Page 1

0D\9RO1R

Spring to Dance Festival page 6

"Ain't Misbehavin" page 7

Wang Gang targets soda market page 12

www.kettleriverfurn.com 6SHFLDO6DOH+RXUV 6DWXUGD\0D\WKDPSP 6XQGD\0D\WKSPSP 0HPRULDO'D\DPSP PLOHVQRUWKRI,RQ5RXWH 66WDWH5WH(GZDUGVYLOOH,OOLQRLV 

5(6,'(17,$/ &86720(5 3(50,7

3565767' 863267$*(3$,' (':$5'69,//(,/


MAY 24 ISSUE

7

10

What’s Inside 3

12

13

20

What’s Happening

A story to tell

Cancer survivors plan documentary.

6 Spring to Dance Festival Touhill to host annual event.

7 "Ain't Misbehavin'" Stages St. Louis will be jumpin'.

10 Raging Rivers

Waterpark primed for summer.

12 Black Chery Bomb Wang Gang developing soda line.

13 Julia Child

A legacy of teaching food's joys.

20 "Othello"

Shakespeare Festival St. Louis.

Friday May 25___________ • Who's Drivin, Laurie's Place (Back Bar), Edwardsville, 9:30 p.m. • Local H w/ Animal Empty, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 8:30 p.m. • Mr. Wizard, Tommy Halloran, Spectator, Blueberr y Hill, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m. • Art of Dying, New Medicine, Fubar, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. • Mo' Pleasure, Villa Marie Winery, Maryville, 7:00 p.m. • Stanley Clark Trio, Jazz at the Bistro, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. • Red Hot Chili Peppers, S c o t t ra d e C e n te r, S t . Lo u i s, Doors 7:00 p.m. • David Lindley, The Wildey Theatre, Edwardsville, 8:00 p.m. • Dirty Dozen Brass Band w/ Snarky Puppy, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m. • Avicii, Chaifetz Arena, St. Louis, 8:00 p.m. • Faith Ringgold: American Quilts, Foundry Art Centre, St. C h a r l e s, 1 0 : 0 0 a . m . to 5 : 0 0 p.m., Runs through June 1. • C u r re n t s 1 0 6 : C h e l s e a Knight, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. • Wa r h o l ' s P o l a r o i d s : A Method Exhibit, St. Louis University Museum of Art , St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Runs through June 10. • A Room Divided, The E u g e n e F i e l d H o u s e & Toy

Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. • 2012 Ar tists-In-Residence E x h i b i t i o n , C ra f t A l l i a n c e - K ra n z b e rg A r t s C e n te r Galleries, St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Runs through July 8. • Star Trek the Exhibition, St. Louis Science Center, St. Louis, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Runs through May 28. • Thomas D. Gipe, Jacoby Arts Center, Alton, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. • T h e A r t o f I l l u s t ra t i o n , E d w a r d s v i l l e A r t s C e n t e r, Edwardsville, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. • Spring to Dance Festival, Blanche M. Touhill Performing Ar ts Center, St. Louis, Doors open 5:30 p.m.

Saturday May 26___________ • Jam Session w/ Mo' P l e a s u re , 2 : 0 0 p . m . ( F ro n t Bar) / Mo' Pleasure, 9:30 p.m. (Back Bar), Laurie's Place, Edwardsville • Devin the Dude, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 7:30 p.m. • London Calling, The Gramophone, St. Louis, Doors 10:30 p.m. • The Goddamn Gallows w/ The Red Handed Bandits, Fubar, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. • Café Soul, Plush St. Louis, St. Louis, Doors 7:30 p.m.

• Stanley Clark Trio, Jazz at the Bistro, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. • Creed w/ Eve to Adam, The Pageant, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. • Split Lip Rayfield, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m. • Faith Ringgold: American Quilts, Foundry Art Centre, St. C h a r l e s, 1 0 : 0 0 a . m . to 5 : 0 0 p.m., Runs through June 1. • C u r re n t s 1 0 6 : C h e l s e a Knight, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. • In the Still Epiphany, Pulitzer Fo u n d a t i o n fo r t h e A r t s, S t . Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through October 27. • Wa r h o l ' s P o l a r o i d s : A Method Exhibit, St. Louis University Museum of Art , St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Runs through June 10. • A Room Divided, The E u g e n e F i e l d H o u s e & Toy Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. • 2012 Ar tists-In-Residence E x h i b i t i o n , C ra f t A l l i a n c e - K ra n z b e rg A r t s C e n te r Galleries, St. Louis, noon to 6:00 p.m., Runs through July 8. • Star Trek the Exhibition, St. Louis Science Center, St. Louis, 9:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., Runs through May 28. • Thomas D. Gipe, Jacoby Arts Center, Alton, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. • Spring to Dance Festival, Blanche M. Touhill Performing Ar ts Center, St. Louis, Doors open 5:30 p.m.

Who We Are ON THE EDGE OF THE WEEKEND is a product of the Edwardsville Intelligencer, a member of the Hearst Newspaper Group. THE EDGE is available free, through home delivery and rack distribution. FOR DELIVERY INFO call 656.4700 Ext. 20. FOR ADVERTISING INFO call 656.4700 Ext. 35. For comments or questions regarding EDITORIAL CONTENT call 656.4700 Ext. 26 or fax 659.1677. Publisher – Denise Vonder Haar | Editor – Bill Tucker | Lead Writer – Krista Wilkinson-Midgley | Cover Design – Desirée Bennyhoff

2

On the Edge of the Weekend

May 24, 2012


People Local men have a story to tell Cancer survivors at work on documentary By KRISTA WILKINSON-MIDGLEY Of The Edge

C

ancer survivor Evan Bartlett, 21, wants others to know that there is life after treatment and their story is one worth telling. To accomplish this, he is heading west to California this summer on a road trip with fellow survivor Elijah Accola, 20, and friend Max Skelton to film a documentary, "Discovering the Beating Path," about their experiences meeting and talking with others who have also survived cancer. "I love talking to people. I love sharing my story. If I can love my life after surviving cancer, then why can't other people?" said Bartlett in a telephone interview from Chicago where he is a film major at Columbia College of Chicago. Bartlett, an Edwardsville native, was diagnosed with leukemia when he was just 4 months old and spent much of his life dealing with the effects of his treatment. He underwent radiation as a baby, which stunted his growth and required him to take growth hormones for years. He was put into speech class at age 3 until he was 7 and was also told he had a learning disorder. He had to take special education classes all through elementary and middle

school even though he knew he wasn't supposed to be there. Eventually, he told his mother to take him out and he was finally moved into regular classes in high school. Bartlett said it was a big moment when he made it into college. Despite these hardships, Bartlett never let on that his problems were the result of cancer treatment. "When people would make fun of me I would never tell them that I had cancer. I could've made them feel bad but I never wanted to. I never wanted to use my cancer as an excuse," he said. "I never liked telling people that I was a cancer survivor because once I told someone that, their perspective of me changes. That's another reason why I wanted to do this documentary, to eliminate that." He has now been cancer free for 19 years and completely off medication since he was 17years-old, which he described as "amazing." Accola, who is also from Edwardsville, was diagnosed with a stage 2 malignant brain tumor in 2010 at the age of 19. He has now been cancer free for a year. Together, the two want to create a documentary showing others who are living and loving their lives just as much as they are. Bartlett said he began talking with other cancer survivors. He continued to research organizations and reach out to people and said he has already spoken with around

For The Edge

Elijah Accola and Evan Bartlett 100 people. "I've realized that all these survivors have the same perspective on life that I do, which, I love my life. And it just amazed me that all these other survivors had the same outlook," Bartlett said. The idea for the documentary grew from there. Bartlett said he wanted to create a documentary that would inspire people and show the positive side of cancer treatment. He said he wanted to take a different approach to filming, which usually is a straight on head shot of a person talking about their cancer. Instead, Bartlett wanted to focus on people's lives before and after cancer, as well as their new fears and goals. He said they want to get the viewer involved as much as possible. "We wanted to take a different

approach to cancer," said Bartlett. "They have an amazing story but the way they're shooting it, it loses everyone's attention...We just wanted to show everyone that there is a life after treatment and it's a beautiful one," said Bartlett. However, to get the project off the ground, he needed support from other cancer organizations. To gain this, Bartlett created a Web series called "I Survived Cancer" in which he tells his own story and interviews other survivors about their experiences. From there, he continued reaching out to other people and organizations. Bartlett, Accola and the rest of the crew will kick off their road trip in Edwardsville on July 1 and continue through Aug. 20. Along the way they will make stops at various cancer camps, treatment

centers and support groups talking with survivors and filming their experiences and also fundraising. The group will also be using CouchSurfing.org, which connects a network of people who have volunteered to open their homes to travelers looking for a place to say free of charge. Bartlett said he will spend all of next year at school working on the film's post-production and expects to release it by early next summer. The plan is to release it both on the Internet and to enter it into as many film festivals as possible, beginning with the Chicago Film Festival. The group is currently looking for donations to help support the road trip and the film's production. Anyone interested in contributing can make a secure donation online by visiting IndieGoGo.com.

Shaw Nature Reserve plans outdoor events The 2,400-acre Shaw Nature Reserve in Gray Summit is the perfect setting for you and your family to enjoy the natural world. A host of events and programs are available throughout spring and summer: May 26: Wildflower Identification and Ecology. This course will focus on identification, relationships and habitats of wildflowers and native grasses of the season. Beginners as well as serious students of wildflowers will increase their knowledge and appreciation of the rich floral diversity of the Nature Reserve’s woods, prairie and wetland. Come ready for moderate hiking with notebook in hand! 9 a.m. to noon. Meet at the Visitor Center. $20. Advance registration required; www.mobot.org/classes or (314) 577-5140. For a complete list of adult classes at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www.mobot.org/classes. May 30: Wednesday Walkers. Each Wednesday, sign in at the Visitor Center, grab a map and gather to meet the other Wednesday Walkers. Each walk will average one-and-a-half to two hours, allowing time to stop, look, listen and converse. At the end of nine weeks, you will have hiked most of the Shaw Nature Reserve’s trails. 10 to 11:30 a.m. Meet at the Visitor Center. $6. Registration encouraged, but walk-ins welcome; pay on arrival at the Visitor Center. For a complete list of adult classes at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www.mobot.org/classes. June 1: Cold Blooded Buddies. Have you ever spotted a lizard sunning itself on a rock or seen a snake slithering through the tall grass? Join us to learn about the many different aspects of herpetology (the study of reptiles and amphibians). We will look at some of the adaptations of frogs, lizards and snakes and discover how they are able to survive in such a variety of different habitats. Following our indoor study we will be taking a short hike

to our wetland in search of the Reserve’s many native amphibians. Don’t forget to bring a flashlight and some old shoes that can get wet. For ages 8 to 12 with an adult. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Meet at the Adlyne Freund Center. $6. Advance registration required; www.mobot.org/classes or (314) 577-5140. For a complete list of youth and family programs at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www.mobot.org/classes. Shaw Nature Reserve - First Time Fishing for Kids classJune 2: Kids’ First Time Fishing. The Missouri Department of Conservation is teaming up with the Shaw Nature Reserve to provide a special fishing experience for first time or inexperienced young anglers. Equipment, bait and assistance will be provided. At least one adult should attend for every two children, but the fishing is for the kids only. Refreshments provided. For ages 8 to 12 with an adult. 9 to 11:30 a.m. Meet at Pinetum Lake. $12 per child. Advance registration required; www.mobot. org/classes or (314) 577-5140. For a complete list of adult classes at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www.mobot.org/classes. June 13: Shaw Family Adventures: Fairy Houses. Do fairies and other mythical creatures live at the Shaw Nature Reserve? This program, based on the children’s book, “Fairy Houses” by Tracy Kane, will shed some light on that question. Construct your own miniature house for a fairy, troll gnome or any other creature that may live in the woods at the Reserve. For ages 3 and up with an adult. 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Meet at the Visitor Center. $5 per child. Advance registration required; www.mobot. org/classes or (314) 577-5140. For a complete list of youth and family programs at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www.mobot.org/classes. June 14: Native Plant School: Rain Gardening for Home Owners. Native Plant School is a year-round series of

indoor/outdoor classes in the Whitmire Wildflower Garden at the Shaw Nature Reserve that covers various aspects of native landscaping. Please bring your questions, comments, drawings and plant specimens. Participation from the audience is encouraged. Native Plant School at the Shaw Nature Reserve is underwritten by Grow Native! and Wild Ones Natural Landscapers. 1 to 4 p.m. Carriage House. $15. Advance registration required; www. mobot.org/classes or (314) 577-5140. For a complete list of adult classes at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www.mobot.org/classes. June 15: Shaw Family Adventures: Creek Stomp. Grab your creek shoes and explore Brush Creek to see what kinds of critters are living in there. If the water level is high, we will explore one of our ponds. For ages 3 and up with an adult. 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Meet at the Visitor Center. $5 per child. Advance registration required; www. mobot.org/classes or (314) 577-5140. For a complete list of youth and family programs at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www.mobot.org/ classes. June 16: Native Plant School: Rain Gardening for Home Owners. Native Plant School is a year-round series of indoor/outdoor classes in the Whitmire Wildflower Garden at the Shaw Nature Reserve that covers various aspects of native landscaping. Please bring your questions, comments, drawings and plant specimens. Participation from the audience is encouraged. Native Plant School at the Shaw Nature Reserve is underwritten by Grow Native! and Wild Ones Natural Landscapers. 1 to 4 p.m. Carriage House. $15. Advance registration required; www.mobot.org/classes or (314) 577-5140. For a complete list of adult classes at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www.mobot.org/ classes.

May 24, 2012

On the Edge of the Weekend

3


People People planner Events planned at Cahokia Mounds The month of May at Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site will feature the fun and interactive Kids Day, and the popular Nature/Culture Hike. Those who enjoy the outdoors and learning about prehistoric Indian culture can join the popular three-mile Nature/Culture Hike on Saturday, May 26 from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. An archaeologist and a naturalist will lead this free hike through several ecozones, explaining how the Indians used the plants for food, medicine, dyes and other purposes, as well as pointing out where mounds and other site features are located and what excavations have revealed in those areas. Participants should come dressed for the weather and bring water and insect repellent. The hike will be canceled if it is raining. Archaeological excavations at Cahokia Mounds begin in May and continue through June. Visitors are welcome to observe the digs Monday through Friday when they are in progress. Cahokia Mounds will be open seven days a week starting April 30 through October. The Interpretive Center is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and the grounds are open from 8 a.m. to dusk. Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site, administered by the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency, is just eight miles from downtown St. Louis in Collinsville, Illinois off Interstates 55-70 (Exit 6) and I-255 (Exit 24) on Collinsville Road. There is no

admission fee but a donation of $7 for adults, $5 for seniors, $2 for students, and $15 for families is suggested. For more information or a calendar of events, call (618) 346-5160 or visit www.cahokiamounds.org.

Forest Service announces photo contest The U.S. Forest Service today announced its My Neighborhood Forest photo contest, celebrating America’s urban and community forests. The Grand Prize winner will receive $200 in outdoor gear courtesy of the National Forest Foundation. The contest, which runs from April 11 – July 22, seeks to highlight the natural beauty that spring and summer bring to U.S. neighborhoods, communities and cities, as well as the crucial role of trees in the places we call home. Those interested in competing should visit Challenge.gov for more details on the prizes and contest rules. Urban forests broadly include urban parks, street trees, landscaped boulevards, public gardens, river and coastal promenades, greenways, river corridors, wetlands, nature preserves, natural areas, shelter belts of trees and working trees at industrial brownfield sites. “Urban forests are different from the forests you might

normally think of, but they are functioning, hard-working ecosystems just the same,” said Tidwell. With 80 percent of the nation's population in urban areas, there are strong environmental, social, and economic cases to be made for the conservation of green spaces to guide growth and revitalize city centers and older suburbs. Urban forests, through planned connections of green spaces, form the green infrastructure system on which communities depend. This natural life support system sustains clean air and water, biodiversity, habitat, nesting and travel corridors for wildlife, and connects people to nature. The Forest Service’s Urban and Community Forestry office is actively engaged in more than 7,000 communities across the United States, providing technical, financial, research and educational services to local government, non-profit organizations, community groups, educational institutions and tribal governments.  The mission of the U.S. Forest Service is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the nation's forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations. Recreational activities on our lands contribute $14.5 billion annually to the U.S. economy. The agency manages 193 million acres of public land, provides assistance to state and private landowners, and maintains the largest forestry research organization in the world.

Shopper Stoppers FREE ESTIMATES ON BODY WORK We work with ALL insurance companies!

www.cassenssons.com

2 Miles North of I-270 on IL Hwy 159

656-6070

Edwardsville/Glen Carbon Call Don Ext. 265

ALVAREITA’S COLLEGE OF COSMETOLOGY • Classes for Men and Women • Day & Evening Classes Available • Financial Assistance If Eligible Pell Award Will Cover Almost Entire Tuition

REGISTER NOW FOR UPCOMING CLASSES!

We Also Feature: You must register 1 month • CEU Training • Instructors Training in advance of next session

333 S. Kansas Edwardsville

656-2593

SALE MARK BRAKE OFF MUFFLER SHOP AUTO REPAIR

25%

Brake Pads

5 DAYS ONLY! May 22 - May 26

NO INTEREST

CAULK’S Collision Center 7157 Marine Rd. Edwardsville, IL 62025

HARDWOOD

excellence guaranteed

www.caulkscollision.com CARPET

*Up to $1,375 Lennox rebate

On the Edge of the Weekend

and

*Up to $800 Ameren rebate

and

**18 Month, No Interest, Equal Payment

CERAMIC Lennox knows you don’t compromise and neither do we. That’s why we dedicate ourselves to product innovation and customer service. So go ahead, get comfortable. Offers expire 6/15/2012. *Rebate offer is valid only with the purchase of qualifying Lennox® products. **See dealer for details or visit Lennox.com. ©2012 Lennox Industries Inc.

Floor Coverings, Inc. Mark Vallow

For All Your Automotive Needs Call

4

Gas & Electric Water Heaters LICENSED, BONDED, & INSURED

VISIT OUR SHOWROOM! #2 SCHWARZ STREET PLAZA, EDWARDSVILLE

BRAKES

692-0700

Lic.#058097635

Celebrating 23 Years of Serving the Community

Since 1983

ALIGNMENT

692-4144

VINYL

THE TRUSTED PROFESSIONALS

OIL CHANGE

EDWARDSVILLE PLUMBING Sales, Service, Repairs & Remodeling

for 18 Months *Ask Store for Details

(618) 656-1093

• Collision Repair • Auto Detailing • 24 Hour Towing • Insurance Claims Specialist

Seth Renken

LAMINATE

1009 Plummer Dr., Edwardsville • www.vallowfloor.com • 618-656-7788

May 24, 2012

888-451-4622 • Heating • Cooling • Air Quality Products

www.ernstheating.com


People People planner Greenville Graffiti Car Show planned Greenville will celebrate a classic American film Saturday, June 16 during the Greenville Graffiti Car Show. Bo Hopkins and Candy Clark, two of the stars of the 1973 movie “American Graffiti,” will sign autographs at the car show and participate in a special question and answer session prior to a showing of the movie at the Globe Theatre. All activities will be held on Second Street and near the downtown square. The show is open to cars and trucks from 1985 and older. Vehicles can be entered either for judging or display. Plaques will be given to the Top 40 selected by the judges. Free dash plaques will be provided to the first 100 entries. Registration is from 9 a.m. until noon with awards presented at 3 p.m. There will also be food, a deejay playing oldies music, and contests. “American Graffiti” will be shown at 4:00 p.m. at the Globe Theatre. Sh-Boom, a popular oldies band from St. Louis, will perform a free concert from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the Bradford National Bank parking lot. This year’s event is coordinated by the Greenville Tourism Office and Greenville Chamber of Commerce. Our Common Ground is also sponsoring a Do It Yourself Street Faire that day from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. featuring robotics, metalworking, fishing and hunting technology, amateur radio, and more. For more information, contact the Greenville Chamber of Commerce at (618) 664-9272.

Annual Whitaker Music Festival planned The Missouri Botanical Garden is setting the stage for its 19th annual Whitaker Music Festival. The summer concert series features nine weeks of free music under the stars, Wednesdays, May 30 through July 25 at 7:30 p.m. Free concert admission begins at 5 p.m. and last entry is at 9 p.m. For more information, visit www.mobot.org/events/whitaker. Whitaker Music Festival concerts will be held outdoors on the lawn of the open-air Cohen Amphitheater, just west of the Climatron® dome. The 2012 performer lineup includes: • May 30 – Marquise Knox, a 21year-old blues prodigy. • June 6 – Vince Martin, worldtraveled vocalist, guitarist and entertainer. • June 13 – Miss Jubilee and the Humdingers, blend of jazz, swing and rhythm and blues. • June 20 – The Rockhouse Ramblers, honky-tonk music and classic country swing. • June 27 – Hamiet Bluiett, jazz legend and champion of the baritone saxophone. • July 4 – Air National Guard Band of the Central United States – military tradition classics and jazz, big band and rock. • July 11 – Ryan Spearman Band, singer, songwriter and folk music multi-instrumentalist. • July 18 – Teresa Jenee, soulful, introspective vocalist and pianist. • July 25 – Aaron Kamm and the One Drops, roots reggae and Mississippi River blues. Whitaker Music Festival concerts will be held outdoors on the lawn of the Cohen Amphitheater, just west of the Climatron® dome on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical

Garden. Guests are encouraged to bring lawn chairs or blankets. The concert series is the only time of year when picnicking is allowed on Garden grounds. Visitors are welcome to bring their own picnic supper, baskets or coolers; no barbecue grills, fireworks, sparklers or pets. Picnic fare and bar items will be available for purchase on site. The Garden is a tobacco-free campus; smoking is not allowed anywhere, indoors or outside, and visitors will be asked to extinguish or discard tobacco items. Soliciting is not permitted. Wednesday evening admission is free after 5 p.m. Music begins at 7:30 p.m. and last entry is at 9 p. m. The Doris I. Schnuck Children’s Garden also remains open late until 7 p.m. on concert evenings, with free admission after 5 p.m. Lantern Festival exhibits will not be lit during Whitaker Music Festival evenings. The Missouri Botanical Garden is located at 4344 Shaw Blvd. in south St. Louis, accessible from Interstate 44 at the Vandeventer exit and from Interstate 64 at the Kingshighway North & South exit. Free parking is available on-site and two blocks west at the corner of Shaw and Vandeventer. An additional concert entry site will be open on Tower Grove Avenue and Magnolia located on the south end of the Garden. For more information, visit www.mobot.org/events/whitaker or call the recorded hotline at (314) 577-5100. In the event of inclement weather, check the Garden’s website, Twitter feed (www.twitter.com/mobotnews) or Facebook page (www.facebook. com/missouribotanicalgarden) for immediate concert updates. The Whitaker Music Festival at the Missouri Botanical Garden is

funded by the Whitaker Foundation, which supports St. Louis arts and parks to promote common heritage, celebrate diversity, and encourage vitality within the community.

