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2018 A N N U A L

R E P O R T


Contents 1 Executive Summary

24 Responsible Business 2018

2 Responsible Labor Initiative

26 Compass Awards

6 Responsible Minerals Initiative

27 Meetings and Events Worldwide

11 Responsible Factory Initiative

30 Leadership Circle

12 Workplace Well-Being

31 VAP Improvements

13 Environmental Sustainability

33 RBA-Online

14 Chemical Management

34 Audit Cooperation Program

15 Public Procurement

35 VAP Audits: By the Numbers

16 Public Policy

38 Annual Sensing Results

18 Stakeholder Engagement

40 Membership Growth

19 Training and Capability-Building

41 2018 Financial Highlights

22 Indirect Spend

42 Senior Leadership, Board and Staff

23 Diversity and Gender

44 RBA Members


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) is unique in that it offers companies programs, tools, services and trainings to improve working and environmental conditions in virtually every part of their global supply chains: from the responsible sourcing of minerals, to ethical recruitment and employment of workers, to safe and sustainable manufacturing, to the protection of indirect service providers. The RBA helps members and their suppliers conduct risk assessments, perform due diligence, train staff, implement corrective actions and advance their corporate social responsibility efforts. Through its public policy efforts, the RBA also works to help shape emerging policy on responsible business conduct, promote greater harmonization across requirements and develop publicprivate partnerships to address salient issues. In 2018 we added even more capabilities and expanded the breadth and depth of our existing offerings and efforts on behalf of members.

The Validated Assessment Program (VAP), which is the gold standard of social audit programs, as well as our Supplemental VAP (SVAP) focused on forced labor, and our responsible recruitment programs, continued to improve to better serve workers, members and auditees. Our online sustainability platform, RBA-Online, supported the VAP through numerous enhancements and processed a record 822 audits and nearly 5,000 SAQs in 2018. The platform now has more than 17,000 users from 6,200 member and supplier facilities.

The RBA’s Responsible Labor, Minerals, and Factory Initiatives continued to grow in scope, sophistication and influence in 2018. These initiatives, their programs and tools are increasingly referenced by governments, inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations and participating RBA members are often recognized as leaders in responsible business conduct.

The RBA also experienced tremendous membership growth in 2018, deeper into supply chains and wider into adjacent industries that share technological commonalities and face similar challenges. In 2018 the RBA had 26 new members join, ending the year with 145 members headquartered in 17 countries.

Today the RBA is a respected industry voice around the world and its input is sought by prominent officials and influential stakeholders. In 2018 we met with U.S. and foreign ambassadors, members of the European Parliament, ministers and representatives from numerous governments in Asia. The RBA also participated in events and conducted joint activities with notable organizations including the United Nations, OECD, ILO, IOM and others, just to name a few.

RBA training programs, in-person and online, also grew. More than 430 people attended our in-person Code of Conduct trainings and VAP Audit Preparation workshops and over 11,800 courses were completed via our online Learning Academy in 2018. By the end of 2018, there were 42,250 users and 73,705 course completions in the Learning Academy since it launched in 2014.

In the pages that follow, you’ll read more about what the RBA accomplished in 2018 to support its members and their suppliers as they embraced the RBA Code of Conduct, the latest version of which went into effect in January 2018, and leaned into the mission and vision of the RBA. There will always be more work to be done, but the collaborative efforts of our members continue to have a positive and lasting impact on those affected by global supply chains.

To learn more about the RBA and how your organization can benefit from this community of practice, visit ResponsibleBusiness.org, follow @RBAllianceOrg and contact us at info@responsiblebusiness.org.

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RESPONSIBLE LABOR INITIATIVE As the international business and stakeholder communities accelerate their commitments to address the risks of trafficked and forced labor in supply chains, the need to collaborate on common approaches is critical for success. Regulations, market access requirements and stakeholder focus related to modern slavery has continued to grow, making it even more important for the private sector to invest in solutions. However, individuals, organizations, industries and even governments cannot shift the status quo on this issue without working together. This is one of the driving principles behind the vision of the Responsible Labor Initiative (RLI): using collective influence to affect change. By the end of 2018, many business coalitions had aligned on the most common principles to eliminate forced labor, including the elimination of recruitment fees and costs, ending the retention of personal documentation, and assurance that workers have freedom of movement and employment agreements provided in their native languages. The RLI now provides a complete suite of tools and services as well as implementation capacity that companies in industries such as electronics, retail, automotive, toys, consumer goods, food and beverage, footwear and apparel look to in order to put these principles into action. Not only does the RLI enable companies in these industries to conduct due diligence in their supply chains, but it also provides a forum to

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encourage stakeholder coordination and application of collective leverage.

Five-Year Strategic Roadmap

In 2018, the RLI initiated and made progress on a number of focus areas, including:

The RLI Steering Committee and Advisory Board worked jointly over the summer and fall of 2018 to develop a five-year strategic roadmap to guide the activities and focus of the Initiative. The membership diversity of the RLI governance provided a balanced and progressive direction as we looked toward the future. This strategic framework is supported by tactical approaches and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that will be reported year over year. In addition, the mission of the organization was updated to include a focus on remedy as well as all stages of recruitment and employment.

• Formalized a five-year strategic roadmap • Enhanced critical tools, including the RLI Supply Chain Risk Assessment Tool, Supplemental Validated Audit Process on Forced Labor, and Labor Migration Corridor Database • Began implementation of the Responsible Workplace and Recruitment Programs in Malaysia, Nepal and Indonesia • Secured grant funding and launched initial efforts to roll out the Responsible Recruitment Program in Chinese Taipei and Vietnam

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Tool Enhancements One of the primary roles of the RLI is to provide end-to-end forced labor due diligence guidance tools and services to members. In 2018, the RLI provided a number of key enhancements to this suite of offerings to enable companies to effectively address this issue in their supply chains, including:

MISSION

Responsible Workplace and Recruitment Programs Through a generous grant from the Walmart Foundation, the RLI was able to scale and expand its pilot programs from 2017 to benefit more workplaces and labor providers. Launched in January 2018 and run through the RBA Foundation, the Responsible Workplace and Recruitment Programs aim to help break the cycle of exploitation in foreign migrant

worker recruitment and employment experiences in the Southeast Asia region by transforming the market for ethical business practices and including workers directly in development of effective solutions to persistent challenges. The Responsible Workplace Program (RWP) focuses on improving workers’ awareness of their labor rights, developing worker-management communication and amplifying workers’ voices to improve working conditions and mitigate issues that contribute to forced labor. To complement the expected outcomes from the RWP in reducing the risk of forced labor in supply chains, the equally important Responsible Recruitment Program (RRP) targets its efforts in the recruitment industry by providing labor providers with a development path toward meeting the ethical recruitment standards of today’s leading industry customers, as well as public recognition for their progress. Both programs are at the half-point milestone of a 24-month period and have achieved considerable progress.

Collective influence through membership growth & partnerships

Accelerate the collective influence of the RLI through material membership growth as well as alignment of standards, policies & programs across sectors

Geographic Expansion

Reduce the prevalence of forced labor through the mobilization of RLI engagement & systems in the high risk regions & countries

Transparency & Impact Measurement

Institutionalize measurement and reporting of forced labor risk reduction and remediation at both the industry and company level

Strategic Priority Statements

The rights and dignity of workers vulnerable to forced labor in global supply chains are consistently respected and promoted through responsible recruitment and employment practices

Strategic Imperatives

STRATEGY

VISION

• Specific guidance on implementing forced labor due diligence as part of the RBA Practical Guide to Implementing Responsible Business Conduct Due Diligence in Supply Chains. • The RLI Supply Chain Risk Assessment tool, which provides members the ability to identify forced labor “hot spots” in their supply chains. This allows companies to take a risk-based, efficient path to due diligence by directing the application of deeper assessment efforts where there is a greater potential for forced labor conditions. • The formal launch of the Supplemental Validated Audit Process (SVAP) on Forced Labor.

This program provides workplace and labor provider self-assessment and on-site audit capabilities focused specifically on detecting and correcting conditions that contribute to forced labor. • Updates to the Labor Migration Corridor Database, providing members with detailed information on recruitment fees and costs in high-risk migration corridors for employment. This information helps inform strategic decisions, remediation and other program aspects when implementing the RBA-RLI “no fees” policy.

Members, suppliers, recruitment partners and stakeholders use their collective influence and application of due diligence to drive the transformation of recruitment markets, reduce the risk of forced labor and provide remedy in global supply chains at all stages of recruitment and employment.

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RBA Foundation Forced Labor Event — Penang, Malaysia

Progress: Responsible Workplace Program Eighteen workplaces across four states in Malaysia enrolled in the RWP in 2018. From July to December, more than 1,500 workers from production lines were trained on how to answer the first baseline worker surveys on forced labor indicators via an interactive voice response system using their mobile phones. The majority of foreign migrant workers who participated in the survey were from Nepal, Bangladesh and Indonesia. The second baseline worker survey on ethical recruitment will be conducted in 2019. In October and November, human resource and compliance managers as well as production-line supervisors from participating sites attended a worker-manager communications workshop held in Kuala Lumpur, Penang, and Johor Bahru as part of this workplace capacitybuilding program. At the workshop, participants learned about various practical guidelines on how to develop effective communications platforms to address worker issues. They were also given information on the SUARA KAMI helpline, which was officially launched in November to support these participating workplaces.

