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"Flashdance – The Musical" page 15

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JANUARY 3 ISSUE

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What’s Inside 3

Rotary fulfills mission Local trio studies in Sweden.

4 Motorcycles on ice

Family Arena to host a rip-roaring good time.

5 Turns on the career path LCCC offers options.

11 "Les Miserables" Hooper's effort is relentless.

14 The world didn't end EAC to host Mayan artifacts.

15 "Moulin Rouge" Touhill to host unique ballet.

16 What a feeling

Peabody to host "Flashdance – The Musical."

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What’s Happening Friday Saturday _ _ _______ January 4 January 5_________ • Lonestar Rodeo, Family Arena, St. Charles, Doors 6:00 p.m. • H a r l e m G l o b e t ro t te r s, Scottrade Center, St. Louis, 7:00 p.m. • Wicked, Fox Theatre, St. Louis, 8:00 p.m. • T h e R e p e r to r y T h e a t re presents Good People, LorettoHilton Center Mainstage, St. Louis, 8:00 p.m. • Opening Reception: PreColumbian Mayan Ar tifacts, E d w a r d s v i l l e A r t s C e n t e r, Edwardsville, 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. • Jack Grelle and the Johnson Family Band w/Erin Rae, Johnny Appleseed, Plush, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m. • Gregory Porter, Jazz at the Bistro, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. • American Idle, Fast Eddie's Bon Air, Alton, 8:00 p.m. • Jake's Leg, Cicero's, University City, Doors 9:00 p.m. • The Manchurian Incident, Hank, Avalon Cinema, The Few, Fubar, St. Louis, 7:00 p.m. • The Hipnecks w/The Reeling Gilly, Mercer & Johnson, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. • Drop Avenue w/The Weekend Routine, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m.

• Lonestar Rodeo, Family Arena, St. Charles, Doors 6:00 p.m. • T h e R e p e r to r y T h e a t re presents Good People, LorettoHilton Center Mainstage, St. Louis, 5:00 p.m. • In the Loop Dance Concert, COCA, St. Louis, 2:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. • P re - C o l u m b i a n M a y a n Artifacts, Edwardsville Arts Center, Edwardsville, 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Runs through February 8. • Wicked, Fox Theatre, St. Louis, 2:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. • Schlafly's 21st Birthday Party feat. The Bottle Rockets • Woe, Is Me w/Texas in July, Capture the Crown, Skylines, Project Emira, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 6:00 p.m. • Gregory Porter, Jazz at the Bistro, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. • Scott and Karl, 3:00 p.m. / American Idle, 8:00 p.m., Fast Eddie's Bon Air, Alton • Guitars on Fire: The Skynyrd Experience, Blueberry Hill, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m. • Krotchripper, Drag the Dead, Eternium, Animated Dead, Fubar, St. Louis, 5:00 p.m. • Dirt Nasty w/DJ Deks & VDJ Jay-E, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 9:00 p.m. • Tough Luck, Out of Time w/A Death A Promise, Cathedral Fever,

Cicero's, University City, Doors 8:00 p.m.

Sunday January 6_________ • Soulard Mardi Gras 12th Night, Soulard, St. Louis, 5:30 p.m. • T h e R e p e r to r y T h e a t re presents Good People, LorettoHilton Center Mainstage, St. Louis, 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. • In the Loop Dance Concert, COCA, St. Louis, 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. • Wicked, Fox Theatre, St. Louis, 1:00 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. • Blackberry Smoke w/Jake White, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. • Scott and Karl, 2:00 p.m. / Ultraviolets, 7:00 p.m., Fast Eddie's Bon Air, Alton • Acedia, Warseid, Mirrorscape, Suffer the Wrath, Fubar, St. Louis, Doors 5:00 p.m. • Open Mic Night, Plush, St. Louis, 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. • Gregory Porter, Jazz at the Bistro, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.

Who We Are ON THE EDGE OF THE WEEKEND is a product of the Edwardsville Intelligencer, a member of the Hearst Newspaper Group. THE EDGE is available free, through home delivery and rack distribution. FOR DELIVERY INFO call 656.4700 Ext. 20. FOR ADVERTISING INFO call 656.4700 Ext. 35. For comments or questions regarding EDITORIAL CONTENT call 656.4700 Ext. 28 or fax 659.1677. Publisher – Denise Vonder Haar | Editor – Bill Tucker | Lead Writer – Krista Wilkinson-Midgley | Cover Design – Desirée Bennyhoff

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On the Edge of the Weekend

January 3, 2013


People

For the Intelligencer

Rotary program participants are, from left: Blake Ordell, Kristy Dickens, Steve Hopper, Cara Lane and Allen Duncan.

EHS teachers get to study abroad Rotary program sends trio to Sweden By JULIA BIGGS Of The Edge Edwardsville High School English teacher Cara Lane, social studies teacher Allen Duncan and art teacher Kristy Dickens spent four weeks in May on a whirl-wind visit to Sweden. But the trip was far from a sightseeing vacation. The three were selected as part of a team of five to participate in the 2012 Rotary Foundation’s Group Study Exchange (GSE) program. The Rotary Foundation’s GSE program is a unique cultural and vocational exchange opportunity for businesspeople and professionals between the ages of 25 and 40 who are in the early stages of their career. The program provides travel grants for teams to exchange visits in paired areas of different countries. For four to six weeks, team members experience the host country’s culture and institutions, observe how their vocations are practiced abroad, develop personal and professional relationships, and exchange ideas. It’s a very busy trip as during a typical four-week tour, applicants participate in five full days of vocational visits, 15 to 20 club presentations, 10 to 15 formal visits and social events, two to three days at the district conference, three to four hours per day of cultural and site tours, and three to four hours per day of free time with host families. Rotarians in the host area provide meals and lodging for each GSE member. Lane, Duncan and Dickens were selected from applications submitted to 51 Rotary organizations throughout Rotary District 6460. The three EHS teachers selected represented the Edwardsville Rotary Club while two others, Rotarian and Team Leader Steve Hopper from Macomb and MacMurrary College’s Assistant men's and women's soccer coach Blake Ordell of Jacksonville, completed the GSE Rotary District 6460 team.

