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WORLD

C U LT U R E

SOUTHERN

STYLE

EIDEMAGAZINE.COM

T H E WA L K I N G D E A D ’ S

LAUREN COHAN SEVEN SOUTHERN

$ 6 . 9 9 U S

GENIUSES

THE SAVANT ISSUE WI NTER

2013/2014

SMART DRUGS · METALLIC BEAUTY NIKOLA TESLA

·

·

BRAIN FOOD

INTELLIGENTSIA COFFEE


noun, plural of ei·dos [ahy-dee]. The distinctive and formal expression of the cognitive or intellectual character of a culture or social group. It is the essence of each thing and its primary substance.

Tova Gelfond EDITOR-IN-CHIEF/ CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Craig Rosenberg CFO

Jaime Lin Weinstein SENIOR EDITOR

Avi Gelfond ART DIRECTOR

Tian Justman FASHION DIRECTOR

Courtney Foster EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Ashley Brechtel, Bonnie Herring, Austin Holt, Jessica Hough, Victoria Knight and Lauren Ladov CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Colby Blount, Russel Dreyer, Max Eremine, Julia Gartland, Austin Holt, Jimmy Johnston, Ian McFarlene and Caroline Petters CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Charlie Watts STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Turiya Clark CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR

Victoria Knight PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSISTANT

Jessica Beazer and Turiya Clark FASHION ASSISTANTS

Anecia Davis WARDROBE ASSISTANT

Gina Yu EDITORIAL INTERN

Jessica Hough FASHION INTERN

© Enlightenmint Media Group, LLC 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be used or reproduced without the written permission of the publisher Enlightenmint Media Group. The views expressed in Eidé Magazine are those of the respective contributors and are not necessarily shared by the magazine or its staff. The registered office of Enlightenmint Media Group is at 1200 Foster Street NW, Suite 20, Atlanta, Ga 30318. All information contained in the magazine is for information only and is as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Enlightenmint Media cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. Readers are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price of products/services referred to in this magazine. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Enlightenmint Media a license to publish your submission in whole, or in part, in all editions of the magazine, including licensed editions worldwide and in any physical or digital format throughout the world. Any material you submit is sent at your risk and, although every care is taken, neither Enlightenmint Media nor its employees, agents, or subcontractors shall be liable for loss or damage. Published four times a year by Enlightenmint Media Group, LLC 1200 Foster Street NW, Suite 20, Atlanta, Ga 30318


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LETTER FROM THE

Celebrating Savants SOMEONE VERY WISE RECENTLY SAID TO ME, “THE CHALLENGE WITH TODAY’S CULTURE IS THAT WE CELEBRATE OUR PREFERENCES OVER OUR ACCOMPLISHMENTS.” IT’S TRAGIC JUST HOW TRUE THIS IS.

W

e boast our choices in music and preferences in style over a quiet commitment to a craft or well-studied understanding of an obscure topic. People take to the online spaces of intercommunication to proclaim their thoughts, feelings and definitive approval of or dismay for any topic on the brain. And we’re deemed “experts” by our own experiences rather than the tutelage under tried and true masters. Somewhere in the process, many people have forgotten the beauty of expertise or the skillful formulation of an educated opinion. That is why we are so proud of this, “The Savant Issue,” which revels in the celebration of wisdom. Tales of those who have tackled the complexities of their talents are just the kind of stories we’re oh, so

hungry for. So much, in fact, we have devoted an entire magazine to it. Bear in mind that genius or any savant-like aptitude comes in many forms. Preferential treatment doesn’t go to the standard measure of intelligence — at least not in our book. Muscle memory, social IQ and unique devotions are equally esteemed in our eyes. It’s fulfilling to be inspired by those who are dedicated to choices that put them on a path to excellence. So let’s engage in that conversation for a change, and praise the intricacies of brilliance instead of the gusto of the latest Miley Cyrus love/hate blog or obsession with cronuts — although all of that stuff is fun, too. The truth is, how much you already know is never as impressive as how much you’re willing to learn.

Tova Gelfond


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THE CONTRIBUTORS RUSSELL DREYER 1 Russell Dreyer is an Atlanta-based photographer and robot

connoisseur. Dreyer received an education at the Creative Circus and has since been involved in many of the city’s notable projects. And of the “Game Night” spread he shot for this issue Dreyer says, “I got to spend my day in an arcade and a skating rink. Kinda a dream shoot.” (russelldreyer.com)

IAN MCFARLANE 2 Athens-based photographer Ian McFarlane has been creat-

ing photos for over 20 years. Hailing from a fine arts background and gallery shows, he opened his commercial and fashion studio in 2000 and has worked with top modeling agencies and magazines in the southeast ever since. “It was a wild and fun-paced day, with an amazing model and wonderful styling,” Ian says of his time capturing the solo brunette in this issue’s "Fair Aim” shoot. “I was wanting a challenge, and the horse in the editorial certainly provided one, but I ended up getting one of my favorite images to this day.” (ianmcfarlanephoto.com)

MAX EREMINE 3 Max Eremine is a fashion and portrait photographer divid-

ing his time between Atlanta and New York. His work style is rooted in the search for the underlying balance between chaos and order and often features the use of the Dadaist photographic techniques. “Photographing seven brilliant and successful people was an extremely exciting assignment for me,” Ermine says of the “Seven Savants” spread he shot for this issue. “I tried to use a photojournalistic approach and tried to capture all of them in the most natural and non-intrusive way possible. Of course some of the shots are a little more controlled than others, but I believe I was able to offer the readers a glimpse into the inner world of the heroes of the story.” (maxeremine.com)

CAROLINE PETTERS 4 Photographer Caroline Petters is inspired by narrative

and mood, which allows her to create imagery with a cinematographic feel — an aesthetic that proved fitting for this issue’s “Robe de Soirée” spread. “This shoot was so fun to create and working with the Eidé team was such a delight,” Caroline says about her experience on set. “Their creativity is endless and makes my job very easy!” (carolinepetters.com)

JIMMY JOHNSTON 5 Jimmy Johnston is an Atlanta based fashion, lifestyle and

portrait photographer. Born and raised in Georgia, he was never quite sure what he wanted to do in life until he started taking disposable 35mm film cameras to punk and hardcore shows in his early twenties. Now he's shooting editorial fashion and portraits as well as commercial work. "It's always refreshing to find that the badass girl from TV is actually a sweetheart in real life," he says about his experience photographing Lauren Cohan for the cover story in this issue. "I couldn't have asked for a better crew, location or studio to work with to make this shoot happen, but it was Lauren's ability to charm us all that really put it over the top!" (jimmyjohnstonphoto.com)

AUSTIN HOLT + Austin Holt, aka Grand Master Flash, is a writer and pho-

tographer based out of the South. In this issue, he penned a look back on Nikola Tesla, and the influence the inventor and engineer has in the 21st century. "One of the things that interested me about Tesla the most," says Holt, "is how relatable he still is. We see the same obsessive spirit in today's inventors, artists, explorers... a certain nerdish quality that one has to be born with."

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F O L L O W O U R S T O R Y O N FA C E B O O K , T W I T T E R A N D I N S TA G R A M @ E I D E M A G A Z I N E


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TABLE OF CONTENTS: 96

59

39

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RIGATONI WITH Roasted Pumpkin, Fennel Sausage and Fried Sage. A recipe by Julia Gartland.

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COMFORT FOOD Warm up with bison meatloaf, a pork belly corn dog, or a smoked ham, peach and brie sandwich.

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INTELLIGENT JOE Intelligentsia Coffee enlightens us with the Direct Trade approach to coffee.

30

FAIR AIM Archery fashions hit a bullseye.

80

ROBE DE SOIRÉE Lingerie goes from seductive to stately.

124

GAME NIGHT Chic plaid and luxury fur scores big points.

111

POP GOES DIOR The iconic fashion house pays homage to renowned artist Andy Warhol.

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STAY IN SCHOOL Schoolhouses are given a new life in old forms.

48

GREEK PHILOSOPHY Escaping city life — the perplexing island of Poros, Greece.

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96 93

122

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LAUREN COHAN LITERARY MASTERMIND, SEXY BOMBSHELL, ZOMBIE KILLER. 7 SAVANTS SEVEN OF THE SOUTH’S MOST INFLUENTIAL TRAILBLAZERS.

122

ME AND MY GTAR There is a new Guitar Hero in town.

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HEAVY METALS There’s more to love about precious metals.

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PORTRAIT IN PLASTIC Pam Longobardi’s found-object installations.

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TOTAL RANDOM The legacy of Paul Rand, considered to be the most prolific designer of the 20th century.

108

INFOGRAPHIC It’s an infographic. On infographics. Enough said.

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SMART DRUGS In an age of pharmaceutical enhancement, the intellect seems to be the next arena of augmentation.

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GEO INTEL Companies are using geospatial intelligence to create new products.

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TESLA UNCOILED The resurgence of Nikola Tesla.

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TEATIME A modern tea party can dress up any afternoon.


FOOD & BEVERAGE

R I G A T O N I R O A S T E D F E N N E L

P U M P K I N ,

S A U S A G E

F R I E D GARNISHED

WITH

w i t h

LEMON

S A G E +

(SERVES

PARMIGIANO

REGGIANO

4-6)

Recipe and photography by JULIA GARTLAND

W

HEN THE WEATHER COOLS DOWN, we need an extra kick of brainpower to get us through the day. These seasonal flavors are not only comforting, but pack a mean nutritional punch. Pumpkin can boost your skin, as well as your mood — which is perfect for the shorter, and sometimes gray days. This warming recipe will give you some extra pep to get through those colder winter months.

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INGREDIENTS 1 1/2 L BS. P UM P KIN OR KA BO C H A S Q UAS H A BOUT 6 TA BL ESP OON S O L I V E O I L 1 LB. FEN N EL OR SW EET ITA L IA N SAU SAG E ( S L I C E D O R R EM OV ED F R OM C AS I N G ) 2 A N C HOV IES, PAC KED IN O L I V E O I L 2 G A R L I C C LOV ES, M I N C E D 1 LAR G E SW EET ON ION , R OU G H LY C H O P P E D 2 -3 T EASP OON S SAG E, DR I E D 2 0 OZ. D R IED PASTA , R I G ATO N I 1 OZ. SAG E L EAV ES, FR E S H 1 L EM ON , JU IC E A N D Z E ST 2 TA BL ESP OON S BUTTE R 1/3 CUP PA R M IG IA N O R EG G IA N O, F R E S H LY G R ATE D

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DIRECTIONS 1. PREHEAT OVEN TO 400 DEGREES. PREPARE PUMPKIN: DE-SEED AND SLICE LENGTHWISE INTO 1-1 1/2 INCH STRIPS. ADD PUMPKIN TO A FOIL-LINED BAKING SHEET DRIZZLED WITH OLIVE OIL. SEASON WITH SEA SALT AND 1 TEASPOON FRESH SAGE, MAKING SURE ALL PUMPKIN STRIPS ARE COATED. ROAST FOR 20-30 MINUTES OR UNTIL BROWNED AND TENDER. SET ASIDE. 2. IN THE MEANTIME, ADD 2-3 TABLESPOONS OLIVE OIL TO A LARGE SKILLET. OVER MEDIUM HEAT, DISSOLVE ANCHOVIES INTO OIL, STIRRING OFTEN. THEN ADD CHOPPED ONION, GARLIC AND SAUSAGE. SAUTテ右 OVER MEDIUM-HIGH HEAT UNTIL SAUSAGE IS FULLY COOKED, USING YOUR SPATULA TO BREAK UP PIECES OF MEAT. SEASON WITH 1 TEASPOON SAGE, SEA SALT AND FRESH GROUND PEPPER. 3. WHILE SAUSAGE IS COOKING, BRING A LARGE SAUCEPAN OF SALTED WATER TO A BOIL. ADD PASTA, THEN SIMMER AND COOK UNTIL PASTA IS AL DENTE, STIRRING OCCASIONALLY. BEFORE STRAINING, RESERVE 1/2 CUP PASTA WATER AND SET ASIDE. ADD STRAINED PASTA BACK INTO SAUCEPAN WITH 2 TABLESPOONS BUTTER, PASTA WATER AND 1/3 CUP FRESHLY GRATED PARMESAN. DRIZZLE WITH OLIVE OIL, MORE DRIED SAGE AND SEA SALT. STIR IN GROUND SAUSAGE FROM SKILLET AND THE ZEST AND JUICE OF 1 LEMON. 4. IN A SEPARATE SKILLET, ADD 2 TABLESPOONS OLIVE OIL WITH SEA SALT. BRING TO MEDIUM HEAT. ADD A FEW SAGE LEAVES. FRY FOR 5-7 SECONDS OR UNTIL ENDS BEGIN TO SLIGHTLY CURL, THEN MOVE ONTO A PAPER TOWEL TO DRAIN. REPEAT UNTIL ALL SAGE LEAVES ARE FRIED. SET ASIDE TO DRAIN. 5. ADD PASTA TO A LARGE SERVING BOWL, SQUEEZING THE LAST BIT OF LEMON JUICE OVERTOP. GARNISH PASTA WITH SLICED ROASTED PUMPKIN, FRIED SAGE LEAVES AND MORE PARMIGIANO REGGIANO. SEASON WITH SEA SALT AND FRESHLY GROUND PEPPER. SERVE AND ENJOY!