Carrington brings laughs to St. Louis Rodney Carrington is a multitalented comedian, actor, and writer who has recorded eight major record label comedy albums selling over 3 million copies. Carrington will appear at 7 p.m. on Friday, September 7 at The Family Arena in St. Charles. Tickets can be purchased at the Family Arena Ticket Office and all MetroTix locations including Macy’s and select Schnucks video centers or on the web at www.metrotix.com. Morning Wood has been certified gold and Greatest Hits has been certified Platinum by the RIAA. Rodney starred in his own TV sitcom Rodney, which ran for two seasons on ABC. He co-wrote and co-starred with Toby Keith in the feature film Beer for My Horses. In 2011 Rodney partnered with the ACA (American Country Awards) by presenting at their awards show and hosting the American Country New Year’s Eve Live show on Fox. According to Pollstar, Rodney has been one of the top ten highest grossing touring comedians for the last ten years and among the top 4 or 5 the last several years. Rodney is on track to be in the top 5 again in 2012. He regularly performs to sold out crowds across the US and Canada. Rodney broke through with his major label comedy CD debut Hangin' With Rodney in 1998. The album featuring fan favorite songs "Letter to My P****" and "Fred," sold more than 450,000 copies, and over ten years later, consistently appears

*Plus Register To Win A FREE $100 Glik’s Gift Card or pair of Sperry Shoes. No Purchase Necessary. Winner Will Be Picked At Random That Evening.

May 31st from 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

on the Soundscan comedy charts The next few years saw six more Top 10 albums: Live, Morning Wood, Nutsack, Greatest Hits, and King of the Mountains, and the newest one, El Nino Loco, all of which continue to receive major radio airplay and a place on the national comedy charts. Morning Wood has earned RIAA gold record certification, and Greatest Hits (a double CD), has now reached platinum status. Carrington will appear at 7 p.m. on Friday, September 7 at The Family Arena in St. Charles. Tickets can be purchased at the Family Arena Ticket Office and all MetroTix locations including Macy’s and select Schnucks video centers or on the web at www.metrotix.com.

MoBOT plans summer events The Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Blvd., south St. Louis, has scheduled the following events. For more information, visit www. mobot.org or call (314) 577-5100 or 1-800-642-8842 toll free May 26 through Aug. 19: “Lantern Festival: Art by Day, Magic by Night,” an international exhibition of larger-than-life, lighted works of art from China, presented by Emerson. Experience one of China’s most treasured events and ancient traditions – the annual lantern festival. Elaborate outdoor sets crafted of silk and steel will celebrate Chinese culture through bold color, dazzling light and striking design. The exhibition offers visitors a unique opportunity to witness a spectacle rarely staged outside of Asia. View the art by day, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily (included with

daytime Garden admission starting May 29; special rates apply May 26-28 for Lantern Festival Grand Opening Weekend). Experience the illuminated magic by night, Thursday through Sunday evenings, May 31-July 29 and seven nights a week, August 1-19 from 6 to 10 p.m. (last entry at 9 p.m.). Lanterns are lit at 8 p.m. Evening admission is $22 for adults, $10 for children (ages 3 to 12), $15 for Garden members and $5 for Garden members’ children. www.mobot.org/lanternfestival.  Throughout June: The Missouri Botanical Garden, Sophia M. Sachs Butterfly House and Shaw Nature Reserve are celebrating National Pollinator Week, June 18 through 24, by dedicating the entire month of June to Picture-Perfect Pollinators. Capture snapshots of butterflies, birds, bees and other pollinators in your own backyard, neighborhood or favorite locale and share your photos on the Missouri Botanical Garden’s Flickr account at http:// www.flickr.com/groups/1381284@ N20/. Browse our class lineup at www.mobot.org/classes for offerings throughout the month focused on the importance of pollinators. Learn more about National Pollinator Week at http://pollinator.org/ pollinator_week_2012.htm.  June 3: Cafe Flora Brunch. S u n d a y s f ro m A p r i l t h ro u g h September, enjoy an a la carte menu and dining at the Spink Pavilion, overlooking the Garden’s central reflecting pools. Seating available inside and outside. (Brunch not offered Memorial Day weekend or Labor Day weekend.) 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Reservations available but not necessary; call (314) 577-0200. Garden admission applies. 

Reed

hair design

$10.00 OFF

Any Salon Service

NEW CLIENTSExpires ONLY May 31, 2012.

Not to be used with other offers.

#5 Ginger Creek Village, Glen Carbon

Call 618-692-3900 TODAY to schedule an appointment

Maryville Women’s Center

“Women Serving Women”

618-288-2970 ~ mymwc.org

2016 Vadalabene Drive • Maryville, IL

May 24, 2012

On the Edge of the Weekend

5


Music Spring to Dance Festival 2012 By RENATA PIPKIN Of The Edge The world-renowned shape-shifters of Pilobolus, the rousing and enthusiastic performances of the Lula Washington Dance Theatre, the sophisticated and striking Ballet X, these are just a few of 30 dance companies adorning the fifth annual Spring to Dance Festival 2012 – a Memorial Day Weekend phenomenon, where for three nights, 30 of the best dance companies of the Midwest and beyond perform a different program every night, still at its original bargain price of $10 a night. Dancers from the 30 companies will gather at the Touhill Performing Arts Center to perform a smorgasbord of styles including cuttingedge contemporary dance, rhythm jazz tap, and classical ballet. Dance St. Louis and the Touhill present the fifth Annual Emerson Spring to Dance Festival 2012 on Thursday, May 24, through Saturday, May 26. Each evening’s ticket covers three shows in one, with interactive demonstrations from St. Louis-area arts groups from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Touhill's Terrace Lobby, a performance at 6 p.m. in the intimate Lee Theater by four companies, and a different performance at 7:30 p.m. in the Anheuser-Busch Performance Hall by six companies. Dance St. Louis Artistic and Executive Director Michael Uthoff, who created Spring to Dance in 2008, said that now that the festival was heading into its fifth year, he had developed a winning formula for the programs: companies that appeared the year before, companies that did not appear that year but did appear in a previous festival, and companies new to St. Louis. This ensures the return of audience favorites while keeping the mix constantly fresh. “For instance, I am excited about the return of River North Chicago Dance Company and Buckets and Tap Shoes, who captivated everyone when they were here two years ago,” Uthoff said. “New companies include Q Dance from Canada and Jennifer Muller/The Works from New York.” The 30 companies are Midwestern troupes and guests from the East Coast, West Coast, and Canada, including Kansas City Ballet, Lula Washington Dance Theatre from Los Angeles, Flying Foot Forum from Minneapolis, Ballet Memphis, and Eisenhower Dance Ensemble from Detroit. “As usual we also love showcasing St. Louis’ own companies,” Uthoff said, “so we have invited Saint Louis Ballet, MADCO, and Common Thread Contemporary Dance

6

On the Edge of the Weekend

For The Edge

Pictured are two different types of dance that will be represented at Dance St. Louis. Company.” At last year’s fourth annual festival, the Friday and Saturday performances sold out. Dance Magazine commented of that festival, "In a difficult economic climate, Dance St. Louis has just the ticket.”  Participating Dance Companies of Spring to Dance 2012 are as follows:  Thursday • Chicago Dance Crash   • TAKE Dance   • Owen/Cox Dance Group   • Flying Foot Forum   • Eisenhower Dance Ensemble   • Kansas City Ballet  

May 24, 2012

• Buglisi Dance Theatre • Nashville • Pilobolus • Chicago Human Rhythm Project Friday • Common Thread Contemporary Dance Co. • Wylliams/Henry Contemporary Dance Co. • Momenta Performing Arts Company • Sossy Mechanics • DanceWorks Chicago • MADCO • BalletX • Jennifer Muller / The Works • Richmond Ballet • Lula Washington Dance Theatre Saturday • Lucky Plush Productions • Neos Dance Theatre • Hedwig Dances • Buckets and Tap Shoes • Saint Louis Ballet • Koresh Dance Company • River North Chicago Dance Company • Q Dance • Dancing Wheels Company • Ballet Memphis A new feature this year is that although performances in the Lee Theater are, as always, included in the $10 ticket, the Lee performances are open only to ticket holders who ask for a free Lee Theater pass at the Touhill box office the night of the show. “We will start handing out passes at 4:40 p.m., and when they’re gone, they’re gone,” Uthoff said. “This way no one will end up standing fruitlessly in line at the Lee entrance hoping for a seat to open up. Instead, if you weren’t able to secure a pass, you can go right away to the Terrace Lobby and enjoy the interactive performances by local dance troupes that run continuously from 5:30 to 7 p.m.” Tickets are $10 and are available at the Dance St. Louis box office at the Centene Center for Arts and Education at 3547 Olive Blvd. in Grand Center, by calling 314-534-6622, and at dancestlouis.org. Tickets are also available at the Touhill Ticket Office, by calling the Touhill at 314-516-4949 or 866-516-4949 toll free, and at touhill.org. Additional information is available at dancestlouis.org. The fifth Annual Emerson Spring to Dance Festival 2012 is sponsored by the Caleb C. and Julia W. Dula Educational and Charitable Foundation, Edward Jones, Fox Performing Arts Charitable Foundation, Missouri Arts Council, Regional Arts Commission, National Endowment for the Arts, Trio Foundation of St. Louis, and the Whitaker Foundation. American Airlines is the official airline of Dance St. Louis. Ameren is Dance St. Louis’ 2011-2012 presenting season sponsor.


Music

The joint will be jumpin' Stages St. Louis to present "Ain't Misbehavin'" By KRISTA WILKINSON-MIDGLEY Of The Edge

T

he joint will certainly be jumping this June as the sounds of Harlem’s legendary Cotton Club and The Savoy Ballroom fill the Robert G. Reim Theatre when Stages St. Louis kicks off its 26th season with the Tony-Award winning musical “Ain’t Misbehavin.'’” This lively musical revue celebrates the music, life and times of jazz great Thomas “Fats” Waller and pays tribute to the musicians behind the swinging sounds of Harlem’s renaissance in the 1930s and ‘40s. Toe-tapping favorites such as “Honeysuckle Rose,” “The Joint is Jumpin’” and the titlesong, “Ain’t Misbehavin,’” will have you stompin’ and struttin’ in the aisles. These show-stopping songs will be performed by the talented cast of Dwelvan David, Wendy Lynette Fox, Raena White and St. Louis natives Willena Vaughn and Eric LaJuan Summers. Vaughn, though certainly no stranger to the stage, makes her Stages St. Louis debut with this season's production of "Ain't Misbehavin.'" The Kevin Klinenominated actress is well remembered for her award-winning performance as Effie White, in The Black Rep's acclaimed 2006 production of “Dreamgirls.” Summers returns to his hometown after touring the country as Sportin' Life in “Porgy and Bess” and working with Barry Gordy on a pre-Broadway workshop of the new musical, “Motown,” as well as filming his first movie, "Reunion 108," which will be coming soon to theaters. His Broadway credits include "The Little Mermaid" (Jetsam), Mereb in Disney’s "Aida," and "The Wedding Singer." Supporting the cast will be a smokin’ hot live band composed of seven talented local musicians led by Adaron "Pops" Jackson. "Pops," as he is affectionately known, is one

of St. Louis' most in-demand jazz pianists. The multi-talented pianist, arranger and composer has performed throughout the U.S. and Europe and has toured with the Grammy Award-winning Temptations. The show was originally created by Richard Maltby Jr. as a cabaret act for the Manhattan Theatre’s Club in February 1978. The production starred Irene Cara, Nell Carter, Andre DeShields, Armelia McQueen and Ken Page and included Maltby as director. It was such a hit that the show was quickly expanded into a full-length musical and opened on Broadway in May 1978 and ran until February 1982. In 1988, Maltby returned to direct the original cast in a highly-successful revival. A 30th anniversary national tour of the show opened in November 2008. St. Louis audiences will be transported back to the glitz and glamour of that bygone era thanks to the talents of James Wolk, who has recreated those great supper clubs with a brilliantly-designed set, and costumes by Lou Bird. Musical adaptations, orchestrations and arrangements by Luther Henderson; vocal and musical concepts by Jeffrey Gutcheon; and musical arrangements by Jeffrey Gutcheon and William Elliott. Don’t miss your chance to relive the golden age of Harlem’s Cotton Club, honky tonk dives, stride piano players and that jumpin’ new beat with Stages St. Louis’ talented cast and crew of “Ain’t Misbehavin.’” The show opens June 1 and runs through July 1. All shows will be performed in the intimate, 384-seat Robert G. Reim Theatre at the Kirkwood Civic Center, 111 South Geyer Road in St. Louis, Mo. Single ticket prices range from $15 - $55. The lobby and box office located in the Reim Theatre will open one hour prior to each performance. Doors to the theatre open 30 minutes prior to each performance. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 314-821-2407 or visit www.stagesstlouis. org.

Tuning in Haggard, Stuart to appear at Family Arena The word “legend” usually makes an appearance at some point when discussing Merle Haggard. It’s an acknowledgment of his artistry and his standing as “the poet of the common man.” It’s a tribute to his incredible commercial success and to the lasting mark he has made, not just on country music, but on American music as a whole. It’s apt in every way but one. In addition to the 40 No.1 hits, Haggard charted scores of Top Ten songs. He won just about every music award imaginable, both as a performer and as a songwriter, and in 1994 was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. His body of work easily places him beside Hank Williams as one of the most influential artists in country music. Since starting out singing gospel as a child, the bluegrass stint with Lester Flatt in the '70s, the six years with Johnny Cash in the '80s, and coming up with his smash "hillbilly rock" hits of the '90s, the four time Grammy-winner, platinum recording artist, Grand Ole Opry star, country music memorabilia preservationist,

stylist, designer, photographer, songwriter, all around renaissance man, charismatic force of nature, and (first of all, perhaps), leader of the extraordinary, versatile touring and recording band The Fabulous Superlatives, Marty Stuart has shown a showman's zest for every conceivable flavor of country music. Not to mention, a missionary's zeal for bringing the importance of the music and its themes home to longtime fans and newcomers alike. Haggard and Stuart will appear at the Family Arena in St. Charles at 7:30 p.m. on June 24 @ 7:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at the Family Arena Ticket Office or online at www.metrotix.com. Prices: $70.00 (Gold Circle), $54.00 (Floor), $41.00 (Lower & Upper Level), To charge by phone call MetroTix at 314-534-1111. For help purchasing accessible seating, please call The Family Arena ADA Hotline at 636896-4234.

Straight No Chaser coming to the Fox The Nine Network presents Straight No Chaser at 8 p.m. Nov. 10 at the Fabulous Fox Theatre. Tickets are $45.50, $39.50, and

$29.50 and are available at the Fox Box Office or by calling 314/534-1111 or online at www.metrotix.com. A cappella sensation Straight No Chaser has announced details for their upcoming #SNClive Fall 2012 Tour, which will stop at the Fox Theatre on November 10. The group is using the tour to continue expanding on their social media interaction with fans. They credit a large amount of its success to its early adoption and encouragement of sharing content. "This group started because of a viral video on YouTube,” explains group member Randy Stine. “From day one, we have encouraged fans to upload photos and videos from our shows, even expanding venue photo policies to ensure that this was possible. We are excited to really drive home the idea of building a fan community around content by naming our tour #SNCLive." As its name suggest, #SNClive will be a multi-platform concert event, with the hashtag giving fans a way to search and categorize content specific to this tour across all social media platforms. The tour will follow seven shows this summer and the first ever Straight No Chaser Cruise – “Chasers at Sea” – on the Carnival

Destiny. PBS will also continue to support Straight No Chaser by airing their highly successful TV special, “Songs of the Decades,” during the June and Fall pledge periods. In addition to their cruise and upcoming dates, Straight No Chaser will be going into the studio this summer to record their fourth full-length album, which is set to be released this fall. For more information on Straight No Chaser, visit www.sncmusic.com.

The Sheldon welcomes Jason Isbell The Sheldon and 88.1 KDHX are pleased to announce the fifth concert in The Sheldon Sessions-Presented by PNC Arts Alive: Jason Isbell & the 400 Unit, Friday, June 29 at 8 p.m. with special guest TBD. Tickets are $20 orchestra/$15 balcony and go on sale Friday, May 18 at 10 a.m. Call MetroTix at 314-534-1111 or visit www.TheSheldon.org. Alabama native Jason Isbell, best known as a former member of the Drive-By Truckers, makes his Sheldon debut with his latest band, the 400 Unit.  Along with keyboard player Derry deBorja, guitarist

May 24, 2012

Browan Lollar, bassist Jimbo Hart and drummer Chad Gamble, Isbell explores his country and acoustic roots, while maintaining the strong lyrics and driving guitar sound that have become his trademark. The band’s latest album, Here We Rest, explores modern life in Isbell’s home state, an area that has been hit particularly hard by the recent economic downturn.  PNC Arts Alive is a two-year, $1 million initiative from The PNC Foundation that supports visual and performing arts groups with the goal of increasing arts access and engagement in new and innovative ways.  A very prestigious grant award, only 16 arts organizations in the Greater St. Louis area were selected for bold thinking around increasing arts access and engagement and The Sheldon, in collaboration with 88.1 KDHX, was one.  For more information on PNC Arts Alive and the grant recipients visit www.pncartsalive.com.  A new series for a new generation, The Sheldon Sessions-Presented by PNC Arts Alive, provides a unique opportunity to experience some of today’s most distinctive rock, altcountry, Americana, and folk-rock musicians, live in the intimate environment of the Sheldon Concert Hall.

On the Edge of the Weekend

7


Music Tuning in Underwood brings tour to St. Louis Superstar Carrie Underwood announced this recently during her appearance on Good Morning America to promote her new album, Blown Away that she will launch a headline North American arena tour this fall, “The Blown Away Tour.” The tour will also include an international run of shows this summer sponsored by Olay, including her first-ever United Kingdom concert taking place at the prestigious Royal Albert Hall in London on June 21, which soldout in 90 minutes. Additional international concert dates will be announced soon. Underwood will appear Nov. 20 at the Scottrade Center in St. Louis. The North American tour dates will be presented and hydrated by vitaminwater®, sponsored by Olay, and promoted by AEG Live. Special guest Hunter Hayes will open. Tickets will be available for “The Blown Away Tour” beginning Friday, May 11. Go to www. carrieunderwood.fm for additional on sale information.  “I can’t wait to get back out on the road and perform new music from my new album for my fans,” says Carrie.  “We have a lot of exciting things planned!”  Carrie is donating $1 from each ticket sold on the North American leg of “The Blown Away Tour” to support Red Cross disaster relief.  Every year, the American Red Cross prepares for and responds to nearly 70,000 disasters across the United States.  This donation will help the Red Cross provide shelter, food, and emotional support for those in need after a disaster.  Proceeds from her Canadian concerts will be donated to the Canadian Red Cross.  Carrie’s two previous headline tours, 2008’s “Carnival Ride Tour” and 2010’s “Play On Tour,” performed for a combined total of nearly 250 shows with 2.2 million fans in attendance, and she wrapped both years as the top-ranked female country touring artist.  Since releasing Some Hearts in 2005, Underwood has sold more than 14 million albums with Some H e a r t s , 2 0 0 7 ’ s  C a r n i v a l R i d e , and 2009’s Play On.  She’s amassed 14 No. 1 singles, six of which she co-wrote, and became the first country artist in history and the only American Idol winner ever to achieve 10 No. 1 singles from their first two albums.  Underwood currently leads the nominations for the upcoming CMT Music Awards with five. She is a five-time Grammy winner, a two-time Academy of Country Music Entertainer of the Year, a three-time Country Music Association and ACM Female

Vocalist winner, and a proud member of the Grand Ole Opry. Visit www.carrieunderwood.fm for up to date information on “The Blown Away Tour.”

Touhill plans events through summer The Touhill Performing Arts Center at the University of MissouriSt. Louis is wrapping up its 2011-12 season. All single tickets on sale, unless otherwise noted, at the Touhill Performing Arts Center Ticket Office; online at www.touhill.org; or by phone at 314-516-4949. EMERSON SPRING TO DANCE 2012 Presented by Dance St. Louis and the Touhill May 24 – 26; 5:30 PM; $10 The 5th annual SPRING TO DANCE is a treasure box of dance from cutting-edge to classic, with 30 companies, three days, and a different program every evening all for just $10 a night. AMBASSADORS OF HARMONY June 23; Sat @ 2 & 8PM; $31, $27, $24 Your favorite a capella chorus is as entertaining as ever as it puts its signature sound to beloved songs. The annual Ambassadors of Harmony June concert boasts all the award-winning showmanship and talent audiences adore each December. THE BIG MUDDY DANCE COMPANY IN CONCERT June 29 & 30; Fri & Sat @ 8PM; $22 The Big Muddy Dance Company is a professional contemporary jazz dance company based in the heart of downtown St Louis. The company presents some of the finest trained dancers performing an eclectic repertoire of new and classic dance works. ALL THAT TAP XXI July 28; Sat @7PM; $22 Some of the brightest lights in the tap dance world will sparkle on the Touhill stage in ALL THAT TAP XXI, the crowning glory of the 21st weeklong festival.

Their new CD/DVD concert special, "Voyage" continues to pay homage to the musical culture of Ireland, while exploring the musical journey each soloist has undertaken since the beginning of Celtic Thunder four years ago. The group performances highlight the diversity of Irish music and song; from the powerful rendition of “Dulaman” to the love song “Maid of Culmore,” the collection also features a rousing performance of “Galway Girl” and beloved Irish party song “My Irish Molly-O.” To view highlights of "Voyage" please click here: http://bcove.me/11tep1gm.

The Fox will host the Jacksons The Jacksons Unity Tour 2012 will roll into the Fox Theatre at 8 p.m. on July 11. Tickets are $65, $55 and $45 and

Fox to host Celtic Thunder The Nine Network presents Celtic Thunder "Voyage" at 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 8 at the Fox Theatre. Tickets are $75, $60 and $45 and are available at the Fox Box Office or by calling 314/534-1111. Order tickets online at www.metrotix.com. Surpassing sales of one million units combined, the musical phenomenon that is Celtic Thunder has been hailed as Billboard’s Top World Music Artist, along with Top World Music Imprint and Top World Album of 2011 for Heritage.

are available at the Fox Box Office or by calling 314/534-1111. Order tickets online at www.metrotix. com. Adored by millions of fans t h e w o r l d o v e r, t h e J a c k s o n s forever changed the landscape of popular music. When siblings Jackie, Jermaine, Marlon, and Tito Jackson rose to fame with their late brother Michael in the 1970s, they instantly became an unstoppable global sensation. The Jacksons' unique brand of soulful pop-funk, their lengthy catalogue of hits, and their impeccable live performances have made them one of the most beloved musical acts of all time. The Jacksons last toured together, in support of their album Victory, in 1984. The Jacksons’ Victory tour was the first of its kind and drew over 2.5 million people to Stadiums across America to see their performances. Now,

for the first time in nearly three decades, the group will be back on stage together for the hotlya n t i c i p a t e d U n i t y To u r 2 0 1 2 . T h e g ro u p w i l l e m b a r k o n a worldwide series of shows this summer, beginning in the U.S., playing the hits from all the eras of their celebrated career: They will perform their universally beloved hits from the Jackson 5, the Jacksons, and Jermaine Jackson’s solo career. The Jacksons’ signature sundrenched harmonies, energetic stage presence, and roster of smash hits have left an indelible mark on popular music: the name ‘The Jacksons’ is known a ro u n d t h e w o r l d , a n d t h e y remain the biggest-selling family in music of all time. Celebrate their extraordinary career and witness music history firsthand this summer when the Jacksons reunite for the Unity Tour 2012.