The five spent nearly the entire month of May in Sweden. A blog that follows their trip day-by-day can be found online at swedengse2012.blogspot.com Earlier this fall, Duncan and Dickens attended an Edwardsville District 7 Board of Education meeting and presented highlights of their trip which included photos of the cultural and historical sites they visited as well as schools, businesses and governmental offices in major Swedish cities. In a recent interview with Lane, she commented that she was initially interested in the GSE program for several reasons. “I personally look for any opportunity to travel because I think there’s a real benefit to being able to go outside your comfort zone. I think that distance offers perspective regardless of what you do, regardless of where you are in your personal or professional life,” Lane said. “And in general, this particular sponsorship of Rotary has a really great reputation. It’s also been around for like 40 years – since the '60s is what I understand. “ Knowing that the experience was going to be tailored to Lane’s profession was also intriguing to her. “That I was going to get to go to schools in Sweden and talk to Swedish teachers and talk to Swedish students, that appealed to me,” Lane noted. Lane also felt that the experience of being away from her own classroom to view how other classrooms are managed was especially beneficial for her own professional growth. “There’s very little opportunity in the U.S. professionally for teachers to be away from their own classrooms and so we’re not afforded that opportunity unless we are able to do sort of these extra opportunities or work collaboratively with each other to have that kind of perspective,” Lane said. “It’s also very difficult to see what American classrooms are like when you’re always in America. You almost don’t even recognize your own culture until you’re not in it anymore. For me, it was a duality between not only being able

to recognize some things that were going on in American school systems only once I was able to contrast them with what was going on in Sweden. So I was learning about Sweden classrooms, but that also helped inform my understanding of how things functioned in my own classroom and in American classrooms in general. I thought it was fabulous.” She pointed out that some may argue that she could just go to any other area high school and get the same experience. “I’m saying, I don’t think you could,” Lane explained. “I don’t think we are able to be as honest as we were when we were in Sweden. There were multiple times where we got to have these conversations, and I felt like I almost got them sort of revealing the under belly of the Swedish school systems because we were safe. We weren’t somebody who was going to report back to their boss or their people and so I felt like I got a fair perspective of how students and teachers and even some administrators felt about what they do and how they handle it in their world. Also things that they felt were strengths and weaknesses. It was wonderful to be able to have those conversations.” Lane equated the GSE experience as lifechanging as one she had in college. “I had the opportunity to study abroad for a summer when I was in college and I felt that was so transformative,” she said. “One of my professional goals with my students is to say, 'Take advantage of those opportunities.' And I think that being able to go other places and learn about yourself and learn about other cultures is how we actually perpetuate this positive view of society. Our understanding of other cultures is very relevant. I’m much more sensitive to Swedish issues now when I hear about them now because I feel an emotional connection.” She could easily see the correlation between Rotary’s mission and the GSE program. “Their overall goal is world peace and part

January 3, 2013

of that is giving people an opportunity to understand each other from other places in the world,” Lane said. One of the areas of immense difference was Sweden’s socialized government. “Sweden was very interesting because so much of their stuff is socialized. They pay an enormous amount of money into taxes but they have socialized medicine and socialized education. And what I mean by that is that you can go to college for free. They have what are called gymnasiums in Sweden so by the time you get to (age) 16 to 19 which is equivalent to our sophomore, junior and senior year – but they start the year later so they don’t graduate until they are 19 – those last three years of school are tailored specially to a trade or particular field. If it’s a trade, then that’s something where you can go on and maybe get your journeyman’s license or it would be equivalent to what we have here in the U.S. to plumbing or construction. They have all kinds of schools that are set up – liberal arts school and fine arts schools,” she said. “That was really interesting to me in the way that they support education – and also the problems that they have with that too.” She hoped that her initiative to seek out an opportunity, apply for it, and then spend the month in another country would be something that her students would mimic. “These are the things I want them to do,” Lane said. “So this opportunity came along and I applied, and it will continue to be transformative because I know that there are benefits that I can’t even recognize from this trip yet because my future hasn’t happened. It just happened. I’m still processing it. So I can only imagine how over the course of my entire career how this experience will continue to inform and have forever changed my perspective on things. So it’s just one more sort of layer to what is life I guess. I just really appreciate that Rotary gave us all the opportunity to do it.”

On the Edge of the Weekend

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People Family Arena plans rip-roaring good time By KRISTA WILKINSON-MIDGLEY Of The Edge Witness the speed and spectacle that is professional ice racing when the Xtreme International Ice Racing (XiiR) tour returns on Saturday, Jan. 26 to The Family Arena in St. Charles, Mo. Now in its ninth year at The

riders earn points to qualify for the main, or final, race. Heats consist of four riders racing handlebar-tohandlebar for four laps. The main event consists of six riders for six laps. The event will include a total of 20 to 25 races. The amount of races will vary from city to city depending on how many local riders participate. The speedway bike engine is

average car has a maximum 8,000 revs whereas an ice speedway bike has a maximum 14,000 revs. Four laps on a speedway bike compares to 10 minutes on a motocross bike. The power (90 horse power at the back wheel) to weight ratio (the bikes weigh only 180 pounds) is something that cannot be explained. Each rider gears his bike differently with 60 to 80 toothed

