holzapfel, B. (2018, Autumn/Winter). Limiting berry size: Investigating the use of anti-transpirant sprayed after fruit set. Hawke’s Bay Wine, 10-11. Gibbs, S. (2018, August). Sixth sense [Painting]. School Journal, Level 2, 24-25. Gibbs, S. (2018, June). A hoe! School Journal, Level 2, 26-32. Gibbs, S. (2018, June). Painted hoe. School Journal, Level 2, 20-25.

Conference Contribution Published conference proceedings—refereed Arasanmi, C., Abdullateef, A., & Ekundayo, S. (2018). Modelling tertiary students’ flow experience in a mobile learning environment. In E. Erturk (Ed.), Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference of Computing and Information Technology Education and Research in New Zealand Incorporating the 31st Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications Wellington, New Zealand 11th - 13th July 2018 (pp. 18-21). Retrieved from https://www.citrenz.ac.nz/ conferences/2018/pdf/2018CITRENZ_1_Arasanmi_Mobile.pdf Day, S. (2018). Digital divide experiences from the Chatham Islands. In E. Erturk (Ed.), Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference of Computing and Information Technology Education and Research in New Zealand Incorporating the 31st Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications Wellington, New Zealand 11th - 13th July 2018 (pp. 22-29). Retrieved from https:// www.citrenz.ac.nz/conferences/2018/pdf/2018CITRENZ_1_Day_Chatham.pdf Frezza, S., Clear, A., & Vichare, A. (2018). Voices on the core of computing. In FIE (Frontiers in Education) 2018 conference proceedings. Retrieved from http:// fie2018.org/ Hartley, T., & MacCallum, K. (2018). Managing expectations during internship matching. In K. E. Zegwaard & K. Hoskyn (Eds.), New Zealand Association for Cooperative Education 2018 Conference Proceedings: Refereed Proceedings of the 21st New Zealand Association for Cooperative Education Conference, held 16th–18th April, 2018, at The Venue, Onetangi, Waiheke Island, Auckland, New Zealand. (pp. 9-10). Retrieved from http://nzace.ac.nz/2018-conference-waiheke-island/ Impagliazzo, J., Clear, A., & Alrumaih, H. (2018). Developing an overview of computing/ engineering curricula via the CC2020 Project. In Proceedings of 2018 IEEE World Engineering Education Conference (EDUNINE), Buenos Aires, Argentina. doi:10.1109/EDUNINE.2018.8450965

research.eit.ac.nz

47


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

MacCallum, K., & Jamieson, J. (2018). Supporting Māori language learning using Augmented Reality. In E. Erturk (Ed.), Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference of Computing and Information Technology Education and Research in New Zealand Incorporating the 31st Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications Wellington, New Zealand 11th - 13th July 2018 (pp. 41-45). Retrieved from https://www.citrenz.ac.nz/conferences/2018/pdf/2018CITRENZ_1_ MacCallum_Maori.pdf MacCallum, K., & Kumar, M. (2018). Exploring ARMobile in early childhood literacy learning. In Proceedings: Flexible Learning Association (FLANZ) 2018 Conference, Palmerston North, New Zealand (pp. 137-142). Retrieved from https://s3-ap-southeast-2.amazonaws.com/ap-southeast-2.accounts.ivvy.com/ account34583/events/124090/files/5b0c5a83276a3.pdf Olsen, L., & Skelton, D. (2018). From Reference-Desk to Help-Desk: The crossover between library services and IT service delivery. In E. Erturk (Ed.), Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference of Computing and Information Technology Education and Research in New Zealand Incorporating the 31st Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications Wellington, New Zealand 11th - 13th July 2018 (pp. 66-72). Retrieved from https://www.citrenz.ac.nz/ conferences/2018/pdf/2018CITRENZ_1_Olsen_Library.pdf Parsons, D., Thomas, H., Lynch, J., & MacCallum, K. (2018). Digital fluency and the entitlement curriculum: Who are the computational thinkers? In Proceedings: Flexible Learning Association (FLANZ) 2018 Conference, Palmerston North, New Zealand (pp. 64-69). Retrieved from https://s3-ap-southeast-2.amazonaws. com/ap-southeast-2.accounts.ivvy.com/account34583/events/124090/ files/5b0c5a83276a3.pdf Parsons, D., Thorn, R., Inkila, M., & MacCallum, K. (2018, December). Using Trello to support agile and lean learning with Scrum and Kanban in teacher professional development. In Proceedings of 2018 IEEE International Conference on Teaching, Assessment and Learning for Engineering (TALE), Wollongong, NSW, Australia. doi:10.1109/TALE.2018.8615399 Pearson, G., Reardon, R., Keen, J., Dwyer, C., & Waran, N. (2018). Investigation into the stress response of horses undergoing veterinary care. In S. McDonnell, B. Padalino & P. Baragli (Eds.), Proceedings of the 14th International Conference: Equitation science 150 years after Caprilli; theory and practice, the full circle; September 21-24, 2018, Hosted by Regiment “Lanceri di Montebello”, Roma, Italy (pp. 130). Retrieved from https://equitationscience.com/file_download/219/ Proceedings+14th+ISES+Conference.pdf Pfaller, S., & Hartley, T. (2018). Comparison of Windows and Linux as Docker Hosts. In E. Erturk (Ed.), Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference of Computing and Information Technology Education and Research in New Zealand Incorporating the 31st Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications Wellington, New Zealand 11th - 13th July 2018 (pp. 121-124). Retrieved from https://www.citrenz.ac.nz/conferences/2018/pdf/2018CITRENZ_2_Pfaller_ Docker.pdf