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RLI-GFEMS-IOM-ILO Project Kick-Off — Hanoi, Vietnam

Posters promoting the helpline were distributed to the participants to generate awareness and accessibility to their respective workers. An e-learning video will be developed as a tool to support the workplaces’ efforts in enhancing their pre-departure orientation process. This will be shared with the participants at the second training workshop for managers on pre-departure orientation in 2019. Parallel to building the capacity of managers, a series of educational push messages will also be sent directly to workers’ mobile phones to increase awareness of their basic rights as foreign migrant workers under international law and the availability of the SUARA KAMI helpline.

Progress: Responsible Recruitment Program Forty-five labor providers from Indonesia, Malaysia and Nepal enrolled in wave one and four more in wave two of the RRP. All labor providers participating in RRP signed and submitted their Declaration of Level 1 Commitments – an aspirational declaration to make progress in becoming an ethical recruiter. As part of RRP activities, the RBA Foundation organized a series

of ethical recruiter trainings in Kathmandu, Jakarta and Penang in June and July. Sixty-five participants from 45 labor providers attended the two-day training. In addition, a one-day refresher course targeted at those who had attended the training in previous years was also organized. The refresher course attracted 44 participants from 30 labor providers. The wave-one labor providers are taking a step closer to being considered RRP Level 1 Labor Providers (Developing) by participating in verified self-assessments. Labor providers that are able to meet the RRP Level 1 requirements will proceed to participate in Level 2 of the program, in which a key activity is to go through the RBA Supplemental VAP on Forced Labor audit. All existing and newly enrolled wave two participants will be going through the same process of training, verified selfassessments and audits in 2019. The RBA Foundation will kick off the remaining activities under the Walmart Foundation grant in 2019 by hosting a regional forum in Malaysia where aggregated data from the first RWP baseline worker survey, key learnings and best practices inspired by both programs will be shared with multistakeholders to generate further

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RLI Advisory Board and Steering Committee Strategy Workshop — Singapore

RLI and IOM at CGF Global Summit on Responsible Recruitment — Singapore

discussion on how to address forced labor and unethical recruitment in global supply chains.

the Vietnamese Association of Manpower Supply (VAMAS) and representatives from Vietnamese manpower agencies.

and activities related to ethical recruitment and employment. The ILO and IOM are both official partners under the grant for project activities in Vietnam.

“Enhancing Fair and Ethical Recruitment to Combat Modern Slavery” Project The RLI launched an Enhancing Fair and Ethical Recruitment to Combat Modern Slavery project in 2018 with grant funding from the Global Fund to End Modern Slavery (GFEMS) to begin initial work in Chinese Taipei – an important destination for many RBA and RLI members. The inception phase project is intended to test and pilot intervention work focusing on Vietnamese migrant workers in both Vietnam and Chinese Taipei. The one-year project enables the RLI to conduct outreach meetings, worker surveys, trainings and assessments with labor providers, workplaces and workers in order to further understand the drivers of forced labor conditions and potential solutions in these countries. In Vietnam, the RLI is working with the International Labour Organization (ILO) and International Organization for Migration (IOM) to conduct research

The learnings from the project will inform future investment in improving recruitment agency practices and provide a more transparent labor supply chain mapping to ethical employers, including allowing for the application of additional funding to scale the RRP and other related activities in these countries and beyond. The RLI, ILO and IOM kicked off the Enhancing Fair and Ethical Recruitment to Combat Modern Slavery project in Hanoi in December 2018. Coordination of work planning and the setting of priorities were followed by securing buy-ins and gathering of inputs from project stakeholders in Hanoi, including

In the same month, the RLI organized an outreach meeting in Taipei to introduce the project. The event attracted nearly 150 participants from members, non-members, suppliers and recruitment agencies from across industries. The rationale behind the project as well as an overview of the activities that will be implemented in Chinese Taipei were shared with participants. In addition, participants were encouraged to complete an online survey designed to identify and understand their roles and areas of interest in relation to the project activities.

Visit ResponsibleLabor.org for more information on the RLI. Visit RBAFoundation.org for more information on the RWP and RRP programs.

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RESPONSIBLE MINERALS INITIATIVE Membership Overview With the RMI’s additional scoping of raw materials beyond tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold (3TG), and the emergence of EU Regulation in the minerals due diligence space, RMI membership continues to evolve and diversify. The RMI welcomed 28 new members in 2018, with strong representation from the electronics, automotive and upstream sectors (mining, smelting, refining). The Vendor Membership category also continues to see solid growth with the addition of four new service provider members. The RMI’s yearend membership total was 356. New program developments, membership tools, and member supply chain engagement are expected to drive additional growth. The RMI continues to strengthen linkages along the mineral value chain and identify opportunities for stronger collaboration across upstream and downstream actors to tackle responsible sourcing challenges, and improve the uptake, quality and effectiveness of the RMI’s tools. To that end, the RMI launched a new

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“upstream” membership category for mining, smelting, and refining companies. The RMI’s mineralspecific workgroups (i.e., the Cobalt, Gold, and Tin Working Groups) and Mining Engagement Team represent some areas where upstream members play a significant role in program development and guidance. These efforts aim to improve communication on responsible mining practices and expectations, and provide an avenue for better recognition of voluntary standard systems in RMI tools and programs.

Program Indicators 2018 was the first year of implementation for the revised Responsible Minerals Assurance Process (RMAP) 3TG standards. RMAP saw an uptick in participation in 2018, in part driven by new program offerings for cobalt supply chain due diligence. Two-hundred seventy-six out of 355 known tin, tantalum, tungsten, gold, and cobalt smelters and refiners (SORs) were either active or conformant to the RMAP or a cross-recognized program. Three cobalt refiners completed an

on-site assessment in 2018, with additional refiners on the horizon for early 2019. In 2018, the RMI identified 35 new SORs, 19 of which were cobalt refiners. Thirteen SORs were considered no longer eligible due to a change in operations. Fourteen SORs became conformant for the first time in 2018, and 17 joined the active list. All 17 active smelters had an on-site assessment scheduled and completed in 2018. Of the RMAP assessments conducted in 2018, 38 resulted in corrective action plans (CAPs), the majority of which were either initial assessments or assessments against the revised standards. The most common findings for the previous (2013) protocols were: (a) insufficient due diligence performed on supplying smelters that were not RMAP-conformant or equivalent; (b) conflict minerals policy was not communicated to suppliers; and (c) conflict minerals policy was not embedded in standard operating procedures. The top three findings for assessments conducted against

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the revised (2017) standards were: (1) incomplete procedure to identify conflict-affected and high-risk areas; (2) supply chain policy did not meet the requirements of the standard; and (3) “Step 5” public due diligence report did not exist or did not meet the requirements of the standard. The RMI assists companies through corrective actions and encourages continual improvement via training and technical assistance.

auditors, the RMI hosted eight inperson trainings. These were held in the United States, China, Europe and Indonesia, and included an advanced auditor training course for participating auditors. Coupled with free one-on-one technical assistance, these resources helped prepare key stakeholders in the assessment process. These trainings will continue throughout the first part of 2019 and periodically thereafter.

Revised Standard Implementation

The RMI also developed a tools corner where SORs can access tools and guidance documents related to the RMAP assessment. Here one can find resources related to identifying conflict-affected and high-risk areas, drafting an “OECD Step 5” public supply chain due diligence report, and templates for supply chain mapping, risk mitigation, and mine-site assessments. 2019 will yield more tools, including a country risk mapping portal, templates for “know-yourcounterparty” activities, and updated training modules.

The RMI Revised Standards for Tin, Tantalum, Tungsten and Gold were released in June 2017. The Standards became effective June 1, 2018. From June 1 until December 31, the RMI offered an “on-ramp” process, allowing SORs to utilize either the 2013 Protocols or the 2017 Standards for their assessment during that time. In 2018, 26 SORs underwent assessments against the revised RMAP Standards on a voluntary basis: 6 gold refiners, 11 tantalum smelters, 7 tin smelters, and 2 tungsten smelters. These SORs were spread across different geographies and had diverse sourcing complexity and risk profiles. In addition to the online training courses available to SORs and

Emerging Risks and Future Trends The RMI expanded its tools and programs in 2018 to cover additional materials and enhanced its engagement with the mining industry. The RMI finalized the integration

of cobalt in the core infrastructures required for companies to conduct due diligence on their cobalt supply chains. Jointly with the Responsible Cobalt Initiative, the RMI developed and published the Pilot Cobalt Refiner Supply Chain Due Diligence Standard and conducted pilot assessments of three cobalt refiners using the RMAP program. The RMI also piloted and released the first version of its Cobalt Reporting Template to help companies identify cobalt refiners in their supply chain. Furthermore, the RMI continued working with its members to identify cobalt refiners and coordinate outreach to confirmed cobalt refiners to promote participation in the RMAP program. The RMI expanded the breadth and reach of OECD-aligned due diligence processes into additional commodities. To help companies make informed decisions on the responsible sourcing of minerals, the RMI enhanced the offerings of the Risk Readiness Assessment (RRA) platform. This included making the RRA available in five languages (English, Mandarin, Japanese, Korean and Bahasa), expanding its scope to 15 materials (Aluminum, Alumina, Tantalum, Steel, Mica, Nickel, Lithium, Iron Ore, Gold, Tungsten, Graphite,

Of 355 known tin, tantalum, tungsten, gold, and cobalt smelters and refiners, 276 were either active or conformant to the RMAP or a cross-recognized program in 2018.