Photos for The Edge

Family Arena, this professional racing tour on ice sees riders go from 0 to 60 mph on an indoor ice arena in under three seconds using modified speedway bikes and quad bikes. Ice racing consists of heats where

equivalent to a 1200 cc sportbike engine in a mountain bike frame, 4-stroke, 4-valve engine that runs on nitro methanol. This allows the engine to run at a higher compression, producing more horsepower. As an example, the

sprockets, which are nearly the size of the wheel itself. “It’s different. You get to see lots of sliding around. It’s pretty exciting,” said Tom O’Keefe, marketing manager for the Family Arena. O’Keefe said last year was the

most successful year yet for the event at the Family Arena. He said it continues to appeal to audiences because of its excellent entertainment and good value for money. “It’s an inexpensive family event. It’s just a fun way to have a family night out for less than the cost of a movie ticket,” said O’Keefe. As of press time, a tentative threecity tour kicks off at the Family Arena in St. Charles, Mo., and makes an appearance on Feb. 23 in Danville, Ill., before concluding on April 6 in Council Bluffs, Iowa. The action takes place at on Saturday, Jan. 26. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the racing starts at 7:30 p.m. Ti c k e t s f o r t h e X t re m e

International Ice Racing event are $5, $15 and $25. Suites for 12 to 24 people are also available. Tickets can be purchased at The Family Arena Ticket Office on the web at www.metrotix.com. To charge by phone, call Metro Tix at (314) 534-1111. For help purchasing accessible seating, call The Family Arena ADA Hotline at (636) 8964234. The Family Arena is located at 2002 Arena Parkway in St. Charles, Mo. From Interstate 70, take the South Fifth Street exit and follow the signs to Arena Parkway. Parking costs $5. For more information, call The Family Arena event hotline at (636) 896-4242 for more information or visit www.familyarena.com.

Shaw Nature Reserve plans winter events The 2,400-acre Shaw Nature Reserve in Gray Summit is the perfect setting for you and your family to explore and enjoy the natural world! A host of events and programs are available throughout the fall and winter months: Jan. 4 through 5: Basket Making Overnight. This is an overnight basket-weaving class in which you choose the basket(s) you will make. Beginners are welcome. The cost includes meals and a dormitory-style overnight in a delightful historic log lodge. Adults only. Friday at 7 p.m. through Saturday at 3 p.m. Dana Brown Overnight Center. $90. Advance registration required; www.mobot.org/classes or (314) 5775140. For a complete list of youth and family programs at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www. mobot.org/classes. Jan. 10: Native Plant School: Control and ID of Common Invasive Plants. Native Plant School is a year-round series of indoor/outdoor classes in the Whitmire Wildflower Garden at the Shaw Nature Reserve that covers various aspects of native landscaping. Native Plant School at the Shaw Nature Reserve is underwritten by Grow Native! and Wild Ones Natural Landscapers. 1 to 4 p.m. Carriage House. $15. Advance registration required; www.mobot.org/classes or (314) 5775140. For a complete list of adult classes at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www.mobot. org/classes. Jan. 11 through 12: Wildlife in Winter Overnight. This program offers games and hands-on activities to focus on some of the strategies used by animals to help them survive the frigid temperatures of winter. In addition, there will be

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On the Edge of the Weekend

a campfire, s’mores, and the option to go on a night hike (weather permitting). Families with children six and over. Friday at 7 p.m. through Saturday at 11 a.m. Dana Brown Overnight Center. $60. Advance registration required; www. mobot.org/classes or (314) 577-5140. For a complete list of youth and family programs at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www.mobot.org/classes. Jan. 20: Maple Syrup from Tree to Table. Everything you need to know to start making your own maple syrup at home! This class will cover the materials you’ll need to the procedures used to turn sap into syrup. Class will be held outdoors, so please dress for the weather. For families with kids ages eight and up. 1 to 3 p.m. Carriage House. Included with Shaw Nature Reserve admission. Advance registration required; www.mobot.org/classes or (314) 577-5140. For a complete list of youth and family programs at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www.mobot.org/classes. Jan. 26: Introduction to Herbal Soap Making. Learn how to make your own cold-pressed soap using vegetable oils and pure, therapeutic essential oils. Stir the pot as various vegetable oils, botanicals and other ingredients are added for a specific blend. Each participant will receive a cured bar of soap to take home. Other soaps will be available for purchase. 9 a.m. to noon. Adlyne Freund Center. $24. Advance registration required; www.mobot.org/classes or (314) 577-5140. For a complete list of adult classes at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www. mobot.org/classes. Feb. 2 through 3: It’s Your Weekend Overnight. Are you

January 3, 2013

looking for time to yourself? Bring your books, hiking boots, camera, paints, bicycle, binoculars, laptop or whatever! Spend all the time you want doing what you want, either by yourself out on the trails, or perhaps with others in front of a fire. The cost includes meals and a dormitory-style overnight in a delightful historic log lodge. An optional class on felting your own wool hat will be offered for an additional $25. Adults only. 9 a.m. Saturday to 11 a.m. on Sunday.  Dana Brown Overnight Center. $90. Advance registration required; www.mobot.org/ classes or (314) 577-5140. For a complete list of youth and family programs at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www.mobot.org/classes. Feb. 14: Native Plant School: Conducting Small Controlled Woodland Prarie Burns. Native Plant School is a year-round series of indoor/outdoor classes in the Whitmire Wildflower Garden at the Shaw Nature Reserve that covers various aspects of native landscaping. Native Plant School at the Shaw Nature Reserve is underwritten by Grow Native! and Wild Ones Natural Landscapers. 1 to 4 p.m. Carriage House. $15. Advance registration required; www.mobot.org/classes or (314) 5775140. For a complete list of adult classes at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s family of attractions, visit www.mobot. org/classes. Valentine's Night Hike Feb 16: Valentine’s Night Hike. Bundle up and spend the evening under the stars with your sweetheart, friends or adult family members! Use your senses to enjoy the wonders of a crisp, cool, but invigorating Nature Reserve winter night. You will have the opportunity to see the constellations and planets