48

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Sabin, M., Snow, P., Simon, Impagliazzo, J., Clear, A., & Timanovsky, Y. (2018). Representative names of computing degree programs worldwide. In Proceedings of the 20th Australasian Computing Education Conference (pp. 105-112). Brisbane, Queensland, Australia: ACM. doi:10.1145/3160489.3160501 Skelton, D., & Blumenthal, T. (2018). Utilising existing frameworks and models for evaluating the relationships between a tertiary provider and the information technology industry in the Tairāwhiti region. In K. E. Zegwaard & K. Hoskyn (Eds.), New Zealand Association for Cooperative Education 2018 Conference Proceedings: Refereed Proceedings of the 21st New Zealand Association for Cooperative Education Conference, held 16th–18th April, 2018, at The Venue, Onetangi, Waiheke Island, Auckland, New Zealand. (pp. 43-47). Retrieved from http://nzace.ac.nz/2018conference-waiheke-island/ Skelton, D., & Westner, M. (2018). International internships: An investigation of international cooperative student experiences by partner institutions. In K. E. Zegwaard & M. Ford (Eds.), Refereed proceedings of the 3rd International Research Symposium on Cooperative and Work-Integrated Education, Stuttgart, Germany (pp. 193-198). Retrieved from https://www.waceinc.org/DHBW2018/WACE_ IRS_2018_Refereed_Conference_Proceedings.pdf Waran, N. (2018). Looking on the bright side of life: Positive emotions in animals and why they matter. In Proceedings: 11th Boehringer Ingelheim Expert Forum on Farm Animal Well-Being, 31st May - 1st June 2018, Sydney, Australia (pp. 10-13). Retrieved from https://farmanimalwellbeing.com/recurso. phpātipo=forum&subtipo=pdf&id=12 Westner, M., Fuhrmann, T., Waas, T., & Skelton, D. (2018). Internationalization of a computer science faculty: Lessons learned from a regional German technical university of applied sciences. In 9th Annual International Conference on Computer Science Education: Innovation and Technology (CSEIT 2018) (pp. 33-38). doi:10.5176/2251-2195_CSEIT18.118

Published conference proceedings—non-refereed Bischofer, M., & Erturk, E. (2018). An IT business intelligence internship: Hardware project at DataNow [Poster paper]. In E. Erturk (Ed.), Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference of Computing and Information Technology Education and Research in New Zealand Incorporating the 31st Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications Wellington, New Zealand 11th - 13th July 2018 (pp. 143). Retrieved from https://www.citrenz.ac.nz/conferences/2018/ pdf/2018CITRENZ_Poster_96_Bischofer_DataNow.pdf Hannon, W., Erturk, E., & Skelton, D. (2018). Cost effective sustainable private cloud [Poster paper]. In E. Erturk (Ed.), Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference of Computing and Information Technology Education and Research in New Zealand Incorporating the 31st Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications Wellington, New Zealand 11th - 13th July 2018 (pp. 149). Retrieved from https://www.citrenz.ac.nz/conferences/2018/pdf/2018CITRENZ_ Poster_110_Hannon_Cloud.pdf research.eit.ac.nz

49


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Impagliazzo, J., Clear, A., & Frezza, S. (2018). Innovative computing curricula and the CC2020 project. In FIE (Frontiers in Education) 2018 Conference Proceedings. Retrieved from http://fie2018.org/ Owens, B. B., Clear, A., Impagliazzo, J., Moro, M., & Zhang, M. (2018). Global awareness for computing educators and scholars [Abstract]. In SIGCSE ‘18: Proceedings of the 49th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, Feb. 21-24, 2018, Baltimore, MD, USA (p. 1069). https://doi.org/10.1145/3159450.3166085 Vontari, V., & Clear, A. (2018). Information technology jobs in Auckland: Where and what are they? [Poster paper]. In E. Erturk (Ed.), Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference of Computing and Information Technology Education and Research in New Zealand Incorporating the 31st Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications Wellington, New Zealand 11th - 13th July 2018 (pp. 144-145). Retrieved from https://www.citrenz.ac.nz/conferences/2018/ pdf/2018CITRENZ_Poster_106_Vontari_ITJobs.pdf Waayer, J., & Skelton, D. (2018). Front-end web development internship with Sysdoc [Poster paper]. In E. Erturk (Ed.), Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference of Computing and Information Technology Education and Research in New Zealand Incorporating the 31st Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications Wellington, New Zealand 11th - 13th July 2018 (pp. 146). Retrieved from https://www.citrenz.ac.nz/conferences/2018/pdf/2018CITRENZ_ Poster_108_Waayer_Sysdoc.pdf

Conference oral presentation—refereed Bahho, M., Milfont, T., & Vale, B. (2018, June). Investigating environmental values: The log cabin project. Paper presented at the 25th International Association PeopleEnvironment Studies (IAPS) Conference, Rome, Italy. Bartley, A., Beddoe, L., & Peter, S. (2018, April). Transnational social work: Engaging the profession in Aotearoa New Zealand. Paper presented at the 8th European Conference for Social Work Research (ECSWR), Edinburgh, Scotland. Bates, J., Zhou, H., Forrest, R., & Hickford, J. (2018, September). DNA technologies for improving animal welfare: Eradication of dermatosparaxis. Paper presented at the New Zealand Companion Animal Conference, Auckland, New Zealand. Forrest, R., Steiner, E., Thomson, S., Bakri, H., Pearson, M., Armstrong, L., & Waran, N. (2018, September). Furry whānau wellbeing: Working with local communities for positive pet welfare outcomes. Paper presented at the New Zealand Companion Animal Conference 2018, Auckland, New Zealand. Gabriel, B., Morris Matthews, K., Hiha, A., Bevin, M., Wills, R., & Tipene-Leach, D. (2018, July). The Ngātahi Vulnerable Children’s Workforce Development Programme in Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Paper presented at the 3rd Biennial Childhood Trauma Conference, Melbourne, Australia. Hanna, S., & Chisnell, C. (2018, December). Disrupting the narrative of silence – Supporting young carers to have a voice. Paper presented at the Sociological Association of Aotearoa New Zealand (SAANZ) Conference 2018, Wellington, New Zealand.

50

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Hantler, A., Bevin, M., & Thompson, S. (2018, November). Gaining ethical approval for research involving ‘vulnerable’ participants. Paper presented at the NZNO Nursing Research Section Inaugural Research Forum, Dunedin, New Zealand. Horwood, M. (2018, November). Developing museum training in response to iwi community needs. Paper presented at the ICR & ICTOP Conference, Auckland and Wellington, New Zealand. Horwood, M. (2018, December). Distributed collections, reassembled relationships. Paper presented at the 12th Conference of the European Society for Oceanists (ESfO), London and Cambridge, England. Mahadeo, J. D., Pillai, R. G., Soobaroyen, T., & Pariag-Maraye, N. (2018, January). Regulating the invisible hand: Mandatory CSR in Mauritius. Paper presented at the FORE International Sustainable Development (FISD) Conference 2018, New Delhi, India. Nikula, P.-T. (2018, January). Increasing international students’ choice in summative assessments: Use of video presentations in demonstrating learning. Paper presented at the Centre for Research in International Education Conference, Auckland, New Zealand. Nikula, P.-T. (2018, January). Recruiting international students with the help of third-party representatives: The issues in incentivising and monitoring education agents. Paper presented at the Centre for Research in International Education Conference, Auckland, New Zealand. Nikula, P.-T. (2018, November). The New Zealand pastoral care policy – Protecting international students’ rights and well-being? Paper presented at the ISANA NZ 2018 Symposium, Wellington, New Zealand. Nikula, P.-T., Gao, X., & Sibley, J. (2018, January). Online simulations as a way to increase collaboration, engagement, and real-life problem solvingā International student perspectives. Paper presented at the Centre for Research in International Education Conference, Auckland, New Zealand. Nikula, P.-T., & Kivistö, J. (2018. December). Controlling third-party recruiter behaviour in Australian and New Zealand export education industries. Paper presented at the 32nd ANZAM (Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management) Conference, Auckland, New Zealand. Nikula, P.-T., & Sibley, J. (2018, November). It is a two-way street: Supporting international students’ academic acculturation. Paper presented at the ISANA NZ 2018 Symposium, Wellington, New Zealand. Peter, S. (2018, April). Critical realism and blended methods for qualitative social work research. Paper presented at the 8th European Conference for Social Work Research (ECSWR), Edinburgh, Scotland. Peter, S., Barley, A., & Beddoe, L. (2018, July). Experience of transition into the host country: Analysis of data from focus groups with transnational social workers (TSWs) in New Zealand. Paper presented at the Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development 2018, Dublin, Ireland.