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RMI-RCS Auditor and Smelter Training — Shenzhen, China

Bauxite, Cobalt, Copper, Tin) and other improvements to the tool such as the ability for companies to complete annual updates to facilitate tracking continual improvement. The RMI publicly committed to a formal review process for the RRA in 2019 to ensure standards used, issue areas included and industry norms defined reflect current industry expectations. In December 2018, the RMI kicked off the new Mining Engagement Team (MET). The MET is co-hosted by the RMI and the International Council for Mining and Metals (ICMM). Its mission is to identify and implement practical steps to strengthen linkages, facilitate communication and promote recognition of responsible practices among mineral supply chain actors across industries and value chains. It brings together representatives of RMI member companies, mineral producers or processors and responsible sourcing initiatives. To help identify areas of focus for the MET, the RMI co-hosted a roundtable with ICMM on “alignment” of standards and supply chain tools. In Indonesia, the RMI kicked off the on-the-ground implementation of two pilot projects funded by the European Partnership for Responsible Minerals (EPRM). On the first project, the RMI partners with CES Advisory and

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RMI-EPRM Side Session at OECD Forum — Paris, France

Refined Bangka Tin for the sustainable land reclamation of former tin mining land. Funding provided by the RMI primarily supports the capacitybuilding of the local cooperative and the development of the reclamation business model. For the pilot project on occupational health and safety, the RMI partners with Earthworm Foundation and works in collaboration with three Indonesian tin producers. Recognizing the potential of new technologies, including blockchain, to support due diligence efforts on mineral supply chains, the RMI released its Blockchain Guidelines to reduce fragmentation and promote the interoperability of blockchain solutions. The Blockchain Guidelines apply to any mineral or metal supply chain with the aim of defining the terms, concepts and fundamental data attributes required to identify supply chain actors that participate in a blockchain-based solution. The RMI furthered its sensing research on additional issues and materials in support of its goal to facilitate the identification, assessment and mitigation of the salient social and environmental impacts of extraction and processing of raw materials in its members’ supply chains. Activities in 2018 included the publication of Material Change, a study developed in

partnership with Drive Sustainability and The Dragonfly Initiative to assess the materiality, environmental, social and governance risks associated with 45 raw materials commonly used by the automotive and electronics industry. The RMI further continued its engagement with key stakeholders on the responsible sourcing of mica, formalized its partnerships with the Aluminum Stewardship Initiative through a Memorandum of Understanding, and joined the Global Battery Alliance as a Community Member.

Supporting Upstream Due Diligence The RMI built on its upstream due diligence review process, including review of and as-needed follow-up on iTSCi incidents and alerts, as part of the RMI’s role on the iTSCi Advisory Committee. Additionally, the RMI supported the development of a critical incidents flagging system in conjunction with the Better Sourcing Program (BSP) and funded a BSP-led risk management project to strengthen linkages between incident collection and risk management, which will result in a risk management protocol and guideline for risk mitigation that can be used across mineral supply chains. In February 2018, the RMI conducted on-the-ground upstream due diligence

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MOST COMMON NON-CONFORMANCES

and stakeholder engagement in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and in Rwanda. Activities included visiting the Alphamin Bisie Mining (ABM) large scale mine (LSM) site and related community projects, as well as iTSCi artisanal and small scale mine (ASM) sites in Walikale, government and stakeholder meetings in the North Kivu Province, and visits to BSP-monitored mine sites and supply chain partners for 3Ts and the ASM gold site of Nyamurhale (USAID-funded TetraTech project) in the South Kivu Province. The RMI met with miners, traders, community leaders and civil society actors and observed LSM and ASM operations. The RMI observed upstream mechanism traceability and due diligence processes at work and gained further insight into relevant risks and opportunities for continual improvement and the role these mechanisms are playing in these areas.

• 8.16% • 4.08%

6.12% •

• 16.33%

14.29% •

4.08% • • 12.24%

6.12% • 8.16% • • 4.08%

• 8.16%

n Auditee did not provide transportation documentation from the supplying smelter or refiner n Auditee did not properly classify the incoming material n Auditee did not conduct due diligence on supplying smelters/refiners who are not RMAPconformant or equivalent n The conflict minerals policy was not communicated to suppliers n The conflict minerals policy was not embedded into the smelter/refiner’s SOPs n The full transaction list was not available n Insufficient documentation to demonstrate chain of custody for non-secondary materials n Not all relevant employees were trained on the conflict minerals policy n The auditee did not complete all requirements for transactions coming from L3 countries n Insufficient documentation to demonstrate origin for non-secondary materials n The auditee did not have a robust system of material control n The conflict minerals policy did not meet the requirements of the protocol n The auditee did not have a process in place to receive, review, and respond to grievances

NUMBER OF CONFORMANT SMELTERS AND REFINERS By Geography 70 Number of conformant smelters

The RMI maintained active engagement with upstream partners and stakeholders in advising and leadership roles, acting as Chair and Founding Partner of the EPRM in 2018, serving on the Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) Projects and Resources working group and participating in PPA small grants proposals review. The RMI continued its term as the international industry representative on the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR) Audit Committee, providing input into ICGLR Regional Certification Mechanism (RCM) review process. The RMI also initiated a collaboration with Solidaridad on solutions for ASM gold miners. Additionally, the RMI continued serving on the CAPAZ Project Advisory Group and Standard Committee that assisted with finalization and rollout of the Code of Risk mitigation for ASM engaging in Formal Trade (CRAFT), and is working on linking up CRAFT with the Responsible Minerals Assurance Process (RMAP).

6.12% • 2.04% •

60

63

50

53

40

36

30

29

20

28 22

19

10

8

0 China

Europe

Indonesia

Asia Other

Japan

USA

Latin America

Other

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Continual Improvement The RMI’s mission is to provide companies with tools and resources to make sourcing decisions that improve regulatory compliance and support responsible sourcing from conflict-affected and high-risk areas. In 2018, we identified the positive impacts we hope to achieve and how our work aims to bring about these impacts through our Theory of Change. This framework communicates the RMI’s goals and strategies and serves as a foundation for measuring and monitoring our progress over time, including SOR participation, SOR performance (public reporting and CAP closure), and downstream engagement. Building on its experience formulating and managing a grievance mechanism, the RMI, in collaboration with the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) and the Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC), led the first phase of the development in 2018 of an online cross-industry platform to screen and address grievances linked to smelters and refiners in global supply chains. The Minerals Grievance Platform will provide a record and communication channel for the identification, review

RMI at a Cassiterite Mine Site — South Kivu, Democratic Republic of the Congo

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and resolution of grievances. Proposed material scope covers 3TG SORs with a potential for expansion into other mineral supply chains. Proposed risk categories include OECD Annex II risks, with an opportunity to expand to other critical risks in the supply chain. The RMI engaged in a stakeholder consultation and beta-testing process for the Platform in 2018 to garner insights and input into platform content and functionalities. The launch of the live platform website is expected in the first part of 2019. In addition to its efforts to develop a cross-industry platform, the RMI continued to manage its own Grievance Mechanism with a standardized incident receipt and response process, and published data summaries for 2016, 2017 and 2018 to RMI members. In 2018, the RMI logged nine grievances as part of this process. The grievances included complaints against smelters/refiners, upstream programs, and mining operations, with risks ranging from OECD Annex II risks, to Dodd-Frank Act conflict-security risks, to various legal risks. The RMI worked with the parties in question to verify and mitigate issues raised in accordance with the Grievance Mechanism,

including reviewing corrective actions, facilitating stakeholder engagement, conducting legal reviews, addressing the issues through the RMAP audit process, encouraging respondents to issue public statements, and/or referring to partner mechanisms for resolution where appropriate.

RMI and Members at China Gold Congress and Expo — Beijing, China

RMI at China Gold Congress and Expo — Beijing, China


RESPONSIBLE FACTORY INITIATIVE The RBA and its members are committed to advancing corporate responsibility in their global supply chains. However, as one goes deeper into the supply chain, factories need specialized attention, effective tools and other resources that may not be readily available to many organizations. To meet this need, in 2018 the RBA board of directors approved the formation of the Responsible Factory Initiative (RFI) as a way to provide individual factories with self-paced solutions that foster improvements regardless of where the factory is in their journey of social and environmental responsibility. The RBA already offers many factorylevel programs to members, their factories and suppliers, including the Validated Assessment Program (VAP) and Validated Audits, SelfAssessment Questionnaires (SAQs), RBA-Online, the e-Learning Academy, Factory Lead Certification, VAP recognition program, and more. The goal of the RFI is to make these

tools and resources more accessible to factories, especially those in the lower-tiers of supply chains. By joining the RFI, non-RBA member factories can access a select group of self-service benefits, all in one place, for a substantially reduced price. Membership includes RBAOnline access, full e-Learning Academy access, and one registration

for the RBA Certified Factory Lead Program. While the RFI is just getting started, there has been great interest from public buyers, retailers, nongovernmental and other organizations in this approach to help factories that need support to meet the RBA Code of Conduct and other requirements.

The RFI provides self-paced solutions that foster improvements regardless of where a factory is in its journey of social and environmental responsibility.