Ooh La La...is SO COOL! Freeze Your Fat Away. One session. One hour. No surgery. No downtime. FDA Approved

Goodbye muffin top... Hello sexy curves!

Spa, Anti-Aging and Wellness Twitter@OohLaLa_Spa

Facebook.com/OohLaLaCenter

Kristen M. Jacobs, M.D. SkinCare Specialist

618.288.9117 • 2102 Vadalabene Dr., Maryville • OohLaLaWellness.com

your mortgage with Retire Your Mortgage aAccelerate shorter term and lower rate!

Closing Costs

Shorten Your Term 8 & 12 Year Terms Available

Lock in a Low Rate Accelerated mortgage rates as low as *

Have you been Working Out? Eating Right? Still No Weight Loss? Are you Adrenal Fatigued? Call today for a Free Symptom Survey

Nutrition

Life

©

Medically Managed Weight-loss Walk-in’s welcome Other Times Available by Appointment Thurs.11:00am - 7:00pm • Fri. 9:00am - 5:00pm • Sat. 9:00am - 12:00pm Tracey Berry BSN, RN - Certified Health Coach

Pharmacy Grade HCG Available!

8

On the Edge of the Weekend

(618) 307-5734

May 24, 2012

Exceeding Member Expectations Alton • Bethalto • East Alton • Edwardsville • Godfrey • Jerseyville •Wood River Scan this QR code to access more info and calculate your payment!

Get started today: (618) 258-3168 • (800) 345-4216 www.1stMidAmerica.org

*3.5% APR applies to 8 year term, resulting in payments of $119.58 per $10,000 borrowed. Rate for 12 year term is 4.125% APR and results in payments of $88.16 per $10,000 borrowed.Rates valid 5/1/12 - 5/31/12. Minimum loan amount is $20,000. Maximum loan amount is $200,000. Member must pay $390 in closing costs. Maximum loan-tovalue is 75%. No escrow account is available for this loan. Other restrictions may apply. Call for full details.


Music Music calendar Thursday, May 24 DJ Too Tall, Laurie's Place (Back Bar), Edwardsville, 9:30 p.m. Horse Feathers w/ Matt Bauer, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 7:30 p.m. Al Scorch w/ Miss Jubilee, The Gramophone, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. Haarp, Lung, Fubar, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. Adam Hajari (of the Blind Nils) w/ Cassie Morgan, Plush St. Louis, St. Louis, 8:30 p.m. Acoustic Stories from the Road: Javier Mendoza and Friends, Sheldon Concert Hall, St. Louis, 7:00 p.m. Stanley Clark Trio, Jazz at the Bistro, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. New Orleans Suspects, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m.

Friday, May 25 Who's Drivin, Laurie's Place (Back Bar), Edwardsville, 9:30 p.m. Local H w/ Animal Empty, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 8:30 p.m. Mr. Wizard, Tommy Halloran, Spectator, Blueberry Hill, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m.

Art of Dying, New Medicine, Fubar, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. Mo' Pleasure, Villa Marie Winery, Maryville, 7:00 p.m. Stanley Clark Trio, Jazz at the Bistro, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Red Hot Chili Peppers, Scottrade Center, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. David Lindley, The Wildey Theatre, Edwardsville, 8:00 p.m. Dirty Dozen Brass Band w/ Snarky Puppy, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m. Avicii, Chaifetz Arena, St. Louis, 8:00 p.m.

Bistro, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Creed w/ Eve to Adam, The Pageant, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. Split Lip Rayfield, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m.

Saturday, May 26

The Tired and True, Latin for Truth, Carridale, Fubar, St. Louis, Doors 7:30 p.m. Salt of the Earth, Sheldon Concert Hall, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. Nickelback, Scottrade Center, St. Louis, Doors 5:00 p.m. Orgone w/ Monophonics, Old

Jam Session w/ Mo' Pleasure, 2:00 p.m. (Front Bar) / Mo' Pleasure, 9:30 p.m. (Back Bar), Laurie's Place, Edwardsville Devin the Dude, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 7:30 p.m. London Calling, The Gramophone, St. Louis, Doors 10:30 p.m. The Goddamn Gallows w/ The Red Handed Bandits, Fubar, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. Café Soul, Plush St. Louis, St. Louis, Doors 7:30 p.m. Stanley Clark Trio, Jazz at the

Sunday, May 27 The Doggs, Laurie's Place (Patio), Edwardsville, 3:00 p.m. Rockabration 2 Feat. Jet W Lee w/ The Orbz, The Mhurs, Peach, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday, May 29

Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m.

Wednesday, May 30 Mo' Pleasure, Laurie's Place (Front Bar), Edwardsville, 6:30 p.m. Best Coast w/ Jeff The Brotherhood, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m. Morning Teleportation w/ Nico's Gun, The Gramophone, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m. 420 Crossing, Humdinger's, Maryville, 8:00 p.m. The Bright Light Social Hour w/ Ravenhill, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m.

Thursday, May 31 DJ Too Tall, Laurie's Place (Back Bar), Edwardsville, 9:30 p.m. Penguin Prison w/ Class Actress, Nee, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m. Moreland and Arbuckle, The

Gramophone, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. Craig Owens w/ Bearcat, Fubar, St. Louis, Doors 6:00 p.m. Rusty Nail Acoustic Duo, Plush St. Louis, St. Louis, 8:30 p.m.

Friday, June 1 Margot and the Nuclear So and So's w/ Dinosaur Feathers, Whispertown, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 7:30 p.m. Bang Tango feat. Strikeforce, The Dogs Divine, Fubar, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. The Root Diggers w/ One Take, Plush St. Louis, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m. JazzU w/ Tim Warfield, Jazz at the Bistro, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. Effic in Concert, The Wildey Theatre, Edwardsville, 8:00 p.m. Elizabeth Cook w/ Tim Carroll, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m.

MEMORIAL DAY 18.1 CU FT. REFRIGERATOR AVAILABLE IN BLACK OR WHITE

with GLASS SHELVES! GTS18EBDWW

M rk’s Regula ar Price

$599 00

Season 2011-2012

arts 

issues

HOLIDAY SALE PRICE Hurry W Supplie hile s Last! LIMITED TIME $150.00 SAVINGS!

MADE IN THE USA

www.marksappliance.com May 24, 2012

We’re locally owned and operated

On the Edge of the Weekend

9


Travel

Raging Rivers rolls into summer

$250,000 pumped into Grafton waterpark to improve the family experience By RENATA PIPKIN Of The Edge

W

ith temperatures rising and summer quickly approaching, Raging Rivers WaterPark in Grafton, has been busy preparing for the upcoming 2012 season by making several upgrades to the 28-acre waterpark. With the goal of creating an even more memorable experience for those looking to entertain their families this summer, Raging Rivers has invested more than $250,000 in various capital improvements, including building a new pavilion for future events and upgrading an existing attraction and other amenities. The final touches are currently being made, and Raging Rivers will be showcasing the improvements when the waterpark opens for its 23rd season on Saturday, May 26, at 10:30 a.m. One of the most exciting upgrades that thrill seekers will notice is the smoother and faster 500foot dual Cascade Body Flumes. The slides are now seamless, giving riders even more of a rush as they speed, twist and turn down the natural hills and contours of the park. The slides are also getting a fresh coat of paint in anticipation of the busy summer season. Another big change for this

10

For The Edge

Two views of Raging Rivers waterpark in Grafton. season is a new 28-foot by 70-foot wood-structure pavilion, which can accommodate large events, including wedding receptions. The Pavilion is situated by the Swirlpools in the south end of the park and will be available for a nominal rental fee. When the waterpark opens, guests will see that improvements have also been made to the concession areas. The main food service area now has a canopy with a ceiling that

On the Edge of the Weekend

provides shade to those looking to stay cool while enjoying a bite to eat. Additionally, the Riverside Grill is now completely covered by a shade structure, providing guests with a cabana feel and relief from the heat on hot summer days. Behind the scenes, Donna Smith, who helped open Raging Rivers back in 1990 with her husband Larry and who has been serving as office manager for more than two

May 24, 2012

decades, has taken over the reins as president and general manager of the waterpark in the wake of Larry's passing last summer. She has helped Raging Rivers, with its attractions and breathtaking views, evolve into one of the St. Louis area's favorite summertime hotspots. "We have been very busy prepping for our 2012 season, and we are excited to once again provide a place where area residents can either relax and soak up the sun or have fun experiencing any of our attractions," said Smith in a press release. "The upgrades we've made will allow kids and adults alike to have an even more enjoyable experience when they visit Raging Rivers this summer." Raging Rivers offers innovative entertainment that individuals of all ages can appreciate. Aside from the newly improved Cascade Body Flumes, thrill seekers will enjoy the Runaway Rafts, a 600-foot long adventure through swift water and wild rapids to three pools; the Shark Slide flume, which floats riders down a 45-foot tunnel flume into a catch pool and the one-of-a-kind Swirlpool. The two-bowl attraction takes riders down a tunnel flume, then swiftly into a giant vortex and ends by dropping the guest into a deep pool of water, incorporating three rides into one. For guests looking for a more relaxing experience, the park also features a 700-foot-long Endless River of cool, clear water that lets riders float along at a tranquil 2 ½ mile per hour pace in a continuous loop; the 18,000-square-foot Breaker Beach Wavepool, which allows swimmers to relax when the waves are off and ride the tide when the four-foot waves start to roll, and the "just for kids" Itty Bitty Surf City that features a pint-sized

waterslide, splash pool, rain tree and tunnel area. Tree House Harbor is another great interactive play area, featuring a crawl tunnel, overhead rope pulls, tunnel slides and the ever-popular bucket that randomly spills 1,000 gallons of water. Raging Rivers will be open Memorial Day weekend, May 26 - 28, from 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. The waterpark will be open daily starting June 2. Through June 8, Raging Rivers will be open from 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Beginning Saturday, June 9 , the park will be open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. through Saturday, August 5th. From August 6th through Aug. 26 , Raging Rivers will return to its 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. schedule. The park reopens for one last blast of summer on Labor Day weekend, Sept. 1, 2 and 3, from 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is $17.95 for children under 48 inches tall and senior citizens ages 60 and older, $20.95 for adults over 48 inches tall and free for children under the age of 2. Guests arriving after 3 p.m. will save $5 on the price of each ticket. Individual season passes are available for $70 each, and family passes are $65 each when buying three or more. Season passes include free parking, one free ticket for a friend and a 10 percent discount on all concession and gift shop purchases. For more information regarding operating hours, attractions, specials, directions and more, call Raging Rivers at (618) 786-2345 or log on to www.ragingrivers.com. The water park is located at 100 Palisades Parkway off the Great River Road in Grafton. Raging Rivers WaterPark offers group and party packages that include special reserved group areas, onsite catering, food service and special group rates.


Travel Travel briefs Owners get funding to reopen Sahara on Vegas Strip LAS VEGAS (AP) — The owners of the shuttered Sahara casino on an aging stretch of the Las Vegas Strip say they’ve secured $300 million in funding to redevelop the iconic resort that once hosted the likes of Frank Sinatra and Elvis Presley. Developer SBE and real estate firm Stockbridge Capital Group LLC said Tuesday they plan to open the property in 2014 under the name SLS Las Vegas. “We see the northern end of the Strip as the future of Las Vegas, and we’re pleased to be positioned at the forefront of that growth,” said SBE CEO Sam Nazarian. Owners say the resort will bring restaurants, nightlife and 1,600 guestrooms and suites to the Strip’s north end, which includes the famed Stratosphere but has seen far less of the glitzy development that’s reenergized the south end in the past decade. The corridor went even darker in May 2011, when owners closed the Sahara after saying it wasn’t economically viable. The casino featured a signature roller coaster and had operated for nearly 59 years. F u r n i t u re a n d m e m o r a b i l i a inside were sold at a fire sale, and the Sahara sign was donated to a museum. Some speculated the building would be imploded b e f o re t h e o w n e r s p re s e n t e d redevelopment plans to the Clark County Commission in the fall. The SLS Las Vegas will include three existing hotel towers, but two will be “stripped down to their skeletons,” Nazarian told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. A low-rise hotel structure will come down, while a 2,500-space parking garage will remain. Nazarian said construction could begin by the end of the summer. SBE, a Los Angeles-based hospitality company that owns luxury SLS Hotels in Beverly Hills and is opening another in Miami, said it will incorporate some of the restaurant and nightclub brands it already operates in Southern California. “ Wi t h L o s A n g e l e s b e i n g Vegas’ No. 1 feeder market, we’re anticipating SLS Las Vegas will resonate powerfully with a clientele already familiar with our brand,” Nazarian said. Gov. Brian Sandoval said the plans were good news for Nevada, which still has the nation’s highest une m p l o y m e n t r a t e a f t e r t h e recession brought explosive growth to a crawl. “Today’s news will make an immediate and positive impact in Las Vegas, infusing hundreds of millions of dollars into our economy and creating thousands of jobs,” he said in a statement. “I commend Sam and his partners for their confidence in our state.”

New York City: 5 free things for visitors to do NEW YORK (AP) — It’s ironic in a city with some of the most expensive hotels and restaurants in the world, but many of New York’s best attractions are free. So many, in fact, that it’s hard to narrow them down. Most New Yorkers would probably agree that at least a few of the five free things on this list are must-sees, but there’s

bound to be debate, which brings us to another famous aspect of life in the Big Apple: Strong opinions. TIMES SQUARE: A vibrant public space like no other, even better in person than it looks on TV. Plenty of things here to buy, of course, but the lights, sights and people-watching are free, 24 hours a day. CENTRAL PARK: Central Park is the city’s communal backyard, a green space where New Yorkers can escape their small apartments to skate, bike, jog, picnic, push a stroller, walk a dog or climb a rock. Stroll the serpentine paths as dappled sunshine filters through the trees, and consider how well the park fulfills the goal of its 19th century designers, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, who sought to create the illusion of nature in an urban environment. STATEN ISLAND FERRY: This humble, utilitarian boat takes commuters between Manhattan and Staten Island 24 hours a day, and it’s free. It also offers classic views of the Statue of Liberty, harbor, and skyscraper canyons. Take the No. 1 subway to South Ferry or No. 4 or 5 to Bowling Green to board the boat on the Manhattan side. Be ready for crowds at rush hour and longer waits off-peak. BROOKLYN BRIDGE: When it opened in 1883, the Brooklyn Bridge was an engineering wonder, the longest suspension bridge in the world. It remains a beloved symbol on New York and an aesthetic triumph, with Gothic arches worthy of a cathedral and a delicate filigree of cables whose patterns change with every step along the mile-long walkway. Take the A or C train to High Street, Brooklyn, and walk back to Manhattan for the best skyline views. HIGH LINE: One of the city’s newest attractions, the High Line has quickly become a favorite with out-of-towners and locals alike. It’s a narrow park built on an old elevated freight railway along 10th Avenue on Manhattan’s West Side, from Gansevoort Street, just below 14th Street, to 31st Street. It offers a unique look at the urban landscape from 30 feet above ground, with a peek at adjacent apartments, Hudson River views, vestiges of the neighborhood’s industrial past — meatpacking plants, auto shops — as well as signs of a trendy rebirth: postmodern architecture, art installations and Diane von Furstenburg’s DVF building. The northern half is more park-like with plantings, benches and birds.

largest industry, generating about $2.8 billion and nearly 30,000 jobs last year. “I would estimate that this year we will see the same level of approximately 30,000 jobs that will be supported by the travel industry,” Shober said Wednesday. “Out of all jobs in Wyoming, about 10 percent are supported through the tourism industry.” In order to sustain and grow the industry, the state spends millions of dollars a year promoting itself as a destination for travelers. This year, Wyoming is spending about $7 million on advertising campaigns in places such as Chicago, Minneapolis, St. Louis, Oklahoma City, Denver and Salt Lake City. The advertising campaign includes TV, magazines, radio and social media. Shober said Wyoming isn’t advertising this year in any new markets but is increasing the frequency of its television and other ads in markets that it has targeted in the past. “That certainly helps in deepening that visibility of the Wyoming message,” she said. A typical visitor to Wyoming is someone who enjoys national parks, mountains and other outdoor recreation. “They may be a very active adventure traveler or they may be a more passive adventure traveler,” Shober said. “It certainly wouldn’t be somebody who would enjoy a beach vacation or is looking for what a city environment would offer.” While the state’s tourism industry hasn’t completely recovered to prerecession levels in terms of visitor spending, tax collections and jobs, Shober said last year’s season came

Audubon N.Y. touts business benefits of birding ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Audubon New York is spreading the word about how birders help local economies. T h e g ro u p h a s l a u n c h e d a campaign that will distribute calling cards for bird-watchers to hand out at restaurants and other businesses. The idea is to show businesses and tourism agencies how much money is spent by people traveling to see birds. The cards feature the slogan, “Birds mean business.” On the back, birders are supposed to write their name and contact information. Audubon spokesman Sean Mahar says the cards will encourage communities to develop events and programs designed to attract birders. Hamilton County has taken the message to heart, hosting the annual Adirondack Birding Festival. Officials say birders make up about 5 to 7 percent of the county’s tourists.

Wyoming's Heart Mountain center gets museum award CODY, Wyo. (AP) — The Heart Mountain Interpretive Center in

Park County has been recognized with an award from the American Association of Museums. The site of a World War II Japanese American internment camp received the association’s “Eloquent Presentation of Topic” award. The Heart Mountain center opened in August 2011. The 11,000square-foot interpretive center includes permanent displays and exhibits developed to showcase how the U.S. government denied basic rights to people of Japanese ancestry following the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. The exhibits are told from the perspective of the internees and highlight their pre-war lives on the West Coast, forced evacuation and travel to Heart Mountain, where they settled into their barracks and lives as prisoners.

Connecticut unveils 2-year, $27M tourism campaign HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Connecticut is using a new marketing strategy to boost tourism that draws attention to the state’s role in the Revolutionary War. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy unveiled on Monday a “Still Revolutionary” Connecticut brand, part of a twoyear, $27 million state marketing initiative. The ads will run on TV to take advantage of “sweeps week” when programs reach for top ratings and on radio, print and digital platforms. Malloy said in an interview that Connecticut’s history is worth telling and that the marketing campaign is well thought-out.

Save Money at the Pump! Subscribe to the Intelligencer and we will give you a QT Gas Card!

Wyoming tourism director anticipates good summer C H E Y E N N E , Wy o . ( A P ) — Despite high gasoline prices, Wyoming is expected to have a strong tourist season this summer, state tourism director Diane Shober said. “All the indications right now look very good, and I think that’s even in light of where we’ve been with gas prices and they seem to be stabilizing and even in some cases dropping,” Shober said. “I’ve been doing this for nine years, and every year at this time we discuss gas prices and what impact it may have on the consumers’ ability to travel, and fortunately while we see some changes in how people modify their behaviors while traveling, the good news is we still know that the American public still gets out and travels.” Tourism is Wyoming’s second

close to closing the gap. Her office is seeing increasing numbers of people inquiring about a vacation in Wyoming this year. “The indications are that things will be good this summer,” she said.

12 Weeks $33.85 - $10 Gas Card 24 Weeks $61.75 - $15 Gas Card 48 Weeks $99.50 - $20 Gas Card 6 Month E-Edition $29.99 - $10 Gas Card 1 Year E-Edition $49.99 - $15 Gas Card

117 N. Second St., Edwardsville, IL 62025 Phone: 656-4700 ext. 20 • Fax: 656-7618 Name:

Phone:

Address: Email Address:

@ Offer valid for new subscribers only. Must receive payment before the gas card is mailed. Coupon code PPD2012. Offer expires Sept. 1, 2012.

May 24, 2012

On the Edge of the Weekend

11


Dining Delights

Mark Polege/The Edge

Wang Gang Asian Eats owner Ryan O'Day with a display of Black Chery Bomb soda.

Wang Gang drops a Black Chery Bomb By KRISTA WILKINSON-MIDGLEY Of The Edge Being named the No. 3 Best Chinese Restaurant in St. Louis 2011 by Sauce Magazine readers is definitely a good start, but Wang Gang Asian Eats owner Ryan O’Day is on a mission to take the Wang Gang brand beyond the doors of the popular Edwardsville restaurant. O’Day recently launched Wang Gang’s own brand of soda which he hopes will soon be available throughout the metro-east and St. Louis region. “We developed it to be a brand extension to Wang Gang and to sell throughout St. Louis and beyond,” said O’Day in a telephone interview. O’Day said he originally thought about marketing a sweet and sour sauce but later

Restaurant now producing soda line dismissed the idea as not broad enough. Instead, he hit upon the idea of developing a line of flavored sodas that could be made widely available to the public in a variety of outlets, including grocery stores and area businesses. “There’s a lot of soda out there but there’s definitely room for some niche ones,” he said. So far, Wang Gang has released one flavor already, the Black Chery Bomb (Yes, the soda's name is spelled with just one r). You can currently get it from the fountain at Wang Gang and Cleveland-Heath, both in Edwardsville. Or, pick up a retro bottle fourpack for $5 or a single loose bottle for $1.25 from the above mentioned restaurants as well as from Market Basket and Township Grocer,

also in Edwardsville, and from Josephine’s in Godfrey. Three other flavors are also in the works: an orange, a root beer and a coconut cola. The orange, called 8 Ball Orange, and the root beer should be ready in four to five weeks, O’Day said, and the coconut cola will be released sometime in the autumn. To coincide with the release of Black Chery Bomb, Wang Gang is also launching a free game app. O’Day said he felt this product was the perfect way to expand the Wang Gang brand because of its wide appeal. Under 21s can enjoy it as a soft drink and for members of the public over the age of 21, it makes for an excellent mixer. O’Day recommended vanilla vodka with the 8 Ball Orange and mixing

the Black Chery with half sour mix or cherry vodka. The sodas are produced in Chicago and made from pure cane sugar with zero high fructose corn syrup and are caffeine free, according to O’Day. He described the taste as “more crisp” than other soda brands due to the pure cane sugar. The plan, he said, is to become a bigger local soda brand and continue growing. O’Day said he is currently working with Folsom Distributing Co. in St. Louis to market Wang Gang’s sodas throughout the region and cited hospitals, offices, retailers and restaurants all as potential places to pick up a bottle. He is also in talks with buyer Compass Group about bringing Wang Gang sodas to the Scottrade Center. “Anywhere you see Coke products now we want to be on the shelves,” he said.