People Sharp turns on the career path By KRISTA WILKINSON-MIDGLEY Of The Edge Two area men – well past traditional college age – opted to get out of dead-end careers and pursue opportunities that interested them. Here are the stories of those two individuals who enrolled in courses at Lewis and Clark Community College's Edwardsville campus. ••• If you ask Tim Thames why he has decided to forego a 14-year career in nursing and embark on a journey to brew beer for Anheuser Busch, he will tell you there is no simple answer. But not long ago the 41-year-old St. Louis native, who lives now in Belleville, began feeling vaguely dissatisfied with his work at a nursing home in Kirkwood, Mo. He began searching online for a new career and eventually ran across a Lewis and Clark Community College website that featured the Process Operations Technology department. “I knew I didn’t want to be a nurse and I wanted to find something that met certain criteria I had,” Thames said minutes before the start of his Process Systems and Instrumentation class at the college’s N.O. Nelson Complex in Edwardsville. “I wanted a variety in the work, plentiful job opportunities nationally, jobs that paid well. And this checked off every box for me.” Thames held onto his job but started taking classes at N.O. Nelson. If all goes well, he will graduate in the fall of 2013 with an associate’s degree in Process Operations Technology. Then, about five months ago, he was hired on part-time at Anheuser Busch after 18 months of trying. Today he works as an equipment operator and as a packer. “After the bottles are filled with beer they are packed into cartons that you would pick up at the store,” he said. “There is a piece of equipment that makes sure that goes smoothly.” But recently Thames began talking with an Anheuser Busch brewmaster about the possibility of switching over to the brewing side. Possibly an assistant brewmaster. A full-time brewmaster, he said, earns about $60,000 a year, not counting overtime pay.

One thing that helped him land the job was that at Lewis and Clark he had studied the process of distillation. While the straight distillation process deals with various ways of heating and distilling crude oil into lighter products such as kerosene, gasoline, diesel gasoline and jet fuel, the concept gave him insights into the brewing process as well. POT coordinator Mike Morgan agreed that program’s broad coursework probably helped Thames land the job. “They’ve looked upon him well, so that speaks well for our program,” Morgan said. Thames said he likes the fact that Morgan and his colleagues have been able to transfer their real-life experience in the field to the classroom. Morgan, for instance, began working for Amoco Refinery and Chemicals in 1977 and has worked for KlinGas R&D, International Waste Energy Systems, and Illini Pipeline before getting hired at Lewis & Clark in 1999. Thames says he enjoys the hands on experience he gets at LCCC. “The instructors are so experienced in the field and they bring that real world knowledge to the classroom through different stories and illustrations of things they’ve experienced during their career in the industry,” he said. “That’s important. It’s not just theory or textbooks. They’re giving you some real life examples, which really helps to cement it in your mind.” ••• By the summer of 2011, Steve Case had been in the restaurant business for about eight years, and he was ready for a change. He had worked as a bartender and server at Casa Romero, a Mexican restaurant in Rosewood Heights, and Chez Marilyn, near the Mississippi River in Alton. “I was still enjoying what I did, but it’s hard to make a career of it when your pay is always dependent on who comes through the doors,” said Case, now 28, who is from Bethalto. He liked science and math and he started looking for ways to match that up with a career that would pay better and have better benefits. A friend had already been through the Process Operations Technology program at Lewis and Clark Community College

Mark Polege/The Edge

Forty-one-year-old Tim Thames works on a project at Lewis and Clark College's N.O. Nelson Campus. and had been working at Wood River Refinery, located in Roxana, Case said. And years ago, Case’s grandfather had worked as an operator at the Shell refinery. One day Case drove to Edwardsville and talked with instructor Al Foster at LCCC’s N.O. Nelson Complex, on Troy Road. “I didn’t know much,” Case said. “I just knew that with the amount of money they were putting into that refinery it would be a steady job.” He began taking classes at the N.O. Nelson campus that would qualify him to one day become a refinery process operations technician. While he was still a student, Case was also able to get hired as a process operator at the Wood River Refinery, owned by Phillips 66 and Cenovus Energy. He is now being trained to operate equipment that is used to make various types of gasoline. Case already had been exposed to that in his classes, which offered hands-on training with something called a model Distillation Training Unit. “We teach distillation like you have in a refinery,” said Mike Morgan, who coordinates the POT program at the campus of N.O. Nelson. “When you bring the crude oil in it has all these molecular components, and we use a process where we heat it and boil it off. Then at different levels we extract it in a vertical column.” At the refinery, Case operates

Mark Polege/Intelligencer

Alan Schaake, center, and Steve Case, right, work in the Process Operations Technology program.