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WORKPLACE WELL-BEING

The RBA launched a new initiative in fall 2018 to advance the health and wellness of workers who contribute to the products and services offered by its members. To set a baseline for this work, the RBA administered a member survey designed to help define the landscape of the current health and wellness programs of our members; within their corporate and supply chain programs. In an effort to bring attention and resources to this issue, in 2019 the RBA will enlist a wide range of experts to assess the current situation on worker health and wellbeing initiatives in manufacturing supply chains, starting in Asia. The initiative will seek input from health experts, researchers and civil society and will leverage leading best practices from RBA member companies that have been working on these important issues for many years.

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Major components of the new RBA initiative include: • Conducting a comprehensive, industry-wide worker survey in the manufacturing sector • Educating workers to improve health awareness • Collecting best practices on worker health programs across diverse member companies • Enhancing worker-management training curriculum and tools • Working to improve grievance and reporting mechanism tools • Engaging external health experts and stakeholders to advise on key issue areas impacting workers

This new initiative will initially focus on understanding the landscape of current health and wellness programs in the supply chain of RBA members to identify gaps and make improvements where opportunities exist. It will identify and implement meaningful collective actions that will be more effective than if any one company attempted the actions alone. The long-term goal is to create a data-driven approach that will generate measurable results and long-lasting positive outcomes.

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ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY Given the increasing international efforts to decelerate global climate change, environmental impact can no longer be defined or measured in compartmentalized programs. Instead the interconnectivity of energy, water and waste challenges industries to respond with equally comprehensive action. The RBA has been restructuring resources to better reflect this increased interconnectivity of environmental issues, so as to address industry challenges with a more holistic approach.

Circularity and E-waste:

Supporting Environmental Goals

Supply Chain Engagement

Perhaps the most pronounced example of environmental interconnectivity is the circular economy, which challenges the traditional “make, use, dispose” business model, to consider opportunities in which materials and resources can be reused or, optimally, not used at all. The RBA created a forum around the challenges and potential solutions to the circular economy within the industry during the 2018 Responsible Business Conference. Through best practice panels, engaging lectures from the academic and nonprofit sectors, and open roundtable discussions, participants concluded that better circularity can only be achieved through multiple approaches addressing challenges in every phase of a product’s lifecycle:

RBA members are eager to further assess and engage with their supply chains to ensure their corporate objectives have a positive environmental impact on a changing planet. While some of these goals go beyond the Code of Conduct, the RBA is dedicated to empowering all members and their suppliers to achieve their ambitions with tools that improve standardization and make resources more accessible. For example, in 2018 a workgroup of RBA members revised the RBA’s environmental survey, a tool on the RBA-Online platform for collecting supply chain environmental data, to capture essential environmental information in a more streamlined and effective process. In addition, the survey has been redesigned to act as an “on boarding” resource for supplier programs in the early stages of collecting and reporting on environmental metrics. By redesigning and repurposing existing resources, the RBA ensures that its members, and their suppliers, continue to have relevant resources to achieve expanding and ambitious environmental objectives.

In 2018 the RBA continued to develop and test its Environmental Maturity Framework, which assesses the resiliency and stability of a company’s environmental program and provides a tailored pathway for development, improving performance and competitiveness and achieving costsaving efficiencies. The Framework was piloted and further refined by RBA members throughout 2018. When completed, it will provide members with a way to more directly collaborate with their suppliers on mutual priorities. For suppliers, the Framework will offer an avenue for them to assess themselves against their peers and make informed decisions on how to grow their program so that it’s more resilient and prepared to address a complex and changing landscape of environmental issues.

• Material selection and product design should consider the final phase of a product’s life. • International conventions and local regulations should prepare for increased movement of materials, while anticipating and preventing abusive practices. • Companies should practice greater due diligence during e-waste recycling processes to ensure protection of the environment, and human and community health. In 2019 the RBA plans to further this discussion with members and stakeholders to find ways to enable the industry to be more efficient and circular.

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CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT RBA members convened to create a strategic plan for its chemical management program in 2018. Through this process, members identified the needs of the industry, the priorities of their companies, and the strengths of the RBA in order to identify the long-term strategies and focus areas of RBA’s chemical management program. The results of this strategic planning will ensure that RBA’s contributions remain relevant and impactful throughout the industry’s supply chains.

Worker Protection from Chemical Hazards The strategic planning process reaffirmed the protection of workers from hazardous chemical exposure as the unequivocal goal of the RBA’s chemical management programming. Every resource and management system developed through the RBA is a contribution toward that ultimate objective. While RBA members have dedicated programs and proven systems to help ensure workers are adequately protected from potential chemical hazards, it comes with the recognition that constant attention and dedication to proven practices are necessary in order to prevent unintended system failures and exposures.

Building Better Management Systems As a convener of industry brands, manufacturers and external stakeholders, the RBA has helped build greater consensus and agreement among members

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on the approaches to chemical management, with a focus on building resources and driving adoption of best practices. In that effort, the member-based Chemical Management Workgroup hosted a series of forums focused on conducting chemical assessments, embedding the hierarchy of controls in management decision-making, and the tracking of chemical inventories. These discussions identified the core tenets, essential practices and best resources for programs to meet the requirements of the RBA Code of Conduct and build more comprehensive systems. By promoting chemical management system elements to suppliers and stakeholders, the RBA continues to facilitate the adoption of proven system practices that are more robust and resilient and better able to protect workers.

External Engagement Developing strong chemical management systems requires diverse perspectives and expertise. To that end, the RBA seeks external

partnerships with like-minded groups interested in expanding these types of resources. Additionally, the RBA engaged with stakeholders through the United Nations Forum on Business and Human Rights to explore how companies can implement human rights due diligence to worker exposure and better provide information and remedies. Our three-year partnership with the Clean Electronics Production Network (CEPN), hosted by Green America’s Center for Sustainable Development, has provided the opportunity to collaborate with other industry organizations, governments and worker rights groups developing programs that engage workers, monitor potential exposure, track process chemical use and identify safer chemical alternatives. The collective work to reduce worker exposure to hazardous chemicals in electronic manufacturing processes has produced several promising prototype programs and industry resources and the RBA will continue to seek opportunities for implementation in 2019.

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PUBLIC PROCUREMENT

Our work in public procurement began years ago when RBA members started to face many different contract requirements across Europe. Since the rollout of the European Union Directives on public procurement, which allow member states to add social and environmental criteria to procurement decisions, this trend has accelerated. In 2016 we conducted a survey to test the ability and ambition of members to meet progressive requirements from public buyers. We also hosted stakeholder roundtable meetings in Europe, met with government representatives, conducted focus groups with RBA members and coordinated numerous meetings on this topic. In 2018 we formalized our work in public procurement by creating a member taskforce. This taskforce is comprised of RBA members

interested in harmonizing the requirements among public buyers across Europe to increase efficiency and bolster compliance. The taskforce plans to develop a guideline in 2019, to help buyers adopt a philosophy of meaningful transparency with their suppliers, as well as a Public Procurement Roadmap. In spring 2019 the RBA is hosting a multi-stakeholder event in Europe for buyers, government officials, industry representatives and other stakeholders to discuss the evolution of public procurement

contracts, the need for harmonization of requirements, and how best to address these expectations. Through these efforts the RBA aims to align the aspirational requirements of public buyers with the realities of global supply chain manufacturing. Additional information about our work in public procurement can be found on our website.

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PUBLIC POLICY 2018 marked another year of expansion in the RBA’s public policy efforts and greater recognition of the organization as partner for governments and intergovernmental organizations. With increasing pressure on member companies to demonstrate responsible business conduct and due diligence in supply chains, RBA policy efforts aim to inform governments and intergovernmental organizations on RBA initiatives and tools, shape emerging policy on responsible business conduct, promote greater harmonization across new requirements, and develop public-private partnerships to address salient issues.

Highlights of 2018 included: • Developed the RBA Practical Guide to Implementing Responsible Business Conduct Due Diligence in Supply Chains, providing an overview of international standards on responsible business conduct and demonstrating how RBA tools, initiatives and services help companies operationalize and live into international supply chain due diligence expectations.

in their operations and supply chains via the use of RBA tools and programs.

• Organized an OECD-RBA Workshop on Due Diligence for Responsible Business Conduct during the OECD Global Forum on Responsible Business Conduct, a one-day event showcasing how RBA members are taking a leading role in implementing due diligence

• Developed due diligence tools to help RBA members comply with the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act (CAATSA), related to North Korean workers in supply chains, and participated in a panel discussion in Washington,

• Hosted a meeting between representatives of the International Labour Organization (ILO) and RBA members in Mexico to discuss issues and opportunities for collaboration in the Mexican electronics supply chain.

RBA at UN Forum on Business and Human Rights — Geneva, Switzerland

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D.C. with U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Customs and Border Protection, State and Labor Department officials. • Participated in the 2018 United Nations Forum for Business and Human Rights, organizing a high-profile session on addressing modern slavery and another on human rights due diligence across value chains. The RBA also collaborated with the development of a UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights (UNWG) report on human rights due diligence, including providing several opportunities for member input.


RBA Meeting with US Ambassador to Malaysia — Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

• Participated in the second Bali Process Government and Business Forum, a cooperative business and government initiative to combat modern slavery and human trafficking in the Indo-Pacific region. The RBA signed a memorandum of understanding with the Bali Process Secretariat, Walk Free Foundation, on anti-slavery efforts through the Bali Process.