A milkshake that's creamy, delicious – and healthy By ALISON LADMAN For The Associated Press Milkshakes are gloriously frosty, creamy, sweet concoctions made from ice cream, syrups and other empty calorie delights. They’re the sort of thing you want to indulge in all the time, but shouldn’t. So we set out to make one that would not be quite so bad for you, but still satisfying. Of course, the obvious route would be to go directly to milkshake’s sometimes healthier cousin, the smoothie. Made from yogurt and fruit, this blended beverage lives in gyms and health clubs. But while smoothies are fine, they aren’t “real” milkshakes. We really wanted a milkshake.

12

On the Edge of the Weekend

For the frosty part of our milkshake, we went with sorbet, a frozen blend of fruit and sugar. Though high in sugar, sorbets generally have no fat. Plus, they pack an intensely fruity flavor. You could substitute a low-fat sherbet, sorbet’s milkier cousin, but the flavor would not be as strong. For creaminess, we went with cottage cheese. It may sound unusual, but the curds blend smooth with a rich and creamy texture. Add in a bit of fat-free half-and-half and we had a seriously good milkshake. For a chocolate version, blend 2 tablespoons of cocoa powder into the mix until smooth. ORANGE DREAMSICLE MILKSHAKE Start to finish: 10 minutes

May 24, 2012

Servings: 2 1 cup orange sorbet (mango also is good) 1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 cup fat-free half-and-half In a blender, combine all ingredients. Blend until smooth. If you prefer a thinner consistency, drizzle in additional halfand-half while the blender is running until you get the desired consistency. Serve immediately. Nutrition information per serving (values are rounded to the nearest whole number): 200 calories; 10 calories from fat (5 percent of total calories); 1.5 g fat (1 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 5 mg cholesterol; 44 g carbohydrate; 8 g protein; 0 g fiber; 320


Dining Delights Child – a legacy of teaching the joy of food By MICHELE KAYAL For The Associated Press Massaging poultry, dropping food and utensils, and warbling her way through boeuf bourguignon and coq au vin, Julia Child left an indelible mark on American food. As television’s towering, ebullient “French Chef,� Child put within reach of the average American a cuisine most had only heard about. Using fresh ingredients and copious amounts of wine, she changed the way we thought about food, demystifying it and placing it firmly at the center of a joyous life. But as we approach her 100th birthday, coming August 15, what’s less obvious is how Child also revolutionized the way women saw cooking — and themselves. “Julia turned women on to the beauty of making a wonderful meal for the family, not just scraping something together,� says Bob Spitz, author of the forthcoming Child biography “Dearie� (Knopf, August 2012). “She let women who watched her feel that they would be heard, that they could do anything she could do,� he said. “She wanted women to be proud of what they did. That was so important to her. That pride. She had found it. And she wanted others to find it, too.� Child didn’t come from pride. Wealth, yes, but pride took longer. Raised in Pasadena, Calif., the eldest child of a prosperous land manager and a paper-company heiress, Child went to Smith College where she partied more than studied and aspired to get married. After college and a series of uninspiring jobs, she joined the Office of Strategic Services, the precursor to the Central Intelligence Agency, and was sent to Ceylon, now Sri Lanka. It wasn’t until she married Paul Child, an artist and diplomat, and moved to Paris that she found herself. In France, she studied at Le Cordon Bleu culinary school, then began work on “Mastering the Art of French Cooking� with two French colleagues. It was a gamechanging cookbook that, unlike its predecessors, outlined every step of a recipe. That was a bold change for the American palate in 1961, an era in thrall to the convenience food industry. It was a time when a constant drumbeat of advertising and what passed for food journalism told women they had no time to cook, says Laura Shapiro, a culinary historian and author of “Julia Child: A Life.� Women were being told they needed canned fruit, frozen vegetables, cake mixes and TV dinners. The fresh food available in supermarkets was segregated, wrapped in plastic and untouchable. The cookbooks of the period reflected this. “The whole trend was to make it fast and easy, and what they considered easy was almost a quick summary of what you did — boil the beef for an hour and a half in a cup of wine and water and that’s boeuf bourguignon,� says Judith Jones, the book editor who rescued “Mastering the Art� after it suffered multiple rejections from a publisher who wanted it revised to include packaged goods and fewer steps. “Julia made the distinction between the home cook just cooking, putting it on the table, and cooking with finesse, tasting and understanding what she was doing. She believed that that’s where the joy came.�

Associated Press

In this Aug. 21, 1978, file photo, American television chef Julia Child shows a salade nicoise she prepared in the kitchen of her vacation home in Grasse, southern France. Child changed the way Americans look at food as well as the way women looked at cooking and themselves. It was a time of social — and particularly gender — upheaval in America: The birth control pill was introduced, sexual mores w e re c h a nging, women were working. Americans were making money, buying houses, supporting the growth of lifestyle magazines, including Gourmet. And anything French was in fashion. The Kennedys — and their French chef — were in the White House. Jackie wore Chanel and Dior. She spoke fluent French. French food such as coquilles St. Jacques and quiche already had made it into middle class homes, Shapiro says, and there were even some French cookbooks around. Soldiers had returned from Europe more worldly and the advent of inexpensive airline travel meant more Americans were seeing foreign lands. Then “Mastering� arrived on the scene.

“People were waiting for that book,� Shapiro says. Yet it got off to a slow start, Jones says. It was helped by a swooning review from New York Times food editor Craig Claiborne, but it was when Child got on television that her appeal and message finally saturated the culture. “The French Chef� began airing in 1963, the same year that Betty Friedan’s feminist tract “The Feminine Mystique� was released, and the underlying messages were strangely similar. “It was to take your life in your own hands,� Shapiro says. “You have a home and a family, if you’re going to cook, get your hands in the food and do something good. You don’t have to hand this over. Betty Friedan’s big message was ‘stand up and take charge of your life, it’s yours.’ And Julia said the exact same thing about food and about the meals

you feed your family.� Even as food television progressed into the modern era, with skinny young things chopping and churning, and sass sometimes more important than substance, Child, who died

in 2004 two days short of her 92nd birthday, kept her message constant. During an appearance on Martha Stewart’s Christmas show, Child and her host both made croque-enbouche, a traditional French pastry shaped like a Christmas tree. “The one Martha made looked like she’d collaborated with Euclid,� says Geoffrey Drummond, who was Child’s executive producer throughout the 1990s. “Julia’s looked like the leaning tower of croque-enbouche. I didn’t think about it at the time. Julia could make a perfect croque-en-bouche. But she wanted to show that it didn’t have to be.� Child was an outspoken champion of women’s causes. She did dozens of fundraisers for Planned Parenthood, and when she underwent a mastectomy in 1968 she was open and public about it, helping to dispel stigma of breast cancer. In the cooking world, she made it her mission to get women into professional kitchens. She famously took on the Culinary Institute of America, berating the institution for not enrolling enough women, and she regularly kept tabs on the progress of women in the industry. “Julia always considered herself a feminist. Always. But not in a fundamentalist sort of way,� says biographer Spitz, whose book will cap what is being called the JC100, a 100-day celebration of Child’s life that includes celebrity-hosted dinners, blogger tributes, readings and other events around the country. “When she got to the states and ate in restaurants, she would march into the kitchen and say, ‘How many women are in here?’ She would tell the great chefs, ‘You need more women here.�’

Card Here’s My Abby’s

EFFICIENT Cooling & Heating

Repair, Installation & Energy-Efficiency

Serving Troy, IL and surrounding area Like us on

Providing Reliable, Honest & Affordable Services

7EST-ARKET3Ts4ROY ),   3-),%s  

Todd Massie, D.M.D. www.atozfamilydentistry.com

We accept many dental plans including Tricare, Delta Dental, Blue Cross Blue Shield Federal and National.

5% Military Discount Active & Retired New Patients - Bring this ad and save $50 on your first visit. (offer excludes purchase of custom mouth guard)

(618) 66-SMILE (618) 667-6453 Convenient Saturday Hours

Todd Massie, D.M.D. 120 West Market Street Troy, IL 62294

www.atozfamilydentistry.com

At A to Z Family Dentistry it’s all smiles for the entire family!

Would you like OVER 20,000 SETS of EYES to see YOUR Business Card?

May 24, 2012

Ask for Mike (618) 381-6899 AbbysEfficientHVAC@gmail.com EPA Certified, Fully Insured/bonded Professional Customer Service

Call 656-4700 Ext. 35 for as LOW as $35.00 a week

each Monday in the Intelligencer and Thursday in the Edge (deadline 4 pm Wednesday)

On the Edge of the Weekend

13


Religion Use God as your GPS system While my car does not have a GPS system, I have been in other automobiles that do have such a system. A few years back we were visiting in Texas, and the system was quite useful in finding ways to get around in a strange environment. The response when you deviate from advice given is quite strange and sometimes amusing. It seems that the system is quite perturbed and it keeps repeating, “Recalculate” or some such advice. It is almost as though an individual is quite frustrated that you have failed to follow the directions. Recently I was speaking with one of my friends and she remarked t h a t s h e h a d h e a rd s o m e o n e speaking about the GPS being a trusted form of guidance and said that we all have another reliable form of guidance when we feel lost and disconnected. Upon inquiring what she was

Doris Gvillo talking about, she replied, “God”. I found myself in total agreement. And not only do we have a G o d w h o p ro v i d e s g u i d a n c e , reassurance that we are traveling the proper path, but one that also sometimes suggests we ‘recalculate’. To add to the knowledge that God does direct and guide, we have the additional reference material commonly known as “The Holy Bible.” I’ll admit that when we can see the building that we have been seeking, make a turn towards it, it is quite frustrating to hear those words “recalculate” because we just know how to get there and we feel we need no further assistance. S o m e t i m e s w e a re r i g h t a n d sometimes we really have made an error because of unfamiliarity with

one-way streets or detours. As I was thinking about this concept and thinking God’s guidance really is infallible, I kept wondering when I know that God’s way is the ‘correct’ way, why do I sometimes dart off in another direction confident I know ‘what I’m doing”. Usually when such a choice is made, I live to regret it. And, I don’t think I am alone in this admission. Why, I often wonder, are we so sure that we are always on the correct path? Has it never occurred to us that we could be ‘wrong’? If we have lived a number of years, experience should tell us that we have often chose the ‘wrong path’ and really do need to ‘recalculate’. One of the most treasured verses of scripture that most of us recall is from the 23rd Psalm. Remember it says, “He leadeth me beside the still waters. He restoreth my

soul; he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.” That verse from Psalm 23 is just one of the many verses in scripture that remind us that when we turn to God, we aren’t walking alone. We aren’t lost. We have guidance that we can trust, and a God who doesn’t leave us to wander, lost and alone. Another verse found in Psalm 110 reminds us “The Lord guides people in the way they should go and protects those who please him.” Truly we have many promises found in scripture that remind us to trust God and to walk in His way. I know the concept of thinking of scripture and our God as our GPS system in the journey of life is a bit farfetched. But for a society that moves closer and closer to everything available in the technology field, it

might be wise to occasionally stop, recalculate and perhaps place our feet once more upon the solid rock of God’s promises. We can deviate from what our GPS suggests and, yes, we can deviate from God’s plans, but while the first might allow us to become lost or confused in a new environment, losing our connection to God is a far more serious matter. I will probably never have a GPS in my automobile, but I can assure you that I want to walk close to my God, rely upon his wisdom, trust his love, and rest confidently knowing that when I walk with God, I am sure I am following the path that will ultimately lead me to His promised gift of salvation. Wi t h G o d a s o u r g u i d e , w e will never get ‘lost’ in our very confused world. Doris Gvillo is a member of Eden United Church of Christ.

Religion briefs Court: Detroit-area pastor can’t testify about teen’s confession in sexual assault case

An organizer of Monday’s protest, Asoka Menikkgoda, said the government should safeguard Buddhism, the state religion, and not yield to Muslim pressure.

DETROIT (AP) — The Michigan appeals court says prosecutors can’t use a pastor’s testimony in a sexual assault case. The court said Wednesday that the testimony would violate a state law that protects communications between clergy and church members. Prosecutors say Samuel Bragg, as a teenager, confessed to the pastor of Metro Baptist Church in Belleville about a 2007 assault of a 9-year-old girl. The Rev. John Vaprezsan alerted the victim’s family and also informed police. Bragg’s case in Wayne County court has been on hold because of the dispute, and prosecutors say they’ll now go to the state Supreme Court. Prosecutors say the pastor’s testimony should be allowed partly because Bragg was with his mother when he talked to Vaprezsan. But the appeals court says the mother’s presence doesn’t make a difference.

Kansas county commission won’t reinstate Christian prayer after demand from national group HUTCHINSON, Kan. (AP) — The Reno County Commission will end its long tradition of offering mostly Christian prayer before its meeting. Four witnesses asked the commission Tuesday to continue having ministers offering Christian prayer. But the commission declined, ordering County Counselor Joe O’Sullivan to draft a new policy. Last month, Americans United for Separation of Church and State told officials that a review of commission meetings from December through March found more than 80 percent of the opening prayers invoked the name of Jesus. The consensus of the board is to seek professionals to offer nonsectarian prayers. If no minister or other speaker is available, a commissioner would say a prayer or ask for a moment of silence.

Sri Lankan monks lead Buddhists in march to demand demolition of mosque KALUTARA, Sri Lanka (AP) — Dozens of Buddhists led by monks joined a demonstration Monday urging Sri Lanka’s government to proceed with plans to dismantle a mosque located in a sacred Buddhist area. The protesters marched peacefully through Kalutara town, south of Colombo. Last month, thousands of Buddhist monks and lay supporters stormed the mosque in the central town o f D a m b u l l a , s a y i n g i t w a s c o n s t r u c t e d i l l e g a l l y. But residents say it has been there for nearly half a century, long before the area was declared a sacred zone. The government announced that the mosque and a H i n d u t e m p l e w o u l d b e d e m o l i s h e d a n d re l o c a t e d . Muslim clerics and politicians have strongly opposed the decision.

14

On the Edge of the Weekend

Coeur d’Alene Tribe in negotiations to buy acreage near historic northern Idaho mission COEUR D’ALENE, Idaho (AP) — The Coeur d’Alene Tribe is negotiating with a private landowner to buy property surrounding a historic mission site in northern Idaho. Ed Short, the real estate agent who owns the land next to the Old Mission State Park, said he believes the Coeur d’Alene Tribe would be the best owner. Ancestors of the tribe and Roman Catholic priests built the Mission of the Sacred Heart in Cataldo in the 1850s. Last October, the Coeur d’Alene Tribe opened a $3.2 million visitor center at the park to house the “Sacred Encounters” exhibit, which details Salish Tribes’ interactions with Jesuit priests. Eric Van Orden, the tribe’s attorney, said tribal officials are interested in purchasing the 100-acre parcel surrounding the mission, but said he couldn’t release details. The land includes an old cemetery with the graves of Jesuit priests, trails to the Coeur d’Alene River and 1,300 feet of waterfront. Short is advertising the property for $750,000.

Aretha Franklin, Ricky Skaggs among new inductees for Gospel Music Hall of Fame NASHVILLE, Tennessee (AP) — The queen of soul is taking her place in the Gospel Music Hall of Fame. Aretha Franklin is one of six people who will be inducted into the Hall on Aug. 14 in Tennessee. She’ll be joined by bluegrass legend Ricky Skaggs, family group The Hoppers, contemporary Christian singer Dallas Holm, the late TV evangelist Rex Humbard and Christian rock band Love Song. Franklin’s gospel roots run deep, starting with her father, who was a prominent Baptist minister. Her 1972 album, “Amazing Grace,” has sold more than 2 million copies and is one of the best-selling gospel albums of all time. The Gospel Music Hall of Fame was established in 1971. More than 150 members have been inducted, including Dolly Parton and Elvis Presley.

Kansas congressional delegation seeks Medal of Honor for late Roman Catholic priest WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — The Kansas congressional delegation is making its case to President Barack Obama that a Roman Catholic priest deserves a Medal of Honor for his heroism during the Korean War. A letter from delegation describes how the Rev. Emil Kapaun pulled wounded soldiers to safety and attended to their injuries while serving as an Army chaplain. Before dying in a prison camp in May 1951, he stole food from nearby farms to bring back to starving prisoners. The letter described Kapaun’s service as “selfless and heroic.” Kapaun was from the Kansas town of Pilsen. He has been

May 24, 2012

classified a Servant of God by the Vatican, a step toward the process to sainthood.

Little Sisters of the Poor marks 140th anniversary PITTSBURGH (AP) — As late-morning sunlight cast soft, blue-and-green panels through the chapel's stained glass windows, William J. Winter, auxiliary bishop emeritus for the Diocese of Pittsburgh, spoke about the modern-day challenge to follow Christ's teachings. Tend to the lambs, he said, treat your fellow man with dignity and respect. Literally and figuratively, he was preaching to the choir. It can be argued that there are few in this world doing a more sincere job of caring for others than the Little Sisters of the Poor. Bishop Winter was on hand Sunday to help celebrate the 140th anniversary of the order in Pittsburgh, an event featuring Mass followed by visitors' tours of the Brighton Heights facility. "Their presence and their work speak to the word of God," Bishop Winter said. Bishop Winter observed the Sisters' work on a personal level: His father, also William, lived at the home for nine years, until his death in 1985. "He loved it here, there was so much to do. One time we were flying kites, another time we went to an ice cream social," he said. Stanley Zubik, father of David Zubik, bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh, is among the 93 current residents. The congregation was founded in 1839 by Jeanne Jugan, a French woman who was later beatified by Pope John Paul II and canonized by Pope Benedict XVI. The first American home was established in 1868, in New York City. In Pittsburgh, where 10 sisters are aided by lay staff, there have been three homes run by the Little Sisters of the Poor. The first, according to Mother Judith Meredith, was by the river in the Allegheny West part of the city. Then the sisters moved to Penn Avenue, finally making their home at the current address in 1932. It's an impressive facility, with three levels of residence for the elderly poor, ranging from independent living to hospice. The magazine U.S. News & World Report recently named it one of the top 39 nursing homes in the country. Between the 140th anniversary and the national recognition, Mother Judith said, the sisters are planning a big year of events. Because their mission is taking care of the elderly, and about half of their $6 million operating budget is obtained through Medicaid, the congregation relies on generosity of donations as well as fundraising events. Upcoming events include the annual Rock-a-Thon. Last year's Rock-a-Thon -- in which 50 rocking chairs were provided to rock for donations -- raised $68,000 to purchase therapeutic whirlpool bathtubs. Bob and Linn Pusateri were touring the facility for the first time Sunday. They are longtime donors, a family tradition going back to Bob's father, Frank. Frank Pusateri worked for a produce company in the Strip District in the 1960s and 1970s when the sisters would make their weekly Tuesday visits to ask for food. "We were happy to come here today because Dad always had a soft spot in his heart for the Little Sisters of the Poor." Bob Pusateri said. Mother Judith's involvement with the Little Sisters of the Poor began when she was a high school student in Kentucky and volunteered on weekends.


ST. BONIFACE CATHOLIC CHURCH 110 N. Buchanan Edwardsville 656-6450 Very Reverend Jeffrey Goeckner

Saturday Vigil - 4:15 pm Spanish Mass - 6:15 pm Sunday Mass 8:15 am, 10:15 am, 5:15 pm Daily Mass Schedule Mon., 5:45 pm Tues., Thurs., Fri. 8:00 am Wed., 6:45 pm

All Are Welcome

Rev. Diane C. Grohmann September - May Worship 10:15 a.m. June-August Worship 9:30 a.m. Our Facility is Handicap Accessible

www.st-boniface.com

LECLAIRE CHRISTIAN CHURCH

ST. THOMAS EPISCOPAL

Sunday Schedule: Worship at 9:30 am and 11:00 am Wednesday Schedule: Men’s Ministry 6:45 pm Please see leclairecc.com for more information. Daycare 656-2798 Janet Hooks, Daycare Director

leclairecc.com

MOUNT JOY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH OF EDWARDSVILLE 327 Olive Street • Edw, IL 656-0845 Steve Jackson, Pastor Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship: 10:45 a.m. Wed. Prayer & Bible Study: 12 noon & 7 p.m.

Hillsboro at North Buchanan in downtown Edwardsville 656-1929

3277 Bluff Rd. Edwardsville, IL 656-1500

www.stpauledw.org

1914 Esic Drive, Edwardsville, 656-0918 “Loving People to Jesus” Shane Taylor, Senior Minister Matt Campbell, Youth and Worship Minister Shawn Smith, Family Life Minister

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

ST. PAUL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST

Summit at School Street Glen Carbon, IL 288-5620 Rev. Dr. Arnold Hoffman

407 Edwardsville Rd. (Rt. 162) Troy, IL 62294 667-6241 Dennis D. Price, Pastor Sunday Worship: 8 a.m., 9 a.m., & 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Worship: 6:30 p.m.

www.troyumc.org

First Presbyterian Church 237 N. Kansas Edwardsville, IL

Located 1 Block North of Post Office Early Worship: 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages: 9:15 a.m. Child/Youth Choir: 10:15 a.m. Late Worship w/Chancel Choir: 10:45 a.m.

Holy Eucharist at 10:30 a.m.

For Music and Other Activities

St. Thomas Child Care Center Now enrolling infants through Pre-K Call 288-5697

YOUTH PROGRAMS  SENIOR HIGH and MIDDLE SCHOOL

“Where Jesus Christ is Celebrated in Liturgy and Life.”

www.fpcedw.org

618-656-4550

The Rev. Virginia L. Bennett, D. Min. Sunday Services: 8:00 a.m. Said Eucharist . . 9:10 a.m. Adult Education 9:30 a.m. Church School 10:00 a.m. Choral Eucharist . . Come worship with us! standrews-edwardsville.com facebook.com/Standrews.Edwardsville

“The fundamental purpose animating the Faith of God and His Religion is to safeguard the interests and promote the unity of the human race.” ~ Baha’u’llah Promote the Unity of the human race everyday! The Bahá’is of Edwardsville warmly welcome and invite you to investigate the teachings of the Bahá’i Faith. For more information call (618) 656-4142 or email: Bahai.Edwardsville@sbcglobal.net P.O. Box 545 Edwardsville, IL 62025 www.bahai.us

NEW BETHEL UNITED METHODIST 131 N. Main St., Glen Carbon, IL Rev. William Adams Church Phone: 288-5700 Sunday Morning Worship 8:30 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. Adult & Children’s Sunday School 9:40 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. Nursery 8:30 a.m. to Noon Senior High Youth Group Sunday at 7:30 p.m. Senior High Bible Study Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. Fully Accessible Facilities www.newbethelumc.org e-mail office@newbethelumc.org

310 South Main, Edwardsville, 656-7498 Traditional Worship: 9:00 a.m. Coffee Fellowship: 10:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday School: 10:30 a.m. Youth: 6:00 p.m. Dr. Brooks, Lead Minister www.fccedwardsville.org

800 N. Main Street Edwardsville (618) 656-4648

Rev. Jackie K. Havis-Shear

9:30 a.m. ~ Contemporary Worship 11:00 a.m. ~ Traditional Worship Free Friday Lunch - 11:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

www.immanuelonmain.org

Let’s Worship... This page gives you an opportunity to reach over 16,000 area homes with your services schedule and information.