equipment that distills crude into gasoline, and jet and diesel fuel. While computers more or less run the operation, someone still needs to monitor the equipment and turn valves on and off as needed. Case also works with a more creative aspect of distilling known as catalytic cracking. Catalytic cracking and hydro cracking help companies like Phillips 66 “get more efficiency to the process and get more out of a barrel of crude,” Morgan said. Adds Case, “We take really nasty crude oil and make it just a little bit better.” When Case’s unit is done with it, they pass the mixture along to other units where it is manipulated until it eventually becomes a gasoline blending component. “The whole refinery is like a puzzle,” he says. “You take one piece out and you can’t complete the puzzle. Everything has its own place along the chain.” With only a month of training under his belt, Case is making $28 an hour. As he moves up the pay ladder, he will have opportunities to earn overtime pay and bonuses. This semester, Case is taking his final two classes: Process Technology Operations and Process Troubleshooting. About half of the graduates from Morgan’s program get hired on at the refinery. In October, the refinery hired 23 new employees, nine of whom came from Morgan’s p ro g r a m . M o rg a n s a y s t h e i r classroom experience makes it easier for them to assimilate into the refinery environment, and they wind up learning the ropes in about half the time it takes someone coming off the street. “They were teachable,” he says. Operators max out at $35 dollars an hour. “Most of them, with just straight time, will make around $80,000 a year with upwards of $100,000 with overtime,” he said. Before technology allowed them to do more with less, the refinery employed thousands of operators; today there are about 350. Not everyone who comes to Morgan’s program is looking to change careers. Alan Schaake, of Glen Carbon, has a master’s degree, and for the past three years he has been a financial accountant for CTF Field Services. CTF – a mechanical contractor – does a lot of contract work with the refineries and Schaake

January 3, 2013

says he wanted to understand what they do so that he can be more of an asset to his employer. “There’s a lot of shop talk that goes on in the office, and a lot of that stuff just goes right over my head,” he said. Last summer, Schaake began taking night classes at the N.O. Nelson Complex. Morgan has convinced him that if he sticks with it he will soon wind up with an associate’s degree. Schaake estimates that if he continues at his present pace, he’ll have one in about 2 1/2 years. While his family time has shrunk as a result, Schaake says he’s still managed to have a good time. Kevin Schwalb finished Morgan’s program five years ago, at the age of 49. One evening last week he came to Edwardsville to speak to one of the classes at LCCC. Beforehand, he said that his basic message to them would be safety. Schwalb works at the refinery as an environmental engineer, in a sulfur plant and a wastewater treatment facility. “In the past we’ve had an accident where a guy had health issues and fell off a big tank and died,” he said during an interview before the class started. Schwalb said he came to work that morning around 5 a.m. and began loading rail cars with sulfur until noon. Schwalb works alongside board operators who monitor gauges that control things such as flow rate and temperature. Board operators, he says, are the orchestra conductors of a refinery. If they find that something needs adjusting – say an equipment gauge – an operator goes out and adjusts it. Schwalb is at the top of the pay scale. Without overtime, that would have put him at around $80,000 a year. But he has worked a lot of overtime this year, and that has put him at “over six figures,” he said. The classes at LCCC give you a leg up on someone applying at the refinery off the street, he said. You understand what the process is and what the equipment does, he said. Still, there’s plenty to learn, and new hires who come to the job with too much confidence do so at their peril. College classes instill you with just enough knowledge to be dangerous. “The last thing you want to do is show up with an attitude of ‘I just got my degree and I’m ready to work,’ Schwalb said. “You’ll be put in your place real quick.”

On the Edge of the Weekend

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People People planner Let's Go Fishing Show returns to Collinsville The Let's Go Fishing Show will return January 4-5-6 to the Gateway Center in Collinsville, Illinois and, in its 20th year, is planning some special prizes for its fans. As part of the 20th anniversary celebration, the show will give away three, Grand Prize fishing boats. A drawing will be held at the completion of each day, for the lucky winner of that day's boat. In addition to the boat giveaways, the first 500 people entering Friday will receive a free issue of the Outdoor Guide Magazine. Saturday, the first 500 entering will receive a free issue of Heartland Oudoors Magazine. On Sunday, a free fishing lure will be given to those 16 and older, entering with a paid admission, while supplies last. There will also be numerous attendance prizes and giveaways. The public event for fishermen, has consistently been able to attract an enthusiastic audience, due to it's “fishing tackle super store� reputation. For sale is a wide variety of fishing tackle, rods and reels, accessories, and aluminum and fiberglass fishing boats. And, there are representatives from resorts and destinations eager to help plan a fishing trip to a nearby lake, Ozark retreat, charter fishing trip, or a Canadian adventure. A full slate of seminars gives attendees the chance to mingle with pro anglers and regional experts. Topics will include fishing for bass, crappie, trout, catfish, muskie, and more. Some of the biggest names in bass fishing have shared fishing tips, given autographs and had photos taken with their fans at the show. Paul Elias, Brent Erhler and Alton Jones are scheduled in this Anniversary year. Jones, a Waco, Texas native, won the most prestigious tournament in his sport, the Bassmaster Classic in 2008, and for 2012 was ranked 35th in the world, according to Bassfan.com. Erhler is from Redlands, California, and finished the year ranked 22nd in the world, winning one tournament. Elias, from Laurel, Mississippi, was the winner of the 1982 Bassmaster Classic. His most recent major win was in 2011. Another noteworthy fact, Elias was one of the major attractions at the 1st Let's Go Fishing Show, in 1994. Returning exhibits of interest will

include live owls and other birds from Treehouse Wildlife Center, located in Dow, Illinois, and games for young anglers, operated by area fishing clubs. All activities are included with admission. Tickets will be available at the door with regular prices $7 for adults; $3.50 for ages 6-15; children 5 and under are free. On Friday, seniors age 60 and above will be admitted for only $5. Parking is free. Hours are Friday: Noon to 9 PM; Saturday: 9 AM - 7 PM; Sunday: 10 AM to 4 PM. The Gateway Convention Center is located 12 minutes from downtown St. Louis, on Highway 157, just north of I-55/70, in Collinsville, Illinois. For information and complete scheduling, you may call 618-288-9952, or visit the web site at www.letsgoshows.com.