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FOOD & BEVERAGE

NTELLIGENT JOE Story by LAUREN LADOV

Photography by THE DEPARTMENT OF THE 4TH DIMENSION / THE D4D Founder & Chief, MATT CHECKOWSKI Director, MATT CHECKOWSKI Cinematographer, KEITH DUNKERLEY Editor, MATT CHECKOWSKI VFX, THE D4D Featuring, KYLE GLANVILLE & CHRIS OWENS

Amid the duets of neighboring chatter and clinks of stirring spoons, coffee unfetters revolutionary thought. Geoff Watts of Intelligentsia Coffee enlightens us with the thinking behind the Direct Trade approach to coffee.

W

e run on coffee. It is our fuel, our blood. If you are in the habit of drinking it, you drink it everyday, probably two cups or more. Most mornings, you can’t get the sleepies out of your eyes if you don’t at least smell the grinds. You can’t pay attention to your teacher, your boss, your book, unless coffee is in your system. And don’t even think about talking to anyone or trying to walk a straight line before that first sip. In the United States, coffee also sits in the passenger

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seat on a road to independence. The Boston Tea Party not only declared autonomy from British rule, but an allegiance to the other caffeinated beverage, coffee. It was in the Merchant’s Coffeehouse of Philadelphia that the Declaration of Independence was first read to the public. More recently, coffeehouses helped solidify the transition into an online society, establishing some of the first free internet access points to the community. But all these inspiring trends exist primarily where coffee is being consumed, not produced.


In most countries where coffee is farmed, this commodity drives already poor societies under the tyranny of the global economy. And because America is the largest importer of the product on the globe (followed by Germany and Italy), our unstable stock market dictates prices and demand.

F

urthermore, in a sea of certifications where labels flood the facades of coffee packaging, it’s difficult to know what or who to trust. Stamps like “Fair Trade,” “Shade Grown” and “Rainforest Alliance” all make a gesture of proof, showing us that their product is just and sustainable. Such gestures, however, cost quite a bit to make and often ring a hollow scheme. Many coffee roasters and business owners, however, seek a route independent of the dictations of the stock

market. In Direct Trade structure, the consumer uses a notion of trust to surpass a familiar badge and rely on a company’s personal integrity. It’s a structure that operates with no operating organization, no auditors, middlemen or outside quality controllers. The only certification they stand by is their own. This opens a kind of gray area for consumers looking for certain sustainability standards, thus encouraging the consumer to ask questions instead of passively taking the product at face value. WINTER 2013/2014

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AND AS AN AVID CONSUMER OF COFFEE, I STARTED TO ASK QUESTIONS. SPECIFICALLY TO GEOFF WATTS, THE MAN WHO COINED THE TERM "DIRECT TRADE." WATTS WORKS AS THE VICE PRESIDENT OF GREEN COFFEE AT INTELLIGENTSIA COFFEE, THE LARGEST COFFEE COMPANY IN THE COUNTRY. Eidé Magazine: Intelligentsia and Direct Trade structures, seem to work on a notion of trust. Could you explain how you build these relationships with the farmers? Geoff Watts: Trust is something that is earned, not purchased or granted. One of the fundamental aspects of our Direct Trade approach is that we aim to build longterm, consistent relationships with farmers that become stronger with every passing year. Some of the growers we work with in Latin America have been our partners for a full decade now, and there is a great deal of trust because we’ve gotten to know each other very well. The good news is that after 10 years of developing these relationships and enduring many seasons where they were tested in both directions we have grown to trust each other a lot. One of the biggest advantages of our Direct Trade model is stability and the massive reduction in risk — for Intelligentsia and for the farmers that are part of our network — that comes as a result of having reliable and sturdy relationships. We have a mutual interest in establishing real solidarity and working together collabora-

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tively, because our goals are essentially the same: we want to keep growing, and we want to have security. EM: So with Direct Trade, is there incentive for farmers to improve the quality of the coffee? GW: Yes. We have a baseline quality requirement — coffees must be very good or we just cannot buy them. But from that starting point, there are premiums associated with incremental increases in quality. We buy coffees in different ‘quality tiers,’ and there is a built-in financial incentive to improve quality. The better the coffee gets, the more value it has and the more we can pay for it. The only limit comes from how much we are able to sell. The other thing about Direct Trade is that it goes beyond financial incentive. We actively help [farmers] improve quality by sharing knowledge with them and helping them gain access to the tools they need. Our annual “Extraordinary Coffee Workshop” is a great example of that.


EM: And what about the consumers? GW: Our customers play a vital role in all of this. They are the ones drinking the coffees, and they are the ones making the decision to seek coffees that taste great. They are the ones that are supporting all of our efforts by acknowledging that quality has a value, and by their willingness to pay a little more for a better tasting coffee. Consumers are the ones who will ultimately decide if this model has merit. They can choose quality and choose to support businesses that put their money where their mouth is. They can take the time to think critically about the coffees they buy and to understand the powerful relationship between quality, sustainability and the price of coffee. EM: Why does Intelligentsia stress the importance of seasonality? GW: Seasonality is huge. Coffee is like all other food products in that it is perishable. Roasted coffee is extremely perishable, and green coffee can begin to lose quality even a couple months after harvest. Many people think about coffee as having a very long shelf life, but the reality is that the things that give great

coffees their appeal — beautiful aromas, delicate fruit acids, sugars, amino acids — these things will always decay over time. Most countries have only one major harvest each year, and will be at their peak flavor for a number of months thereafter. For that reason it is important to roast and consume coffees while they are in their prime. A good rule of thumb is to choose Northern Hemisphere coffees (Central America, Northeast Africa) during the late spring, summer and early fall. During the winter months and early spring, coffees from countries located in the Southern Hemisphere are at their peak. EM: So for you, what is that perfect cup of coffee? GW: An heirloom coffee variety that is cultivated in optimal conditions by a careful farmer who takes pride in their work, that is roasted with precision by a skillful coffee professional, and that is extracted thoughtfully and precisely by someone who knows what they are doing. When all of those conditions are met, the cup of coffee has these traits: it is effusively aromatic, full of delicate fruit acids, clean and refreshing in the finish and deliciously sweet.

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FOOD & BEVERAGE

COMFORT FOOD The Gourmet Way

Story by GINA YU

I T ’ S B E E N A L O N G D AY. I T ’ S COLD,

T

AND

YOU’RE

TIRED.

he granola bar you had for breakfast is a dry, brittle memory, and your stomach is craving something that feels like a warm sweater. What you want is comfort food. Restaurants are answering this call by giving people a culinary cuddle — with a sophisticated hand, of course. To the comfort-food-loving chefs from these acclaimed southern establishments, gourmet comes down to quality ingredients, a personal touch and technique-driven execution.

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SIGNATURE GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICH with Tomato Bisque {three} sheets Atlanta, Ga.

TILLAMOOK CHEDDAR BETWEEN FINCH

APPLEWOOD CHEESE

SLICES

OF

SOURDOUGH

IS

SMOKED L AY E R E D

HOLEMAN BREAD

&

AND

SERVED ALONGSIDE A HOMEMADE TO M ATO B I S Q U E .

Innovating classic dishes allows {three} sheets to surprise its diners. “At first look, they may see it as an ordinary grilled cheese sandwich, but once they take a bite they quickly realize it’s much more than that,” Chef Philip Osburn says. “For us, the bread is one of the most important ingredients as it provides the overall texture, as well as taste,” Osburn explains. “As far as the cheese goes, we utilize artisan cheeses due to their unique flavor profiles, but you can still make a great sandwich with any type of cheese.” WINTER 2013/2014

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PORK BELLY CORN DOG Republic Garden & Lounge Charleston, S.C. T H E P O R K B E L LY C O R N D O G B E G I N S W I T H S E A R I N G OFF

THE

PORK

B E L LY

AND

BRAISING

IT

IN

PORK

STOCK AND MIREPOIX. AFTER PORTIONING OFF THE C O R N D O G P I E C E S , T H E B AT T E R I S P R E PA R E D W I T H A W E S T B R O O K W H I T E T H A I T E A ( L O C A L LY B R E W E D IN

CHARLESTON)

AND

SOUTH

CAROLINA

H O N E Y.

THE DISH IS SERVED WITH A TRIO OF SAUCES — A P I C K L E D M U S TA R D S E E D C AV I A R , R E D C U R R Y C R È M E F R A Î C H E A N D M E LT E D L E E K P I S T O U .

Chef Benjamin Harris believes using choice ingredients, taking the necessary time to ensure a high level of quality, and using as many locally sourced products as possible is essential to elevating the wellknown corn dog. “Classics are classics for a reason,” Harris says. “Using a classic dish, that may be outdated at this point, and updating it with quality ingredients and proven techniques will always yield happy diners.”


EAGLES REST RANCH BISON MEATLOAF Broad Street Grille Chattanooga, Tenn.

T H E B I S O N I S S O U R C E D L O C A L LY F R O M EAGLES REST RANCH, ENHANCING THE QUALITY

AND

EASE

OF

AVA I L A B I L I T Y

OF THE DISH ON THE MENU. DUE TO THE

Executive Chef Adam Roe elevates the meatloaf by highlighting the main component of the dish (instead of masking it with overpowering flavors) to respect the product and the farmers that make such products possible. He once worked for a chef that said, “We are not here to invent new dishes, we are here to appreciate classics and to make them our own,” a rule he has now incorporated into his own cooking philosophy.

LO W FAT C O N T E N T O F G R O U N D B I S O N , B A C O N P U R É E A N D H E AV Y C R E A M A R E F O L D E D I N T O T H E M E AT.


SMOKED HAM, PEACH PRESERVES, AND BRIE SANDWICH Big City Bread Athens, Ga.

THE

CLASSIC

THROUGH

THE

HAM

AND

LABORED

CHEESE L AY E R I N G

FINDS OF

A

Photo by KRISTYN NUCCI

TWIST

HOUSEMADE

WA L N U T W H E AT B R E A D , D I J O N M U S TA R D , H O U S E M A D E P E AC H P R E S E R V E S , B R I E C H E E S E , A L L N AT U R A L N I T R AT E FREE S M O K E D H A M , H O N E Y A N D F R E S H B A S I L .