Call Lisa at 656-4700 Ext 46

May 24, 2012

On the Edge of the Weekend

15


Auto Loan Rates have dropped AGAIN! Rates as low as

1.74%

APR*

for up to 63 months

Payments as low as $166.22* for 63 months on a $10,000 Loan!

Come visit our Edwardsville location! • Fast approval • Flexible terms • 100% financing for qualified buyers

*APR=Annual Percentage Rate. Rate shown is valid as of April 27, 2012. Rates are subject to change and are based on the term of the loan, model year of the vehicles, as well as your credit history. Loan example: The monthly payment on a $10,000 loan at 1.74% APR for 63 months would be $166.22. Maximum term on secured loans is dependent upon the age of the security and mileage on the collateral. Some restrictions may apply.

16

On the Edge of the Weekend

May 24, 2012

1067 S. State Route 157 www.scu.org • (618)692-1200


Television "House" reaches the end after 8 seasons NEW YORK (AP) — It will be painful saying goodbye to “House.” The Fox medical drama concluded its eight-season run Monday with a series finale, preceded by a one-hour retrospective. And with that, Hugh Laurie will be done as the show’s abrasive champion, Dr. Gregory House — unless, Laurie adds with a laugh, “someone comes up with an idea for a stage musical.” “I feel a huge satisfaction that we got to the end with our dignity intact,” he declares. “I never felt that we did anything that wasn’t true to the character or the show — like, ‘House gets a puppy.’ I think that’s quite an achievement.” No doubt. Sure, the medical mysteries that formed the core of most episodes inevitably grew a bit formulaic as the seasons piled up. (Didn’t each week’s patient always seem to start bleeding from a different orifice, bafflingly and life-threateningly, right on cue before each commercial break?) But if the rhythm of the investigation began to feel over-familiar, House never did. On the contrary: He is only more complex, obstreperous and fascinating. Not that he didn’t start with a bang right from the series’ inception in November 2004: Here was a brilliant diagnostician with a snide manner, a limp and a cane, a stash of painkillers and a perpetual stubble. He flouted regulations, ducked cases that bored him and kept things stirred up as a not-so-merry prankster. He was conceived as a contemporary Sherlock Holmes. Like that fictional 19thcentury sleuth, House is indifferent to those he is helping, focused instead — with cool deduction and uncanny intuition — on the challenging nature of the mysteries that plague them.

not that simple: There was a possibility that he might have behaved much the same even without his affliction.” It was Laurie who chose which leg for his character’s crippling blood clot, he divulges with a laugh when asked. “I tried it various ways, including limping with BOTH legs, but that was just ungainly,” he jokes. “Then I settled on the right leg. But I have always wondered whether, if I switched legs for an episode, anyone would notice.” In conversation, the Oxford, Englandborn Laurie is not only charming, but witty, befitting his past comedic series “Black Adder” and “Jeeves and Wooster” (in which he starred with Stephen Fry), as well as, more recently, the “Stuart Little” films. Of course, “House” had its own mordant comic streak. “It was EXTREMELY important that the character be funny: He had to be good value for the audience, and also to explain Wilson’s tolerance and friendship. You had to believe that, at the end of the day, Wilson just delighted in the fact that House was an occasionally outrageous but almost always funny character to hang out with.” Sample House-isms, delivered deadpan and gratingly razor-sharp: — “Adjectives matter: Hate nurses, love naughty nurses.” — “Treating for wrong diagnoses can result in side effects, like death.” — “What’s the opposite of ‘Thank you’? I’m pretty sure it ends in ‘you.”’ House has never lost his funny bone, nor his perversity, even in the face of Wilson’s cancer diagnosis in recent episodes. After helping Wilson administer aggressive treatment on the sly, on his living room couch, House shares his Vicodin for Wilson’s painful

Both men play musical instruments, take drugs (House is hooked on Vicodin, while Holmes has a thing for cocaine), and both have trusty sidekicks: Holmes’ Dr. John Watson and House’s Dr. James Wilson, his best and probably only friend, played with quirky forbearance by Robert Sean Leonard. But the Holmes connection has never been the most interesting thing about “House.” More impressive was how “House” put a difficult, largely unpleasant figure front and center as the hero of a TV series. “Traditionally in an American drama, the damaged, sarcastic cynic would be a peripheral character,” notes Laurie, who signed with the show thinking House would be just that. “To make someone so apparently jagged and unsympathetic into the central character was a very bold step. And so was clinging to that premise, never relenting to suggest that, underneath it all, he has a heart of gold. I’m not sure that House does have a heart of gold. He is on the side of the angels, but that doesn’t mean that he’s an angel.” And there was even more to the brave House recipe: the pain he endured. Perhaps no TV protagonist has been imprinted so profoundly by a physical affliction. Walking with a limp, his cane supporting his bum right leg, House is constantly hurting. Pain is part of his persona. And the idea of that ever-present pain ran counter to every rule of routine TV, which, typically conceived as aspirational for viewers, calls for the hero to personify a desirable state. On the contrary, House is all about discomfort, and coping with it. “The pain explains, to some extent, his personality,” says Laurie. “But we never gave the viewer any definite answers about how much, and I’m rather glad about that. It’s

side effects while razzing him, poker-faced, with, “Remember, they’re a gift, so it’s rude to keep throwing them up.” Laurie chuckles at the thought of such rampant candor. “Yes, one can say House has no manners,” he declares, “and that’s probably true. But good manners are probably not our principal goal in life.” Not House’s, anyway. However much a jerk, he’s a jerk who believes morality is measured not by attitude, but results. On that score, he’s got no cause to apologize. He saves lives no one else can save. That gives him a pass to act or think however he chooses. Maybe House, the impish truth-teller, could be viewed as the resident court jester of Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital. “Being free of the requirement to be wellmannered, House was able to get to the heart of things in ways that other people might not,” says Laurie. “But the question was always whether he’s using his indispensableness to behave badly, or whether he’s using it to tell the truth. House being House, he exploited this license to an appalling degree.” On last week’s episode, House continued to coax, pester and bully Wilson into not giving up his battle against cancer. House can’t bear the thought of losing his friend. But Wilson (who, ironically, is an oncologist) doesn’t want to put himself through more chemotherapy. “He just doesn’t want to live in pain,” a colleague tries to explain, which triggers a furious reaction from House. “LIFE is pain!” House roars, his voice at a pitch never heard from him before. “I wake up every morning, I’m in pain. I go to work in pain. You know how many times I wanted to just give up, how many times I’ve thought about ending it?”

1-800-ALL-FORD 2012 Ford Explorer XLT

2011 Chevrolet Cruzy LT

$

#P7974

#P7972

#P7959

18,922

$

2011 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT

33,720

$

17,344

$

2008 Toyota Sienna XLE #BB952A

2008 Ford Ranger XLT #CC358A

2011 Mercury Milan Premier

$16,831 2007 Ford F-150 Lariat

$16,936

2010 Honda Odyssey EX-L

2010 Hyundai Elantra

2010 Toyota Highlander Hybrid

#CC214B

#P7952

#CC507A

#BB854A

$29,923 $15,334 $34,931 $

#P8004

#P7991

#CC558A

22,338

$

20,901

2011 FORD FUSION SEL

$

25,431

2012 Ford Mustang #P8011

5 to choose from

Starting at

Est. 28 mpg

$

20,934

Don’t Miss Out!

2011 Nissan Altima 2.5 S #P8010

Many more ! Log on to JACKSCHMITT FORD.COM now! 2012 Ford Taurus Limited #P8012

$27,620 $22,229 $27,527 2012 Chevrolet Equinox LT #P7983

2005 Acura MDX Touring #CC656B

$29,517 $16,499

#P7955

$16,918 $18,928

13,984

2011 Mazda CX-9

2011 Dodge Grand Caravan

$17,301

See our entire selection at JACKSCHMITT FORD.COM

#P7987

2012 Ford Focus SE

2007 Ford F150 XLT

2008 Toyota Camry Solara SE

2011 Hyundai Elantra #P7975

2011 Suzuki Kizashi #P7982

2011 Kia Soul #P7969

#CC617A

$24,575 2012 GMC Terrain SLT #P8002

$17,933 $15,931

$29,220

2011 Toyota Sienna LE

2012 Hyundai Sonata GLS

2011 Nissan Cube #P8005

#P8008

#P7985

2009 Ford Mustang

2004 Issan Titan SE

$17,233 $25,640 $19,921

Browse, shop, 2007 Jeep save 24/7 at Wrangler Sahara #P7992A JACKSCHMITT FORD.COM

$23,958

May 24, 2012

#CC471A

#CC619A

$19,910 $10,995

On the Edge of the Weekend

17


Movies

QuickGlance Movie Reviews

“The Raven”

What would Edgar Allan Poe be doing if he were alive today? Clawing at the inside of his coffin, desperate to get at the people who used and abused his diabolical tales as the basis for this pile of cinematic bird poo. Like carrion feeders themselves, director James McTeigue and his colleagues peck at Poe’s stories to fill out a plot that sounds sort of cool in concept — a serial killer using the author ’s fiction as a blueprint for ghastly murders — but is featherheaded in execution. John Cusack makes a terrible Poe, the somber role as one of literature’s great tortured souls spotlighting his limitations as an actor. With his little goatee and his black cape, Cusack vaguely looks the part, but he’s a lightweight — voice too whiny, mannerisms too exaggerated, cadence too reedy to bring alive the movie’s frequent passages of Poe’s lyrical writing. Cusack’s Poe is enlisted by a Baltimore police detective (Luke Evans) to help solve a string of killings inspired by the author ’s macabre stories. The movie reinforces how fiendishly clever Poe’s ideas were, but the filmmakers make poor use of their source material, wringing a few moments of gore from them while adding no suspense or originality of their own. RATED: R for bloody violence and grisly images. RUNNING TIME: 110 minutes. ASSOCIATED PRESS RANKING: One and a half stars out of four.

“The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel”

In theory, seeing Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Tom Wilkinson and Bill Nighy share the screen should be a delight. In reality, this seriocomic romp merely has its moments, but more often feels heavy-handed, sappy and overlong. Sure, it’ll seem warm and crowd-pleasing but probably only to crowds of a certain age, who may relate to these characters who find themselves in flux in their twilight. Handsome as the film is from John Madden, who directed Dench to her supportingactress Oscar for “Shakespeare in Love,” it too often spells out too much, and features painfully literal symbolism like a bird taking flight at just the right time. Still, Dench does some of the loveliest work of her lengthy and esteemed career here as Evelyn, who’s recently widowed after 40 years of marriage and struggling to establish an identity on her own. She’s one of several elderly Brits who travel to a resort in Jaipur, India, that advertises itself as an elegant destination for retirees. In truth, the place is empty and falling apart, despite the best efforts of the enthusiastic, young manager who inherited the hotel from his father (Dev Patel of “Slumdog Millionaire”) to turn it into a palace. Each character experiences an obligatory moment of truth in this colorful, bustling city, but the plot machinations in the script from Ol Parker, based on the novel “These Foolish Things” by Deborah Moggach, feel rather creaky. RATED: PG-13 for sexual content and language. RUNNING TIME: 122 minutes. ASSOCIATED PRESS RANKING: Two stars out of four.

“First Position”

This is a welcome antidote to tawdry reality shows like “Dance Moms” and breathless competitions like “So You Think You Can Dance.” Director Bess Kargman’s documentary follows a half-dozen aspiring professional ballet dancers at the Youth America Grand Prix, a competition for performers ages 9-19 where prizes, scholarships and contracts with prestigious companies await. Structurally similar to the documentaries “Spellbound” (about the National Spelling Bee) and “Waiting for ‘Superman”’ (about public-school students hoping for chances at a better education), “First Position” reveals the home lives of these youngsters as they prepare and lets us

18

On the Edge of the Weekend

“Dark Shadows”

What's at the Wildey

May 25, 8 p.m. – David Lindley May 26, 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. – Specticast presents "La Traviata" June 1, 8 p.m. – EFFIC in Concert: Presented by Excel Bottling SKI & 97.5 The Rock June 16, 8 p.m. – The Original Knights of Swing featuring Maria Kenah June 21, 7:30 p.m. – Confederate Railroad June 30, 8 p.m. – C.J. Chenier & the Red Hot Louisiana Band For ticket information, visit www.wildeytheatre.com

get to know their families, all of whom have made huge sacrifices to foster their children’s dreams. They come from varied backgrounds but they’re all inspiring in their focus and discipline, as well as their willingness to embrace a childhood that is far from ordinary. Kargman’s tasteful, intimate approach features all of the theatricality of the art form with none of the backstage drama; “The Turning Point,” this is not. Her film actually may be a little too understated, a little too safe. But Kargman is both a former ballet dancer herself as well as a journalist, so she knows not only what’s important but also how to stay out of the way and let the story tell itself in her filmmaking debut. Little girls (and some boys) will love “First Position”: It’s an ideal film for kids to see with their families. RATED: Unrated but contains nothing more offensive than some mangled toenails. RUNNING TIME: 94 minutes. ASSOCIATED PRESS RANKING: Three stars out of four.

“Mother’s Day”

Inspired by the 1980 Troma slasher flick of the same name, this is notable for a chilling lead performance from Rebecca De Mornay and not much else. The home-invasion thriller from director Darren Lynn Bousman (who made the second, third and fourth “Saw” movies as well as one of the worst films I’ve ever seen in my life, “Repo! The Genetic Opera”) takes us through all the obligatory steps of the genre: Bad guys enter, assert their dominance and pick people off one by one. The hostages make futile attempts to attack or escape but their actions aren’t as important as the structure itself, which serves as a crucible of human nature. That would be all well and good if the characters here were vaguely intriguing. They’re not even cliched types — they’re just sort of bland, and eventually they’re bloody. That makes De Mornay’s quietly commanding, creepy turn stand out even more. She stars as Mother, who steps in to clean things up when her idiot bank-robber sons (Patrick Flueger, Warren Kole and Matt O’Leary) botch a job and then try to hide in what they believe is their childhood home. Turns out Mother got foreclosed on, and the place now belongs to Beth (Jaime King) and Daniel (Frank Grillo), who were in the middle of a housewarming party. Gnarly, sadistic torture ensues. RATED: R for strong brutal bloody violence and torture, pervasive language and some sexual content. RUNNING TIME: 112 minutes. ASSOCIATED PRESS RANKING: Two stars out of four.

May 24, 2012

Tim Burton and Johnny Depp are snuggled warmly in their comfort zone in this chilly horror-comedy, their eighth collaboration as director and star, respectively, and their weakest by far. You don’t need to know a thing about the “Dark Shadows” TV series that provides the inspiration. Tonally, thematically, visually, you’ve seen this movie before, with its oddball characters, skies in varying shades of gray and a foreboding sense of gothic mystery. It’s actually a wonder that Depp hasn’t played a vampire before; still, his longundead Barnabas Collins, who’s been buried alive for nearly two centuries and suddenly finds himself back in his insular Maine hometown in 1972, fits squarely within his well-honed on-screen persona. He thinks he’s quite the charmer, but he’s actually a bit awkward, and that contradiction provides the main source of humor. Or at least, it’s supposed to. The script from Seth Grahame-Smith (”Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter”) allows its family full of weirdos to shine, but too often is crammed with fish-out-of-water gags as Barnabas struggles to make sense of the time in which he’s found himself. He struggles to understand modern romance as he courts the family’s delicate, wide-eyed nanny (Bella Heathcote) and tries to fit in by smoking pot with the local hippies. Ho ho! “Dark Shadows” feels too languid, and bogged down as it is with an obsessive eye for costumes and period detail rather than offering anything resembling an engaging story. And by the time Burton finally puts his visual effects skills to their best use, in a climactic showdown between Barnabas and the witch who cursed him (Eva Green), it’s too late. With Michelle Pfeiffer, Helena Bonham Carter and Jackie Earle Haley. RATED: PG-13 for comic horror violence, sexual content, some drug use, language and smoking. RUNNING TIME: 116 minutes. ASSOCIATED PRESS RANKING: One and a half stars out of four.

“Girl in Progress”

The strong, sexy presence of Eva Mendes and the girlish perkiness of Cierra Ramirez can only go so far to make this forced mother-daughter dramedy tolerable. It’s a coming-ofage story that knows it’s a coming-of-age story — as in, our young heroine is well aware of the conventions of this kind of tale and goes out of her way to manufacture various rites of passage to expedite her transformation from innocence to womanhood. Ramirez’s Ansiedad literally creates a flow chart in her bedroom and spells out her strategy with her only friend — whom she’ll soon cast aside, she declares, because it’s a necessary step in the process. Breaking down and sending up a specific genre is fine if the script is strong enough to get away with such cutesy self-reference, as in “Juno” and “Easy A.” Director Patricia Riggen and screenwriter Hiram Martinez don’t go far enough, don’t dig deep enough with these characters. They play it too safe, which makes “Girl in Progress” feel like a slightly racier version of an ABC Family show. And the flat, overly bright lighting further makes it feel like forgettable television. It certainly doesn’t help that the two main figures are cliches. Mendes’ Grace is the child in the equation, having given birth when she was just 17 and hopping from man to man and town to town ever since. Ansiedad — which means anxiety in Spanish — is the responsible one: Smart, studious and organized, she’s left to scrub the sink full of dishes while her mom’s out with her married gynecologist boyfriend (Matthew Modine, whose character doesn’t have a single perceptible redeeming quality). Do you think it’s possible that, by the end, they’ll both have learned some lessons and assumed their rightful roles? RATED: PG-13 for mature thematic elements, sexual content including crude references, and drinking — all involving teens. RUNNING TIME: 84 minutes. ASSOCIATED PRESS RANKING: One and a half stars out of four.


Movies

Associated Press

In this film image released by Pantelion Films, Eva Mendes, left, and Cierra Ramirez are shown in a scene from "Girl in Progress."

"Girl in Progress" fails to mature By CHRISTY LEMIRE Associated Press The strong, sexy presence of Eva Mendes and the girlish perkiness of Cierra Ramirez can only go so far to make the forced motherdaughter dramedy “Girl in Progress” tolerable. It’s a coming-of-age story that knows it’s a coming-of-age story — as in, our young heroine is well aware of the conventions of this kind of tale and goes out of her way to manufacture various rites of passage to expedite her transformation from innocence to womanhood. Ramirez’s character, the teenage Ansiedad, literally creates a flow chart in her bedroom and spells out her strategy

with her only friend (the sweetly nerdy Raini Rodriguez) — whom she’ll soon cast aside, she declares, because it’s a necessary step in the process. Breaking down and sending up a specific genre is fine if the script is strong enough to get away with such cutesy self-reference, as in “Juno” and “Easy A.” Director Patricia Riggen and screenwriter Hiram Martinez don’t go far enough, don’t dig deep enough with these characters. They play it too safe, which makes “Girl in Progress” feel like a slightly racier version of an ABC Family show — and the flat, overly bright lighting further makes it feel like forgettable television. It certainly doesn’t help that the two main figures are cliches. Mendes’ Grace is the child

in the equation, having given birth when she was just 17 and hopping from man to man and town to town ever since. Ansiedad — which means anxiety in Spanish — is the responsible one: Smart, studious and organized, she’s left to scrub the sink full of dishes while her mom’s out with her married gynecologist boyfriend (Mathew Modine, whose character doesn’t have a single perceptible redeeming quality). Do you think it’s possible that, by the end, they’ll both have learned some lessons and assumed their rightful roles? Riggen cuts awkwardly and sometimes too quickly between potentially poignant moments and scenes of wacky humor, which undermines her attempts at emotional honesty.

Meanwhile, supporting characters who were intended to provide depth merely feel like types — Modine’s cold, controlling wife or the kindhearted Mexican immigrant who works alongside Grace at a restaurant. And in a painfully literal device, Ansiedad’s English teacher (Patricia Arquette) just happens to be explaining the steps in a coming-of-age story as Ansiedad embarks on them. It’s maddening: “Girl in Progress” knows that every teen movie has to have a blowout bash where important events take place, and it can’t even get the tone of that right. This is being marketed as an ideal film for moms and daughters to see together on Mother ’s Day weekend. A long, awkward brunch sounds more fun — and more truthful.

"Dark Shadows" a good kickoff to summer By ROBERT GRUBAUGH For The Edge I was but a glimmer in my father's eye when the sci-fi soap series "The Dark Shadows" ended its five season run in 1971, but I was graced with a penchant for retaining things of pop culture significance. Therefore, and largely through the auspices of Al Gore's greatest invention, I was not unprepared for the feature film remake of the story of the Collins family (from director Tim Burton) that arrived on America's post-Avengers doorstep this weekend. Unfortunately, America seems to have nothing but an appetite whetted for more "Avengers" and I found myself in a small majority of the movie-going population that cared to see what a visionary director from the modern

day could do with the campiest of material from yesteryear. "Dark Shadows" is nothing of the notoriously poorly-made sort of production that its namesake was. There are no second class special effects. All of the dialogue can be heard and is correctly dubbed. Yet, the feeling of hammy, Me Decade delight is not missing entirely from this story of Barnabas Collins (Johnny Depp), the son of an 18th Century fishing magnate who finds himself eternally frustrated by the actions of a jilted witch (Eva Green). As spurned lover Angelique Bouchard, Green is a kittenish mess who damns Barnabas into vampire form when he chooses the coquettish Josette (Bella Heathcote) over her. When Barnabas is, quite literally, unearthed in 1972, he has to rebuild the fortune and good

reputation that his family once held in the quaint Maine fishing village that bears their name, Collinsport, while fending off a not-aged-a-day Angelique and courting Josette's spirit, reincarnated in the form of a child's governess named Vicky. The cultured, mannered Barnabas turns to his beloved Collinwood, the dilapidated family home that now houses a distant generation of his troubled family. Besides bloodlust, and lust in general, family is the most important thing to Barnabas. It is plainly seen that casting of this important group was of the utmost importance to the film's producers as well. The strength of this work relies on it quirky use of Michelle Pfeiffer as Elizabeth Collins-Stoddard; Jonny Lee Miller as her brother, Roger;

Gulliver McGrath as his troubled son, David, and Chloe Grace M o re t z a s E l i z a b e t h ' s m o o d y d a u g h t e r, C a r o l y n . M o r e t z , especially, and groundskeeper Willie (Jackie Earle Haley) are smack on their marks in this witty, silly little drama that does best when left to its characters' idiosyncrasies and its worst when they try to blend it all into a coherent story. Burton's o t h e r u s u a l c o - s t a r, H e l e n a Bonham Carter, portrays David's psychiatrist, Dr. Julia Hoffman. If your thing is to see great actors running amok through a highly stylized set - where top work is done to reproduce everything that was best liked about the '70s - then "Dark Shadows" will be much to your liking. In fact, I adore that they fit

May 24, 2012

in a cameo by rocker Alice Cooper and the original Barnabas Collins, Jonathan Frid (who died just a few weeks ago). Christopher Lee, too, plays a small role, cinching the best casting of someone else from the vampire movie universe. Depp does his always memorable work, twirling about with a wolf's head cane, dapper English accent, and using his long, manicured fingers (complete with an extra knuckle on each) to do his best Jedi mind control trick on the weak-willed people who get in the way of his return. I got a kick out of the whole thing. ••• "Dark Shadows" runs 125 minutes and is rated PG-13 for comic horror violence, sexual content, some drug use, language, and smoking. I give this film two stars out of four.