Eagle watching season draws near

visit the 13 “Eagle Watching Hot Spots� featured in the 2013 Eagle Watcher’s Guide. Again this year, the Alton Eagle Watching App will guide visitors during their eagle watching adventure. The free app, which is available for iPhone and Android, will lead visitors to the eagle watching hot spots, provide information on upcoming events and festivals, allow visitors to share their eagle photos, offer deals from restaurants and shops, as well as a list the shops, restaurants, attractions and lodging found along the byway. Back again this year, visitors are invited to take part in “Eagle Caching� at the numerous Eagle Watching Hot Spots. Within the guide, information can be found about the caches and clues on where to find them. Like geocaching, each cache has a set of coordinates that are plugged into the GPS navigator and used by the explorer to search for the treasure. All the information

As the brisk winter wind blows in from the north, it’s time to “relax� all around Alton, Ill., for an unforgettable eagle watching adventure. Every January, experts anticipate hundreds of American Bald Eagles will migrate to the region, many reclaiming their winter nests along the Meeting of the Great Rivers National Scenic Byway from Alton to Grafton and Pere Marquette State Park. With the help of the Alton Regional Convention & Visitors Bureau’s 2 0 1 3 E a g l e Wa t c h e r ’ s G u i d e , visitors can plan their own eagle watching adventure and take part in numerous eagle watching events and tours happening throughout the region. Eagle watching has been an attraction for the last decade all around Alton. During the first Saturday of 2013, the Audubon Center at Riverlands at the Riverlands Migratory Bird Sanctuary will be one of the hosts of the AltonAudubon Eagle Festival from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The festival on Jan. 5 will kick off the 2013 eagle watching season in Alton with eagle watching activities taking place at the Alton Visitor Center as well as an ice carving demonstration and other ice events in Downtown Alton. The event is free. For more information, go to VisitAlton.com or call 1-800258-6645. Every day visitors can travel along the Meeting of the Great Rivers National Scenic Byway to

needed, including the clues, coordinates and GPS rentals, can be found at www.VisitAlton.com/ EagleCaching, or by visiting the Alton Visitor’s Center at 200 Piasa St. in Downtown Alton. There will also be an Alton Eagle Watcher contest to encourage visitors to stop by the various Eagle Watching Hot Spots. Visitors who visit five of the six hot spots (Alton Visitor Center, Audubon Center at Riverlands, Lewis & Clark Confluence Tower, Melvin Price Locks & Dam, Pere Marquette State Park and Two Rivers National Wildlife Refuge Center) listed and have their eagle watcher card initialed by a Visitor Center representative will be entered into a drawing to win an Amazon Kindle HD. For more information on this contest go to www.VisitAlton.com/ EagleWatcher. Finally, for visitors eager to “give back� during the eagle watching

getaway, participants can sign-up to participate in the Great River Road Clean Up on Saturday, Jan. 26 from 10 a.m. to noon. The project will create a better eagle watching experience. Contact Christine Favilla by e-mail at cfavilla10@ sbcglobal.net or by calling (618) 4626802 for more information. Annually, the opportunities for eagle watching continue to grow in the Alton region. Visitors can head out to view the eagles on their own, or they can take part in some of the traditional eagle watching events in the region, including eagle meet & greets, eagle watching tours and live bird demonstrations. Events take place nearly every weekend and throughout the week, from January through March. Plus, most of the events in the region are free of charge. A full list of events can be found online at www.VisitAlton. com and in the Eagle Watcher ’s Guide.

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People People planner Tyson's one-man show coming to St. Louis After a highly successful bout on Broadway, Mike Tyson announced today that he will take his acclaimed o n e - m a n s h o w, " M i k e Ty s o n : Undisputed Truth" on a national tour. Helmed by renowned director Spike Lee and producer James L. Nederlander, the tour is set to begin February 2013. The show comes to St. Louis for one-night only April 5, 8pm. Tickets are $35, $45, $55 and $65 plus a $3 facility fee. Th e l e g e n d a r y b o x e r, “ I ro n M i k e , ” w i l l k i c k o ff h i s 1 0 week tour with a two-night engagement at the Murat Theatre in Indianapolis on February 12 –13. The three month tour will visit over 36 cities including Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Houston, and Washington D.C. For ticketing information and a full list of cities, please visit: www.facebook.com/ MikeTysonOnTour. “After a successful run at the MGM in Las Vegas and on Broadway at the Longacre Theatre with Spike Lee, I’m excited to take 'Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth' on tour and share it with my fans across the country,” said Tyson. “’Undisputed Truth’ is my storyI'm giving my all. I’m proud to take the show nationwide, and it’s a privilege to continue working with The Nederlander Organization.” “MIKE TYSON: UNDISPUTED TRUTH” is a rare, personal look inside the life and mind of one of the most feared men ever to wear the heavyweight crown. Directed by Academy Award nominee Spike Lee, this riveting one-man show goes beyond the headlines, behind the scenes and between the lines to deliver a must-see theatrical knockout. Created by Adam Steck, CEO of SPI Entertainment, "Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth" is presented by James L. Nederlander, directed by Spike Lee, written by Kiki Tyson, executive produced by Mike Tyson, Kiki Tyson, and Adam Steck and originally directed by Randy Johnson.