RBA and Bali Process Secretariat WFF Sign MOU on Anti-Slavery Efforts — Bali, Indonesia

• Met with the U.S. Ambassador to Malaysia in Kuala Lumpur to discuss RBA programs and initiatives to address salient supply chain issues in the region. • Met with Australia’s Ambassador for People Smuggling and Human Trafficking at RBA headquarters to discuss developments related to forced labor and trafficking.

• Provided business views on ethical recruitment issues at several negotiating sessions of the United Nations for the Global Compact on Migration, to help ensure alignment with RBA policies.

RBA at CAATSA Event — Washington, D.C.

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STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT The RBA regularly engages with civil society groups, trade unions and other worker-focused groups, academia and research institutions, socially responsible investors, and governmental and multilateral institutions. Through relationships with these key stakeholders we discuss and debate standards and norms, best practices, ongoing challenges and emerging issues in supply chain sustainability. In some instances the RBA acts as a conduit for companies to raise problematic issues with stakeholders, and vice versa, in a candid and constructive way.

Key efforts in 2018 included: • Meetings with public buyers to encourage the use of RBA tools for procurement purposes related to social and environmental criteria in contracts. • Numerous stakeholder roundtables at RBA and other external events.

• Facilitation of discussions between member companies and stakeholders around specific and facility-level issues.

• Engagement with Know the Chain (KTC) on its 2019 ICT Benchmark study, including credit to companies for participation in the RBA.

• Regular stakeholder webinar series on relevant reports, developments and emerging issues.

• Input into the methodology of the pilot 2019 Corporate Human Rights Benchmark (CHRB) study on the ICT industry.

Through relationships with key stakeholders we discuss and debate standards and norms, best practices, ongoing challenges and emerging issues in supply chain sustainability.

RBA at Forum Europe-Dell Technologies Public Procurement Event — Brussels, Belgium

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TRAINING AND CAPABILITY-BUILDING RBA Learning Academy Use of the RBA’s Learning Academy by members, particularly with suppliers, increased in 2018. More members took advantage of the custom-branding feature that enables a member’s logo to appear as the logo in the portal for their specified learners and pushed training out to their teams and suppliers. In 2018 there were 2,554 new accounts created (for a total of 42,250 user accounts) and 11,828 course completions (for a total of 73,705 course completions since launch). On average, there were 574 monthly active users. RBA staff helped members launch training to their suppliers and helped customize curricula in the form of learning paths and also helped upload member material for specific learners.

Training Modules in the RBA Learning Academy

New courses added in 2018 included the revised RBA Code of Conduct module, which reflects the updated Code of Conduct, the RBA name, a multi-industry focus, and the more modern animation style of newer modules. Each area of the Code (Environment, Ethics, Health & Safety, Labor, and Management Systems) was broken into individual modules, to be used separately or taken in order in a learning path format. Other courses added included “Bribery and Corruption 1: Resisting Bribery” and a series on Supervisors Skills that includes: • • • • • • •

Handling Feedback Providing Feedback Resolving Conflict Preventing Bullying and Harassment Motivating Workers Pre-shift Meetings Health and Safety

Fourteen Spanish translations were added as well. Additional translations of the RBA Code module, the Supervisor Series and other courses are forthcoming.

By the end of 2018, there were 42,250 total user accounts and 73,705 course completions since the Learning Academy launched in 2014.

TOP 10 COURSES IN 2018 RBA COURSE 2: Industry Standards RBA COURSE 1: Understanding Supply Chain Responsibility HEALTH & SAFETY 2: Fire Safety FORCED LABOR 2: Preventing Forced Labor FORCED LABOR 1: Recognizing Forced Labor RBA COURSE 4: Responsible Supply Chain Management (For Factory Management) HEALTH & SAFETY 1: Health and Safety Management Systems WAGES & BENEFITS 1: Managing Wages RBA CODE OF CONDUCT – ENVIRONMENT (new in 2018) RBA CODE OF CONDUCT – ETHICS (new in 2018)

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In-Person Trainings The RBA continuously holds training sessions around the world to ensure companies and auditors understand the Code of Conduct and how to prepare for VAP audits. In 2018 we held Code and VAP trainings for 431 participants, compared with approximately 260 in 2017. The trainings in 2018 were held in: Mumbai, India; Penang, Malaysia, Shenzhen, China; Chinese Taipei; Tokyo, Japan; Prague, Czech Republic; Oudenaarde, Belgium; and Santa Clara, California USA. Additionally, we began trainings on the Supplemental VAP on Forced Labor (SVAP), with 40 participants in three of the aforementioned countries.

RBA Code and VAP Training — Shenzhen, China

RBA Code and VAP Training — Mumbai, India

RBA Code and VAP Training — Prague, Czech Republic

RBA Code and VAP Training — Penang, Malaysia

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RBA SVAP Training — Chinese Taipei

RBA Code and VAP Training — Chinese Taipei

RBA Code and VAP Training — Tokyo, Japan

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INDIRECT SPEND Supporting manufacturing operations are numerous service provider suppliers, whose services range from call centers and tech support to construction, property management and waste disposal. These suppliers are part of the manufacturing supply chain but may fall outside the scope of some supply chain sustainability activities. In 2014 the RBA created a special taskforce on these “indirect spend� service provider suppliers. The taskforce focuses on understanding key human rights, environmental and ethical risks associated with indirect spend suppliers and then developing special tools to assess, remedy and prevent future risks.

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In 2018 the RBA Indirect Spend Taskforce piloted the use of four new Self-Assessment Questionnaires (SAQs) in RBA-Online. These SAQs, which are now found in the Supplemental Survey area of the tool, targeted four types of suppliers: Facilities Management, Promotional Products, Contract Labor, and Call Centers. The surveys used a single master list of questions, with some questions moved in or out of scope depending upon the supplier type, to collect basic information and assess risk levels.

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DIVERSITY AND GENDER

Gender has long been represented in the RBA Code of Conduct, primarily through the nondiscrimination provision. In the last Code update that position was strengthened with the addition of protections for nursing and pregnant mothers. With strong support from members, the RBA formed a Diversity and Gender Taskforce in 2018 to bolster its efforts around diversity and gender. The first effort of the taskforce was to partner with external experts to conduct an evaluation of the current RBA Code of Conduct and formulate recommendations of possible ways to

incorporate diversity and gender into the 2021 Code update. In addition, the task force is creating tools that will be made available in the RBA e-Learning Academy for members, their suppliers, and factories that are members of the Responsible Factory Initiative (RFI).

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RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS 2018 Members, non-member companies, civil society and government representatives participated in the RBA and RMI annual conferences and member meetings in Santa Clara, California. These events were our most widely attended yet, with a combined attendance of more than 700 people. More importantly, the discussions that took place around crucial issues will help advance the efforts of the RBA and its members as they work to improve social, ethical and environmental conditions in global supply chains. The members-only meeting on Monday, October 29 started with a new member breakfast where those relatively new to the RBA could meet with staff and other members, learn how to maximize their time during the conference and get involved in RBA activities such as work groups and task forces. During the State of the RBA session, members learned about the growing strength of the organization in terms of not only its size but its influence and capabilities. Afterward, staff provided updates on the RBA’s

initiatives, tools and programs, as well as key issue areas. Later members gathered around work group and initiative roundtables to learn about and discuss numerous subjects and related RBA efforts on issues such as diversity, chemical management, public policy and stakeholder engagement, public procurement, VAP and compliance, environmental sustainability, member online tools and the Responsible Minerals, Labor, and Factory Initiatives.

The evening was capped by the inaugural RBA Compass Awards Dinner, where finalists and winners were honored (see next section of this annual report for more on the awards). The following day, RBA Board Chair Paula Pyers gave a welcome address and talked about how the RBA is living into its name and driving impact through the collective, collaborative efforts of its members. Paula then introduced our keynote speaker, Barbara Annis, who is CEO of the Gender Intelligence Group and a

The RBA and RMI annual conferences had a combined attendance of more than 700 people in 2018.

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world-renowned expert on gender, diversity and inclusive leadership. Barbara gave a fascinating and thought-provoking presentation that provided the audience with important information to take back to their respective organizations. The keynote address was followed by a panel of senior business leaders from RBA member companies who discussed future trends and challenges in the ever-changing landscape of corporate social responsibility. Afterward, a panel of high-level representatives from governments and intergovernmental organizations talked about public-private collaboration in implementing responsible business conduct. Panelists represented the UN Working Group on Business and

Human Rights, the ILO, OECD, and the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. Before the conference broke into separate tracks on forced labor, environment and compliance, each with notable speakers from industry, government and civil society, Executive Deputy Director Guo Xiuming of the China Electronics Standardization Association gave a presentation on promoting innovation and social responsibility. That evening, to celebrate Halloween and have a bit of fun after a day of serious business, the RBA held a masquerade-themed reception, hosted by ERM, with costumes and face painting.

where key company executives shared best practices from their own companies and the RBA discussed its related efforts. The conference once again went into separate tracks and, that afternoon, the Responsible Minerals Initiative kicked off its annual conference, Responsible Minerals 2018, with many speakers and panelists from industry, government, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations who came together to discuss strategies, programs and emerging issues related to responsible mineral sourcing. The RMI conference was also an opportunity to celebrate the Initiative’s 10-year anniversary and look back on progress made as well as look ahead toward the future.