On the Edge of the Weekend

19


The Arts

Shakespeare Festival St. Louis

"Othello" scheduled as this year's production By KRISTA WILKINSON-MIDGLEY Of The Edge Shakespeare's tragic tale of the murderously jealous general and his doomed wife will come alive on stage in Forest Park's Shakespeare Glen at this year's Shakespeare Festival St. Louis' 2012 production of "Othello." The show opens Friday, May 25, and runs through Sunday, June 17. The play tells the story of the handsome, yet violent, Othello, a moorish general, who is married to the gentle Desdemona; Othello's lieutenant, Cassio; and the villainous Iago, an ensign in Othello's service. Enraged at being passed over for promotion to lieutenant by Cassio, Iago decides to exact revenge by convincing Othello that his lieutenant is having an affair with Desdemona. Iago's manipulative words poison Othello's mind and send him into a fit of jealous rage that sees him murder Desdemona. Later, grief stricken when he learns the truth about Iago's lies and his wife's innocence, Othello kills himself. “Shakespeare challenges stereotypes in his writing and nowhere is that more true than in the tragedy of Othello,” said Rick Dildine, executive director of Shakespeare Festival St. Louis, in a news release. “The

20

implications are that knowing oneself and others isn’t always what it appears to be; that bad judgment arises from accepting stereotypes and relying on one’s perception of another rather than true knowledge of the other.” The hilarious antics and romantic entanglements of last year's "Taming of the Shrew" drew a season attendance record of 63,000 people. "Othello," believed to have been written in approximately 1603, has endured as one of the bard's best-loved tragedies and is set to attract just as big a crowd this year. Broadway actor Billy Eugene Jones will star as the eloquent and powerful general Othello. His credits include roles on Broadway in “The Mountaintop,” “Passing Strange,” “Radio Golf,” “Gem of the Ocean” and “A Raisin in the Sun.” Some of his Off-Broadway credits include “In the Footprint/The Battle Over Atlantic Yards (The Civilians),” “Three Sisters,” and “Waiting for Godot” (Classical Theatre of Harlem). A graduate of The Yale School of Drama, Jones, is originally from Dallas. Heather Wood, who received her undergraduate degree from Saint Louis University, will play the Venetian debutante, Desdemona. Her New York and regional credits include “The Seagull” and “A True History of the Johnstown

On the Edge of the Weekend

May 24, 2012

For The Edge

Two scenes from rehearsals for "Othello." Flood” (World Premiere) at The Goodman Theatre, “Romeo and Juliet” and “The Merry Wives of Windsor” at The Old Globe Theatre. She won the Critics’ Choice Award for Outstanding Supporting Performance in “Agnes of God” at Stray Dog Theatre in St. Louis. Justin Blanchard, who made his Shakespeare Festival St. Louis debut in “Hamlet,” will play Iago. He has directed and acted throughout the country. St. Louisans will remember his performance as Laertes in the festival’s “Hamlet” two years ago. He’s performed on Broadway in “Journey’s End” and in Off-Broadway productions of “Hamlet,” “Henry V,” “Macbeth,” and “The Broken Heart.” Blanchard holds a B.F.A. from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. Both Wood and Blanchard received their M.F.A.s from Brown University/Trinity Rep. “Billy Eugene Jones is one of the most impressive actors in the country right now,” said Dildine. “The depth he brings to his roles is bar none compared to others. He is a phenomenal talent and we are incredibly lucky to have him leading the cast. Heather is one of the most sought-after ingenues in the country, capable of combining both a sweet naivete with power in her roles. Justin is an all-encompassing force of nature when it comes to stage artistry. Not only does he act, he’s a writer and a director. He does it all. St. Louisans are really in for a remarkable treat this season.” St. Louisan Bruce Longworth, who directed “Hamlet” two years ago, will direct the “Othello” production. This marks the first time in the history of the festival a director has returned for a second production. Longworth has been a faculty member in the Conservatory of Theatre Arts at Webster University since 1985 and is currently head of the acting program. He has worked extensively in St. Louis and around the country as a director, actor, and voice and dialect coach. In addition to the three main characters, other cast members include Kim Stauffer (Emilia), Joshua Thomas (Cassio), Cherie

Corinne Rice (Biancia), Rudi Utter (Roderigo), Whit Reichart (Brabantio), Joneal Joplin (Duke of Venice), Christopher Hickey (Montano), Jerry Vogel (Lodovico), and ensemble members Chauncy Thomas, Pete Winfrey, Kevin Mimms, Michael Fariss, Eric White and Jared Lotz. Robbie Jones, Associate Professor at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, is the set designer for the show. Jones is a five-time Omaha Entertainments Award nominee for set and costume design; a Kennedy Center-ACTF Region 5 National Teaching Artist Grant Award Nominee; and assistant scene designer and fellowship winner for the Tony Award-winning Eugene O’Neill Theater Center. He has worked in theater across the country. Lou Bird, Assistant Professor at Saint Louis University and Program Director for the SLU Theatre Department, will be the costume designer for “Othello.” This is Bird’s second time designing costumes for SFSTL, having worked on “Much Ado About Nothing” in 2007. The popularity of last year ’s inaugural backstage tours before each performance and 20-minute post-show talkbacks will continue this season. As in previous years, the pre-show festival activities will include a nightly Green Show at 6:30 p.m. The pre-show will include: a 20-minute adaptation of “Othello” which will introduce the characters and plot to children of all ages; musicians, dancers, singers, jugglers; craft table for kids; conversations on the lawn by local scholars, as well as new activities. In the past 11 years, the Shakespeare Festival has attracted more than a half million people to the performances in Forest Park. The organization has reached an additional 235,000 students through its educational touring productions, school programs, summer camps and community partnerships. Performances run nightly (except Tuesdays) at 8 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, visit www. shakespearefestivalstlouis.org, or call 314/531-9800.


The Arts Artistic adventures Fox announces Broadway series T h e F a b u l o u s F o x T h e a t re continues its 30-year tradition of bringing the best of Broadway to St. Louis audiences with the announcement of its 2012-2013 U.S. Bank Broadway Series. Celebrating 30 years of Fabulous Broadway in 2012, Fox Associates is proud to present a seven-show subscription package featuring Broadway's hottest Tony Award-winners and classic favorites. “The Book of Mormon,” winner of nine 2011 Tony Awards including Best Musical headlines this spectacular season as it makes its Fox debut. Also making its first St. Louis appearance is “War Horse,” the 2011 Tony Awardwinner for Best Play. Other new shows include current Broadway hits “Priscilla Queen of the Desert” and “Million Dollar Quartet” “Anything Goes,” winner of the 2011 Tony Award for Best Musical Revival, will set sail for St. Louis and the timeless classic "Les Miserables" will return to the Fox Theatre stage in an all-new 25th Anniversary production. The energetic and electric Blue Man Group will make a stop at the Fox during its first U.S. theatrical tour. U.S. Bank Broadway Series subscribers will also have the first opportunity to purchase tickets for St. Louis favorites “Wicked,” “Stomp,” and “Rock of Ages which will be featured as off-series specials. "Les Miserables," October 16-28, 2012 Cameron Mackintosh presents a brand new 25th anniversary production of Boublil & Schönberg's legendary musical, "Les Miserables," with glorious new staging and dazzlingly reimagined scenery inspired by the paintings of Victor Hugo. This new production has been acclaimed by critics, fans and new audiences and is breaking box office records wherever it goes. The New York Times calls this Les Miserables, "an unquestionably spectacular production from start to finish." The London Times hails the new show "a five star hit, astonishingly powerful." Blue Man Group, November 20December 2, 2012 Blue Man Group is best known for their wildly popular theatrical shows and concerts which combine comedy, music and technology to produce a totally unique form of entertainment. The New York Times heralds th show as "One of the most delightful performance pieces ever staged." E! Entertainment News exclaims, "Blue Man Group" is what every live performance aspires to be." The Baltimore Sun raves, "Blue Man Group packs a wallop. It's a big, loud, funny, silly, visually arresting production!" Blue Man Group is now on the road for its first U.S. theatrical tour. "Priscilla Queen of the Desert," January 29-February 10, 2013 Bette Midler proudly presents the most outrageously fun Broadway musical: "Priscilla Queen of the Desert!" This spectacular show tells the uplifting story of a trio of friends on a road trip of a lifetime, who hop aboard a battered old bus searching for love and friendship in the middle of the Australian outback and end up finding more than they could ever have dreamed. An international hit with over 500 dazzling, 2011 Tony Award-winning costumes, Priscilla features a hit parade of dance-floor

favorites including "It's Raining Men," "Finally" and "I Will Survive." "The Book of Mormon," February 19-March 3, 2013 Nine 2011 Tony Awards say it's the Best Musical of the Year. Vogue says, "It's the funniest musical of all time." And The New York Times says, "It's the best musical of this century." It's "The Book of Mormon," the Broadway phenomenon from South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone and Avenue Q co-creator Robert Lopez. The Daily Show's Jon Stewart calls it "A crowning achievement. So good, it makes me angry." Contains explicit language. "War Horse," March 13-24, 2013 Winner of 5 2011 Tony Awards, including Best Play, War Horse is a remarkable tale of courage, loyalty and friendship set in England in 1914. As World War One begins, Joey, young Albert's beloved horse, is sold to the cavalry and shipped from England to France. He's soon caught up in enemy fire, and fate takes him on an extraordinary journey. This powerfully moving and imaginative drama, filled with stirring music and songs, is a show of phenomenal inventiveness. At its heart are astonishing life-sized puppets created by South Africa's Handspring Puppet Company, that bring to life breathing, galloping, charging horses strong enough for men to ride. "War Horse" is being presented by The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis and will be offered as a special to their subscribers. "Million Dollar Quartet," April 23May 5, 2013 "Million Dollar Quartet" is the Tony Award-winning Broadway musical, inspired by the electrifying true story of the famed recording session that brought together rock 'n' roll icons Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins for the first and only time. On December 4, 1956, these four young musicians were gathered together by Sam Phillips, the "Father of Rock 'n' Roll" at Sun Records in Memphis for what would be one of the greatest jam sessions of all time. "Million Dollar Quartet" brings that legendary night to life with an irresistible tale of broken promises, secrets, betrayal and celebrations featuring timeless hits including "Blue Suede Shoes," "Fever," "Great Balls of Fire," "I Walk the Line," "Hound Dog" and more. "Anything Goes, "May 28-June 9, 2013 All aboard for this saucy and splendid production of Roundabout Theatre Company's "Anything Goes." Presented by Dance St. Louis, "Anything Goes" is the winner of three 2011 Tony Awards including Best Musical Revival and Choreography. One of the greatest

musicals in theater history, Cole Porter's first-class musical comedy is sailing to St. Louis, while it continues a triumphant run on Broadway. When the S.S. American heads out to sea, etiquette and convention get tossed out the portholes as two unlikely pairs set off on the course to true love. Peppering this timeless classic are some of musical theater's most memorable standards, including "I Get a Kick Out of You," "You're the Top" and of course, "Anything Goes." Off-Series Specials Three specials for the 2012-2013 season will be offered to subscribers for priority seating before their public on-sale dates. After breaking box office records and selling out in record time in three previous engagements, "Wicked" will defy gravity once again at the Fox December 12, 2012-January 6, 2013. The international percussion sensation "Stomp" returns to the Fox for a limited engagement January 11-13, 2013 presented by Dance St. Louis. Finally, "Rock of Ages" will return by popular demand May 24-26, 2013. Disney's The Lion King, one of the Fox Theatre's 2011-2012 off series specials, plays the Fox August 15September 2, 2012 and will also be available as a Swap One show for 2012-2013 U.S. Bank Broadway subscribers. Current U.S. Bank Broadway subscribers will receive their renewal information in April with new subscriptions going on sale in late May. Dance St. Louis and Repertory Theatre of St. Louis subscribers will also receive information from those organizations about priority purchase of each organization's sponsored shows. On-sale dates for individual shows will be announced later. For more information, call the Fox Subscription office at 314-5351700. Groups of 15 or more should call 314-535-2900 for special rates and reservations. The Broadway Series at the Fabulous Fox Theatre is presented by U.S. Bank.

Muny prepares for 2012 season The dates for The Muny’s 2012 season were announced recently. “The major through-line that connects the 2012 Muny shows is, they’re all great entertainment,” says The St. Louis Post-Dispatch. KMOX-CBS Radio has predicted that 2012 will be “a season that will make Muny ticket holders stand up and cheer.” Muny President and CEO Denny Reagan also had an announcement. “We are excited to now offer the option of paying for renewals in 4 equal automatic payments,” he said. “Hopefully, this new process will

NO LINE HERE! Hail Damage Repair!!

A Financial Assistance Program for Those Who Qualify

6960 State Rt. 162 Maryville, IL (618) 288-2211

• Restoration & Repair of: RV’s, Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles and Boats • Sandblasting (We’ll Blast Anything) • Custom Painting & Stripes • Industrial Fabrication / Repair / Refinishing

www.TabFrameandBodyRepair.com

story of an all-girl singing trio from Chicago called the Dreams. Based on the show biz stories of the 1960s R&B acts like the Supremes and James Brown, Dreamgirls portrays the heartbreak and challenges of breaking new ground, both musically and socially, and how family and friendships triumph and last through all the trials. Dreamgirls features the blockbuster songs “One Night Only,” “Dreamgirls” and the landmark “And I’m Telling You I’m Not Going.” • “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” July 23 - 29 Last produced at The Muny in 2007, Joseph… is a generational favorite of many musical colors. Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice originally wrote a children’s oratorio that has, in time, expanded into a beloved classic. Children of all ages know the Old Testament story of Jacob, his twelve sons, and the amazing adventures of the youngest, Joseph. This production will be the first at The Muny to use the orchestrations and changes that were developed for the highly successful West End Production in London. • “Pirates (or Gilbert & Sullivan’s Punder’d)” July 30 - August 5 Swashbuckling pirates! A curse! Caribbean comedy! The Muny premiere of Pirates! (or, Gilbert & Sullivan Plunder’d) is a new version of Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Pirates of Penzance. The spirit and songs of the original have been revamped within a rousing and riotous Caribbean setting that supplies greater adventure, bigger laughs and non-stop entertainment. Pirates!… was co-created by Gordon Greenberg, St. Louis native John McDaniel, and Nell Benjamin (Legally Blonde), who also wrote the new book and lyrics. The Muny will be presenting the fourth U.S. production of this exciting show. “The King and I” August 6 - 12 Last seen at The Muny in 2006, this captivating and timeless Eastmeets-West musical treasure has been enchanting Muny audiences since the first Muny production in 1955. Cultures collide as Anna struggles to find her place in the exotic Siamese world of beauty and grand tradition, ruled by a King whom she must learn to serve and understand. This Rodgers and Hammerstein classic includes “Something Wonderful,” “Shall We Dance?” and “Getting to Know You.”

We have thumbs up from our Residents! Come and See for Yourself!

AN ILLINOIS SUPPORTIVE LIVING COMMUNITY

5506 Dial Dr. Granite City, IL 62064 COLLISION REPAIR & INDUSTRIAL PAINTING

877-931-2723

make budgeting Muny season tickets easier.” Current season ticket holders can sign up for automatic payments online, by phone, by checking the box on their renewal forms, or in person at the Muny box office in Forest Park. New season tickets will go on sale Saturday, March 3, and single tickets will be available beginning Saturday, June 2 • “THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE” June 18 - 24 Winner of six Tony Awards, including Best Musical, Thoroughly Modern Millie is the tale of a smalltown girl arriving in New York City to lead a new, thoroughly modern lifestyle. A big, fun-filled show done in true Muny fashion, …Millie is filled with energetic dance numbers, fabulous flappers, and the spectacle of 1920s New York. Music by Jeanine Tesori and book and lyrics by Dick Scanlan. • “Chicago” June 25 - July 1 The number one pick on the Muny survey for years, the 2012 production of Chicago will bring merry murderesses Roxie Hart and Velma Kelly to the grand Muny stage. This Tony- and Oscar-winning international smash hit tells a jazzy, hilarious tale of how murder can feed celebrity. Kander and Ebb’s brilliant score is electrified by extraordinary c h o re o g r a p h y. ( A l t h o u g h t h e Broadway production of Chicago appeared at The Muny in 1977, this is the first time The Muny has produced this show.) • “Aladdin” July 5 - 13 Following upon the fantastic success of the Muny production of Disney’s The Little Mermaid, The Muny presents its premiere of Disney’s Aladdin. The Muny production will be only the third production of this new stage musical adapted from the beloved animated feature to be produced anywhere in the world. Disney’s Aladdin features the favorite movie characters and all of the beloved songs from the film’s Oscar-winning score, plus n e v e r- b e f o re h e a rd M e n k e n / Ashman songs restored from early drafts of the film. Variety hailed this new full-length stage version of Aladdin as “fresh, funny and very entertaining.” “Dreamgirls” July 16 - 22 Winner of six Tony awards and two Oscars, Henry Krieger and Tom Eyen’s Dreamgirls follows the

Live in a Gracious, Affordable, Assisted Lifestyle with Peace of Mind.

3900 Sullivan Drive Swansea, IL (618) 234-8910

844 Cambridge Blvd. O’Fallon, IL (618) 624-9906

Call Today to Arrange Your Tour at Any of Our 3 Locations and Enjoy a Delicious Complimentary Lunch!

May 24, 2012

On the Edge of the Weekend

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

21


The Arts Artistic adventures SLSO announces summer schedule T h e 2 0 11 - 2 0 1 2 s u b s c r i p t i o n series has ended, but there are still plenty of opportunities to enjoy the St. Louis Symphony at Powell Hall. Seven Live at Powell Hall performances take place in May and June, offering a wide variety of genres, styles and sounds. The summer schedule includes: Saturday, June 9: Sounds of New Orleans: A Tribute to Louis Armstrong: Renowned jazz trump e t e r a n d v o c a l i s t B y ro n Stripling brings the Big Easy to Powell Hall. Together with the St. Louis Symphony, he’ll pay loving tribute to the man known the world over as Satchmo. Friday, June 15: Wynonna: The country music superstar joins the Symphony for a not-to-bemissed performance. From her days performing with her mother Naomi as the Judds, to her smash s o l o c a r e e r, Wy n o n n a ’ s s o l d millions of records and inspired legions of fans. She’ll sing her favorite country hits, with a few Symphony surprises as well. Sponsored by Sam and Marilyn Fox F r i d a y, J u n e 2 2 : C l a s s i c a l Mystery Tour: The legendary m u s i c o f T h e B e a t l e s i s f ro n t and center at Powell Hall, as the Symphony performs with a Fab Four that will take you through more than 30 Beatles classics. After sold-out engagements in 2010, the Classical Mystery Tour returns for one night only this summer. Sponsored by Moneta Group Since the St. Louis Symphony introduced the Live at Powell Hall concerts three years ago, 116,000 tickets have been sold. About 50% of people attending the concerts are first-time attendees. Ti c k e t s f o r a l l s e v e n o f t h e Live at Powell Hall summer concerts are still available and m a y b e p u rc h a s e d b y c a l l i n g 314-534-1700, at the Powell Hall Box office, or on-line at www. stlsymphony.org Founded in 1880, the St. Louis Symphony is the second-oldest orchestra in the country and is widely c o n s i d e re d o n e o f t h e world’s finest. In September 2005, internationally acclaimed conductor David Robertson became the 12th Music Director and second American-born c o n d u c t o r i n t h e O rc h e s t r a ’ s history. In its 132nd season, the St. Louis Symphony continues to strive for artistic excellence, fiscal responsibility and community connection. In addition to its regular concert performances at Powell Hall, the Symphony is an integral part of the St. Louis c o m m u n i t y, p r e s e n t i n g m o r e t h a n 2 5 0 f re e e d u c a t i o n a n d community partnership programs e a c h y e a r. I n J u n e 2 0 0 8 , t h e Symphony launched Building Our Business, which takes a proactive, t w o - p ro n g e d a p p ro a c h : b u i l d audiences and re-invigorate the Symphony’s brand making the St. Louis Symphony and Powell Hall the place to be; and build the base for enhanced institutional commitment and donations. This is all part of a larger strategic plan adopted in May 2009 that includes new core ideology and a 10-year strategic vision focusing on artistic and institutional

22

excellence, doubling the existing audience, and revenue growth across all key operating areas.