Sesame Street Live returns to St. Louis J o i n t h e c h o ru s f o r t h i s t o e tapping, finger snapping musical event! All you need is a song

w h e n E l m o , A b b y C a d a b b y, Murray and all of your favorite Sesame Street friends bring the magic of music to life on stages big and small – and right into the audience! The all-new Sesame Street Live “Can’t Stop Singing” is at Peabody Opera House from Thursday, Jan. 24 through Sunday, Jan. 27 Tickets for all nine performances are on sale now! When Elmo gets his furry fingers on Abby Cadabby’s magic wand, there’s something in the air - and Sesame Street becomes a nonstop, all-singing, all-dancing musical montage! Grover and Baby Bear sing their highs and lows, Cookie Monster s i n g s f a s t a n d s l o w, B e r t a n d Ernie converse in song and Murray makes mouth music for all to sing along! Learn why it feels good to sing a song, but why it feels good to stop, too! What will Elmo learn about the power of musical magic? Join the conga line of fun to find out! Come and play before the show! Play Zone at Sesame Street Live - a fun way for children to experience their favorite street! Imagine your child sitting in Big Bird's nest, popping up in Oscar's trash can, twirling in Zoe's dance studio or visiting Elmo's World. You never know who'll make an appearance! Families won't want to miss a single picture-perfect moment. Play Zone opens one hour before the show - best of all, Play Zone is free with your Sesame Street Live ticket! P e r f o r m ances are scheduled for: Jan. 24, 10:30 a.m. & 7 p.m.; Jan. 25, 10:30 a.m. & 7 p.m.; Jan. 26, 10:30 a.m., 2 p.m. & 5:30 p.m. and Jan. 27, 1:00 p.m. & 4:30 p.m. Tickets are $12, $18 and $24. A limited number of $36 Gold Circle seats and $60 Sunny Seats are also available. Special $60 Sunny Seat p a c k a g e s a re a v a i l a b l e a t a l l shows. Sunny Seats feature VIP s e a t s a n d a p re - s h o w M e e t & G re e t w i t h E l m o a n d a n o t h e r Sesame Street Live friend. For more information, call 314622-5400. To charge tickets by phone, please call Ticketmaster a t 8 0 0 - 7 4 5 - 3 0 0 0 . Ti c k e t s m a y also be purchased online at w w w. t i c k e t m a s t e r. c o m . F o r information online, please visit w w w. s e s a m e s t r e e t l i v e . c o m . Become a fan of Sesame Street

Wishing everyone a Safe and Healthy Happy New Year!

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COCA presents quilt artist's work COCA presents an exhibition of contemporary art quilts by multimedia artist Edna Patterson-Petty in the Millstone Gallery November 30 through January 13, 2013. Based in East St. Louis, Patterson-Petty fuses traditions of American, European and African-American quilting and extends them to produce visual narratives that reject rigid geometric structure and employ a distinctive a n d i m p ro v i s a t i o n a l “ j a z z y ” aesthetic. The exhibition features old work and new, none of which has been shown in the St. Louis area before. The exhibit will be shown in the Millstone Gallery at COCA, 524 Trinity Avenue, St. Louis. Edna Patterson-Petty’s work functions as conveyor of memory and history of place, exploring themes such as slavery, race and racism, community, feminism and self-emancipation. Patterson-Petty creates cohesion out of the fragments of African textiles, scraps of cotton and silk, old clothing and found objects. Traditional quilt-making techniques are expanded to produce visual narratives and pictorial compositions infused with histories, as well as collective stories about the current socio-political moment. Patterson-Petty works in a number of mediums as an artist and art therapist, but she is nationally recognized for her art quilts and the stories they convey. Her art quilt “Road to Redemption,” was specially created to commemorate Barack Obama’s presidency and was

displayed in Washington during his inauguration. Her work has been exhibited in venues ranging from the St. Louis Art Museum to Antioch College in Los Angeles. One of her pieces was on display for three years at the American Embassy in Pakistan, and she has an art quilt on permanent display in Senegal, West Africa. Patterson-Petty has received fellowships from the Illinois Arts Council and the St. Louis Regional Arts Commission. She co-authored the book Quilt Designs and Poetry Rhymes. Her work has also been featured on the cover of African A m e r i c a n R e v i e w, A m e r i c a n Art Therapy Journal and other publications. The life-long East St. Louis resident has won many awards including the Grand Center Visionary Award and the 2008 NAACP Arts Award. She devotes a significant amount of time mentoring young artists in the region; her collaborations with students, family members and local artists reveal deep ties to the community. She is a member of the 2009 SIUE Alumni Hall of Fame.

Globetrotters to appear in St. Louis Known as innovators of the game of basketball for decades, the world famous Harlem Globetrotters are again introducing something unparalleled in the history of sports and family entertainment, taking kid participation and fun to a whole new level when the Globetrotters come to Scottrade Center in St. Louis on Friday, Jan. 4, 2013, at 7:00 p.m.  For the first time ever, during the Globetrotters’ 2013 “You Write the Rules” World Tour, your family’s

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smiles will begin before you even get to the show. Fans will decide the rules for the game that could affect the final outcome. This could be anything from playing with two basketballs at once, to getting double the points for each basket made.  Go online with your kids to www.harlemglobetrotters.com to vote for which ground-breaking rule you want to see implemented in the game.  Then, get your tickets, and see the winning rules in live action at the Globetrotters’ world championship game.  Ti c k e t s , s t a r t i n g a t $ 1 9 . 0 0 , a r e o n s a l e n o w a t w w w. harlemglobetrotters.com, www. ticketmaster.com, the Scottrade Center box office, or by phone at 800-745-3000. Information on group and scout tickets can also be found at www.harlemglobetrotters. com.  Before the game, take part in a once-in-a-lifetime experience with your family where you get to actually spend time on the court with the Globetrotters oneon-one – shooting, trying out ball tricks, autographs and photos.  The unique 30-minute pre-show, “Magic Pass,” will create memories of a lifetime.#  After virtually every game, Globetrotter stars remain on the court for autographs and photographs with fans.*  This year's Globetrotters roster features stars such as Big Easy Lofton and Scooter Christensen.  They will join many other fan favorites, including, 7-foot-4 Stretch Middleton and female star TNT Maddox.** The North American leg of the 2013 “YouWrite the Rules” World Tour will tip-off on December 26, 2012, and will run through April 2013. 