Matthew Scott, owner of Big City Bread, believes comfort food is all about technique when it comes to sophistication, whether it be a perfect sunny sideup egg or the ideal toast on sandwich bread. For their take on the ham and cheese, “the walnuts are in there for texture and crunch, the smoothness of the brie with the mouth-feel of the ham, the sweetness of the peach preserves and the temperature differences between those items, too,” he says.

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FAIR

IM Photography by IAN MCFARLENE Styling by TIAN JUSTMAN

Model: SAFFY (Factor Atlanta) Makeup and hair styling by NOORFACE Assistant styling by JESSICA BEAZER Production assistance by TURIYA CLARK and ANECIA DAVIS Horse: ZAN Shot on location at LITTLE CREEK FARM CONSERVANCY

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BLOUSE, $245, PANT, $245, BOTH BILLY REID. VINTAGE SAKS FIFTH AVENUE COAT, $725, GLOVES, $65, BOTH ONE OAKS, EIDEMAGAZINE.COM.

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DRESS, $295, BILLY REID. TIGHTS, $18, RALPH LAUREN. HAT, $125, ONE OAKS, EARRINGS, $95, GEOFLORA, BOTH EIDEMAGAZINE.COM.


COAT, $1,995, BILLY REID. LEGGINGS, $48, RALPH LAUREN. NAIL POLISH, $12, MINT POLISH, EIDEMAGAZINE.COM

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DRESS, $325, ONE OAKS, EIDEMAGAZINE.COM.


CARDIGAN, $395, SKIRT, $265, BOTH BILLY REID. LEGGINGS, $48, RALPH LAUREN. BLOUSE, $210, MATTOM BECCA, EIDEMAGAZINE.COM

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BAG, $625, BILLY REID. LEGGINGS, $45, RALPH LAUREN. TUNIC DRESS, $475, TIAN JUSTMAN FOR ONE OAKS, VEST, $45, LEATHER CAP, $65, BOTH ONE OAKS, EIDEMAGAZINE.COM.


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ART & DESIGN

I N

C I T S A PL I T A R T P O R

BY JESSICA HOUGH

ART AND ACTIVISM IN

PAM

MEET

LONGOBARDI'S

FOUND-OBJECT INSTALLATIONS

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LING SWIR C W ACIFI SOME P H RT E NO H EW T IN IVE ST S S A M N IS A E AS OCEA LARG S A E . RBAG E X A S OF GA T F O S I Z E E H T HERE

K

a Lae, the southernmost point of Hawaii — and all of the U.S. for that matter — would be a tropical paradise, were it not for the mountains of plastic debris that wash ashore. It is here, in 2006, that Pam Longobardi, installation artist, environmental activist and winner of the 2013 Hudgens Prize, was first inspired to clean these garbage-strewn beaches and create art with her findings. Although Longobardi’s work includes painting, photography, film and video, as well as works on paper and large-scale installations, what links all of her projects is a focus on environmental issues and an interest in exploring the relationship between humans and nature. The Drifters Project, which is perhaps the apotheosis of this lifelong fascination with environmental processes, is an ongoing series of art installations in which Longobardi collects debris washed up on the beach and transforms it into aesthetically stunning, beautifully composed and disturbingly sinister portraits of human consumption and environmental destruction. When I visited her Virginia Highlands studio to discuss the project, I was greeted with a beaming smile, warm with southern hospitality. A long line of tiny plastic objects stretched across a wall, from a thumbnail-sized Hello Kitty head on one end to a bizarre plastic bear on the other — each pinned to the wall in order of ascending size, floating against the white backdrop. “It’s a timeline,” she tells me. Part of the Drifters Project, the piece speaks to a larger cultural anthropology that Longobardi showcases in her collection.

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She is interested in systems of valuation and devaluation — the way that an object is created, and then consumed and transformed into waste, all within global economies of exchange that run tangent to the economy of the environment. Plastic, she tells me, is the byproduct of this interaction. “This is the cultural archaeology of our time. This is how our time in history will be marked,” she says. And it’s true. Currently, ecologists are considering officially designating an “Anthropocene Epoch” to account for the damage to the natural environment that humans have caused — a sobering and disquieting fact. Prior to being selected as the winner of the prestigious Hudgens Award, several of Longobardi’s pieces were on view at the Hudgens Center. Encountering the installations is like returning to Ka Lae, where Longobardi conceived the collection. Finding heaps of plastic debris on the beach, she tells us that she was first struck by the beauty of its form and color — “It was almost like finding a sleeping giant” — and then horrified by the realization that it was all trash. Longobardi’s work is characterized by harmony of form and muted tones that render the once familiar abstract. Approaching the piece, one realizes in a moment fraught with fascination and guilt, that each of its sculptural elements is a bit of garbage — plastic, to be specific, morphed and softened by the ocean’s currents. Interacting with Longobardi’s pieces is a visceral and emotional experience. As a viewer, it is impossible not to feel implicated in the destruction of our environment and simultaneously torn between the undeniable beauty of the objects’ color and form, and the

sickening message that her installations articulate. Longobardi intends her work to expose the interaction between humans and their environment, and to force us to look closely at the products of our consumption. Central to the Drifters Project is the concept of the Conscious Ocean. This Conscious Ocean philosophy operates on the assumption that the ocean is an active and reactive entity that is in the process of communicating its decline, from shrinking fish stocks to pollution. “Just like the rainforests are the world’s respiratory system, the ocean is its cardiovascular system. The ocean consciously communicates with me. I literally feel like things are laid


out in messages,” Longobardi says. Each small piece in her installations carries meaning, like the life ring she found in one of her first outings for the project or the tiny plastic baby that she found deep within a crumbling cave. I ask her about the objects’ coloration and mutation and Longobardi tells me that she does not alter the pieces at all. Rather, they come from the ocean as almost ready-made art objects capable of articulating their own histories and somber significance. As the ocean tries to expel the waste, it is transformed: “Plastic has this garish attractiveness anyway because it’s trying to sell itself to us, and then nature softens that and speaks through it.” Her work goes be-

yond visualizing society’s disregard for its world: on a much larger scale it embodies systems of valuation and economies of scale and is an archaeology and anthropology of both modern and ancient values, offering a blaring critique of quotidian apathy. It was difficult to leave Longobardi’s studio without feeling a bit hopeless and more than a bit heartbroken, but I think the key to Longobardi’s work — and what she herself feels is critically important — is that there is hope. With reassuring confidence she tells me, “We don’t have time to be depressed about this. And as soon as you start doing something, you aren’t depressed.” It’s all about giving the ocean a voice, and

Longobardi’s installations do this in a particularly powerful way. “For me, beauty is my greatest weapon, because the horror of this material and what it really does is lurking right behind that. You can’t go straight into that because people will turn away,” she adds. Each object goes through phases of valuation and devaluation, familiarity and abstraction, utility, irrelevance and, for Longobardi, substantive beauty, where we can find the perfect intersection of art and activism. As I left, she told me, “This whole thing is really about love. When you love something, you take care of it, and we’ve somehow forgotten our love for nature along the way. But people are finding it again.” WINTER 2013/2014

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ART & DESIGN

STAY in SCHOOL Schoolhouses are given a new life in old forms.

Story by COURTNEY FOSTER

Antiquated structures are often revamped and re-polished while maintaining the essence of their original design. This time around, historical schoolhouses are given a second chance in the form of renovated hotels. Their transforma-

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tive designs manage to reference the past while lending modern comfort and luxury. These hotels will have guests thinking about school, and leave them feeling nostalgic in a manner that only such structures can.


MCMENAMINS KENNEDY SCHOOL Photos by LIZ DEVINE

Since breaking ground in 1915, the Kennedy School has been a historical, scholastic landmark in Northeast Portland.

B

efore the renovation of this unique hotel, the Kennedy School was home to children’s laughter, tardy bells and the smell of textbooks. After housing elementary students for years, the school was abandoned and later revitalized by McMenamins who incorporated the architecture of the old school house into the creation of an extraordinary destination for guests. Guests can feel the nostalgia of the young boys and girls that roamed those halls in their suspenders and ankle socks and take a stroll down to the old audito-

rium for a movie, or take a seat in one of the classrooms for a few brews and cocktails and light up a stogie in the detention hall. The Kennedy School includes 57 plush guestrooms, (all complete with schoolhouse décor such as chalkboards and old fashioned telephones), private tubs, pool, gift shop, and dining at the school cafeteria, aka the Courtyard Restaurant which is open for breakfast, lunch, happy hour and dinner. Channel John Bender à la The Breakfast Club and relive your days of being the unabashed bad boy when you kick back with a cold brewski in the principal’s office. WINTER 2013/2014

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HOTEL ELLA

F

ormerly known as the Mansion at Judges’ Hill, Hotel Ella has maintained a deep -rooted history that dates back to 1846 when the property had first been granted to Adam Maag by the state of Texas one year after it was admitted by the union. Shortly after, one of the founders of the University of Texas, by the name of Thomas Dudley Wooten, purchased the lot and his son Goodall and wife Ella took up residence there in 1900. Known as a true Renaissance man, and her, a trend-setting socialite, the couple had aspirations

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Seated on approximately one acre of exquisitely manicured soil and accented with vibrant dianthus that line the front lawn, Hotel Ella’s beauty is undeniable, but its true appeal comes from the past. to convert their simple home into something grand. After investing thousands of dollars (of which the current estimate would be $1 million) into decorating the home, Ella suffered the passing of her husband and went on to sell the home to a Mr. Fred Adams who later converted the mansion into student housing for the University of Texas in 1944. Up until 1979, young, liberated Longhorns left their mark in the dormitory hallways hosting late night parties, stealing kisses with freshman sorority girls and perpetually joining in a rambunctious

display of team spirit shouting “Give ‘em hell, give ‘em hell. Go, Horns, go!” After being converted into the Austin Recovery Center, major changes were made in 2001 when real estate developer, Bill Gurasich transformed the estate into the hotel Mansion at Judges’ Hill. Then on Sept. 25, the landmark took the name of its deserving proprietor and debuted as Hotel Ella, undergoing a multi-million dollar renovation complete with 48 guestrooms, a cabana lap pool and a wrap-around veranda that overlooks the spectacular landscaping (think Great Gatsby meets The Notebook).


WASHINGTON SCHOOL HOUSE HOTEL Seated amidst the peaks of Park City, the Washington School House Hotel is a picturesque, cozy compound straight out of a Thomas Kinkade painting.

W

ith panoramic views of the surrounding snow-covered mountains and evergreens, the Washington School House Hotel exudes warmth and comfort to guests. But underneath the oak barn wood floors of this exquisite ski lodge is a historical, academic acknowledgement that dates back to 1898. Originally built as one of three schoolhouses, the Washington School House (yes, named after George Washington) has maintained its prominent landmark while surviving misfortunes such as the Great

Fire that almost resulted in demolition. After the stock market crash of 1929, the schoolhouse was sold to the Veterans of Foreign Wars in 1936, and was used for social gatherings up until the 1950s. In need of a lift, the inn was renovated and later reopened in December 2011 and now features plush furnishings and antique artwork, along with a hearty breakfast, complimentary aprèsski every afternoon and an outdoor pool and spa. Exclusive to only guests staying at the inn, the Washington School House Hotel makes for a very private and intimate stay. WINTER 2013/2014

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ART & DESIGN

TOTAL OM PAUL RAND IS A REMINDER TO ARTISTS AND CONSUMERS THAT GENIUS IS EVERYWHERE IN THE FORM OF GRAPHIC DESIGN. The cereal box on your breakfast table, the computer on your desk and the can of soda in your hand have all been toiled over by an artist. And when it comes to the logos of ABC, UPS, IBM and countless others, the toiling was done by a

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brilliant master of the craft. The legacy of Paul Rand, considered to be the most prolific designer of the 20th century, still influences our aesthetic and literary world today. We are never too far from a Rand design, concept or -ism.