Grand Center seeks dancers for fall event Grand Center Inc. invites individual dancers and dance troupes to apply for the sixth annual Dancing in the Street Festival, held Sept. 29 on outdoor stages in Grand Center. Dancers and dance companies can submit an application, including a DVD of a recent performance through the May 18 deadline. Participants will be notified of their acceptance by June 30. To submit a performance application, please contact Amy Johnson at 314-2891517 or ajohnson@grandcenter. org. Submission forms may also be obtained at www.grandcenter.org. All applications will be reviewed by a selection panel. Hosting approximately 15,000 visitors each year, Dancing in the Street is one of the largest outdoor dance festivals in the region. Last year more than 1,000 dancers from 65 local and regional dance companies captivated audiences on four outdoor stages and on the streets of Grand Center. The juried street festival embodies the beauty, art and athleticism of dance, incorporating a variety of styles from traditional ballet to hip-hop and more. Grand Center is the major arts and entertainment district in the St. Louis region and is home to more than 30 arts organizations that demonstrate the depth and diversity of the city’s cultural life. The district hosts more than 1,500 cultural events each year and welcomes over 1.5 million visitors annually. Grand Center ’s artistic renaissance began with the restoration of Powell Hall and the Fabulous Fox Theatre and continues today with the growing vitality of restaurants, retail, commercial and residential development. For more information about Grand Center and Grand Center Inc. visit grandcenter. org.

view of the power of greed and desire by James M. Cain. The Rep’s Imaginary Theatre Company season of live, professional theatre for young audiences will include Hansel and Gretel: The Next Generation, A Gnome for Christmas and Annie Oakley. For complete play descriptions, run dates, subscription package details, pricing and benefits, touring schedules (ITC) and a list of audience enrichment and accessibility options, please visit The Rep’s website at http://www. repstl.org. The Rep is also excited to cop re s e n t Wa r H o r s e w i t h t h e Fabulous Fox Theatre in their U.S. Bank Broadway Series March 1324, 2013. Winner of five 2011 Tony Awards®, including Best Play, War Horse is a remarkable tale of courage, loyalty and friendship s e t i n E n g l a n d i n 1 9 1 4 . Wa r Horse is not included in any Rep package, but subscribers to The Rep will have the opportunity to purchase full-price single tickets for any performance before they go on sale to the general public. For performances March 19-24, 2013, the prime center mezzanine section is reserved exclusively for purchase by Repertory Theatre of St. Louis season ticket holders until Labor Day, 2012. An order form will be mailed to subscribers this summer. The Rep’s 2012-2013 season subscription campaign is underway, with packages available

for the Mainstage and Studio Theatre series. Subscribers can save substantially over the cost of purchasing individual tickets to shows and enjoy exclusive benefits by purchasing season tickets at The Rep Box Office (located inside the Loretto-Hilton Center) or by calling (314) 968-4925. Subscription packages range in price from $87-$423 for six Mainstage shows and $93-$144 for three Studio Theatre shows. Additional Mainstage Series discounts are also available for senior citizens (65 and older) and full-time students. Subscription benefits include free parking at the Loretto-Hilton Center, special discounts and advance ordering opportunities, informative subscriber newsletters from Artistic Director Steven Woolf, free ticket "insurance" and free, unlimited ticket exchanges within the same production run, providing the ultimate in schedule flexibility. Parents can introduce their children to the wonder of live, professional theatre with special pricing that makes any Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday night a Family Night at The Rep! Young people (ages 10-18) can enjoy an entire Mainstage series of six plays for only $60 when purchased with a full-price adult subscription. Study Guides are available for free download from The Rep’s website t o e n h a n c e t h e t h e a t re - g o i n g experience with before- and afterthe-show activities.

In addition, selected matinee and evening Mainstage performances f e a t u re f re e , h a l f - h o u r P o s t Performance Discussions with the cast to discuss the play just performed; two evening performances in the final week of each Mainstage production are preceded by Pre-Performance Presentations to introduce the world of the show. The Rep is also pleased to offer accessibility services for sight- or hearing-challenged audiences. The Mainstage theatre is equipped with an FM listening system for the hard of hearing. Headsets are available FREE of charge at all performances. In addition, The Rep offers Open Captioning for the deaf or hard of hearing on the last Sunday matinee of each Mainstage production. Blind or sight-impaired patrons may enhance their theatre experience through Audio Description. Recorded guides are available for all non-preview performances. For information about these services, call the Box Office at (314) 968-4925. Deaf and speech-disabled patrons may use the Relay Missouri service by calling (800) 735-2466 (TTY) or (800) 735-2460 (voice). For more information about The Rep’s 2012-2013 Mainstage season, to request a free season brochure, or to charge subscriptions with MasterCard, Visa, American Express or Discover, call the Box Office at (314) 968-4925. Additional information on all 2012-2013 Mainstage and ITC productions is available at http://www.repstl.org.

The Rep announces Mainstage schedule The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis (The Rep) is proud to announce its 2012-2013 season of performances on the Mainstage, as well as the three productions to be performed by its Imaginary Theatre Company (ITC). The three productions to be included in the Studio Theatre season will be announced in July. The Mainstage series opens at the Loretto-Hilton Center for the Performing Arts, 130 Edgar Road (on the campus of Webster University), Webster Groves, on September 5, 2012 with Neil Simon’s semiautobiographical classic, Brighton Beach Memoirs. Other productions in the Mainstage series, which continues through April 2013, include: the world premiere of Daddy Long Legs, an elegant musical love story with music and lyrics by Paul Gordon and book by John Caird; The Foreigner, a wild and wacky comedy by Larry Shue; Good People, a poignant look at the "haves" and "have-nots" and a standout hit of the 2011 Broadway season by Tony Award-winner David Lindsay-Abaire; a fresh adaptation of Jane Austen’s timeless classic, Sense and Sensibility, by Jon Jory; and the noir thriller Double Indemnity, a dark and treacherous

On the Edge of the Weekend

May 24, 2012

#T2161

#T2181


The Arts Arts calendar Thursday, May 24 Faith Ringgold: American Quilts, Foundry Art Centre, St. Charles, 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Runs through June 1. Currents 106: Chelsea Knight, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. Warhol's Polaroids: A Method Exhibit, St. Louis University Museum of Art , St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Runs through June 10. A Room Divided, The Eugene Field House & Toy Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 2012 Artists-In-Residence Exhibition, Craft Alliance Kranzberg Arts Center Galleries, St. Louis, noon to 6:00 p.m., Runs through July 8. Star Trek the Exhibition, St. Louis Science Center, St. Louis, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Runs through May 28. Thomas D. Gipe, Jacoby Arts Center, Alton, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. The Art of Illustration, E d w a r d s v i l l e A r t s C e n t e r, Edwardsville, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Spring to Dance Festival, Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center, St. Louis, Doors open 5:30 p.m.

Friday, May 25 Faith Ringgold: American Quilts, Foundry Art Centre, St. Charles, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through June 1. Currents 106: Chelsea Knight, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. Warhol's Polaroids: A Method Exhibit, St. Louis University Museum of Art , St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Runs through June 10. A Room Divided, The Eugene Field House & Toy Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 2012 Artists-In-Residence Exhibition, Craft Alliance Kranzberg Arts Center Galleries, St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Runs through July 8. Star Trek the Exhibition, St. Louis Science Center, St. Louis, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Runs through May 28. Thomas D. Gipe, Jacoby Arts Center, Alton, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. The Art of Illustration, E d w a r d s v i l l e A r t s C e n t e r, Edwardsville, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Spring to Dance Festival, Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center, St. Louis, Doors open 5:30 p.m.

Saturday, May 26 Faith Ringgold: American Quilts, Foundry Art Centre, St. Charles, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through June 1. Currents 106: Chelsea Knight, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. In the Still Epiphany, Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through October 27. Warhol's Polaroids: A Method Exhibit, St. Louis University Museum of Art , St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Runs through June 10. A Room Divided, The Eugene Field House & Toy Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 2012 Artists-In-Residence Exhibition, Craft Alliance Kranzberg Arts Center Galleries, St. Louis, noon to 6:00 p.m., Runs through July 8. Star Trek the Exhibition, St. Louis Science Center, St. Louis, 9:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., Runs through May 28.

Thomas D. Gipe, Jacoby Arts Center, Alton, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. Spring to Dance Festival, Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center, St. Louis, Doors open 5:30 p.m. Specticast presents: La Traviata, Wildey Theatre, Edwardsville, 3:00 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

Sunday, May 27 Faith Ringgold: American Quilts, Foundry Art Centre, St. Charles, noon to 4:00 p.m., Runs through June 1. Currents 106: Chelsea Knight, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. Warhol's Polaroids: A Method Exhibit, St. Louis University Museum of Art , St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Runs through June 10. A Room Divided, The Eugene Field House & Toy Museum, St. Louis, noon to 4:00 p.m. 2012 Artists-In-Residence Exhibition, Craft Alliance Kranzberg Arts Center Galleries, St. Louis, noon to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 8. Star Trek the Exhibition, St. Louis Science Center, St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Runs through May 28., Runs through May 28. Thomas D. Gipe, Jacoby Arts Center, Alton, noon to 4:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. Specticast presents: La Traviata, Wildey Theatre, Edwardsville, 3:00 p.m.

Monday, May 28 Star Trek the Exhibition, St. Louis Science Center, St. Louis, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Tuesday, May 29 Faith Ringgold: American Quilts, Foundry Art Centre, St. Charles, 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Runs through June 1. Currents 106: Chelsea Knight, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. Thomas D. Gipe, Jacoby Arts Center, Alton, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1.

Wednesday, May 30 Ink Techniques Class, Lost Arts and Antiques, Edwardsville, 6:30 p.m. Faith Ringgold: American Quilts, Foundry Art Centre, St. Charles, 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Runs through June 1. Currents 106: Chelsea Knight, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. In the Still Epiphany, Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, St. Louis, noon to 5:00 p.m., Runs through October 27. Warhol's Polaroids: A Method Exhibit, St. Louis University Museum of Art , St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Runs through June 10. Thomas D. Gipe, Jacoby Arts Center, Alton, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. 2012 Artists-In-Residence Exhibition, Craft Alliance Kranzberg Arts Center Galleries, St. Louis, noon to 6:00 p.m., Runs through July 8.

Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. Warhol's Polaroids: A Method Exhibit, St. Louis University Museum of Art , St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Runs through June 10. Thomas D. Gipe, Jacoby Arts Center, Alton, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. 2012 Artists-In-Residence Exhibition, Craft Alliance Kranzberg Arts Center Galleries, St. Louis, noon to 6:00 p.m., Runs

through July 8.

1.

Friday, June 1 Opening Reception: Folk Fiber & Flowers, Edwardsville Arts Center, Edwardsville, 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Faith Ringgold: American Quilts, Foundry Art Centre, St. Charles, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Currents 106: Chelsea Knight, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Runs through July

Warhol's Polaroids: A Method Exhibit, St. Louis University Museum of Art , St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Runs through June 10. Thomas D. Gipe, Jacoby Arts Center, Alton, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through July 1. 2012 Artists-In-Residence Exhibition, Craft Alliance Kranzberg Arts Center Galleries, St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Runs through July 8.

$4,175 off MSRP* *Includes all applicable rebates and incentives. Includes Lincoln Exchange promotion of $1,000 exchange cash when you trade in a qualifying vehicle. Applies to this specific VIN # only. Similar discounts taken off of other vehicles. See dealer for details.

1000 2LMDJ6JK9CBL15268

$5,001 off MSRP*

$6,749 off MSRP*

$4,580 off MSRP*

*Includes all applicable rebates and incentives. Includes Lincoln Exchange promotion of $1,000 exchange cash when you trade in a qualifying vehicle. Applies to this specific VIN # only. Similar discounts taken off of other vehicles. See dealer for details.

*Includes all applicable rebates and incentives. Includes Lincoln Exchange promotion of $1,000 exchange cash when you trade in a qualifying vehicle. Applies to this specific VIN # only. Similar discounts taken off of other vehicles. See dealer for details.

*Includes all applicable rebates and incentives. Includes Lincoln Exchange promotion of $1,000 exchange cash when you trade in a qualifying vehicle. Applies to this specific VIN # only. Similar discounts taken off of other vehicles. See dealer for details.

1,000

1,000

1,000 1LNHL9ER8CG800025

3LNHL2GC4CR811662

Jack Schmitt Lincoln

2LMHJ5FR7CBL52899

1820 Vandalia Collinsville, IL 1-800-255-3673 www.jackschmittlincoln.com

*Includes all applicable rebates and incentives. Includes Lincoln Exchange promotion of $1,000 exchange cash when you trade in a qualifying vehicle. Applies to this specific VIN # only. Similar discounts taken off of other vehicles. See dealer for details.

Do you distribute flyers, brochures, newsletters for your business?

We

Can help you save money!

QUALITY Products AFFORDABLE Pricing Amy Schaake Advertising Mgr. 656.4700 Ext 35

Thursday, May 31 Faith Ringgold: American Quilts, Foundry Art Centre, St. Charles, 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Runs through June 1. Currents 106: Chelsea Knight, St.

May 24, 2012

On the Edge of the Weekend

23


Classified

Jewelry

922

John Geimer Jewelry 229 N. Main St. Edwardsville 692-1497 Same Day Ring Sizing Jewelry Repair Diamond & Stone Replacement

WE BUY GOLD AND JEWELRY Garage Floors

• • • • •

949

Make your Garage feel like another room in your Home! Epoxy Application for Concrete Cracks repaired Covers pitting & stains Reduces moisture, bugs & cleanings Installation of baseboards & cabinets

Call Paul (618) 444-2123 AMAZING CONCRETE RESURFACING

Cleaning

958

Painting

960

Caring Beyond Cleaning

•Licensed, Bonded, Insured •RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL •CARPET, UPHOLSTERY, TILE & GROUT •HARDWATER REMOVAL/ SHOWER DOORS •BIOHAZARD CERTIFIED Call us today for a free quote on weekly, biweekly, monthly, one time, move in move out, repossession and foreclosure cleaning

Full Service Company

* Interior/exterior Painting * Power-washing * Deck Staining/Restoration * Exterior Mold Removal * Drywall Repair Environmentally Friendly Excellent Quality, Great Prices (618) 210-6105 (618) 637-2331 christyandsonspainting.com

JIM BRAVE PAINTING 20 Years Experience! • Wallpaper • Specialty Painting • Inside or Outside Work • Power Washing • Deck Refinishing Call: (618) 654-1349 or cell phone: (618) 444-0293 PAINTING DECKS/FENCES Stain/Paint Powerwashing

• No job too small • Insured • Local • Will beat all competitors Written bids

DAN GRAY 656-8806 910-7874

Roofing & Siding

961

A GENTLE TOUCH

IN

YOUR HOME

Interview me.... Joyce Tel: 618-980-6858 “LIKE” us on Facebook!

Got A Service to Sell? Advertise it in the classifieds! To list your service call the classified department at 656-4700. The Edwardsville Intelligencer reserves the right to remove ads with past due accounts.

May 24, 2012

TOWNER HOMES Affordable Quality Builders for 25+ years Offering Replacement Roofing

INSURED & BONDED

969

•Drywall repair •Remodeling •Roof repair •Tile work •Replace fixtures •Caulking Tim Russo 618-979-2006 Trimming • Tree Removal Stump Removal • Lot Clearing Overgrowth Maintenance • Bobcat Work • Sod Installation 60ft Bucket Truck Chippers Ladders Free Estimates Fully Insured 15% Off For Seniors And Veterans

Lawn & Home Care

967

(618) 696-9418 BOB’S

Insured

HAUL ALMOST ANYTHING/ EVERYTHING Remove Unwanted Debris From Basement Garage, Attic; Wherever! VERY REASONABLE RETIRED DEPUTY SHERIFF

692-0182

• Remodeling • Painting • Carpentry • Drywall • Lighting & Ceiling Fans • Windows & Doors Most Home Repairs Insured 20 Years Experience

Call Lee: (618) 581-5154 MASTER CRAFTSMAN Carpentry, 30 Years Decks, Garages, Remodeling, Home Repair Basement Finishing Ceramic Tile Small Jobs Welcome Reasonable Rates Andy 618-659-1161 (cell) 618-401-7785

Darrell’s Carpentry Plus

• Mowing • Spring Clean-Up • Fertilizing • Landscape Installation • Landscape Maintenance 656-7725 GatewayLawn.com

963

HANDYMAN SERVICE

Call Bob: (618) 345-9131

Insured

Driveway & Hauling

BOB’S HANDYMAN SERVICE Remodeling & Repair Drywall Finished Carpentry Painting Ceramic tile Build & Repair Decks Exterior House And Deck Washing Landscaping Blinds & Draperies Light Fixture & Ceiling Fans No Job Too Small Insured Call Bob Rose 978-8697

Home Remodeling & Waterproofing 971

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL

Call Stan Towner: 581-4002

618-659-5055

www.mrhandyman.com

•Spring Lawn & Landscape Clean Up •Gutter Cleaning • Window Cleaning • Power Wash: Deck, Siding, Patio • Driveway & Deck Sealing • MULCH WORK • Landscape Work 25 Years Experience

Highest quality work priced right! References

Techs highly skilled-all trades Professional - Safe - Reliable “Bonded and Insured”

LET ME FIX IT! • Mowing • Trimming • Edging Lawns starting at $25!! • One Time Cuts • Weekly • As Requested No Contract Required

OUTDOOR SERVICES

(618) 920-0233

• Residential • Small Business • Move In/ Move Out

Handyman

Air Conditioning/ Heating 976

Free Estimates Licensed and Insured

www.pristine-cleaning.biz

Sunny Surface Cleaning

966

Christy & Sons Painting

Interior/Exterior

PRISTINE CLEANING

Tree Service

Foster & Sons Lawn Service

Ceramic Tile Decks & Fences DOORS: Entrances Interior & Trim Patio Drywall Repairs Paint & Texture REMODELING: Basements Bathrooms Kitchens Replacement Windows Room Additions Rental Rehabs Service Upgrades Storm Damage

Insured & Bonded 656-6743

Tree Removal

New Construction And Remodeling 618-401-0100

Bush & Shrub Trimming &

30 Years Experience

Lawn Cutting & Trimming

Removal Landscape Mulching Residential & Commercial

Fully Insured

618-459-3330 618-973-8422 Pick The Service You Need From The Classifeds!

Insured References • Room Additions • Kitchens & Baths • Finished Basements • Windows & Doors • Siding, Soffit, Fascia • Decks • Flooring (Ceramic Tile) (Laminates) (Hardwood)

Proudly servicing the area for over 25 years. Free estimates Financing available Repairs and installations

Call us for all of your heating and cooling needs.

656-9386 www.garwoodsheating.com

Masonry & Concrete

978

Edwardsville Concrete & Masonry •Driveways •Sidewalks • Patios • Foundations • All Brickwork Tuckpointing • Chimney’s Fully Insured

618-944-3350 Home Improvements

979

Call Bill Nettles with WRN Services CONSTRUCTION REMODELING COMMERCIAL PROPERTY MAINTENANCE An insured contractor providing quality crafted work. A custom wood work specialist with labor rates starting at $30 per hour!

618 974-9446

MANSFIELD BUILDERS • Flooring • Drywall • Cabinet Installation • General Remodeling

Call Kyle: (618) 223-8509 Electrical

981

Randy Moore Repair Service, Inc. “24 Hour Emergency Service” 35 Years Experience - Code Analysis - Troubleshooting - Service Repairs And Upgrades - All Electrical Items - Install Lights & Fixtures - Complete Rewire

www.randymoore repairservice.com

618-656-7405 Cell 618-980-0791

Find The Service You Need In The Classifieds! The Edge – Page

24


Classified Automotive

Happy Ads

Have Something To Sell? “SELL IT WITH PICS” The Intelligencer is enhancing your liner ads! Insert a small photo with the text of your ad.

CALL FOR DETAILS 656-4700 ext. 27

THIS +7=4,*YOU...

...If What You Advertised Sells In

Call 656-4700 ext 27 To Place An Ad!

120

HERE LOOK

Have Something To Sell?? “Sell It With Pics” The Intelligencer is enhancing your liner ads!!!! insert a small photo with the text of your ad. CALL FOR DETAILS 656-4700 EXT. 27 Lost & Found

206

Help Wanted General

88 MUSTANG convertible, black on black, 1 owner, heated garage, V-8 5.0 5 speed. 93K miles $6,500. (618) 656-6775.

Driver & trimmer operator for small lawncare business. Full time starting immediately. 618655-0273.

TOP PRICE PAID!! We Buy Junk Cars Towing Included 618-960-4008

Licensed hair stylists to rent space in established professional salon. Commission plan available on retail sales. Call 618-659-2149 or e-mail: salonresponses70@gmail.com

Service & Parts

225

YOUR JUNK CAR EQUALS FAST CASH!! ANY CONDITION FREE TOWING CONTACT US ANYTIME 314-276-4208

Boats

240

125

2003 Aloha 180 Pontoon w/9.9 Mercury. Fresh tune up and service. Asking $6850.00. May LOST Rose Breasted Cockatoo. consider older pontoon on trade Lost on May 16th Glen Carbon 618-978-5884. area. If you find “Rosie” please call 618-444-0284.

Lawn & Garden

305

PART TIME MEAT CUTTER PLEASE RESPOND TO P.O. BOX 347 HAMEL, IL. 62046 Part-time Position Available This is a general labor position working in our newspaper’s post production operation. - Immediate opening (15-30 Hours Per Week) - Must be able to work late Friday night - Enjoy hands-on training - Mechanically inclined - Must understand what team-work means - Possess problem solving skills - Skilled in both verbal and written communication

Carrier Routes 401

Rt 35 — Newspaper carrier needed in the area of Bunn Ave, Chapman St, Columbia St, Hickory St, Mill St, Orchard St, State St. There are approximately 25 papers in this route. The papers need to be delivered by 5:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday, 8:30 a.m. Saturdays. If you are interested in this route, please call the Intelligencer at 656-4700 ext 40

Misc. Merchandise

for

Class A CDL OTR Drivers Must be 23 years old, have 2 years current experience, Clean MVR and Good CSA Score. Full Benefit Package - Home on Weekends.

Contact Recruiting at

1-800-527-9486

Yard Sales

Help wanted Office

3 Piece sofa set, excellent condition $195. Please call 618920-9207.

K

puppies, kittens or any other pet!!! Want to know more? CALL US FOR DETAILS 656-4700 EXT 27

315

Part time Admin. Asst. position for Glen Carbon financial firm, 25-30/hrs per week: must have extensive office experience & proficiency in MS Office Suite. $12-14/hr. Email resume to: cpfgfinancial@gmail.com

1099

BARN SALE 4506 NORTH STATE ROUTE 157 EDWARDSVILLE (1 MILE NORTH RP LUMBER) THURSDAY 4PM-8PM FRIDAY 7AM-6PM SATURDAY 7AM-2PM Washer/Dryer, Fridge Red Leather Chair Microwave, Plants Etched Glassware Snow Shoes Kodak Slide Carousels

May 24, 2012

426

15ft Boat & Motor; Various TV Sets; Sears Rotary Arm Saw; Table Saw; Propane Tank; Various Tools & Supplies. Call for appointment 656-9251.

L

Small Family Owned trucking company looking

Yard Sales

TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL 217-851-5320

CARRIER NEEDED!