research.eit.ac.nz

51


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Pierard, T. (2018, December). Around the backbeat: Exploring the influence of jazz drumming in popular music. Paper presented at the International Association for the Study of Popular Music – Australia/New Zealand (IASPM-ANZ) Conference, Hamilton, New Zealand. Roy, S., & Roy, R. N. (2018, May). Evaluating and overcoming the barriers of radio frequency identification (RFID) implementation in a process industry in New Zealand. Paper presented at the 29th Annual Conference of Production and Operations Management Society (POMS), Houston, TX, USA. Sutherland, B. (2018, December). Listen to the lion: The phenomenon of electric rock music and the disappearing animal. Paper presented at the International Association for the Study of Popular Music – Australia/New Zealand (IASPM-ANZ) Conference, Hamilton, New Zealand. Tipene-Leach, D. (2018, April). Mauri ora, whānau ora, wai ora: Achieving equitable outcomes. Paper presented at the National Rural Health Conference, Auckland, New Zealand. Tipene-Leach, D. (2018, March). Nurturing the people of the land: Reducing SUDI in New Zealand. Paper presented at the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand Annual Scientific Congress, Auckland, New Zealand. Tipene-Leach, D. (2018, July). The wahakura lens and an update on cultural competence. Paper presented at the GP18 RNZCGP’s Conference for General Practice & Quality Symposium, Auckland, New Zealand. Tipene-Leach, D. (2018, July). The wahakura project: Using tradition to effect change. Paper presented at the PRIDoC (Pacific Regional Indigenous Doctors) Conference, Hilo, Hawai’i. Walker, R. (2018, February). What influences patient dialysis decision-making? Paper presented at the Biennial Australia & New Zealand Home Dialysis Conference, Auckland, New Zealand. Waran, N. (2018, April). Equine welfare – Why should we care. Paper presented at the 15th World Equine Veterinary Association Conference, Beijing, China. Waran, N. (2018, May). The companion animal conundrum: Different values lead to different challenges. Paper presented at the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) Annual Conference, Brisbane, Australia. Waran, N. (2018, May). Do animals experience happiness and why does it matterā Research into positive emotions. Paper presented at the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) Annual Conference, Brisbane, Australia. Waran, N. (2018, May). Just because it works doesn’t mean its right: The ethics of training animals. Paper presented at the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) Annual Conference, Brisbane, Australia. Waran, N. (2018, May). Misbehaving or misunderstood: Addressing problems with horse behaviour and human safety. Paper presented at the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) Annual Conference, Brisbane, Australia. Waran, N. (2018, May). One world - one welfare: International work on human behaviour change and animal welfare. Paper presented at the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) Annual Conference, Brisbane, Australia.

52

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Waran, N. (2018, May). To close your eyes does not ease another’s pain: The problem with assessing pain in animals. Paper presented at the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) Annual Conference, Brisbane, Australia. Waran, N. (2018, May). Human behaviour change for animals - International examples. In Changing human behaviour: Changing animal lives. Australian Veterinarians for Animal Welfare and Ethics (AVAWE) workshop conducted at the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) Annual Conference, Brisbane, Australia. Waran, N. (2018, June). One welfare – Animal welfare through a human-centric lens. Paper presented at the New Zealand Veterinary Association Conference, Hamilton, New Zealand. Waran, N. (2018, June). One world - one welfare: Why do animal feelings matter? Paper presented at the New Zealand Veterinary Association Conference, Hamilton, New Zealand. Waran, N. (2018, September). One welfare: Making animal welfare relevant. Paper presented at the 27th New Zealand Companion Animal Council Conference, Auckland, New Zealand. Waran, N. (2018, October). Normalising and socialising animal welfare in a global context: Lessons learned. Paper presented at the UFAW (Universities Federation for Animal Welfare) 2018 Conference, Hong Kong.

Conference oral presentation—non-refereed Buckley, C. (2018, October). Presenteeism and missed nursing care: The paradox of quality. Paper presented at the College of Emergency Nurses New Zealand (CENNZ) 27th Annual Conference, Napier, New Zealand. Buckley, C. (2018, September). Social media and healthcare: Pitfalls and pit stops. Paper presented at the Hawke’s Bay Primary Care Symposium, Napier, New Zealand. Clear, A. (2018, October). Computing curriculum 2020: A global initiative. Keynote address presented at the Association for Computer Machinery (ACM) India COMPUTE 2018 Symposium, Chandigarh, India. Clear, A. (2018). ACM/IEEE CC2020 overview. In M. Zhang (Chair), SIGCSE China. Symposium conducted at the Association for Computer Machinery Turing Celebration Conference - China (ACM TURC 2018), Shanghai, China. Settle, A., Clear, A., Impagliazzo, J., Yang, B., Chen, J., & Zhang, M. (2018, May). Computer curricula for the future [Panel session]. In SIGCSE China. Symposium conducted at the Association for Computer Machinery Turing Celebration Conference - China (ACM TURC 2018), Shanghai, China. Cotter, R. (2018, April). Improving student employability. Paper presented at the New Zealand Association of Cooperative Education (NZACE) Annual Conference, Waiheke Island, Auckland, New Zealand. Erturk, E. (2018, December). Ethics and sustainability perspectives on blockchain technology. Paper presented at the Australasian Business Ethics Network (ABEN) Conference, Auckland, New Zealand.