“I HATE WORDS THAT ARE ABUSED, LIKE CREATIVITY.” Interview with Steven Heller, 1988

“IDEAS ARE FUEL FOR THE IMAGINATION, THEY ARE THE UNIQUE RESPONSE TO MEANINGFUL QUESTIONS.” From Lascaux to Brooklyn, 1996

GET AN IN-DEPTH LOOK AT HIS LIFE, BELIEFS AND WORK AT MODA’S NEW EXHIBIT “ABOUT PAUL RAND: DEFINING DESIGN” THROUGH JAN. 26, 2014.

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TRAVEL

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G R E E K P H I L O S O P H Y T H E

P E R P L E X I N G

I S L A N D

O F

P O R O S ,

G R E E C E

Story and Photography by ASHLEY BRECHTEL

SOME

WOULD

ARGUE,

AND

WITH

GOOD

REASON,

THAT GREECE IS THE BIRTHPLACE OF THE SAVANT. THIS IS THE NATION THAT HELPED SHAPE ART, POLITICS, PHILOSOPHY AND SPORTS FOR THE MODERN WORLD. OVER ITS RICH HISTORY RULERS

HAVE

RISEN

PHILOSOPHERS ARTISTS PEOPLE

AND

HAVE

HAVE HAVE

FALLEN,

PONDERED,

CREATED SIMPLY

AND BEEN.

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“I HATE THE GREEKS BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T LEAVE US ANYTHING TO DISCOVER, JUST TO DEVELOP.” - NIETZSCHE

W

hile most gravitate to the capital of Athens or one of the many popular islands like Santorini or Mykonos, the bold traveler will look further for the simple pleasures of Grecian life, away from throngs of people snapping pictures and striking silly poses in front of iconic monuments. Luckily, just a short ferry ride southwest of Athens, the island of Poros offers this escape. If Athens is the place to be seen and heard then Poros is the place to relax, lay low and enjoy being alive — something many Athenians do from time to time. When telling people I was visiting this island, I’d often get the response, “Poros? Never heard of it. Are you sure it’s a real place?” I’d laugh and offer my assurance. Of course it is a real place, I Googled it and found a Wikipedia entry. It doesn’t get more legit than that. However, when I arrived to the dock, ready to be whisked away from Athens and I didn’t see my boat, I began to wonder. None of the other tourists I spoke with were going to my destination; their vessels were ready and waiting to take them to more well-known islands. As I waited patiently, and perhaps a little nervously, I joked that I was going to be picked up in a tiny fishing boat and forced to catch my own dinner before arriv-

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ing to a remote island where no one would ever see me again. And while that didn’t sound all that bad, I was still curious as to what my next few days would hold on this island that no one had heard of. “Nothing exists except atoms and empty space; everything else is just opinion.” - Democritus The ferry did arrive eventually, and upon my first glimpse of Poros, my thought was, “Oh, it’s a real place alright. Real and wonderful.” One side of the main road boasts a wide sidewalk perfect for strolling along the water. Small fishing boats and not-so-small yachts bob side by side, the patrons of each chatting back and forth to each other. As I walked along, I exchanged pleasantries with a fisherman who was more than eager to chat about his beloved home to a stranger. As he repaired an old net, making a point to show me how he weaved the fabric just so, he exclaimed in broken English how this island is the only place for him. When I said that I came from Athens he scoffed, “too busy,” and proceeded to tell me that he goes to the “big city” once a year for supplies but never stays longer than necessary. He can’t wait to get back to his Poros. At that moment I couldn’t blame him.


Opposite the docks are small restaurants and shops, the roads behind wind upward into the mountain, causing houses to appear as if they are sitting atop one another. The days are lazy here. While you may see a few people scattered along the beaches enjoying the warm breeze, the streets are mostly empty. At night, however, this seemingly sleepy island comes alive. The lights that are strung along the boardwalk begin to shine, music pours into the avenues and people appear as if out of nowhere. As I watched this scene unfold, I wondered where the hell everyone had been all day. Preparing for the night, I suspected. “The art of living well and the art of dying well are one.” - Epicurus There seem to be no boundaries here, young and old mingle seamlessly. As I drank on the patio of a local club I watched in awe as the tough-looking, heavily tattooed bouncer tussled the hair of children as they walked past, exchanging friendly banter. I was surprised to witness this dynamic where kids and adults are all engaged in conversation with one another, instead of being sequestered by their designated age groups. No one seemed to care that it was past midnight on a weeknight. This isn’t a special privilege (as it would have been for me as a child), it’s just how life is here.

“HE IS RICHEST WHO IS CONTENT WITH THE LEAST, FOR CONTENT IS THE WEALTH OF N A T U R E . ” - S O C R AT E S

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I

decided to head back to the hotel around 2 a.m., well before anyone else seemed ready to do so. A man asked me why I was going so early and I replied that I was tired. He didn’t understand. “It’s still early,” he urged. I split a cab with two young women — one was carrying a sleeping infant in her arms. Anywhere else that would have seemed odd and maybe even a little inappropriate, but after experiencing a night here I didn’t think much of it. I made an attempt at conversation but the language barrier seemed too difficult to overcome at such an hour. Later, I drifted to sleep thinking how amazing it must be to grow up in such a place. The freedom and carefree attitudes I had just witnessed touched my soul. I wonder if the youth here realize how odd or wonderful their lifestyle seems to some visitors. I assumed, however, that they, just as everywhere else in the world, dream of the spaces beyond; hoping for bigger and better things in the big city of Athens.

“Youth is the best time to be rich, and the best time to be poor.” - Euripides I believe that an ocean breeze is the best cure for a hangover — that and a strong

cup of coffee. I enjoyed both of these the next morning at a sidewalk café across from the water’s edge. Once again, this small town with fewer than 4,000 inhabitants seemed abandoned. I thought back on the night before and how alive this very street had been. At the table next to me, a British guy struck up a conversation. He was writing a book and chose Poros just because of days like this. He had been here before and continued to return when in need of uninterrupted inspiration. I immediately decided that that was also the place I’d choose to write the next great literary masterpiece. A place where the people are pleasant but have no interest in taking up your time, because they are too interested in enjoying theirs. “Time is a game played beautifully by children.” - Heraclitus As I stood, prepared to leave the island no one had heard of, my phone dinged and I got an email telling me that my flight from Athens to New York the next day had been cancelled due to weather. I was in no hurry to reschedule, happy to just stay in Poros and continue to soak in the sleepy days and spectacular nights. I got around to booking a new flight eventually.

HAPPINESS IS THE MEANING AND THE PURPOSE OF LIFE, THE WHOLE AIM AND END OF HUMAN EXISTENCE.” - ARISTOTLE WINTER 2013/2014

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D I N N E R PA RT Y

Teatime

Story by JAIME LIN WEINSTEIN | Styling by TOVA GELFOND | Photography by CHARLIE WATTS Shot on location at SOFIA XIV STUDIO

I

sn’t it strange how a cup and saucer can instantly upgrade even the most informal of afternoons? This credit is owed perhaps to the British, whose long history of “teatime” evokes visions of a ta-

ble laid with tiered stands of cucumber sandwiches, crumpets and, of course, a porcelain china tea set complete with kettle, sugar bowl and creamer. A modern American tea party can be every bit as refined as a U.K. counterpart with the right servingware — say pewter pieces accented with stamped ceramic dishes for rustic charm. ALL CHINA AND LINENS AVAILABLE AT KATHRYN LEACH HOME

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TEA PARTY ETIQUETTE R

When using a cup and saucer while seated at a table, the proper manner of drinking tea is to raise the teacup only, placing it back into the saucer in between sips. When standing, or sitting in a chair sans table, one holds the teacup in his or her dominant hand, the saucer in the other at one’s lap, or waist height.

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P INKIE S UP R

The first teacups were originally made in China without handles. In order to not spill the hot liquid within, the proper way to hold the vessel was to place a thumb at the six o’clock position and one’s index and middle fingers at the twelve o’clock position, while gently raising one’s pinky up for balance.

L OW V S . HIGH R

While many refer to afternoon tea as “high tea,” this moniker actually pertains to dinner, or the main, hearty meal of the day. Afternoon tea, traditionally taken around 4 - 5 p.m. is known as “low tea” because it is usually conducted in a sitting room with low tables (like coffee tables) laid among sofas and chairs.

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ONE OF A KIND STYLE | ONE OAKS MEDIA | WWW.ONE-OAKS.COM


7

S E V E N SAVA N T S Defying laws of rational genius, these seven savants suprass the unconventional notions of IQ. From the French origin, the definition of a savant is a “person of profound or extensive learning,” but these intellectuals have demonstrated cerebral dominance within their professions — that can be attributed to more than academic proficiency, but also dynamic footprints that add sustenance to society.

I T ’ S ALL ABOUT PASSION . By the strike of a hammer, the point of a toe, a snap of a latex glove, a word of mouth or the perfect placement of a glass, there is a vast eagerness running through their veins that brings prosperity to those that cross their paths. Resting on the affection of yearning eyes and elated smiles, these individuals find sanctuary in the gratification of the human being. Success can be attributed to the balance.

Spending countless hours working at a craft certainly comes with sacrifice, but each of these individuals has the eternal support of their family to keep them grounded, yet still progressing in their industries. As if they’re wearing an invisible suit of armor, these seven people power through life in a way that is admirably immortal, giving each and every ounce of themselves and taking up arms for the greater good of mankind.

Story by

COURTNEY FOSTER Photography by

MAX EREMINE

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STEPPING TOWARD THE MUTED SILVER SINK TO BEGIN SCRUBBING IN FROM HIS

which are branded by intricate tattoos, Nicholas M. Boulis, M.D. prepares for his neurosurgeries inside an Emory operating room. Showcasing a heart-warming intensity to treat his patients, Dr. Boulis briskly races through the fluorescent hallways aggressively securing a future for the tragically horizontal. While taking up residence in South Jersey, Dr. Nicholas Boulis became obsessed with the brain. He was intrigued by the mind as a mechanism that allows humans to experience their reality and create a purpose and identity for themselves. Inspired during his work in Latin America in the late 80s’ he committed himself to Harvard Medical School and the conviction of living a life of purpose, accepting great responsibility and observing the human brain on a very intimate level. Specializing in functional neurosurgery, trigeminal neuralgia, refractory pain and peripheral nerve surgery, Boulis has provided his advanced research to programs such as Project Shunt in an effort to raise funding to provide treatment for patients in Guatemala suffering from hydrocephalus and spina bifida, and has performed over 250 free operations for children. With focus, discipline and passion, Dr. Nicholas Boulis has cultivated a perplexing outlook on neurosurgery saying, FINGERTIPS TO TRICEPS,

NICHOLAS M. BOULIS, M.D.

“It’s like staring into the night sky and bungee jumping all in one…and you help people.”

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RACHEL VAN BUSKIRK AS RACHEL VAN BUSKIRK

LACES UP

takes position on the dance bar inside the Atlanta Ballet studio and begins to arabesque to tunes by Jay-Z and Lorde, she displays a graceful, yet sassy equilibrium that is truly spellbinding. With a pintsize frame — sculpted with an immortal display of muscle, Van Buskirk carries an amount of alluring ferocity counteracted by an adolescent, bright-eyed charm when she takes the stage. When she first saw the winter white tutus of Swan Lake floating across her television screen, Van Buskirk was overHER WELL-WORN POINTE SHOES,

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come with a devotion that has continued through her stage success. By the age of 9, Van Buskirk had enrolled in the youth ballet and scored the role of Clara in The Nutcracker, solidifying her calling as a prima ballerina. At the age of 27, Van Buskirk has scored other notable roles in Dracula, Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella, and having just returned from touring in China, Van Buskirk has continued to captivate audiences with her jeweled demeanor, playful strength and dainty charisma — adorned with rosy cheeks and wrapped up in form-fitting nylon and spandex.