C.K.S. METAL CORP. (618) 656-5306 M-F 8:00-5:00 SAT 8-12 Come in and fill out EDWARDSVILLE, IL Help Wanted an application at the #1 Copper $3.05/lb. General 305 #2 Copper $2.95/lb. Edwardsville Intelligencer Automotive 206 Yellow Brass $2.02/lb. 117 North 2nd Street $8.50 per hour Stainless $.62/lb. Edwardsville, IL Cleaners needed Painted Siding $.60/lb. 09 Chevy Cobalt LT. 2-Door, M-TH 4pm-9pm and Scrap Alum $.50-.81/lb Equal Opportunity Employer Imperial Blue/Metallic. Cloth F & SUN 2pm-9pm in Alum Cans $.56/lb. PT Office Mgr./Admin. Asst.: Clean Alum Wheels $.81/lb. interior, rear spoiler, CD/MP3, Edwardsville retail store must have QuickBooks, Mic. Electric Motors Auto transmission, 25,012miles, Call 1-800-537-1376 ext 311 $.32/lb. Office, time/task mgt. expertise. Seal Units Excellent condition $12,500. $.25 ATTENTION Brewster, Maryville, IL: apply @ Batteries 656-3194. $.30 COLLEGE STUDENTS jobs@brewster-co.com Alum Transmissions $.20 & 2012 HS Grads Insulated Wire#1-$1.20 #2-1.10 Subway at $15 base-appt, FT/PT schedScrap Iron - $200.-$230./Ton Edwardsville Park Plaza ules, sales/svc, no exp nec, CHECK ALL OUR PRICES AT Manager Wanted! all ages 17+, conditions apply CKSMETALCORP.COM We offer Competitive Pay, 618-223-6184 CALL FOR TODAY’S PRICES!! Vacation, Sick Pay, Retirement Plan, Healthcare. EST. CONSTRUCTION CO. dedicatMurray Riding Mower, used 1 ed to quality, excellence & cusyr. on city lot, 12.5h.p., 40” Send resume and tomer service seeking remodelmower-width, $650.00. 16” salary history to: ing & repair professional. Min Band Saw, self-standing, Shepard Subway 5yrs exp in carpentry, electrical, $150.00/OBO. Table Drill Press, Enterprises, Inc. plumbing. Tools, truck & driver’s $125.00/OBO. Sears Table #2 Professional Park Dr. license req. Call 618-288-7710 Saw, cast-iron, heavy-duty, Maryville, IL 62062 $125.00/OBO. 618/288-9584. FT Excavating Superdenient: must have equip, supervisor, The Edwardsville School District has the following project & task mgmt exp., CDL Pets 450 opportunities available: pfrd apply@Brewster, Maryville, IL: em: jobs@brewster-co.com Part time Food Service Workers The successful applicant must have experience in food service, sanitation certificate preferred. The positions are 3 to 7 hours a day. Salary is to be We can help sell determined by the collective those special bargaining agreement. Nancy Spina Personnel, ECUSD7 708 St Louis St. Edwardsville, IL 62025 www.ecusd7.org

455

Houses For Rent

705

4 BR, 2 BA, Edw. historic Leclaire area; walking distance to park; complete remodld; w/d hkup; fncd yrd. $1290/mo. + dep. 618/830-3429 or 618/304-3638 $1075 Reduced! 3BD, 2BA, 2Ksf ranch, 2 car gar, w/o bsmt. #3 Singletree Lane., Glen Carbon. Call Agent: 618/789-5863 1, 2, & 3 BR Maintenance-free Homes & Villas New construction

DOLCE PROPERTIES www.dolceproperties.com 618/972-5415 2 bedroom, newly remodeled. Central air and heat. 2 car garage and workshop. Downtown Edwardsville. $900/per month. 618-792-1704. 3 BR, 2 BA: large house in Montclaire, Edw.; 2500 s.f.; LR, FR, DR, laundry rm, back yard. $1250/mo. Call 314/775-6368. 3 BR, 2BA central Edw.: 635 E. Vandalia. LR, DR, office, bsmt, fridge, stove, AC $1175/mo. Students prefer’d 618-670-9166 4BR, 4BA newer home in great Edw. neighborhood on cul-de-sac! NICE! 3 car gar., large fin. bsmt & yard. $2100/mo./obo 618-581-1999

Apts, Duplexes, & Homes Visit our website www.glsrent.com 656-2230 Holiday Shores lake community home for rent 3200 sq. ft. 4 bedroom, all the extras available $1650 per month.. 618-540-0263. Large 4 bedroom house in rural Alhambra: large yard, 3 car garage, deck, fireplace, appliances. No pets. $1200/month. 618-972-3891. Residential & Commercial Properties for Rent: Office & retail space, apartments, duplexes, homes. Meyer & Assoc. 656-1824 Property Management Services Available. www.meyerproperties.com

ARE YOU: •Renting •Buying •Selling

Real Estate Advertising In The Intelligencer

1099

HUNTER’S CROSSING SUBDIVISION GARAGE SALE FRIDAY NIGHT 6/1 4P.M.-8P.M. SATURDAY 6/2 8A.M.-12NOON LOCATED BEHIND HOME DEPOT

on Highway 159, Edwardsville Look for Balloons on Mailboxes!

Yard Sales

1099

SUBDIVISION YARD SALE COVERED BRIDGE ESTATES COVERED BRIDGE LANE GLEN CARBON FRIDAY MAY 18th 3:00PM-7:00PM SATURDAY MAY 19th 8:00AM-1:00PM

The Edge – Page

25


Classified Apts/Duplexes For Rent

710

1 Bedroom apartment, water and trash paid. 327 M Street, Edwardsville $550/month 618-581-5154. 1 Bedroom Edw, Range, refrig, dishwasher. W/S/T provided. No pets/smoke $585. 656-1480

OPEN HOUSE, SUN., JUNE 13 1:00-3:00 P

Apts/Duplexes For Rent

710

Roommates

COLLINSVILLE — 1 BR 1 BA, carport, nice area, good storage, W/S/T included. On site laundry, $495 month + deposit. 618-781-7692.

712

Share house with 3 male persons. Smoking environment. $325/mth plus deposit, utilities paid. 656-0498.

Your Home... Our Commu nit

y (618) 655-1188

Mobile Homes

IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY

1/2 month FREE rent For Rent 715 1 & 2 bedroom apartments, 1 Bedroom loft apartment, Also 5 minutes to SIUE 2 Bdr 1ba $500/mo; incl W/T/S. 1 bedroom duplex. Clean and 791-9062. 1st & last mo, will work w/dep

well maintained. CREDIT CHECK. No pets, no smoking $585mth. $585dep. 656-8953.

No pets. 618-780-3937. Move in Special 1st Month 1/2 off 1 excellent 3BR, 1200 sq.ft. TH: 2 BR, 1 Bath Glen Carbon Office Space Collinsville, near 157/70; 12 QUAIL HOLLOW, w/d hook-ups, For Rent 725 min. to SIUE, FP, DW, W/D, ceil- $675 (618)346-7878 www.osbornproperties.com ing fans, cable, sound walls, offOffice space for lease at IL 157 st. prkng. Sm pets OK, yr. lse. and Center Grove Road, up to 30 $780/mo. 618/345-9610 give 3200sf, $2300/mth. 656-1824 AM/PM phone. meyerproperties.com 2 & 3 BR DUPLEX: 2 BA, Esic RENT REDUCED! newly rennoAll utilities paid!!! area. 1 car garage. $900-$950 2 bd apt ($825) 1 bd apt ($700) vated 800 Sq. Ft. office or store per month. 618/541-5831 or Newly painted, new carpet, space, prime location, Troy Rd., 618/558-5058. Edw. 618/977-9459. hardwood floors and coin laun2 Bedroom 1.5 bath TH, Edw.; dry facilities on site. Quite No pets, Appl. fee required neighborhood, close to downMultiple house available for rent town and St. Boniface Church. @dandiproperties.com Call or text Jamie 618-550-3309 618-520-2813

MP PROPERTIES

2 Bedroom APARTMENT, Edwardsville, minutes from SIUE: 1.5 bath, W/D hookup. $625/month. 618-407-5333

Homes For Sale

Nice 2 bedroom apartment. Near SIUE $650 per month. 660-281-9291.

EdwardsvilleHomes.com

NICE 2 bedroom apt, large 2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 bath town rooms, walkin closet, coin-op home $665 per month, no pets. laundry. 10 minutes to SIUE. 692-7147. $525/mo. 618-806-0220. 2 BR apt., $550/mo. Maryville, TROY, 2 Br Duplex Apt, WST, stove, refrig. Newly Close to downtown & highways remodeled, off street parking. $525/mo + Deposit 656-3256 10 minutes from SIUE. Now available 618-779-0430. 2 BR LOFT, newly remodeled: DW, micro, stove, frig, garbge disp, w/d hkup. New kit/ba/wi/dr $735 incl wt/sw/tr 618/593-0173

Roommates

712

Realty services exclusively for buyers. Consultant-level support without additional costs. Home Buyers Relocation Services! In our 21st year without a single listing. 6620 Center Grove Road, Edwardsville; 618656-5588

Lots For Sale

Share 4 BEDROOM HOUSE on Available Now! 2 & 3 bed- Esic Drive near rooms. Ask about our specials. Edwardsville(YMCA). Fur692-9310 www.rentchp.com nished room $375/month $375/deposit Utilities/cable washer/dryer included. No pets/no smoking 618-307-4473.

County y t n u o C Y s n o P e s i d m a O o M EC n Madiso

HOMES E FR . 20

H

in e in Magaz l E s ta te in c e 1 9 9 0 a e R e g S in e audid Il li n o is e LG Tha Your Are e s te rn S o u th w

n Ja

012 APRIL 2

state & for Real E ices Home Serv

Y CT.,TRO OKFIELD O R B 0 12

0 $499o,n9p0age 19 re

See mo

Cover

Offe Home

red By

liance l A x a Re/M Quality aturing

:

e Rd. 531 Belt Lin IL Collinsville, y 111 (618) 345-2 This home listed b

ww

sonCo w. M a d i

entre Realty C altors e tial One Pruden anker Brown R ors ll B alt e e R w n ld n o a C 21 Hartm ry tu n e C k FCB Ban Realty, Inc. rk Landma Wooff

untyH

et omes.n

es deliv ty Hom n Coun o is d a have M 0 x20 to .656.470 8 1 6 ll a C

May 24, 2012

211 WOLF AVENUE, HAMEL ADORABLE 2BR home in Edwardsville School Dist. Many updates to the outside of the home as well as many upgrades on the inside. Large fenced yard. Very efficient. 1 year home warranty. $113,000

CALL NORMA KASTEN (618) 377-9933

CALL MARY JANE COLLINS (618) 210-8061

CALL MARY JANE COLLINS (618) 210-8061

MARYVILLE - LOOKING FOR PRIVACY, ACREAGE, pole barn, & extra living quarters? Spacious brick ranch sits WAY back on its own 1.5 acres w/a pole barn. 3BR/3BA. Gorgeous kitchen. TRULY A MUST SEE!

EDWARDSVILLE 4BR/4BA home situated on 4 beautiful acres with a private pond. Updates from top to bottom on this home. Custom kitchen. Master suite with elegant spa bath. Supersized deck w/spacious lower patio. $369,900

FOR FREE 24 HR RECORDED PRICE & INFO CALL DEBBIE BURDGE 800-489-1481 EXT. 3003

CALL SUSAN LANDING, MANAGING BROKER (618) 779-7777

HOME SITES FOR SALE or 100 ACRES FOR SALE EDWARDSVILLE - 100 Acres +/- with frontage, timber, & 3 acre lake. Seller will divide 100+ acre farm into 5 acre tracts & up, you decide! CALL DEBBIE BURDGE (618) 531-2787

Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/REMAXPreferredPartners See More Of Our Listings At Our Website: www.YourILHome.com

www.theintelligencer.com

Looking to Move? WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED!!! THE LEADING REAL ESTATE MAGAZINE IN SOUTHWESTERN ILLINOIS SINCE 1990

:

Alliance RE/Max ryville a M e tr en Realty C ies, Inc RE/Max Boeker Propert ent pm lo e nity Dev ealtors Commu rR ta ty S n u o . nC ate, Inc Madiso t Real Est mes.ne ociates ss A & r untyHo mes o Cisle C n o com/Ho Madis ig e n c e r. : ll t te a In e e th in g s a t s onlin Visit u a re a l e st a te li st siness. re a h your bu se a rc ered to

Fe

OPEN HOUSE, SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2-4 PM 9 HICKORY KNOLL, EDWARDSVILLE CHARMING 5BR/4BA on a gorgeous 1 1/2 acre wooded lot. Directions: Esic to Berkshire, Left on Hickory Knoll. $340,000

red by

es Offe

ervic ies & S

t

Proper

OPEN HOUSE, SAT., MAY 19, 10 AM-12 PM 909 ROLLING MEADOWS DR., MARYVILLE 3BR/3BA, 2663 sq. ft. not an ordinary ranch. Finished LL beyond expectations. Huge kitchen, great room. Large master suite, walk-in closet & private bath. Lots of upgrades including hardwood & ceramic flooring. www.kasten.biz $196,900

820

SUN RIDGE ESTATES Just past Fruit Rd, Edwardsville 2+ Acre Lots Call for special prices 618/792-9050 or 618/781-5934

Rental Rental Properties Properties

0 01 2 , .2 b Fe

OPEN HOUSE

Open House 512 East Ave, Edw Leclaire Lake Jun. 2, 10am-4pm 2BD, 2BA, CA, FP, 2 car detached garage, full bsmnt, fenced in yard. 217-556-1225.

ROOMMATE WANTED: Esic area $334/month plus utilities No smoking, no pets 618-509-3730

2 BR, 1.5 BA, Edw./Glen Cbn., near SIU: W/D hookups, off-st. pkng. $710 up to $745. 6926366. HSI Management Group

805

OPEN HOUSE

VIEW THE FULL COLOR EDITION ONLINE:

www.madisoncountyhomes.net or pickup your FREE copy at any of our 320 dropoff locations throughout Madison County The Edge – Page

26


Classified www.PruOne.com

For up to date listings and open house information visit: New Listing

New Listing

ON 4 +/- ACRES WITH 6BR/6 BA, 4 car garage, chef’s kitchen, finished walkout.

IMPRESSIVE CUSTOM ON 6.74 ACRES! 6 bedrooms, 3.5 baths. Finished walk-out. Stocked pond. Beautiful views.

New Listing

COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITY! 1 +/- acre parcel at Rt. 162 & 157. Easy access to interstate.

New Listing

SUMMER FUN! 2 +/- acres, 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, inground pool, hot tub, stocked pond.

$589,900 Edwardsville PR100366 SANDIE LAMANTIA (618) 978-2384

$450,000 Dorsey PR100375 SANDY LANE (618) 792-7918

$399,000 Glen Carbon PR100364 JEANNE HORNBERGER (618) 444-8899

$358,000 Troy PR100370 JANINE SHIELDS (618) 789-7111

New Listing

New Listing

New Listing

New Listing

WOODED 2.8 +/- ACRES just a short distance to Main St. 3 bedrooms, 4 bath, & occasional wildlife.

NICE BRICK 3BR/2BA, main floor laundry, appliances included, generous deck.

REMODELED HOME vaulted ceilings, walkout lower level, on 1 1/2 lots.

$180,000 Edwardsville PR100360 CAROLYN KOESTER (618) 791-6712

$199,000 Edwardsville PR100372 GIGI VIRTA (618) 781-6875

$136,900 Edwardsville PR100369 NORMA LINCK (618) 444-8733

ALL BRICK RANCH on 1.2 +/- acre, hardwood floors, oversized garage. Room to build. $119,900 Moro PR100365 NORMA LINCK (618) 444-8733

New Listing

BUNGALOW W/COTTAGE INFLUENCE! 9 & 11’ ceilings, hand scraped hardwood, patio, 4 yr. old home. $249,000 Glen Carbon PR100367 DEBORAH AHRENS (618) 604-4924

New Listing

INVITING RANCH! All appliances and blinds stay. Lrg. LR w/fireplace. Patio & fenced yard. $233,000 Glen Carbon PR100373 BETSY BUTLER (618) 972-2225

New Price

New Price

SPACIOUS 4 BEDROOM, 4 BATH 2 story, located in Homes of Center Grove. Screened porch. Close to park/schools. $269,900 Edwardsville PR100134

BEAUTIFUL 4 BEDROOM HOME with finished lower level in Vicksburg Commons. Must See! $259,000 Edwardsville PR100304

Search properties on the go by scanning our QR code with any smart phone or visit www.m.pruone.com and let the results lead you home!

Edwardsville 1012 Plummer Dr.

618-655-4100 New Price

OPENNew HOUSE SUN, MAR 20, 1-3 Price PM

New Price

OPENNew HOUSE SUN, MAR 20, 1-3 Price PM

New Price

New Price

2.18 ACRES, Edwardsville Schools, complete with beautiful 3 bedroom ranch style home. $244,900 Worden PR100314

DELIGHTFUL 2 STORY IN THE OAKS SUBDIVISION! 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2 car garage. $240,000 Edwardsville PR100224

LOTS OF HARDWOOD! 3 BR, 2 BA, 1957 sq. ft. Open floor plan, large kitchen, fenced, great landscaping. $214,900 Edwardsville PR100342

WALKING DISTANCE to trails, YMCA, plus easy commute to SIUE & St. Louis. $202,500 Edwardsville PR100355

DUNLAP LAKE four bedroom, two baths, fenced yard. Oversized garage, water privileges. $164,900 Edwardsville PR100264

LOCATION CLOSE TO BIKE TRAIL, shopping, Children’s Museum. 1 1/2 story 3 to 5 bedroom, 2 bath home. $130,000 Edwardsville PR100306

Featured Listing Featured Listing OPEN HOUSE SUN,Listing MAR 20, 1-3 Featured Listing Featured Listing Featured

New Price

PM

IMPRESSIVE with unique open floor plan! Great room with fireplace, covered lanai. Must See! $314,900 Edwardsville PR9808

GREAT OPPORTUNITY for first time buyer or investor. 3BR, 1 bath. W-O basement. Deep backyard. $109,900 Edwardsville PR100021

NEW & IRRESISTIBLE home has great room with custom fireplace, chef’s kitchen, luxury master suite & finished LL. $500,000 Edwardsville PR9174

IMPRESSIVE! This home has many unique features & is located on wooded cul-de-sac lot. Agent related. $369,900 Edwardsville PR8383

Featured Listing

OPEN SUN, MAY 27,20, 1-31-3 PM OPENHOUSE HOUSE SUN, MAR

OPEN HOUSE SUN, MAY 27, 1-3 PM OPEN HOUSE SUN, MAY 27, 1-3 PM

LAKESIDE at Dunlap Lake. Great location with 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, & terrific views! $299,900 Edwardsville PR9227

ALL BRICK 3 BR with large back yard, family room on main & lower levels. $170,000 Glen Carbon PR9810

OPEN HOUSE SUN, MAY 27, 1-3 PM

OPEN HOUSE SUN, MAY 27, 1-3 PM

281 Fountain Drive, Glen Carbon $500,000 OPEN SUN. 1-3 PM

1 Timber Stone Court, Glen Carbon $459,000 OPEN SUN. 1-3 PM

626 Grandview, Edwardsville $144,500 OPEN SUN. 1-3 PM

BETTY TREAT (618) 830-3952

DIANA MASSEY (618) 791-5024

BRENDA HOLSHOUSER (618) 789-2742

PM

ALL BRICK TOWNHOUSE with 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, private patio, on cul-de-sac, near SIUE. $107,000 Glen Carbon PR9836

7001 Monday Court, Edwardsville $539,900 OPEN SUN. 1-3 PM MICHELLE HEINLEIN (618) 781-2322

7000 Monday Court, Edwardsville $509,900 OPEN SUN. 1-3 PM MICHELLE HEINLEIN (618) 781-2322

An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.

Save Money at the Pump! Subscribe to the Intelligencer and we will give you a QT Gas Card!

New Subscribers only.

12 Weeks $33.85 - $10 Gas Card 24 Weeks $61.75 - $15 Gas Card 48 Weeks $99.50 - $20 Gas Card 6 Month E-Edition $29.99 - $10 Gas Card 1 Year E-Edition $49.99 - $15 Gas Card

Expires Sept. 1, 2012.

117 N. Second St., Edwardsville, IL 62025 • Phone: 656-4700 ext. 20 • Fax: 656-7618

May 24, 2012

The Edge – Page

27


2007 Cadillac CTS

21,990

Stk#25585 2011 $ Cadillac CTS Sedan

Stk#25570 2012 $ Chevrolet Equinox

27,290

Stk#10727-1 2006 $ Nissan Armada

2011 Buick Regal

21,490

2007 Audi Q7

Stk#25594

Stk#25536

$

$

Stk#25562

$

29,590

2010 Cadillac SRX

$

42,990

21,990

Stk#10741-1 2010 $ Dodge Challenger

23,890

24,490

Stk#10705-1 2008 $ Chevolet Tahoe

25,890

Stk#25589

THESE PREOWNED VALUES ARE UNBELIEVABLE! 2011 Cadillac CTS Sedan Stk#25545 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,990 2011 Cadillac CTS Sedan Stk#25548 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30,590 2011 Cadillac DTS Stk#25567 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,990 2011 Cadillac SRX Stk#25572 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $36,390 2010 Cadillac DTS Stk#10662-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30,990 2009 Cadillac CTS Stk#10667-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,990 2008 Cadillac DTS Stk#25557 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,990 2008 Cadillac DTS Stk#25528-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,990 2008 Cadillac STS Stk#10433-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,790 2007 Cadillac CTS Stk#10600-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,490 2007 Cadillac CTS Stk#25561 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,990 1999 Cadillac Eldorado Stk#10709-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,440 2011 Buick Lucerne Stk#25591. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,690 2011 Chevrolet Malibu Stk#25577. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,990 2011 Chevrolet Traverse Stk#25558 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,390

2010 Chevrolet Impala Stk#25533, 25534 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,990 2007 Chevrolet Monte Carlo Stk#25552 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,390 2006 Chrysler 300-Series Stk#25553. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,690 2004 Chrysler 300M Stk#25556 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,390 2012 Ford Focus Stk#25559 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,790 2012 Ford Edge Stk#25581. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30,990 2007 Ford Mustang Stk#25595 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,990 2011 Saab 9-5 Stk#10408 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,990 2008 Hyundai Santa Fe Stk#25586 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,490 2009 Volkswagen Jetta Sedan Stk#10694-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,390 2007 Volkswagen Jetta Stk#25582 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,590 2010 Mazda MX-5 Miata Stk#25564 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,890 2011 Mazda 3 Stk#25574 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,890 2012 Mitsubishi Eclipse Stk#25580 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,390 2012 Mitsubishi Eclipse Stk#25579 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,990

1-800-GO-CADILLAC

(462-2345)

With Every Test Drive Receive a FREE “Cadillac� Embroidered Blanket with coupon. Bring

in this 7EST(WYs/&ALLON ), Certificate   sWWWSCHMITTCADILLACCOM

28

On the Edge of the Weekend

May 24, 2012

2012 Nissan Altima Stk#25578 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,990 2004 Nissan Murano Stk#10724-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,890 2009 Honda Accord Sedan Stk#25573 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,990 2009 GMC Yukon XL Denali Stk#25566 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $37,590 2011 Mercury Mariner Stk#25588. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,790 2006 Mercury Grand Marquis Stk#10596-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,990 2011 Toyota Corolla Stk#25587 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,390 2011 Toyota Camry Stk#25571 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,990 2003 Toyota Camry Stk#25569-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,490 2009 BMW 328i Stk#25530-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,690 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan Stk#25592 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,890 2003 Infiniti I35 Stk#25537-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,490 2009 Kia Sportage Stk#10722-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,590 2008 Suzuki XL7 Stk#25596 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,590 2008 Pontiac G6 Stk#25597 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,790

Jac� S�hmitt Cadi�a�

Contact us at: www.schmittcadillac.com 915 WEST HWY. 50 • O’FALLON, IL 618.632.1000

052412 Edge Magazine  

THE EDGE OF THE WEEKEND is a product of the Edwardsville Intelligencer, a member of the Hearst Newspaper Group. THE EDGE is available free,...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you