research.eit.ac.nz

53


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Fagan, K. (2018, December). Social mobility, identity, belonging and tattoos. Paper presented at the Sociological Association of Aotearoa New Zealand Conference (SAANZ), Wellington, New Zealand. Horwood, M. (2018, April). Researching with/by/for Māori. Paper presented at the Victoria University of Wellington Museum & Heritage Studies Wānanga Taonga: Māori Perspectives on Museums & Heritage, Hongoeka Marae, Plimmerton, New Zealand. Nikula, P.-T. (2018, September). Go digital to engage. Paper presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology Teaching and Learning Conference, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Nikula, P.-T. (2018, October). Regulating education agent behaviour: New Zealand versus Australian national codes. Paper presented at the Australian International Education Conference, Sydney, Australia. Olsen, L., & McMillan, A. (2018, December). Using te reo Māori in academic writing. Paper presented at the Association of Tertiary Learning Advisors of Aotearoa/New Zealand (ATLAANZ) 2018 Conference, Wellington, New Zealand. Walker, R. (2018, October 26). KEEP IT: Kids and Parents Experiences, Expectations and Perspectives In Transplantation. Paper presented at the Renal Society of Australasia New Zealand Branch 2018 Annual Symposium, Dunedin, New Zealand. Walker, R. (2018, October 26). Understanding how to better support PD patients with remote monitoring. Paper presented at the Renal Society of Australasia New Zealand Branch 2018 Annual Symposium, Dunedin, New Zealand. Wynyard, M. (2018, November). Ngā Tatangi Apakura o Te Aitanga a Materoa, Te Whānau a Rākairoa, Te Aowera. In Maori Caucus For Educational Research Symposium conducted at the Te Hunga Mātauranga o Aotearoa, New Zealand Association for Research in Education (NZARE) Conference 2018, Auckland, New Zealand.

Conference poster presentation—refereed Steiner, E., Thomson, S., Bakri, H., Pearson, M., Forrest, R., Waran, N., & Armstrong, L. (2018, September). Patu pets - The furry whānau. Poster session presented at the New Zealand Companion Animal Conference, Auckland, New Zealand.

Report Forrest, R., Lander, P., Wawatai-Aldrich, N., & Pearson, M. (2018). Patu™ Meke Meter: Use in the classroom; 2017 Pilot Study - Final Report. Prepared for the Research and Innovation Centre, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. McKelvie-Sebileau, P., Matthews, K. M., & Tipene-Leach, D. (2018). Ngātahi - Working as one: Data scoping report. Prepared for the Hawke’s Bay District Health Board. Morris Matthews, K., Hiha, A., & Bevin, M. (2018). Ngātahi: Working towards better outcomes for vulnerable children and their families. Prepared for the Hawke’s Bay District Health Board. Nelson, E., & Rehu, M. (2018). Our vision, our work, our children, our community - ILE development at Richmond School 2015-2017. Prepared for Richmond School Board of Trustees.

54

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Te Rore, C. (2018). Project based learning: Using kaupapa Māori and Photovoice for deeper learning and improved literacy skills. Project report. Retrieved from https:// ako.ac.nz/assets/Knowledge-centre/RHPF-c87-Photovoice-as-a-teachingtool/7a2a6575c4/PROJECT-REPORT-Using-kaupapa-Maori-and-Photovoice-fordeeper-learning-and-improved-literacy-skills.pdf

Exhibition Refereed Baker, P. (2018). Tāne Mahuta - Piiata lights [Fluorescent lights with wood boxes]. Napier, New Zealand: Aroha & Friends, January 2018. Brooking, H. (2018, April). Tā moko (Live exhibition). Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan: Keio University, Shonan Fujisawa Campus. Bruce, L. (2018). Bottled water I [Ceramic, slips, glazes, recycled copper pipe, metal hardware, ply & limestone trolley]. In UKU Clay Hawke’s Bay [Group exhibition]. Napier, New Zealand: Creative Arts Napier, October 27-November 21, 2018. Bruce, L. (2018). Terracotta water jugs I & II, White water jug 1, Water bottle II [Ceramic, slip, glaze, recycled copper pipe, metal hardware]. In NZ Sculpture OnShore [Group exhibition]. Auckland, New Zealand: Fort Takapuna Historical Reserve, November 3-18, 2018. Gibbs, S. (2018). He tohu [Acrylic, gold leaf on ply]. In Hawaiiki hou [Group exhibition]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Tairawhiti Museum, December 14, 2018- February 12, 2019. Gibbs, S. (2018). Sixth sense [Painting]. In He kirohanga ki tai: Dismantling the doctrine of discovery [Group exhibition]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Tairawhiti Museum, December 18, 2018-March 10, 2019. Gibbs, S. (2018). Tū hono [Acrylic, gold leaf on ply]. In Hawaiiki hou [Group exhibition]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Tairāwhiti Museum, December 14, 2018- February 12, 2019. Gibbs, S. (2018). Tūmanako [Acrylic, gold leaf, copper on recycled native timber]. In Pouwhare – A pillar of strength [Group exhibition]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Tairāwhiti Museum, July 1-September 23, 2018. Gibbs, S. (2018, September). He taniwha, he tipua, he tangata [8 paintings, acrylic on tapa cloth, blue glass beads, whariki and steel nails]. In Rangiiwaho - Ihu ki te moana [Installation]. London, England: National Maritime Museum. Graham, B. (2018). Plus and minus [Video]. In Wai [Group exhibition]. Wellington, New Zealand: Bartley + Company Art, May 9-June 9, 2018. Hawksworth, M. (2018). [Series of three art works (Theatre, F109; Room, F108; and F-Block, New build [Photomontages with pins, from artist’s and private collections]), Orientation 2018 [Self-published book], and Orientation design [Spoken word/ powerpoint performance (images and text from Orientation 2018) delivered at Hastings City Art Gallery, September 15, 2019]. In EAST 2018 [Group exhibition]. Hastings, New Zealand: Hastings City Art Gallery, August 11–November 11, 2018. Kelly, R., & Fisher, C. (2018). Objects of play [3D work]. In Molly Morpeth-Canaday Award 2018 (Finalists exhibition). Whakatane, New Zealand: Whakatane Museum and Arts, February 17-April 18, 2018. research.eit.ac.nz