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DAVID COUCHERON AS

SWEET MELODIES OF HIS MOTH-

ER PLAYING PIANO FILLED THE HOME OF

DAVID COUCHERON OUTSIDE THE NESODDEN, Norway, he was inspired. And at the tender age of 3, Coucheron began perfecting his musical genius with the strings. Currently holding the title as the youngest concertmaster among any major orchestra in the United States, and commiting his youthful talent to the first violin section of the world-class Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (ASO), Coucheron brings symphonic titillation to concert halls around the world. Performing for largely notable patrons like the Norwegian royal family and Olympic team for the Salt Lake City games, or striking with a string quartet in Tokyo; Coucheron’s talent has had concertgoers standing at attention. In addition to elevating the presence and artistry of the ASO, and his eagerness to continue to play chamber music and engagements in solo performances with other orchestras, David Coucheron’s career strums on. With melodic muses such as Robert Spano, Claudio Abbado and Sir Simon Rattle, Coucheron performs with much intensity and enthusiasm in every stroke of his 1725 Stradivarius. Though his orchestral aptitude is palpable, his stage presence is most intriguing. With arresting ice-blue eyes, a coy smirk, effervescent gracefulness and an addictive child-like innocence, Coucheron’s tuned persona can only be described as a shot of pure charisma. Coucheron’s coolness factor is not only upgraded by his badass violin rendition of Eminem’s “Lose Yourself ” and his competitive ping-pong skills, but his impeccable ability to rattle the auditory senses of his listeners, saying:

YOUNG

LITTLE TOWN OF

“Music touches people in a way that no other form of communication can, and if I can just reach one person in the audience during a concert, it’s worth it for me.”

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MARK HOPPER

“Every hole and scar on my hand has a story.”

MARK HOPPER’S

FIERY PASSION FOR

HOLLAND where he was born into a family of artisans. His father’s obsolete collection of Persian knives, his grandfather’s command for cabinetry and his mother’s and sister’s construction of clothing ignited a spark of joy. Having taken up longbow archery at the age of 8, Mark Hopper was then inspired to begin knife making. Studying alongside his woodshop teacher, who was skilled at molding horse shoes, Hopper was introduced to the art of metal, which in turn, earned him a scholarship in London where he began to create Viking helmets, axes and knives. While there, Hopper’s work as a CRAFTSMANSHIP

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BEGAN

IN

tradesman was influenced by the blacksmith down the street at the local metalsmith shop Fire and Iron. Hopper generated a Dali-esque concept, inspired by women’s hourglass figures, incorporating an erotic aesthetic into his trade. Crafting stunning architectural hardware such as cast iron staircases, tables, sculptures, cutlery and much more, his work as a refined blacksmith is showcased by his productivity and integrity in every stroke of his hammer. Mark Hopper’s vast aptitude to produce pieces that instill everlasting longevity and beauty contributes to the pinnacle of his success.


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WEARING

POSITIVITY ON HIS SLEEVES,

business and marketing enthusiast, Joey Reiman has a long list of accolades. Founder and CEO of BrightHouse, professor of Ideation at Emory University’s Goizueta Business School, life-changing public speaker and innovative author, Reiman has continued to heal society by “making imagination the world currency.” With a pensive smile, spellbinding disposition and whimsical articulation, Reiman’s free spirit has been influenced by an eclectic group of trailblazers such as “Bewitched” star Darrin Stephens, Mahatma Gandhi and director Federico Fellini. Joey Reiman incorporates a lighthearted yet effective philosophy into his work, emphasizing the individual and the importance of “making meaning versus making money.” Calculating the success of business with a perfect balance of being, doing and saying, Reiman has reincarnated “entering the real world” in a way that inspires individuals to identify who they are, versus what they do, saying:

SHOULDERS AND LIPS,

JOEY REIMAN

“Don’t get a job or start a career — discover your calling instead. Only then you will be truly rich.” Living life as “famillionaire,” Reiman measures his wealth by his family and friends.

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DANIELLE ROLLINS EXUDING A REFINED STYLE AND TASTE IN

JUST ONE OF HER FINELY MANICURED OX-

BLOOD FINGERNAILS ALONE, Danielle Rollins executes a charismatic, no-boundaries display of design that impresses her clients’ cerebral and visionary notions of a modern-day soirée. Rollins’ flourishing career as a lifestyle expert has been heightened by her ability to preserve trusting connections and to create colorful memories for her guests. This calling came to life while hosting a dinner party for world-renowned fashion designer Oscar de la Renta (who encouraged Rollins to write her book, Soirée Entertaining with Style), to benefit the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta who aided in the survival of her daughter who was in a life-threatening accident.

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Along with being a talented cook, proficient decorator, accomplished author and devoted, fashion-forward mother of three, you can also find Rollins planting vibrant seeds in the vegetable garden outside her breathtaking French château-inspired home. As a sanctuary of style, Danielle Rollins has mastered the art of celebrating life’s exciting moments saying,

“Life gives us lemons — sometimes even pelts us with them — so take them, and add vodka, a striped straw and a garnish, then use the leftovers for Limoncello, lemon bars and lemonade.”


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JOHN M. SHOFFNER, M.D. WHEN JOHN M. SHOFFNER, M.D.

ENTERS A ROOM, IT FEELS AS IF YOU’VE BEEN

HIT

BY

A

TRANQUIL

DOSE

OF

PROZAC. With a serenading, lullaby inflection and humble display of intellect, Dr. Shoffner’s calming character is infectious. Primarily affecting the brain, heart and muscle in both children and adults, mitochondrial disease carries an aptitude of severity resulting in fatigue, muscle weakness and diabetes. Specializing in mitochondrial medicine, holding a respectful seat on the Board of Directors for the Foundation for Mitochondrial Medicine, and ultimately being responsible for spearheading the discovery of mitochondrial disease, Dr. Shoffner has dedicated his time to working in a collaborative and supportive research environment. Furthermore, he is committed to creating a bridge to pharmaceutical companies to bring new drugs to clinical trial. Having birthed the foundation for the Medical Neurogenetics Research Lab, Dr. Shoffner has enabled a comprehensive approach to clinical evaluation, and molecular and metabolic genetic testing that is progressing today. Growing up on a farm in Newnan, Ga., Dr. John Shoffner’s medicinal interest was propelled by his love of science and his igniting perseverance to diag-

nose and treat patients. Gently pressing his forehead against his microscope and focusing his soothing grey eyes on the spheres of illness, Dr. John Shoffner searches for hope. Truly a Renaissance man, Dr. Shoffner finds joy in sampling wine, donning the sharpest Gucci suits, playing his guitar and cozying up with his two rescue dogs. He radiates a youthful yet perpetual comfort that is endearing, to say the least.

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SOCIETY

9:45 a.m.

I ingest 20mg of Adderall. This is the first time I’ve taken this particular drug, though it’s not the first time I’ve taken an oral medication of its kind (I happened to have easier access to the lesser known ADHD medication, Concerta as a university student, and even once tried Provigil, prescribed to improve wakefulness in adults who suffer from sleep disorders like narcolepsy). It wasn’t then, and still isn’t now, uncommon for college kids to turn to pharmaceuticals to help write that 10-page research paper or pull all-nighters before a big exam. I wanted to reexamine this practice, from not only a professional perspective, but also an experiential one, and figured the best way to do so was to engage in the activity myself (and with my own deadline looming, this empirical exercise seemed even more enticing.) I won’t divulge my new source of Adderall, but I will say that I acquired it from an individual who did not have a prescription himself, but had a decent supply at hand. It wasn’t hard. I knew he had it, and I simply had to ask for it. He didn’t even charge me for the pills. The subject matter isn’t new: In this age of increased academic and professional competition, coupled with widespread expectation for instant gratification (thanks to the rapid pace of technology), people everywhere are falling victim to the desire for an easy method to get a leg up. And this magic potion happens to come in the form of a little tablet that increases focus and prevents fatigue. 74

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But the conversation is changing: We already use drugs for sexual enhancement, (hello, Viagra), physical enhancement, (i.e. steroids, diet pills) and mood enhancement, (America wasn’t dubbed “Prozac Nation” for nothing), so is there really a difference in wanting a drug for cognitive enhancement? After all, the use of “drugs” to heighten human capabilities has occurred since the times of antiquity. There’s evidence of ancient Greeks ingesting opium juices to improve their performance at the original Olympic Games. Ancient Chinese writings detail how tea would improve alertness and concentration (though it would not be known until the 1800s that this was caused by caffeine), and it’s safe to assume that the stimulating effects of nicotine are the reason that has led people to smoke or chew the leaves of the tobacco plant for thousands of years. The latest treatments used to alter human behavior are, however, considerably more complex than the likes of caffeine and nicotine. They’re not naturally occurring substances found in a plant or extracted from a coffee bean. The treatments are so-called “smart drugs” (medically known as nootropics), pharmaceutically developed pills created to treat complex maladies such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and purported to enhance mental functions such as memory, cognition, motivation and concentration. Among this group of prescription medications are those defined by their active ingredient of dextroamphetamine (most commonly sold as Dexedrine and Adderall) or methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta) that work by increasing the levels of two neurotransmitters in the brain, dopamine and norepinephrine, which are responsible for attention, motivation, pleasure and reward. They are some of the most widely prescribed medications in the United States — prescriptions for these stimulants rose to almost 35 million in 2007 (up from 5 million in 1991) — and the most widely abused.


10:30 a.m.

I start to feel the effects of the medication within an hour. I feel alert, focused and perhaps even more motivated. The assignments at hand seem less taxing, and I am ready to dive into my work with an abnormal sense of pleasure. A mild feeling of anxiety sets in when my drive to accomplish work exceeds my physical ability to accomplish it — my mind seems to be moving faster than my fingers are capable of typing. I don’t necessarily feel smarter, but I’m certainly more vigilant and more equipped to accomplish all that needs accomplishing. Young adults are by far the fastest-growing segment of people taking ADHD medications — legally and illegally. There were nearly 14 million monthly prescriptions written for Americans ages 20 to 39 in 2011 — two and a half times the 5.6 million just four years before. And that doesn’t account for the number of individuals taking the drugs

without a prescription. The group perhaps most likely to seek the stimulants? Undergraduate college students. Alan D. DeSantis, Ph.D., a professor and researcher at the University of Kentucky, has been collecting survey data on the illegal use of stimulants on college campuses for nearly a decade. The raw numbers show that one out of every three students on college campuses will illegally use a stimulant and that number grows even higher if you look at just third and fourth-year students. But undergraduates aren’t the only ones with documented significant use of these drugs. Diagnoses of ADHD in children under the age of 18 continue to rise (due to wider recognition of the disorder, or misdiagnosis we can’t be sure), resulting in an increase of ADHD prescription use, too. Additionally, between 2002 and 2010, there was a 750 percent increase

in Adderall prescriptions for women between the ages of 26 and 39, and some mothers even admit to stealing the drug from their children. The Rolling Stones may not have been referring to Adderall when they wrote “Mother’s Little Helper” in 1966, but that’s what the drug has become to a growing number of suburban mothers who are turning to medication to keep up with the demands of a home, a husband, children and a career. Who else is turning to a magic little pill? Truck drivers take prescription stimulants to stay awake during long shifts. Musicians use them to enhance performance precision. Even poker players have admitted to using the drugs for increased concentration during highstakes tournaments. And the military has long recognized the use of amphetamines to combat fatigue and maintain alertness and morale.