Wednesday, October 31 began with a session on wellness in the workplace,

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COMPASS AWARDS The RBA launched the Compass Awards for members, their suppliers and factories, in June of 2018. Its primary objective is to recognize and encourage efforts that lead to meaningful, positive change in line with the RBA’s vision and mission. Many of the award submissions will also serve as examples of successful actions that other companies can emulate. The awards program celebrates corporate social responsibility excellence across three categories: Leadership, Innovation, and Implementation. In the Leadership category, RBA members must demonstrate a highlevel commitment to corporate social responsibility (CSR), embedding it as a core business practice and supporting it with a large investment in time, money or other resources. The Innovation category requires members, with or without partners, to show a highly effective program that represents an innovative solution to a CSR challenge. The Implementation category is open to any factory, member or supplier facility that can demonstrate an impressive application of CSR at the site level that is well-documented and repeatable by other sites.

This first year of the Compass Awards program was a great success. We received 55 entries, nearly 20 in each category, which were reviewed and scored by an independent panel of judges from intergovernmental organizations

The winners of each category were:

LEADERSHIP: Intel Eliminating Forced Labor in the ICT Supply Chain

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and civil society. The finalists and winners of the inaugural RBA Compass Awards were announced during a ceremony at the Responsible Business 2018 annual conference in Santa Clara, California.

INNOVATION: Dell Innovatively Creating Value From Waste Using Sustainable Materials

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IMPLEMENTATION: Jabil The Jabil Family Looks After Your Family


MEETINGS AND EVENTS WORLDWIDE The RBA is constantly on the move, holding and participating in meetings and events worldwide that support responsible business conduct in global supply chains and provide opportunities to evangelize the RBA Code of Conduct, promote our tools, programs and initiatives, and showcase the best practices of our members. Highlights of just some of these meetings and events the RBA conducted or took part in include:

RBA Outreach Meetings

Throughout the year the RBA held Outreach Meetings geared toward members, non-member companies and suppliers in: Kuala Lumpur Malaysia; Shenzhen, China; Tokyo, Japan; Seoul, South Korea; Guadalajara, Mexico; Guangzhou, China; and Chinese Taipei. RBA Outreach Meeting — Chinese Taipei

RBA Outreach Meeting — Prague, Czech Republic

RBA-GeSI Outreach Meeting — Guangzhou, China

RBA Outreach Meeting — Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

RBA Outreach Meeting — Seoul, South Korea

RBA Outreach Meeting — Tokyo, Japan

RBA Outreach Meeting — Shenzhen, China

RBA Outreach Meeting — Guadalajara, Mexico

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UN Forum on Business and Human Rights Geneva, Switzerland

The RBA participated in two side sessions during the due diligence track at the UN Forum on Business and Human Rights, which took place in Geneva, Switzerland, November 26-28. The first session, on “Human Rights Due Diligence Across Value Chains,” was in partnership with the Global Business Initiative on Human Rights and included a panel with NXP, Pact, Trafigura, and Rio Tinto. The second session, on “Business Responses to Addressing Modern Slavery in Supply Chains,” was co-hosted with the Consumer Goods Forum and included a panel with Apple, HP, Walmart, Hilton, Nestle, GRI and IJM. Across both sessions, panelists agreed on the need for cross-industry collaboration, engagement with stakeholders and government, and improved data to drive impact.

Bali Process Government and Business Forum Bali, Indonesia

The RBA attended the second Bali Process Government and Business Forum on August 6-7 in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia. The Forum brought together government representatives from 45 countries, three United Nations organizations and members of the private sector. The RBA shared its experience and recommendations at the Forum and delivered a statement to the Ministers on working collectively to address the complicated challenges of modern slavery. On August 6 the RBA also signed a memorandum of understanding with the Bali Process Secretariat, Walk Free Foundation, to collaborate on anti-slavery efforts through the Bali Process.

OECD Blockchain Policy Forum Paris, France

The RBA participated on a panel about Blockchain for Responsible Supply Chains at the OECD’s Blockchain Policy Forum in Paris, France on September 5. The RBA spoke about how blockchain could be used to improve supply chain due diligence and transparency through the simplification of operability between blockchain stakeholders, and emphasized the role of the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) in leading the discussions and collaboration to meet those needs of the industry.

Malaysia’s World Day Against Child Labour Putrajaya, Malaysia

The RBA participated on a panel about “Eradicating child labor toward achievement of the Sustainable Development Goal 8.7” at the launch of Malaysia’s World Day Against Child Labour 2018 in Putrajaya, Malaysia on September 13. The event was jointly hosted by Malaysia’s Ministry of Human Resources and the International Labour Organization (ILO) and was keynoted by the Minister of Human Resources. The RBA shared its efforts to help ensure child labor-free supply chains and spoke about the prohibition of child labor and the RBA Code of Conduct’s Young Workers provisions.

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Ethical Recruitment Event at UN GCM New York City, N.Y.

The RBA co-sponsored a side event on ethical recruitment with the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the International Organisation of Employers (IOE) on July 9, during the Sixth Round of Intergovernmental Negotiations on The Global Compact For Safe, Orderly And Regular Migration (GCM) at UN headquarters in New York City. The side event consisted of a high-level panel and dialogue with governments and other stakeholders to explore the role of ethical recruitment in global labor mobility as well as to discuss good practices and emerging initiatives.

Colombo Process Events Bangkok, Thailand

The RBA participated in the Third Symposium on “Promoting Regulatory Harmonization of Recruitment Intermediaries in the Colombo Process Member States (CPMS),” March 13-14, and a Regional Workshop to share key findings from the Mapping of Complaints Mechanisms in the Colombo Process Member States on March 15. The symposium covered strategies for collaboration, and identified regional priority actions to reduce gaps between recruitment policies and legislation among CPMS and countries of destination. The Regional Workshop was a platform for the CPMS, key partners and stakeholders to engage and discuss proposed plans for activities that strengthen complaint mechanisms.

IHRB-CGF Events

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Bangkok, Thailand The RBA participated in two regional events on driving responsible recruitment, jointly hosted by the Institute for Human Rights and Business and The Consumer Goods Forum in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on March 20 and in Bangkok, Thailand on March 22. The discussions focused on transitioning to the Employer Pays Principle in migrant worker recruitment. The RBA shared key themes from the Supply Chain Forced Labor Training and Roundtable event it held earlier in Penang as well as information on the Responsible Labor Initiative and the RBA Foundation’s Responsible Recruitment Program.

RBA-ILO CSR Event Guadalajara, Mexico

On June 11 the RBA, representatives from member companies IBM and HP, International Labour Organization (ILO) officials, and the Mexican Chamber of Electronics, Telecommunications and Information Technologies (CANIETI) met in Guadalajara, Mexico to discuss corporate social responsibility in global supply chains. The RBA provided an update of tools, initiatives and programs and the meeting highlighted innovative practices being implementing on CSR and other topics by electronics companies in Mexico. Several site visits to suppliers of RBA member companies were also conducted. The ILO is in the process of gathering information for possible future work in various countries and expressed interest in deeper collaboration with the RBA and member companies in Mexico.

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LEADERSHIP CIRCLE Forty-five executives from member and non-member companies attended the 2018 RBA Leadership Circle in National Harbor, Maryland from May 22-23. This year’s challenge for participants was to think about how the RBA can improve the impact measurement of its initiatives, programs and tools, what are the appropriate inputs, outputs and specific outcomes desired, and what data do we already have or need to add to reach our goals. The Leadership Circle was facilitated by Caroline Rees, president of Shift, and featured plenary discussions as well as breakout sessions. Keynote speakers included Dante Pesce, Chair of the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights, and Martha E. Newton, Deputy Undersecretary for International Affairs at the U.S. Department of Labor. RBA staff shared the great insights garnered from the Leadership Circle with the wider membership at its annual conference, Responsible Business 2018, and is using that information to inform current and future projects.

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RBA Leadership Circle — National Harbor, Maryland

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VAP IMPROVEMENTS In 2018 key drivers for improvements to the Validated Assessment Program (VAP) were efforts focused largely on time, quality and cost issues.

Reducing Time

Improving Quality

Reducing Audit Costs

The program staff worked throughout 2018 to improve report delivery lead times through the introduction of several pilot initiatives with the audit firms and in cooperation with the third-party Audit Quality Manager. These pilot projects included an extra on-site day for the auditor for report writing, as well as the creation of a standardized template for conformance statements, which could be used by audit firms to help ensure more consistent reports. A lean process was undertaken to review and reduce the turnaround time to release final audits.

Several processes were developed and deployed to improve communication and consistency in the program:

Building upon the work done in 2017, the Small and Medium VAP were fully launched in 2018. Additionally, the Supplemental VAP on Forced Labor moved from pilot to introduction phase in late 2018. Each of these VAP products (SVAP, VAP-Small, VAP-Medium) allows members and auditees to take a more appropriately focused approach to risk assessment relative to the operational complexity, risk level and size of the facility.

• The VAP Operations Manual Notification Process, launched in Q2, created a method for RBA to publish corrections, additional guidance or clarification to the audit community, auditees and other stakeholders on the existing live Operations Manual. • The VAP Grievance Mechanism was developed and deployed more fully in the second half of 2018, allowing auditees, auditors and the AQM to raise concerns regarding live audits to an internal RBA panel for discussion. • Members are also able to access this RBA panel for additional guidance on program implementation in support of the Code of Conduct.