55


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Koopu, E. (2018). Hei ā mā Apanui [Paintings; solo exhibition]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Tairāwhiti Museum, May 4-June 24, 2018. Koopu, E. (2018). He tipua, he taniwha, he tangata mural [Solo mural]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Seawalls Festival, October 8- October 12, 2018. Koopu, E. (2018). Te awe Māpara [Painting]. In Hawaiiki hou [Group exhibition]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Tairāwhiti Museum, December 14, 2018- February 12, 2019. Koopu, E. (2018). Te pure me te huamata [Painting]. In Pouwhare – A pillar of strength [Group exhibition]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Tairawhiti Museum, July 1-September 23, 2018. Koopu, E. (2018). Toihoukura [Group mural]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Toihoukura Building, October 22- October 26, 2018. Lardelli, D. (2018). Ipu kārewa – Floating memories [Fishing buoy and acrylic paint]. In Hawaiiki hou [Group exhibition]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Tairawhiti Museum, December 14, 2018- February 12, 2019. Lewis, A. (2018). Wakatapu [Kererū and kaahu feathers, copper nails, acrylic paint on laminated rimu and pinus radiata]. In Hawaiiki hou [Group exhibition]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Tairāwhiti Museum, December 14, 2018- February 12, 2019. Paterson, R. (2018). Koroua whare (Home sweet home) [Installation of full wall sized photographs; solo exhibition]. Hastings, New Zealand: Hastings city Art Gallery, January 27-March 11, 2018. Paterson, R. (2018). Whare sweet whare [Multi-media 3D work]. In Molly MorpethCanaday Award 2018 (Finalists exhibition). Whakatāne, New Zealand: Whakātane Museum and Arts, February 17-April 18, 2018. Solomon, M. (2018). Sets of waves [Pine]. In Hawaiiki hou [Group exhibition]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Tairāwhiti Museum, December 14, 2018- February 12, 2019. Solomon, M. (2018, April). Tā moko (Live exhibition). Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan: Keio University, Shonan Fujisawa Campus. Solomon, M. (Designer). Toihoukura [Group mural]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Toihoukura Building, October 22- October 26, 2018 Solomon, M. (2018). Waka huia [Rimu]. In Hawaiiki hou [Group exhibition]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Tairāwhiti Museum, December 14, 2018- February 12, 2019.

Non-refereed Baker, P. (2018). Footnotes [Fluorescent light boxes with steel structure]. In Murmur of words #1 [Group exhibition]. Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand: Vent Gallery, Eastern Institute of Technology, February-March, 2018. Binding, W. (2018). Amazing leisure activities 1-3 [Painted artworks]. In Playtime 11 [Group exhibition]. Havelock North, New Zealand: Muse Gallery, December 3-31, 2018 Binding, W. (2018). Cupcakes 1-12 [Painted artworks]. In Home baked [Two artist exhibition]. Havelock North, New Zealand: Muse Gallery, July 19-August 15, 2018. Binding, W. (2018). In the study [Painted artworks; solo exhibition]. Hastings, New Zealand: Arts Inc Heretaunga, October 8-27, 2018.

56

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Binding, W. (2018). Painting and its consequences [Painted artwork]. In Murmur of words [Group exhibition]. Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand: Eastern Institute of Technology, Vent Gallery, February 26-March 9, 2018. Bruce, L. (2018). Blue jugs I & II [Ceramic, slip, stain, glaze, recycled copper pipe, metal hardware]; Watchdogs 1-5, Watchdogs 1-7 (small) [Metal armature, limestone & white cement, fossil oyster shell, paint]. In Wildflower Sculpture Exhibition [Group exhibition]. Hastings, New Zealand: Round Pond Garden, November 6-11, 2018. Bruce, L. (2018). Wai-hanga-rua I-V wall tiles, Wahine I-V wall tiles [Clay, slip, glaze, metal hardware]. In Wai-hanga-rua [Group exhibition]. Hastings, New Zealand: Hastings Community Arts Centre, January 29-February 10, 2018. Paterson, R. (2018). Man v Nature I (Te Mata) and Man v Nature II (Pandora) [Screen print and stitch]; Lamp [Fabric design]. In East Side Story 2 [Group exhibition, Hawke’s Bay Inkers and Gisborne Printmakers]. Hastings, New Zealand: Hastings Community Arts Centre, June 18-30, 2018. Paterson, R. (2018). [Series of photographs]. In Wai-hanga-rua [Group exhibition]. Hastings, New Zealand: Hastings Community Art Centre, January 29-February 10, 2018. Paterson, R. (2018). Whare sweet whare [Multi-media 3D work]. In Pātaka [Group exhibition]. Hastings, New Zealand: Hastings Community Art Centre, June 5-16, 2018.

Curation Baker, P. [Curator]. (2018). Kristine Burns [Solo exhibition]. Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand: Vent Gallery, Eastern Institute of Technology, May-June 2018. Baker, P. (Curator). (2018). Murmur of words #1, #2 [Group exhibition]. Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand: Vent Gallery, Eastern Institute of Technology, February-April, 2018. Gibbs, S. (2018). (Curator). Hawaiiki hou [Group exhibition]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Chrisp Gallery, Tairāwhiti Museum. December 14, 2018- February 12, 2019. Koopu, E. (Curator). (2018). Te Araroa [Group exhibition]. Gisborne, New Zealand: Maia Gallery, Toihoukura, April-June 2018. Lardelli, D. (Curator). (2018). Tā moko [Live exhibition]. Tokyo, Japan: New Zealand Embassy Paterson, R. (Curator). (2018). Wai-hanga-rua [Group exhibition]. Hastings, New Zealand: Hastings Community Art Centre, January 29-February 10, 2018.

Design Chiappin, A. (2018). Ahuriri Neighbourfood Market brand [Graphic design, development of brand elements]. Napier, New Zealand. Chiappin, A. (2018). EIT Student Association (younited) [Branding and brand guideline including associated collateral]. Eastern Institute of Technology, New Zealand. Chiappin, A. (2018). Tararua District brand [Colour refresh]. Tararua District, New Zealand. Gibbs, S. (2018). Rangiiwaho - Ihu ki te moana [Concept design and installation in collaboration with four other Iwi based artists]. London, England: Pacific Encounters Gallery, National Maritime Museum. Gull, J. R. (2018). Autumn moods for cello & guitar by Anthony Ritchie. Music score. [Book Design]. Marshall, M. (Ed). Pirongia, New Zealand: Hatchet Music.

research.eit.ac.nz

57


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Gull, J. R. (2018). Melancholia for solo guitar by Anthony Ritchie. Music score. [Book Design]. Marshall, M. (Ed). Pirongia, New Zealand: Hatchet Music. Gull, J. R. (2018). Refresh the IDEAschool [Logo, signage and stationery, both digital and print based]. Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Gull, J. R. (2018). Rhapsody on a riff for solo guitar by Michael Calvert. Music score. [Book Design]. Marshall, M. (Ed). Pirongia, New Zealand: Hatchet Music. Gull, J. R. (2018). Suite for violin & guitar by Kenneth Young. Music score. [Book Design]. Marshall, M. (Ed). Pirongia, New Zealand: Hatchet Music. Gull, J. R. (2018). Tense melodies for flute & guitar by Philip Norman. Music score. [Book Design]. Marshall, M. (Ed). Pirongia, New Zealand: Hatchet Music. Gull, J. R. (2018). Three sad waltzes for solo guitar by Kenneth Young. Music score. [Book Design]. Marshall, M. (Ed). Pirongia, New Zealand: Hatchet Music. Lardelli, D. (2018). Awarua [Design and installation]. Gisborne New Zealand: Gisborne District Council building. Lardelli, D. (2018). Te Manu a Tāne [Design, logo and playing strip]. New Zealand Universities Rugby. Lardelli, D. (2018). Toki [Design and installation]. Gisborne, New Zealand: H. B. Willams Memorial Library.