2:00 p.m.

A single 20mg dose of Adderall is said to last around four hours. (The XR, extended release formula, can last anywhere from 6 to 12 hours.) I took another half pill (10mg) at around 10:45 a.m. and just took the last half. Everyone metabolizes medications at different rates and it is not uncommon for those actually prescribed the medication to take more than one dose throughout the day. (And I happen to have a high genetic physiological tolerance. Thanks, Mom and Dad.) So why are so many people taking Adderall and other stimulants like it? In regards to their popularity within the university system, DeSantis rejects the idea that increased pressure and academic competition has led to an increase in stimulant drug use in recent years. “Kids will say that,” he explains, “but it’s my

21st year in academia and my whole life revolves around kids and college and I don’t see there’s any more pressure today than there was five years ago or 10 years ago … I think it’s so popular,” he says, “because it works. Whether it’s homework or studying for an exam, there are many ways Adderall makes those tasks easier … you want to say don’t do it, because it’s a terrible, terrible thing and you will die from its use, but the problem with that though is that these students know that it is effective.” Another telling statistic from Dr. DeSantis’ research is what he calls, “interesting linguistic gymnastics separating the differences between what a drug is and what Adderall isn’t.” Students view drugs like Adderall on a completely dif-

ferent spectrum than say, alcohol, marijuana and cocaine. When, in fact, the Drug Enforcement Administration classifies Adderall, Ritalin and other stimulants as Schedule II controlled substances — the same category as cocaine and methamphetamine — based on its high potential for abuse and physical dependence. Perhaps this altered viewpoint is due to the fact that they’re using it for schoolwork, not for recreation. “One of the questions we ask [in student surveys] is when you are on a stimulant what are you more likely to do? We were trying to find connections to unprotected sex, doing drugs, fighting, etc.,” DeSantis elucidates. “[Students on stimulants] are more likely to clean their apartment! It is the number one answer by a mile.” WINTER 2013/2014

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“STUDENTS VIEW DRUGS ADDERALL ON A COMPLE DIFFERENT SPECTRUM T SAY, ALCOHOL, MARIJUAN AND COCAINE.”

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S LIKE ETELY THAN NA

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4:15 p.m.

As far as I can tell, this stuff really does work. I’m still working, consumed by my tasks hours later, and have not even needed to stop for a quick, mental break. In fact, I tried to take a break, but could feel my mind still moving, my insides pulsating, like my body and brain just wanted action (or maybe that was just my increased heart rate talking…). The only other “side effects” I notice thus far are an increase in thirst and a significant decrease in appetite. I haven’t eaten since the scrambled eggs I consumed at 9:30 this morning (but, believe me, I’m not complaining about this reaction). I’m actually a little disappointed in the outcome so far, to be honest. For some reason, I was expecting more significant stimulation. I’m certainly experiencing increased focus and

motivation, but I had imagined a more excited, euphoric sensation likened to a cocaine high. Bummer. Ask Dr. DeSantis if he thinks prescription stimulant abuse is a real problem, and his answer is a resounding “no.” “People aren’t dying. They’re not becoming addicts. And they’re not jumping off buildings … Alcohol on campus, for example, is responsible for far more harm than stimulants.” And when asked if smart drug use is harmful, the answer is again a definitive no: “I very rarely say this in public, but for the large majority of students that use [Adderall], it is effective, it is safe, it is cheap and there is very

little chance for negative consequences or side effects. In fact, we have two generations of kids that have been taking this stuff prescribed to them, and we have virtually no negative data or side effect research from this.” While there are cases of addiction and even psychosis caused by the use of stimulant drugs, “You have to take a lot of it and it combines with both genetic predisposition and extended use,” explains Philip Harvey, Ph.D., a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. “You don’t take one dose of amphetamine and become psychotic, generally.”

6:30 p.m.

A dull headache sets in, a side effect said to occur in around 26 percent of those who take Adderall based on research and clinical trials. In addition to increasing the release of dopamine and norepinephrine, amphetamines also set off the discharge of stress-related chemicals in the brain, thereby triggering headaches. I’m now also starting to experience what is known as the “Adderall crash.” It’s a phenomenon that occurs when one is coming down from the stimulating effects of the drug. I have an overall sense of fatigue, which is apparently my body recovering from the excess energy it exerted while on the Adderall. I try to eat something, thinking that might make me feel better, but I have yet to regain my appetite and can only force myself to swallow a few bites of chicken noodle soup. The question then changes from is it a problem, to what happens next? How do we, as a culture, want to address the smart drug situation?

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Do we want to view smart drugs as an unfair advantage and punish their use? After all, we punish athletes who use steroids and strip them of their titles and accolades. “If I find that some of my graduate students took Adderall before the GREs, do I kick them out?” asks DeSantis. “Do we expunge the records of people that we find have used it before? In med schools, if you find somebody that used it, or that used it in undergrad to get their GPA high enough to get into med school, do we kick them out? Because in many ways they took that med school spot from someone that didn’t use it.” And if we allow the use of smart drugs, what kind of implications would that bring? “Would it require that professionals, physicians for example, who obtained their professional degrees with the help of drugs continue

to take the drugs in order to practice?” asks James McGaugh, Ph.D., a research professor of neurobiology and behavior at the University of California, Irvine. “Why not? After all, I have prescription lenses because of less than perfect vision and in California am required to wear glasses in order to drive my car… And what about the costs, and the effects on those who lack funds?” And, moreover, do we even want to create a culture of people on stimulants? Would we be amplifying an obsessive drive in our culture where we already spend more time on working than we do on cultivating our human relationships? And whom would it really even benefit? “The answer in many ways from a larger macro perspective,” says Dr. DeSantis, “is it benefits employers, not the employees. This is the perfect drug. I would love to have my workforce on Adderall. They’re more diligent; they’re less tired.”


9:15 p.m.

The effects, stimulating and reactionary, seem to have all worn off by now, but the results? Looking at the 2,000 plus words on the computer screen in front of me, the results, well, the results are clear. I deem the personal experiment a success. Am I ready to take smart drugs again? Ask me the next time deadline rolls around‌

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Necklace, $3,475, MASHA ARCHER, available at Jonathan Buckhead. Bra, $180, Thong, $96, both NEVAEH.

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SOCIETY

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G E O S PAT I A L I N T E L L I G E N C E

Story by VICTORIA KNIGHT BORGES

In a world where knowledge is power and time is of the essence, the need for faster and better information is crucial to keeping cities and communities safe, and for creating a sustainable tomorrow. The latest information being analyzed? Geographical data. Info on the natural and man-made structures surrounding us is being recorded by everyone from Google to the CIA, and being interpreted to give us what is known as “geospatial intelligence.� While the likes of the Unit-

ed States government may be using it to assess foreign territorial threats, consumer-based companies are using it to create products that provide a little extra convenience throughout the course of our daily lives. Learn what this form of intelligence can do for you. WINTER 2013/2014

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SMARTER COMMUTE It isn’t restricted to just James Bond or Bill Gates – the Martin Jetpack, a GPS-enabled, oneman flying machine is powered to send you 8,000 feet in the air, just high enough to glide over your work commute or explore the city. Packed with an emergency ballistic parachute, the jetpack plans to hit the market in 2014.

SMARTER CARS

Humans have driven cars since the founding of the modern automobile in 1886, — but they won’t be for much longer. With the help of intelligent transportation systems, cars are beginning to think for themselves, talk to intersections and exchange information with each other. Soon, cars will hit the market with the ability to park, operate in traffic and break without human input.

Google Inc. has already created a remote control car (or self-driving car), that currently transports employees to work at Google headquarters in California. General Motors isn’t far behind. The secret is in the car’s bumper, where sensors, lasers and cameras guide the car to make calculated driving decisions. And as if an unmanned car wasn’t enough to surprise you, there’s also an iPhone app called Automatic Link that connects with car ports to monitor speed, gas level and energy usage — including a GPS tracker to gauge the price of gas for a car’s current journey.

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SMARTER MAPS Technology experts are asking what we can do with the constant flow of location information such as the location of landmarks, public restrooms and airports. Google Maps has given us one answer. Always ahead of the curve, they are applying what some would consider useless information to create a strategic prevention program that can detect where drug use is taking place as well as gang activity, and using geo-tagged security cameras to locate unidentified bank robbery suspects. According to the FBI, there is also a custom Google Maps

page to protect local residents from gun violence. It’s all thanks to something called predictive analysis (and it’s just as complicated as it sounds). Through a series of high-tech mathematical calculations and data analysis techniques, geographical information systems (GIS) transform geospatial information into cutting-edge analysis software that can do anything from predict terrorist activity and bank robberies, to locate meth labs and track illegal marijuana growth.

SMARTER HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES Samsung recently released a refrigerator with Wi-Fi capability and an LCD screen that connects to your smartphone. This refrigerator comes with a touch screen and downloadable app that lets you scan food barcodes to help manage food consumption and expiration dates from any location. For the consumer technology company LG, smart capabilities don’t end with refrigerators. Through a food management technology solution called Smart Access, users can monitor their laundry from their smartphone or smart TV, without having to be physically in the laundry room. In addition, Smart Access enables food expiration date monitoring and suggests recipes based on the food items in your refrigerator. It can help locate the milk or cheese that may have gotten lost in a sea of refrigerated food, too. Not forgetting about the vacuum cleaner and oven, Smart Access also allows remote control steering of automated vacuum cleaners and temperature control of ovens to ensure quick and efficient cleaning and cooking from your smartphone. Although consumers need to purchase the proper LG refrigerator and washing machine in order to use Smart Access, today’s kitchen possibilities might even impress Jane Jetson.

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The Seay Firm LLC is an entertainment, intellectual property, and business law firm based in Atlanta, Georgia. Our founding attorney, John Seay, is a former musician and journalist with over a decade of experience in the entertainment industries. That experience helps John connect with and understand the needs of his artist and arts-related business clients. Among the services we provide are contract review, drafting, and negotiation, licensing, business formation, registration and protection of copyrights and trademarks, and litigation. The Seay Firm LLC provides cost-efficient legal solutions that are as creative and dynamic as you are.

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SOCIETY

TESLA UNCOILED T TH H EE R RE E SS U UR RG E N C CE E O O FF N N II K KO L A A T TE E SS L LA A

A

Story by AUSTIN HOLT

s a whole, we appreciate genius when we see it. But innovation can be redundant, and the originality behind it can lose its sheen as inevitable waves of copycats come down the pike. Influential names and important dates go down into the history books, the names behind them, footnotes. Almost as much as the genius itself, we appreciate the flaws that come matched with it. Outlandish

intelligence can be alienating, but outrageous peculiarity can serve to re-humanize. When we have a face to attach to a whole epoch of thought, and when that face is recognized, equally and universally, for both its brilliance and its quirk, an icon is born, and remembered. Steve Jobs was a control freak. Howard Hughes was a recluse. Michelangelo was cripplingly unsociable. Beethoven was an angry bastard. And Nikola Tesla?

Nikola Tesla was out of his mind. The quintessential mad scientist. But he invented the 20th century. WINTER 2013/2014

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It’s a little unlikely, but this eccentric, Serbian-American inventor is experiencing a bit of a renaissance. Particularly unlikely due to the fact that he died, penniless, more than 70 years ago. But so goes the underdog tale.