The targeted approach of VAP-Small and VAP-Medium allow for a Validated Audit to take place in manufacturing facilities with fewer than 500 workers and less than seven health & safety risk elements. Auditors are able to evaluate smaller, less risky facilities in a more targeted way at a lower cost.

IN-SCOPE EHS RISK ELEMENTS WHICH CAN BE COVERED IN THE VAP-SMALL/MED • Usage of Hazardous Chemicals or radioactive material • Generation of Toxic and Regulated Waste • Generation of industrial wastewater • Generation of industrial air emissions • Canteen Services • Dormitory Services • Foreign Migrant Workers • < 500 in-scope workers

Factory

Number of in-scope workers

4+ risk elements Medium

Small 1-3 risk elements

Complexity

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Adding Resources and Processes

Following the 2017 RBA insourcing of the Audit Program Manager function, more RBA staff were added throughout Asia. The expanded team supports all inquiries related to the scheduling of VAP audits. In March 2018, the RBA opened its Beijing, China office, to further represent the RBA and support its members in the region. The introduction of a dedicated VAP Training Director position in September 2018, and the appointment of a COO earlier to oversee core operations, further signaled RBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to improving the program.

Audit Firm Capacity

With an increase in volume of overall audits, the geographical spread of these audits, and the new markets and services the RBA is supporting, additional capacity was needed for 2019. Thus, the RBA increased the number of its approved audit partner firms from 9 to 10 by November 2018. At the end of 2018 there were 268 qualified auditors from these 10 firms, and on average 25 auditors were qualifying or renewing their certifications on a monthly basis.

The RBA now provides a weekly updated full-spectrum tracker to all members, showing the velocity, dispersal and status of the VAP program. This change in data sharing and support came from work outlined in late 2017, and advisory work with the Leadership Circle in May 2018. Our shadow auditing capacity was also enhanced in 2018, with a second shadow auditor appointed in August. This has led to an increase of RBAshadowed audits, from 23 in 2017 to 44 in 2018.

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RBA-ONLINE

As part of continuous improvement plans for a more robust supply chain management tool, a series of major improvements to RBA-Online were made in 2018 to better support the Validated Assessment Program (VAP). These changes support a more robust workflow process, and included enhancements aimed to: • Make Auditor inputs more efficient • Support a wider range of quality management steps • Provide draft reports in MS Word format • Alert RBA Members of Priority Findings in a quicker automated manner • Provide a more granular view on the status and progress of each Audit • Improve and simplify Corrective Action Plan (CAP) management • Create a full communications system between auditors, the quality management team and auditees

nearly 30 percent. Feedback from RBA members, suppliers/auditees, the auditor community, and the quality management team has been very positive. RBA-Online also supported a record numbers of risk assessments during 2018. Total Self-Assessment Questionnaires (SAQs) completed and shared with customers was just under 5,000 and thousands of audits using the RBA Code of Conduct, including 822 of our flagship VAP audits, were processed. The total number of supplier facilities in the system is now at 6,200 and total user count is more than 17,000.

As the use of RBA-Online as a supply chain management tool for risk assessments grows, the RBA continues to incorporate input from stakeholders, invest in new technology, and increase the capacity, quality and usability of the overall platform.

These changes helped RBA reduce turnaround time of audit reports by

The RBA-Online platform has more than 17,000 users from 6,200 member and supplier facilities.

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AUDIT COOPERATION PROGRAM RBA member companies and their suppliers have access to comprehensive, high-quality VAP audits. A VAP audit is conducted on the entire factory, including all lines of business, and covers all of the workers on-site. Conducting a single audit, and sharing the results, reduces audit fatigue and costs while increasing visibility of supply chain corporate social responsibility performance. A shared audit also allows member companies to redistribute their audit budget deeper into their supply chains. To facilitate the sharing of audits, in March 2018 the RBA announced its Audit Cooperation Program (ACP), which allows members to nominate suppliers for a VAP audit. Through the nomination process members can also add their own custom questions, which the auditors cover while onsite. The RBA developed approaches for the ACP during 2018, which will be implemented in 2019. First, we determine which RBA members share the same factories with at least one other member within the RBA-Online platform. Next, we give those members the opportunity to nominate their entire shared supply chain for a VAP audit. Once we have a list of all nominated suppliers, we

check to see if they already have, or have scheduled, a valid VAP audit. If they do, we remove them from the nomination list (or ask about a closure audit). We are then left with a list of nominated suppliers that do not have a current or scheduled VAP. Each of those suppliers then receive a letter inviting them to do a VAP audit and listing the nominating members (customers). As this is a voluntary program, the supplier either agrees (and pays for an audit) or declines the audit and is removed from the list for the remainder of the year.

To facilitate the sharing of audits, in March 2018 the RBA announced its Audit Cooperation Program (ACP), which allows members to nominate suppliers for a VAP audit.

34


VAP AUDITS: BY THE NUMBERS VAP AUDITS PERFORMED n INITIAL AUDITS n CLOSURE AUDITS n PRIORITY CLOSURE

AVERAGE AUDIT SCORE 27

171.5

42 200

168.9 154.4

261

123.3

46

n 2016 n 2017 n 2018

122.6 107.9

117

95.9

544

534

2017 (786 TOTAL)

2018 (822 TOTAL)

77.9

73.4

375

2016 (538 TOTAL)

INITIAL AUDITS

CLOSURE AUDITS

PRIORITY CLOSURE

The total number of VAP audits performed in 2018 increased to 822 versus 786 in 2017 and 538 in 2016.

2018 AUDITS BY COUNTRY CHINA CHINESE TAIPEI

THAILAND

MALAYSIA

INDIA MEXICO

7%, 56 Total 6%, 50 Total 4%, 34 Total 4%, 31 Total

SINGAPORE

2%, 20 Total

UNITED STATES

2%, 19 Total

JAPAN

2%, 19 Total

PHILIPPINES VIETNAM BRAZIL SOUTH KOREA

2%, 18 Total 2%, 14 Total 2%, 13 Total 1%, 10 Total

ROMANIA

1%, 8 Total

INDONESIA

1%, 7 Total

14 OTHER COUNTRIES

54%, 443 Total

7%, 60 Total

2%, 20 Total 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450

In 2018, factories in China continued to represent the majority (54 percent) of all audits conducted, with 443 of the 822 audits. We also saw year-over-year increases in the number of audits conducted in Chinese Taipei (60 in 2018 compared with 50 in 2017), Thailand (56 in 2018 compared with 46 in 2017), Malaysia (50 in 2018 compared with 42 in 2017), Mexico (31 in 2018 compared with 27 in 2017), Japan (19 in 2018 compared with 13 in 2017), the Philippines (18 in 2018 compared with 10 in 2017), and Brazil (13 in 2018 compared with 6 in 2017). RE SP ONSIBL E BUSINES S A LLIA NCE 2018 Annual Report

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VAP AUDITS: BY THE NUMBERS 2018 VAP FINDINGS BY SECTION

Working Hours • 15% Other (27 Subsections) •

Improvement Objectives

2% •

Emergency • Preparedness

11%

Risk Assessment and Risk Management •

2%

Management Accountability and Responsibility •

2%

Child Labor Avoidance •

2%

Legal and Customer • Requirements

• Occupational Safety

2%

• Air Emissions

8%

2% Industrial • Hygiene

2%

• NonDiscrimination

2%

• Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

3%

• Wages and Benefits

3%

• Hazardous Substances

4%

36

6%

• Food, Sanitation and Housing

• Supplier Responsibility • Occupational Injury and Illness

5%

• Freely Chosen Employment

5%

RE SP ONSIBL E BUSINES S A LLIA NCE 2018 Annual Report

5%


VAP AUDITS: BY THE NUMBERS TOP FINDINGS BY COUNTRY

COUNTRY

SECTION

Working Hours

CHINA

Emergency Preparedness

Occupational Safety

Wages and Benefits

Emergency Preparedness

Working Hours

CHINESE TAIPEI

Freely Chosen Employment

Supplier Responsibility

Working Hours

Emergency Preparedness

Occupational Safety

Supplier Responsibility

Emergency Preparedness

Working Hours

Occupational Safety

Energy Consumption and GHG

Working Hours

Occupational Safety

Emergency Preparedness

Freely Chosen Employment

THAILAND

INDIA

MALAYSIA

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ANNUAL SENSING RESULTS 2018 was the fifth year for the RBA annual sensing study, with assistance from BSR, and serves as one of the mechanisms the RBA uses to better understand the current issue areas most salient to members and stakeholders. As in past years, data points are from surveys of RBA members and stakeholders, VAP and SAQ results, in-depth interviews with industry and issue experts, analyses of NGO and IGO reports, media coverage, and other qualitative assessments. We tested 32 issues across the four broader categories of Labor and Human Rights, Health and Safety, the Environment, and Governance and Ethics. Every one of these issues is important, but some are more relevant to our membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; supply chains today and thus more of a focus than others. In the sensing maps on the opposite page, the further to the right an issue is, the more salient it is to our members, and the higher it is, the more important it is to stakeholders. For the purposes of this exercise, we are therefore most interested in identifying issues that are in, or are moving toward, the upper-right quadrant because those are most salient to members and stakeholders.