Film Sutherland, B. (Director). (2018). Gold - Hamish Kilgour [Video file]. Retrieved from https://vimeo.com/278860107 (Track from Kilgour, H. (2018). Finkelstein [LP]. New York, NY: Ba Da Bing Records).

Performance Brooking, H. (2018). Te Kapa Haka o Whāngārā Mai Tawhiti. In 2018 Tairāwhiti Regional Tamararo Competition. Gisborne, New Zealand: Gisborne Showgrounds, May 26-27, 2018. Brooking, H. (2018). Te Kapa Haka o Whāngārā Mai Tawhiti. In 2018 Taichung World Flora Exposition Opening Ceremony. Taichung, Taipei, Taiwan: Shuinan Economic and Trade Park, November 3, 2019. Koopu, E. (2018, February). Tauira-mai-Tawhiti kapa haka. In Mataatua Regional Kapa Haka Competition. Whakatāne, New Zealand: Te Teko Racecourse. Lardelli, D. (Leader). (2018). Te Kapa Haka o Whāngārā Mai Tawhiti. In 2018 Taichung World Flora Exposition Opening Ceremony. Taichung, Taipei, Taiwan: Shuinan Economic and Trade Park, November 3, 2019. Lardelli, D. (Leader). (2018, April 3). [Cultural performance]. Performed at the New Zealand Commonwealth Games team welcome ceremony, Gold Coast, Australia. Lardelli, D. (Kaitataki Tane & Composer). (2018). Te Kapa Haka o Whāngārā Mai Tawhiti. In 2018 Tairāwhiti Regional Tamararo Competition. Gisborne, New Zealand: Gisborne Showgrounds, May 26-27, 2018. Marshall, M. (2018). Concerto soloist. In Concerto for guitar and small orchestra by Ulrik Neumann, with the Risingholme Orchestra conducted by Philip Norman. Christchurch, New Zealand: Knox Church, November 4, 2018.

58

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

Marshall, M. (2018). Concerto soloist. In Concierto de Aranjuez by Joaquin Rodrigo, with the Kāpiti Concert Orchestra conducted by Kenneth Young. Ōtaki, New Zealand: Memorial Hall, November 17, 2018. Marshall, M. (2018). Solo guitar recital. Music by J. S. Bach, P. Maxwell-Davies, P. Norman, B. Verdery. Christchurch, New Zealand: Philip Carter Concert Hall, November 6, 2018. Marshall, M. (2018). Solo guitar recital. Music by H. Villa Lobos, D. Reis. Wellington, New Zealand: New Zealand School of Dance, June 22, 2018. Marshall, M., & Du Plessis, H. (2018). Cello and guitar recital. Music by F. Kleynjans, R. Gnattali, A. Ritchie, A. Ourkouzounov, R. Charlton. Dunedin, New Zealand: Marama Hall, July 25, 2018. Marshall, M., & Du Plessis, H. (2018). Cello and guitar recital. Music by H. Villa Lobos, A. Piazzolla, F. Kleynjans, R. Gnattali, A. Ritchie, A. Ourkouzounov, R. Charlton. Belmont, Lower Hutt, New Zealand: House Concert, July 15, 2018. Marshall, M., & Du Plessis, H. (2018). Cello and guitar recital. Music by H. Villa Lobos, F. Kleynjans, R. Gnattali, A. Ritchie, A. Ourkouzounov, R. Charlton. , Lower Hutt, New Zealand: St Mark’s Church, July 18, 2018. Marshall, M., & Hohauser, C. (2018). Solo guitar + flute and guitar recital. Music by K. Young, M. Calvert (world premiere), P. Norman, N. Koshkin (world premiere). New York, NY: Steifel Concert Hall, June 29, 2018. Marshall, M., & Manghi, L. (2018). Flute and guitar recital. Music by A. Piazzolla, O. Costa, M. Giuliani, S. Bruni. Dante Alighieri Chamber Music Series, Festival Italiano. Remuera, Auckland, New Zealand: St Luke’s Church, October 20, 2018. Marshall, M., Manghi, L., & Du Plessis, H. (2018). Chamber music recital. Music by O. Costa, M. Giuliani, N. Paganini, F. Molino. Dunedin, New Zealand: Marama Hall, October 22, 2018.

Commission Pierard, T. (Composer). (2018). Ashley Homestore theme [Radio and television]. National. Pierard, T. (Composer). (2018). Moneylion Finance web short [Online]. International. Pierard, T. (Composer). (2018). Screen Vista outro sting [Cinema]. National.

Thesis Graham, A. (2018). Tika tonu: Young Māori mothers’ experiences of wellbeing surrounding the birth of their first tamaiti (PhD thesis, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand). Retrieved from http://researcharchive.vuw.ac.nz/ handle/10063/7670 Norris, M. (2018). Huataki ai te Tikanga ā-Tangata i te kōpā o te wahine: Mā te oriori anō hai tūāpapa whakatipu tamariki i roto i tānei ao (Unpublished Master’s thesis). Te Whare Wānanga ō Awanuiārangi, Whakatāne, New Zealand. Wynyard, M. (2018). Ngā Tatangi Apakura ō Te Aitanga ā Materoa, Te Whanau ā Rākairoa, Te Aowera (Unpublished Master’s thesis). Te Whare Wananga ō Awanuiārangi, Whakātane, New Zealand.