IF

you’re not familiar with Tesla, you’ve seen his personage somewhere lately. He was played by David Bowie in The Prestige, that movie where Hugh Jackman got killed off a couple hundred times. His namesake is being used by Tesla Motors, which manufactures electric cars. He’s been the subject of numerous memes and videos online. And if you walk onto any college campus, you won’t go too far before seeing a T-shirt depicting an intense, gaunt, mustached man riding a dinosaur while shooting bolts of lightning out of his hands. He’s the topic of conversation among nouveau-educated 20-somethings who are growing up in a time when capitalism is splintering, the technological zeitgeist is shifting and scientific awareness is, well, cool. These hornrimmed, cool-pants’d literati discuss alternating current electricity, early robotics, radio waves and energy policy. About the methodologies behind his work. They talk about the fact that he was able to create bolts of lightning and draw electricity straight from the atmosphere at a time when most of the world lived without electricity, at all. And finally, they talk about how he got screwed by the man, and how unrecognized unconventional genius is one of the world’s great tragedies. Seventy years after his death, a global community of his own prediction (he foretold the internet a century ago) has elevated the scientist to legendary hipster status. Born in Croatia in 1856, young Tesla was a talented kid. His math teachers thought he was somehow cheating when he proved himself capable of performing calculus in his head. But he was just “that student.” He never missed a lecture, overworked himself to exhaustion and earned the highest grades possible at the Austrian Polytechnic in Graz, Austria. Halfway through his studies, however, he lost his scholarship over ill blood with some members of the faculty and became addicted to gambling. Tesla had to drop out of school. What followed were six years of ups and downs. Tesla cut off relations with his family and friends to avoid revealing that he had dropped out (some friends actually thought he had drowned), and worked a series of odd jobs in his field, in between card games with men on the street. Finally, he shifted into another job that would have an indelible impact on his career. He moved to New York to

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work with Thomas Edison. Edison saw the talent in Tesla. He had a tremendous, intuitive knowledge of engineering, he was a workaholic, and was able to apply it toward improving some of Edison’s company’s previous designs. One day, Tesla said he could eliminate the problems Edison was having with his direct current generators. Historically, the story went something like this: “There’s $50,000 in it for you, if you do,” Edison said. Tesla followed through on his end of the bargain, and vastly improved Edison’s machines. When he asked for the money they had discussed, Edison patted him on the shoulder and laughed, saying, “You don’t understand our American humor.” Needless to say, Tesla was a little pissed at losing out on the modern equivalent of $1 million, so he quit and went to work with Westinghouse, a competitor of Edison’s. And then, one of the more interesting chapters in American history, occurred: the War of Currents. Insert lightning bolts and theme music here.


A

t a time during electricity’s infancy, there were two currents. Direct current, Edison’s design, and alternating current, which was Tesla’s design. In many ways, alternating current is a safer and more practical way to conduct electricity, but this was a competition for market dominance. In marketing at its finest, Edison would pay neighborhood kids to steal dogs and cats, and would publicly electrocute them using Tesla’s alternating current (direct current wouldn’t have fared any better on the poor critters). Tesla went back to work, becoming, as writer Robert Lomas put it, “the man who invented the 20th century.” Tesla entered a limbo for the rest of his life, experiencing periods of wealth and fame alongside those of penniless solitude. But he continued working, and he continued patenting with each new discovery. Perhaps it was a reflection of his own bad experiences with greed, but Tesla was a generous scientist, and was pleased to share his past work with fellow scientists the world over. Marconi invented the radio using 17 of Tesla’s patents. Tesla came up with the idea of radar, 18 years before it was actually invented. He built the hydroelectric plant at Niagara Falls, inventing hydro-electricity. He patented the transistor a century ago. Wireless communications, neon lights, the remote control, robotics and even the technology to obtain energy for your household straight out of the ionosphere (which we’re still decades away from): All Tesla. But for all his brilliance, Tesla was a geek, not a businessman. Edison had been a CEO. Tesla was the ideas man. As he grew older, his demeanor intensified. He would never sleep for a period any longer than two hours, and would work for days straight. He became a strict vegetarian, living only on milk, bread, honey and vegetables. He was pathologically self-aware of his appearance and expected those around him to be impeccably assembled (he once fired a secretary for being overweight). He remained celibate his whole life — though not without opportunity — as he believed relationships and sex would cloud his thinking. In his final days, he lived in a hotel in New York City, where he fell in love with a pigeon. But he and Mark Twain were besties, so that’s kind of awesome. There’s something we see in Tesla — something we see in every tortured genius who’s growing up in the wrong time. Deeply seeded in the hipster psyche, parallel to an ebbing resentment for the mainstream, is an affinity for Tesla. He’s a role model for restless creatives who have eschewed the system in favor of their own path. He’s justification that one doesn’t have to be normal to be successful (or at least, have successful ideas). And he’s a cautionary tale — for all his brilliance, he died alone and broke, and over the rest of the century, faded from the public memory, to be revived through clever, group-thought marketing. Too nerdy for the mainstream, too crazy for high school American history.

BUT TESLA IS BACK, and he’s cool again, in a way that even he probably couldn’t have predicted. Matthew Inman, proprietor of humor website The Oatmeal, got wind that some concerned citizens needed a boatload of cash to acquire and restore one of Tesla’s old laboratories in Storeham, N.Y. The lab, called Wardenclyffe, was where the inventor conducted some of his earliest experiments with wireless transmission, but had fallen into disrepair. A grassroots fundraiser was conducted on The Oatmeal, and in a matter of days, nearly $1 million had been raised. Further donations, with a matching grant from the state of New York, brought the total to $2.2 million. The site is presently being cleared, and plans are underway to turn it into a museum dedicated to the legacy of Nikola Tesla.

“Let

the

future

tell

the

truth, and evaluate each one according to his work and accomplishments. The present is theirs; the future, for which I have really worked, is mine.” –N. Tesla WINTER 2013/2014

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LAUREN COHAN LITERARY MASTERMIND, SEXY BOMBSHELL, ZOMBIE KILLER Story by TOVA GELFOND Photography by JIMMY JOHNSTON Styling by TIAN JUSTMAN Makeup by ERICA BOGART Hair styling by JAIDEN SMITHSON Photography assistance by AUSTIN HOLT, MICHEL PARISAY and CHARLIE WATTS Wardrobe assistance by ANECIA DAVIS Production assistance by AVI GELFOND and JAIME LIN WEINSTEIN Shot at PEGASUS STUDIOS and on location at the GOAT FARM PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

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“Don’t worry guys, I kill zombies for a living.” LAUREN COHAN LETS OUT A BOLD LAUGH WHILE SITTING ON A RICKETY OLD SWING TIED HAPHAZARDLY TO A STEEL POST 50 FEET HIGH — in European couture no less. Post-apocalyptic locations are no match for her. This sort of terrain is exactly the kind where she spends eight months out of the year when filming on the set of the highly acclaimed, cult-followed television series, “The Walking Dead.”

I

t’s 4:30 p.m. on an unexpectedly sunny Monday and she’s swinging valiantly into the weeds of the overgrown backlot of The Goat Farm Performing Arts Center, and she just can’t stop laughing. It’s magical really, how comfortable she is with a group of people watching and fussing over her for a photo shoot and she’s completely unaffected. Her motions are fluid, relaxed as she flips the spirals of her hair to one side. Then the next. All too soon is it apparent why there’s a fanatical degree of fanfare attached to this woman: she’s phenomenal. Rita Hayworth once complained, "Men fell in love with Gilda, but they wake up with me." But this could never happen to Cohan. She’s unequivocally herself. Whatever your expectations, she exceeds them. You think she’ll be northeastern, or southern, or British. She’s not. None of them. She represents an amalgam of each area’s virtues and none of their disadvantages: charming like her southern belle character, straightforward like her New Jersey birthplace and suited up with high-tea English etiquette. It’s impossibly confusing and curiously sexy. But alas, it is all Lauren. Her own breed of person and creation. BRIEF INTRODUCTIONS When she walked into the studio at 2 p.m. — with a loose-fitting sweater and unfussy jeans accessorized by a

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hot coffee — the charisma was palpable. She’s familiar and calm, kicking off her casual booties, and wrapping her red-polished toes around the bottom bar of her chair. Just like a pro. These are the kinds of opportunities where Cohan gets to dress up, and play. She’s excited about today — an opportunity to be in hair and makeup that doesn’t require dirt and fake blood. Or how about a wardrobe that’s not farmer T’s and dirty jeans? Bingo. But first, there are questions and I delve right in. I want to know it all. The usual stuff, I suppose. Although her answers aren’t usual — at least not in the delivery. She’s clever. She says words like “bravado” and “catharsis”

She talks about her childhood in New Jersey prior to moving across the pond (when she kept the passport but lost the accent). “We moved when I was 13, I was kicking and screaming not to leave, but it was the best thing. It’s so funny now because all I want to do is play a girl from Jersey, ’cause it would be sort of the biggest challenge ... it’s kind of hard not to cliché a Jersey accent.” The gym, tan, laundry/Don Jon aspects of that Garden State life are not lost on her, although it wasn’t quite her cup of Earl Grey. She was into more solitary things and when her family left Jersey for Britain, her hobbies were pottery, swimming, reading. “And I think that on a level, that is why acting has appealed to

“I love how you can sort of disappear for a long time, into researching things and then basically live like gypsies. Cause that’s part of acting.” with an ease that I liken to the average Joe saying “mac and cheese” or “funny.” These conversational bits are littered with dry bouts of humor and substantial cultural references that are so comfy, you want to try ’em on too. And the voice; that voice. It’s lower tonality is brightened with the drawing out of vowels to a British end. It’s sultry and unconventional — a hipster fantasy that edges on mainstream.

me now,” she says. “I love how you can sort of disappear for a long time, into researching things and then basically live like gypsies. Cause that’s part of acting. You go and you get flown to some random place and everyone becomes your family. You stay in caravans for like 19 hours of the day because you live more on set than you do from home. And everyone there just gets it.” She makes the notion of living like gypsies sound so cool.


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THE INTELLECTUAL COMES OUT When Lauren entered college, acting was more hobby than vocation. She even founded a theatre company while attending University of Winchester and King Alfred's College where she studied drama and English literature (an obvious choice). “We had this module in college which was called ‘Exploding the Cannon,’ which is taking iconological literature and just inverting it and turning it upside down,” she says with a fantastically nerdy fondness. She explains how they would take a play and find the main doctrines in order to invert them. “We had Pygmalion as our final project. We set the play in the first World War ... it’s hard to explain now, but it became this really dark masochistic version of Pygmalion.” She’s tickled by the memory, beaming like a schoolgirl. Then she takes a long swig of her coffee. It’s really only then, when she left university, that she seriously considered acting — it brought together the art, academia and even psychology she’s so fervent about. I DIGRESS I roll my neck while taking notes. Her eyes register a hint of concern. “Sorry, I slept wrong last night,” I say. “You need to see my acupuncturist, he’s

amazing.” She perks up. “He’s this sweet little Asian man, and he’s authentic, and his herbal remedies are so great. You’ll love him.” I don’t have the heart to tell her I’m deathly afraid of needles, but all of a sudden I want to buy whatever she’s selling. I wonder to myself if this is the kind of quality that Marilyn Monroe was legendary for — the ability to capture someone’s attention and investment by her presence. “Really?” I inquire. “Oh, yes. So much emotion and memory is embedded in your muscles. I do Pilates, and it’s crazy how certain workouts will make me think about memories from my childhood.” “Oo, Pilates. I should do that, too.” Again, the Monroe effect in action. Before I can even look down at my notepad, I realize we have digressed to a friendly, more intimate place — a place from which I don’t want to return. But “The Walking Dead” is on my mind. Just hours prior, I had seen the Season 4 opener, and was already chomping at the bit to ask about it. Lauren is recognized for her run of paranormal plots, starring in shows such as “Supernatural” and “The Vampire Diaries,” but she’s known best, of course, for her work on “The Walking Dead.” WINTER 2013/2014

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“THE WAY FRIENDS TEXT ME WHEN THEY WATCH THE SHOW OR AFTERWARDS, THEY ARE LIKE, ‘DAMN YOU FOR MAKING ME LOVE THIS SHOW...I’M SO TENSE!’”