Forced Labor and Human Trafficking remains the top-rated issue for the third year in a row, and has been in the top 5 for the past 4 years. In fact, 3 of the 5 top issues have appeared here for the past 4 years: Forced Labor and Human Trafficking, Safe Use of Hazardous Substances and Chemicals, and Working Hours. The biggest movers in a positive direction (upward and/or toward the right) in 2018 were: Privacy and Data Protection, E-Waste, Working Hours, and Freedom of Association. The biggest movers in a negative direction (downward and/or to the left) in 2018

were: Conflict Minerals (still fourthhighest rated overall), Respect for Intellectual Property Rights, and Non-Discrimination. 2017 was the first year we saw environmental issues move into the upper right quadrant and the same three remained there in 2018: Climate Change, Energy Management, and Waste and Effluents.

TOP 5 OVERALL ISSUES FOR 2018 AND 2017 in descending order

38

2018

2017

1. Forced Labor and Human Trafficking

1. Forced Labor and Human Trafficking

2. Working Hours

2. Conflict Minerals

3. Safe Use of Hazardous Substances and Chemicals

3. Safe Use of Hazardous Substances and Chemicals

4. Conflict Minerals

4. Working Hours

5. Occupational Safety

5. Ethical Sourcing of Raw Materials


2018 RBA Sensing Assessment Map n Labor and Human Rights n Health and Safety Importance to Supply Chain Sustainability

n Environment n Governance and Ethics

Importance to RBA Member Companies

2017 RBA Sensing Assessment Map n Labor and Human Rights n Health and Safety Importance to Supply Chain Sustainability

n Environment n Governance and Ethics

Importance to RBA Member Companies

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MEMBERSHIP GROWTH SWITZERLAND 1% •

BRAZIL • 1%

HONG KONG • 1% • ISRAEL • MALAYSIA

1%

FRANCE • SWEDEN • SINGAPORE •

1%

1%

• THAILAND

1%

3%

2%

KOREA • GERMANY •

2%

2%

CHINA •

1%

ENGLAND •

3%

CANADA •

3%

2018

NETHERLANDS •

4%

• USA

55%

JAPAN •

6%

CHINESE TAIPEI •

12%

RBA MEMBERS’ HEADQUARTERS IN 2018 The RBA saw unprecedented growth in 2018 as inroads into new industries, such as the automotive and telecom sectors, among others, continued and members came to us from four new countries including Brazil, Israel, Malaysia and Thailand. RBA’s international reach continued to broaden despite the majority of companies headquartered in the United States. The RBA had 26 new members join in 2018 and ended the year with 145 members. At least 34 percent of new members were required to join the RBA by an existing member. • The RBA now has members in 17 countries and had new members from 12 countries in 2018, including four countries in which we previously did not have members. • After the U.S., Sweden and Japan were the highest growth countries for RBA membership.

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2018 FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

2018 OPERATING REVENUE

2018 OPERATING EXPENSES

$13,518,825

$13,205,615 5%

12%

EVENTS

OTHER

38%

20%

21%

ADMINISTRATIVE

MEMBERSHIP DUES

RMI

35%

RMI

12%

PROGRAMS

30%

27%

VAP AUDITS

VAP AUDITS

*The RBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fiscal year runs from January 1 through December 31. These numbers have not yet been audited.

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41


SENIOR LEADERSHIP AND STAFF Board of Directors 2018 PAULA PYERS

TODD MELENDY

RBA Board Chair, and Senior Director, Supplier Responsibility Apple Inc.

Vice President - Sustainability & Compliance, Celestica Inc.

HAMLIN METZGER

JOAN MOTSINGER

RBA Board Vice-Chair, and Senior Vice President, Business Excellence Seagate Technology, LLC RBA Board Treasurer, and Vice President Jabil

ERIC-PAUL SCHAT

RBA Board At-Large Representative, and Vice President Supply Chain Sustainability Dell Technologies

ANTHONY DEPAOLI

Vice President, Compliance Amkor Technology

MICHAEL MESTON

Vice President, International Human Resources, Western Digital Corporation

ERIC AUSTERMANN

JENNIFER ALLISON

Director, Corporate Responsibility & Sustainability, Best Buy

Senior Director, Sustainability, Environmental Health & Safety NXP Semiconductors

MARY WROTEN

Global Purchasing Senior Manager, Supply Chain Sustainability Ford Motor Company

HARINDER JEET KAUR

Global Social Responsibility Director Molex

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RBA Staff 2019 ROB LEDERER

MARIANNA SMIRNOVA

KARINA BELTRAN ROMERO

JONATHAN IVELAW-CHAPMAN

KHAI YAU CHUA

AARON JIA

DEBORAH ALBERS

DANIEL REID

GAVIN WU

BOB MITCHELL

ANDY CHIU

KYLE RAND

LEAH BUTLER

CICI YE

STEVE MOLONEY

CHRISTINE BRISCOE

KA EA LIM

ANASTASIIA OLVERA

SHERLIN SHI

ANTIONETTE ADAMS

Executive Director

Senior Project Manager

Chief Operating Officer

Senior Program Manager

Vice President

Environmental Program Manager

Vice President

Director of Audit Assurance

Vice President

Quality Assurance Manager

Vice President, Member Services and Human Resources

Senior Program Manager

JARRETT BENS

Senior Account Manager

Director of Communications

Membership Coordinator VAP Support Analyst Program Associate

Software Support Technician Chief Financial Officer Accounting Manager

Accounting/Database Clerk

MANN CHYUN SIM

CARLOS BUSQUETS

VAP Program Manager

Director of Public Policy

NIRMALADEVI KRISHNAMOORTHY

KENNETH ANDERSON

Quality Assurance Manager

Director of Information Technology

MICHÈLE BRÜLHART BANYIYEZAKO

ROSS LANDIS

Database Project Manager

Director of Innovations

LAURA LANDRAU

Director of Meetings

HILLARY AMSTER

Director of Audit Operations

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43


RBA MEMBERS

AS OF MARCH 2019

Americas

EMEA

ASIA

Advanced Micro Devices

Keysight Technologies, Inc.

ASML Holding

AcBel Polytech Inc.

Allegro MicroSystems, LLC

Kingston Technology

Atea ASA

Acer Inc.

Alphabet Inc.

KLA Tencor

BT plc

Amazon.com Inc.

Lexmark

BMW Group

ASE Technology Holding Co., Ltd.

Amkor Technology, Inc.

Logitech Inc.

Edwards Ltd

ASUSTeK Computer Inc.

Amphenol Corporation

Marvell Technology Group Ltd

Ericsson

Brother Industries Ltd.

Analog Devices, Inc.

Micron Technology, Inc.

Fairphone

Chicony Electronics Co., Ltd.

Apple, Inc.

Microsoft

Fingerprint Cards AB

Compal Electronics, Inc.

Applied Materials

ModusLink

Media-Saturn-Holding GmbH

Foxconn

Arista Networks, Inc.

Molex Incorporated Motorola Solutions

Nexperia

Fujitsu Limited

Arlo Technologies, Inc. ARRIS

NetApp

Nielsen

Hi-P (Xiamen) Precision Plastics Manufacturing Co., Ltd.

Avaya Inc.

Netgear

BCE Inc.

Nu Mark

Best Buy

Nvidia Corporation

Bose Corporation

ON Semiconductor

Cadence Design Systems

Oracle America, Inc.

Celestica

Plexus Corp.

Ciara Technologies

Poly

Ciena Limited

Positivo Tecnologia S.A.

Cirrus Logic, Inc.

Qorvo

Cisco Systems Inc.

Qualcomm

Citrix Systems

Sanmina

Cypress Semiconductor Corp.

Seagate Technology

Dell Technologies

Semtech Corporation

Samsung Electronics

Fabrinet

Sierra Wireless, Inc.

Senju Metal Industry Co., Ltd.

Facebook

Skyworks Solutions, Inc.

Simatelex Manufactory Co., Ltd.

Fairphone B.V.

SMART Modular Technologies, Inc.

SK Hynix Inc. - Icheon

Fitbit, Inc.

Snap, Inc. Symantec

Sony Corporation

Flex Ford Motor Company

TCL North America

GlobalFoundries

Tesla, Inc.

Hasbro, Inc.

Texas Instruments

Hisense USA Corporation

3M Electronics and Energy Business Group

HP Inc.

NXP Orbotech Ltd. Philips Schneider Electric Signify Sky CP Ltd STMicroelectronics N.V. International

HTC Corp. Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Inventec Corporation Konica Minolta, Inc. Lenovo LG Electronics Longwell Company

Technicolor SA

New Kinpo Group

TomTom International BV

Nikon Corporation

TT Electronics Plc

Pegatron

Volvo Car Group

Powertech Technology Inc. Quanta Computer Inc.

Taiwan Chinsan Electronics Industrial Co., Ltd. Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Ltd. (TSMC) Tokyo Electron Limited

Venturer Electronics Inc.

Toshiba Corp.

IBM Corporation

Veritas

V.S. Plus Sdn Bhd

Infineon Technologies Americas Corp.

Vishay Intertechnology, Inc.

Wistron Corp.

VIZIO Inc.

XP Power LLC

Insight Enterprises, Inc.

Walmart

Intel Corporation

Western Digital

Jabil

Xerox

Juniper Networks

Zebra Technologies Corporation

Keurig Dr Pepper

ZTE (USA), Inc.

HPE

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RE SP ONSIBL E BUSINES S A LLIA NCE 2018 Annual Report


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