research.eit.ac.nz

59


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Oral Presentation External Binding, W. (2018, October 20). Artist floor talk presented at the In the study exhibition, Arts Inc Heretaunga, Hastings, New Zealand. Gibbs, S. (2018, October 7). Oceania and Pacific encounters: A local perspective. Public talk presented at Tairāwhiti Museum, Gisborne, New Zealand. Gibbs, S. (2018, October). Rethinking Captain Cook [Series of four oral presentations for staff and public as part of Rangiiwaho – Ihu ki te moana installation]. Pacific Encounters Gallery, National Maritime Museum, London, England. Hawksworth, M. (2018, September 25). Public talk presented at the Humanity Painters’ Fertile ground group exhibition, Arts Inc Heretaunga, Hastings, New Zealand. Koopu, E. (2018, May). Presentation to international guests at Hei ā mā Apanui [Solo exhibition], Tairāwhiti Museum, Gisborne, New Zealand. Koopu, E. (2018, May). Presentation to Te Kura Mana Maori o Maraenui at Hei ā mā Apanui [Solo exhibition], Tairāwhiti Museum, Gisborne, New Zealand. Koopu, E. (2018, May). Presentation to Te Kura Mana Maori o Whangaparaoa at Hei ā mā Apanui [Solo exhibition], Tairāwhiti Museum, Gisborne, New Zealand. Koopu, E. (2018, May). Presentation to Toihoukura students and staff at Hei ā mā Apanui [Solo exhibition], Tairāwhiti Museum, Gisborne, New Zealand. Koopu, E. (2018, June). Presentation to Te Kura o Kaiti [Karakia workshop], Toihoukura, Gisborne, New Zealand. Koopu, E. (2018, November). Ngā pou o tōku whare. Presented at the Rangatahi Symposium, Te Wharekura o Ruatoki, Ruatoki, New Zealand. Lardelli, D. (2018, April 27). Maori art, culture and music. Public lecture presented at Keio University, Shonan Fujisawa Campus, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan. Lardelli, D. (2018, April 28). Haka. Lecture presented at Kumomoto University, Japan. Lardelli, D. (2018, June 16). Te Kawenga. Public lecture presented at New Zealand Central, Shanghai, China. Lardelli, D. (2018, September 13). Mātauranga Māori Framework. Presented at the Toi Māori Strategy Development Workshop, Te Wharewaka, Wellington, New Zealand. Lardelli, D. (2018, September 28). Tā moko. Presented to French senators and delegation, Te Papa Museum, Wellington, New Zealand. Lardelli, D. (2018, November). Moving forward in education from a Māori world view. Keynote address presented at the Māori RLTB (Resource Teachers: Learning and Behaviour) National Hui, Whāngārā Marae, Whangara, New Zealand. MacCallum, K. (2018, September 13). From headset to handset: The potential for technology to support our learners. Public lecture presented at Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Marshall, M. (2018, May 17). “That’s not research, you’re just the performer.” Public lecture presented at Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Marshall, R. (2018, January 30). Research at EIT: A personal insight. Public lecture for the Royal Society, Hawke’s Bay Branch, presented at Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand.

60

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

McConnell, C. (2018, September 14). Nurturing respect and identity with young children (infants to school age). Presented at the Heretaunga Women’s Centre 2018 Women’s Forum, Hastings, New Zealand. Morris Matthews, K. (2018, June). Hawke’s Bay women who served overseas in World War One. Keynote address presented to the National Council of Women (Hawke’s Bay), Havelock North Function Centre, Havelock North, New Zealand. Morris Matthews, K. (2018, September). Tribute: Anna Elizabeth (Bessie) Jerome Spencer. Address presented to Napier Girl’s High School Assembly, Napier, New Zealand. Nelson, E., & Rehu, M. (2018, November). MLE: Māori learning environments. Presented to Resource Teachers, Learning and Behaviour, Irongate School, Hastings, New Zealand. Nelson, E., & Rehu, M. (2018, October 17). ‘Our vision, our work, our children, our community’ - ILE development at Richmond School 2015-2017. Presented to Richmond School Board of Trustees, Napier, New Zealand. Nikula, P.-T. (2018, May 22). Labour’s new zero-fee policy. Presented at the Tertiary Education Policy: Fees, Funding, and Rankings panel, Public Policy Institute, University of Auckland, New Zealand. Nikula, P.-T. (2018, May 23). Labour’s zero-fees policy: Making tertiary education accessible for all New Zealanders? Presented at the Department of Social Sciences research seminar, AUT, Auckland, New Zealand. Tipene-Leach, D. (2018, April 7). Achieving equity in SUDI: WAI 2499. Presented at the National Hui on Māori Health Issues, Āhenga Marae, Rotorua, New Zealand. Tipene-Leach, D. (2018, March 7). The wahakura story: What next? Invited presentation at the Whānau Ora, Mokopuna Ora: Healthy Birth, Healthy Futures Symposium, Highbury Whānau Centre, Palmerston North, New Zealand. Tipene-Leach, D. (2018, March 8). Achieving equity in ED. Invited presentation to the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine, Te Mānukanuka o Hoturoa Marae, Auckland, New Zealand. Tipene-Leach, D. (2018, November 9). 30 years in 30 mins: How to do research and lead a busy Māori life. Presented at the Otago Polytechnic Māori Research Symposium, Dunedin, New Zealand. Tipene-Leach, D. (2018, November 17). The wahakura story: What comes next? Presented at the Ngā Maia National Māori Midwives Conference, Pukemokimoki Marae, Napier, New Zealand. Tipene-Leach, D. (2018, September 9). Cultural competence in context: An update. Invited presentation at the Health Hawke’s Bay (PHO) Primary Care Symposium, Napier, New Zealand. Walker, R. (2018, July 26). Understanding patient preferences and decision-making regarding renal dialysis in people with kidney disease. Public lecture presented at Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Waran, N. (2018, June 14). Do animals experience happiness and why does it matter? Public lecture for the Royal Society, Hawke’s Bay Branch, presented at Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Waran, N. (2018, March 22). Fish gotta swim and birds gotta fly: Why does animal welfare matter. Public lecture presented at Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. research.eit.ac.nz