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been too overwhelmed to do a good audition.” She laughs, pausing for another sip of coffee. “As soon as I got the gig, I watched the first season and I thought, ‘OK...take a deep breath...this is maybe the best thing ever!’” “And so, how is it actually working on the show?” I ask. She pauses. “You get this impression immediately with ‘The Walking Dead’ that you are in this circle of trust and that appealed to me and my theatre background and just from this tribal thing you get. We are literally this tribe of nomads that have to rely on each other. And that’s how it feels as actors and that’s how it feels on the sets and being removed from your family ... so I had an amazing time and it was great because the anxiety and unknowing of coming onto this show was mirroring the trajectory for Maggie.”

MEETING MAGGIE This show has become more than an iconic and terrific thriller set in the South, but rather an all-consuming obsession for zombie fanatics. I, myself, have never been into supernatural themes, but connect to the main tenets and impressive plot lines. It’s addictive — even if you don’t like Night of the Walking Dead. Her character, Maggie, has filled the male-fantasy role as the sexy southern-farmer’s-daughter-turned-warrior. Maggie came onto the show in Season 2, and it’s hard to believe there was ever a “Dead” episode without her. And even though she had a season to watch prior to auditioning for the role, she hadn’t seen a moment of the TV drama. “With ‘The Walking Dead,’ I was not aware of the show,” she admits. “I was, of course, aware of Frank Darabont, and a fan of everything he had ever done. The whole first season had been aired, and the interesting thing is I knew enough to know I could do this character ... and I loved the two scenes we had for the audition. But I was almost super grateful that I hadn’t watched the show because I might have

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BUT EVERYONE DIES I start to imagine the anxiety that might come with a role like this. “The Walking Dead” is notorious for killing off major characters when the viewer least expects it. It can be devastating, but certainly makes for great television. The episodes with Maggie have been memorable, though it’s not a guarantee she’ll live. So I come out and say it, “How do you cope with the not knowing if you’re gonna die?” “Yeah,” she takes a breath. Then a sip. “I think about it, but ... I dunno. You never know. I just really think about Maggie, and go on that journey.” “It’s very interesting where she starts as a character ... and she’s very much defined by her family and by her surroundings. As we have moved through this series, and especially now through Season 4, she begins to identify herself more as an individual and it’s been interesting to ask myself, ‘Who is she?’ as me, looking at her, and now in Season 4, Maggie is finally asking, ‘Who am I?’.” “Even within the boundaries of her southern, religious upbringing, there is such a feistiness about her. I mean, that’s the first thing we learn about her. Even looking back at that whole pharmacy epi-

sode, to me, that was a girl who was kind of trying something on. Trying on this perspective and being a little ballsy, and seeing if it took.” Pretty heavy stuff considering the fact that we are talking about a storyline where dead people come back to life and growl with disturbing makeup. But there are so many layers to these characters, and so many themes to this version of the classic genre. It’s about people, relationships and what elements of society would survive when the laws that govern us crumble. “You are kind of your own therapist with the show and then you are therapist to however many people watch each week,” she says. “The way friends text me when they watch the show or afterwards, they are like, ‘Damn you for making me love this show...I’m so tense!’ but then you get such catharsis as well.” “Do you watch it when it airs?” I ask. “Sometimes, but not really. I live it most of the year, and I need a break from the story because it’s very emotional for me.” MORE THAN DEAD She operates on a frequency that’s really tapped in, so there’s a need to tune out. It also gives her a chance to take on other ventures, like starring in an episode of “Law & Order: SVU,” which she did after the Season 2 break. And there are other things in the works, like another project filmed during her “off time,” Reach Me, (where she stars alongside Sylvester Stallone, Elizabeth Henstridge and Cary Elwes) currently in post production. “I haven’t seen it yet,” she says eagerly. But she’s smiling. She likes it. I look down at my watch, and it’s time to get her into hair and makeup. On a more casual day, she might sport a pair of tortoise-shell thick-rimmed glasses and an uncomplicated bun. But today, she gets to be a glamazon — and I don’t want to stand in the way. But even after she’s lined and blushed and curled into a fashion-forward seductress (evocative of Sophia Loren), it’s the real Lauren we can’t take our eyes off of. The one making jokes, menacingly swinging and jumping around by smashed windows and spray-painted steel.


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INFOGRAPHIC

an

Infographic on

Infographics Infographics are great ways of presenting and sharing data so it’s no surprise that they’ve been gaining popularity. But with a mass of new visual information, comes trends and

expectations. So what makes an infographic? What are the current popular ways of laying out such data? For example, an introductory statement is in 74% of other infographics.

DECORATIVE RIBBON

92%

UPPERMOST HEADLINE

B Y AV I G E L F O N D

16%

36%

OF INFOGRAPHICS

SOLID COLOR BLOCK

HAVE MAPS

56%

1 IN 5 USE PICTOGRAPHS

WHAT KIND OF DECORATIVE LINES ARE USED? 108

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SOLID LINES

DOTTED LINES

X-LINES

72% 36% 1%


KEEP IT COLORFUL FOREGROUND

BACKGROUND 3+ COLORS

30%

34%

OTHER 10% 6%

OTHER

6%

10% 10% 8% 18%

4%

8%

85% FONTS CHOSEN

SAN SERIFS ARE

32%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF SOURCES

OF INFOGRAPHICS HAVE ONLY

ONE SOURCE

14%

OF INFOGRAPHICS HAVE

10+ SOURCES

3.06

THE DATA FOR THIS INFOGRAPHIC WAS CREATED BY TAKING 50 INFOGRAPHICS, SCOURED FROM THE INTERNET, AND CONVERTING THEM INTO STATISTICS. WINTER 2013/2014

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FA S H I O N

POP GOES DIOR Story by JAIME LIN WEINSTEIN Illustrations by TURIYA CLARK

This season, the iconic fashion house pays homage to renowned American artist Andy Warhol. “The idea is not to live forever,” Andy Warhol once said, “it is to create something that will.”

I

ndeed, Warhol’s creations — his art, his films, his philosophies — continue to live on (in artifact, in memory, in influence) since his pass-

ing February of 1987, a truth that is further confirmed by Raf Simons’ Autumn-Winter Ready-to-Wear collection for the House of Dior.

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jonathan Buckhead 404.846.7988 | jonathan@jonathanbuckhead.com Atlanta | 110 East Andrews Drive #4 by appointment


A COLLABORATION WITH THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS resulted in the artist’s portraits of women printed on the bodices of bustier dresses and high-heel drawings embossed on handbags (“Female Head with Stamps,” “Unknown Female” and “Stamped Shoe with Butterflies” among them).

T

he graphics featured were actually precursors to his most well-known pop work, created when he was a commercial artist producing illustrations for magazines and advertising campaigns. “For me Warhol made so much sense,” creative director Simons says of the collaboration in the show’s dossier. “I was interested in the delicacy and sensitivity in the early work he did, I was drawn to that graphic style naturally in this collection. It was that notion of hand work and personal signature that fitted throughout.” The perfect complement to the collection? The set for the show, which featured giant, floating Mylar spheres, reminiscent of Warhol’s New York City studio, The Factory. Often referred to as the “Silver Factory,” it was decorated with tin foil and silver paint, the ceiling often flanked by silver balloons.

I can’t help but assume Warhol would have adored it all.

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BEAUTY

METALS H E AV Y

THERE’S MORE TO LOVE ABOUT PRECIOUS M E TA L S T H A N T H E I R I N V E S T M E N T VA L U E .

Photography by COLBY BLOUNT Models: SHANA AND COLLEEN (Click Atlanta) Makeup and hair styling by MARAZ using STILA Nail design by LUNA X ARTISTRY Shot on location at PEGASUS STUDIO

P

erhaps it’s the way they are able to reflect light — producing a soft gleam of silver, a bright, yellow luster of gold and an orangey copper glow — or maybe it’s a subconscious attraction to their rarity, but the chemical elements copper (Cu), silver (Ag) and gold (Au) are somehow perfectly suited for adornment, and

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makeup is taking note. From soft, platinum powders for the skin to gold flakes embellishing eyebrows and lashes, these metals are pushing beauty boundaries with their feminine, yet futuristic effects. And if you want a more wearable option, try a simple metallic manicure, or an understated, shimmery eye shadow.


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LEG END ARY THE LEGENDARY ISSUE COMING IN 2014

eidemagazine.com


E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Me and my

GTAR Story by BONNIE HERRING P h o t o g r a p h y b y C H A R L I E WAT T S

Step aside video games; there is a new Guitar Hero in town.

O

ne step ahead of the ever-popular band game phenomenon, is the gTar by Incident, no musical experience or ability required. Idan Beck, founder of Incident, originally set out to create a fully digital guitar as an aid for computer musicians, but since its inception, the gTar has evolved into a multi-diverse yet operationally simplistic instrument that puts the power of music and creativity in the hands of the player.

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Now rolling off the production lines, the gTar is poised to change the difficulty and steep learning curves associated with music education. And with a price tag of around $400, the gTar may just be the thing to do it. The developers of the gTar believe that they are providing users a tool that will enable them to experience the joy of creating music and not just consuming it, without the need to spend countless hours on expensive lessons and memorizing songs. Incident’s success story begins with

a Kickstarter campaign where the team successfully raised funds to cover the initial startup and production costs — hitting their goal of $100,000 in only 11 hours (making it Kickstarter’s most-funded music platform). Knowing that people change phones frequently, Incident has future-proofed the gTar with interchangeable docks that will keep up with all new iPhones and other smartphones. So if you’re ready to release your


inner rockstar, simply download the gTar application on your iPhone, iPod or Android smartphone and insert the device into the integrated docking station (or plug it into the included adapter). The app provides instructions and LEDs light up the fretboard indicating correct finger placement (the strings and fret are designed identical to that of a traditional guitar — and bonus, it never needs tuning!).

There is a built-in intuitive Smartplay feature that detects and mutes out incorrectly played notes and aids the

able sounds and effects. Additional apps are available for use with the gTar and Incident says more are in development. I have tried the gTar and can admit, I’m addicted. I can’t put it down. It feels and sounds like you are playing a real guitar. I am someone who has always wanted to learn to play but never wanted to dedicate the time. I just want to be able to pick up a guitar and rock, and that is exactly what gTar provides.

I have tried the gTar and can admit, I’m addicted. player through difficult songs. The Free Play feature gives options of choosing a variety of guitar model modes as well as keyboards, synthesizers and even drums, along with a multitude of avail-

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY RUSSELL DREYER STYLING BY TIAN JUSTMAN MODELS: AMY LEE AND CHRISTINA V. (FACTOR ATLANTA) MAKEUP BY MARAZ USING TARTE HAIR STYLING BY JAIDEN SMITHSON PRODUCTION ASSISTANCE BY TURIYA CLARK

SHOT ON LOCATION AT JOYSTICK GAMEBAR AND SPARKLES FAMILY FUN CENTER IN SMYRNA


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PHOTO BY GREENER_PASTURES

GREEN IS THE NEW BRIGHT Have you ever taken one of those psychological favorite-color tests? Pick the color red and you’re defined as tenacious. White and you’re organized and logical. Purple and you’re artistic and unique. Green? Green happens to be a favorite color of intelligent individuals — geniuses, in fact. Studies of intelligence have revealed that those with extremely high IQ’s share a commonality in their favorite color: green.

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jessica nell graves @lenoxshopgirl


The Savant Issue  

WINTER 2013/2014 Featuring: The Walking Dead's Lauren Cohan. Seven Southern Geniuses. Smart Drugs. Metallic Beauty. Brain Food. Nikola Tesl...

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