61


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Internal Adelowo, A., & Ekundayo, S. (2018, June 1). Nostalgia as coping: The experience of immigrants in Aoteroa New Zealand. Brown Bag Research Lunchtime Seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Brown, H., Jagroop-Dearing, A., Lander, P., & Skelton, D. (2018, September). [International Teacher/Mentor Panel]. Panel discussion presented at the 2018 Te Pae Tawhiti EIT Academic Staff Conference, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Chittenden, R. (2018, August 30). Extraction of phenolics in red wine making. Brown Bag Research Lunchtime Seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Collits, P., Sibley, J., & Skelton, D. (2018, June 8). “A change is gonna come”: Building a digital Hawke’s Bay - What might it look like? What will it take? Policy think-tank session conducted at Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Dennis, R. (2018, October). Ngā pou o Te Ara o Tāwhaki. Presented at the Te Ūranga Waka and Te Whatukura Research Symposium, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand. Erturk, E. (2018, September 27). Ethics and sustainability of blockchain technology. Brown Bag Research Lunchtime Seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Forrest, R. (2018, May 17). Breeding for less susceptibility to fly-strike. Brown Bag Research Lunchtime Seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Forrest, R. (2018, November 15). Furry whānau wellbeing: Working with local communities for positive pet welfare outcomes. Brown Bag Research Lunchtime Seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Gao, X. (2018, June 29). China in international society: The making of ‘responsible power’ diplomacy. Brown Bag Research Lunchtime Seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Hakiwai, P. (2018, October). Ka hao te rangatahi - The role of rangatahi on our marae. Presented at the Te Ūranga Waka and Te Whatukura Research Symposium, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Hiha, A. (2018, October). Weaving, weaving, weaving: The Whatu metaphor and our context. Presented at the Te Ūranga Waka and Te Whatukura Research Symposium, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Lopez, D., Lopez, M., Erturk, E., & Sibley, J. (2018, April 18). Conceptions of teamwork and feedback among international students. Brown Bag Research Lunchtime Seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Matthews, K. M., Hiha, A., Bevin, M., & Tipene-Leach, D. (2018, September 27). Ngātahi: Towards better outcomes for vulnerable children and their families. Brown Bag Research Lunchtime Seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. McConnell, C. (2018, September). Nurturing respect and identity with young children. Presented at the EIT Early Childhood Education Research Symposium, Napier, New Zealand.

62

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO 2018

McKinnon, N. (2018, October). Te Raranga Whakapaepae o te Reo. Presented at the Te Ūranga Waka and Te Whatukura Research Symposium, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand. Morris Matthews, K. (2018, September 19). The women’s suffrage campaign in Hawke’s Bay. Suffrage Day address presented at Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Nelson, E., & Rehu, M. (2018, October 18). MLEs: Māori Learning Environments. Brown Bag Research Lunchtime Seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Nikula, P.-T. (2018). Inside the mind of an education agent: How to improve our communication and training. Workshop seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Nikula, P.-T. (2018, February 8). Innovation in assessments. Presented at the School of Humanities (EIT) Professional Development Day, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Nikula, P.-T. (2018, March 23). Zero fees – What could be better? Policy Think Tank session conducted at Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay New Zealand. Nikula, P.-T. (2018, September 27). Enhancing learning through educational simulations. Brown Bag Research Lunchtime Seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Nikula, P.-T., & Yang, W. (2018, October 25). The future of international education in Hawke’s Bay. Policy think-tank session conducted at Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Nuku, P. (2018, October). He kai kei aku ringa. Presented at the Te Ūranga Waka and Te Whatukura Research Symposium, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Olsen, L., & McMillan, A. (2018, October). The use of te reo Māori in academic writing. Presented at the Te Ūranga Waka and Te Whatukura Research Symposium, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Paton, C., & Lander, P. (2018, November 15). Acute responses to peripheral blood flow restriction during cycling exercise. Brown Bag Research Lunchtime Seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Rohe-Belmont, P. (2018, October). He titonga waiata, he kohinga whakaaro. Presented at the Te Ūranga Waka and Te Whatukura Research Symposium, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Sibley, J. (2018, July 26). Entrepreneurship@EIT. Brown Bag Research Lunchtime Seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Sibley, J., & Schumacher, C. (2018, April 12). The Hawkes Bay Growth Study: What we are doing and findings to date. Brown Bag Research Lunchtime Seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Tibble, A. (2018, October). Te tū a ngā wāhine i roto i ngā haka o Ngāti Porou. Presented at the Te Ūranga Waka and Te Whatukura Research Symposium, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand.

research.eit.ac.nz

63


RESEARCH SHOWCASE 2018

Timu-Fosio, M. (2018, October). Matahiwi Marae. Presented at the Te Ūranga Waka and Te Whatukura Research Symposium, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Tipa, K. (2018, October). Māna anō e whakamāui ake. Presented at the Te Ūranga Waka and Te Whatukura Research Symposium, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Tipa, K. (2018, October). Te Hā o Te Tuhimāreikura. Presented at the Te Ūranga Waka and Te Whatukura Research Symposium, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Tumoana, H. (2018, October). Pinepine te Kura. Presented at the Te Ūranga Waka and Te Whatukura Research Symposium, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Wynyard, M. (2018, October). Taku Karani rau karaka. Presented at the Te Ūranga Waka and Te Whatukura Research Symposium, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Turvey, J. (2018, October 18). To feedback or not to feedback: That is the question. Brown Bag Research Lunchtime Seminar presented at the Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand.

Other Outputs Duignan, G., Haggerty, C., Rodrigues, A., Fraser, C., Casley, S., Stewart, D., . . . Ross, K. (2018). Teaching employability skills [Series of 10 guidelines]. Wellington, New Zealand: Ako Aotearoa National Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence. Retrieved from https://sites.google.com/view/employabilityskills/home Gibbs, S. (Commentator). (2018). [a-hoe, Great North Museum, Hancock, Newcastle, England]. In Artefact [Television documentary series], Series 1, Episode 3, The Power of Gifts (screened on Maāri Television May 21, 2018). Funded by NZ On Air’s Rautaki Maori Strategy and made for Maori Television by Greenstone TV. Retrieved from http:// www.maoritelevision.com/tv/shows/artefact/S01E003/artefact-series-1-episode-3 Hitchcock, J., Duignan, G., Haggerty, C., Ro drigues, A., Stewart, D., Casley, S., . . . Walke, J. (2018). Real good teacher guides [Series of 12 guides]. Retrieved from https://ako. ac.nz/knowledge-centre/real-good-teacher-guides/ Nikula, P.-T. (2018, February 9). Let’s look to Finland and adopt universal free school lunches. Stuff. Retrieved from https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/ education/101305452/lets-look-to-finland-and-adopt-universal-free-school-lunches Nikula, P.-T. (2018, February 27). Food for thought – Free of charge school lunches. The Policy Observatory Briefing Papers. Retrieved from http://briefingpapers.co.nz/ food-for-thought-free-of-charge-school-lunches/ Waran, N. (2018, September 19). One welfare [Television interview]. Retrieved from https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/researcher-talks-positive-knockeffect-animal-welfare-keeping-us-and-our-pets-happyāvariant=tb_v_2.

64

research.eit.ac.nz


HE ROUROU KŌRERO Research at EIT - Te Aho a Māui

18

Profile for EIT RecandSport

He Rourou Kōrero  

Eastern Institute of Technology Research Showcase 2018 research.eit.ac.nz

He Rourou Kōrero  

Eastern Institute of Technology Research Showcase 2018 research.eit.ac.nz

Profile for eitsport
Advertisement