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Religion Black pastor a new sight in Oklahoma church TULSA, Okla. (AP) — The new pastor of Ascension Lutheran Church does not fit the mold. The Rev. Marilyn Robinson is an Africandescent woman in an all-white congregation in an era when 11 a.m. Sunday is called the nation's most segregated hour. She was raised Catholic, spent years in independent Pentecostal churches, and now, in her late 50s, is a pastor in one of Christendom's most formal denominations. She once was blind, but now she sees — literally. And she has been homeless. Robinson was formally installed at Dec. 2 as pastor of Ascension Lutheran, 4803 S. Lewis Ave. She is the only black woman pastoring one of the 53 churches in the Arkansas-Oklahoma Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. "My identity is in Christ, not in race or gender," Robinson said. "We're really excited about having her," said Bishop Mike Girlinghouse, who

recommended her to the Tulsa church. "She'll be a great asset to the community." Girlinghouse told The Oklahoman (http://is.gd/SJB62N ) that Robinson is a good fit for Ascension Lutheran. "When we look at a person's gifts and skills, gender and race are not part of the equation," he said. "Rev. Robinson has a very deep understanding of God's grace," and is "both a strong leader and a compassionate leader." He said the ELCA is less diverse than the U.S. population but is working hard to address that. "That's very important to us. And I think that Ascension calling Pastor Robinson is a sign of what we're working toward. "We've got a long way to go to create an inclusive community where everybody truly is welcome, but that's what we strive for." Lutherans are not the only faith community that does not reflect the diversity of the society at large. Bishop Bob Hayes, the first black man to oversee Oklahoma's predominantly

white Oklahoma Conference of the United Methodist Church, said he applauded the Lutheran Church. "I commend them for being bold," he said. "Traditionally, 11 o'clock Sunday has been America's most segregated hour, but that is changing slowly," he said. In 1986, Hayes became the first black minister to pastor a white church in Houston. "The very first Sunday, they let me know this was not the place for me to be," he said. "I realized that being one of the first, I had to make it work." He served there for nine years, he said, building a spiritual foundation that has served him ever since. Hayes said he is encouraged that young people today are much less race conscious than older generations. "I'd recommend churches get to know the churches down the street. ... Our differences enrich us," he said. The Rev. Gary McIntosh, white pastor of the predominantly black Transformation

Church in north Tulsa, said U.S. churches have remained ethnically separate primarily because of differences in worship and cultural styles. "The church tends to be very prejudiced, more than society," which is a "horrible hindrance" to its mission, said McIntosh, who spoke Thursday at the University of Tulsa on the concept of America as a melting pot, and what that means to the church. "America is no longer a melting pot. We're more like a stew," he said. "Each ingredient has its own identity. But when we simmer together, we take on the flavor of each other." Ethnic groups have much to offer one another, he said. The Rev. W.R. Casey, founder of Tulsa Together, an annual racial reconciliation service, said churches have failed to integrate because they do not understand each other. "We need to get to know each other," he said. "If we get to know each other's culture, there's no reason why we can't come together as one in Jesus Christ."

Religion briefs Irish government plans to legalize abortions in life-threatening cases, including suicide risk DUBLIN (AP) — Ireland’s government pledged to pass a law soon that will allow women to receive abortions if continued pregnancy threatens their lives — including from their own threats to commit suicide if denied one. The announcement comes after decades of inaction on abortion in Ireland, and just weeks after the predominantly Roman Catholic country faced international criticism over the death of an Indian woman hospitalized i n I re l a n d w i t h a n i m m i n e n t miscarriage. Health Minister James Reilly said parliamentary hearings on the issue would begin next month, lawmakers would receive a bill by Easter and they would be expected to vote on it by the summer. This would mark the first time that Irish lawmakers have ever voted on abortion, arguably the most divisive issue in a country whose constitution bans the practice.

Pope tells Italy’s Olympic team not to give in to the "blind alley" of doping VA T I C A N C I T Y ( A P ) — Pope Benedict XVI told Italy’s Olympic team not to be tempted by performance-enhancing drugs, saying doping was a “blind alley” that isn’t worthy of such models of perseverance, sacrifice and human ability. Benedict held an audience Monday with members of Italy’s Olympic and Paralympic teams in the frescoed Clementine Hall of the Apostolic Palace, congratulating them on their 28 medals, eight of them gold, from the London Olympics. The 85-year-old German pontiff said sport was beneficial f o r i n d i v i d u a l s a n d s o c i e t y, re q u i r i n g l o y a l t y, re s p e c t a n d altruism — as well as patience

8

and humility “which is never applauded but is the secret of victory.” And while victory is a worthy goal, he said, “Pressure to win good results should never prompt you to take shortcuts as happens with doping.”

Canada’s high court rules witnesses can wear religious veil while testifying, in some cases TORONTO (AP) — A female w i t n e s s c a n w e a r a re l i g i o u s veil that covers her face while testifying in court in certain circumstances, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled in a split decision in a landmark case that pitted religious freedom against an accused person’s right to a fair trial. The case involved a Muslim woman who sought to wear the veil known as a niqab, which l e a v e s o n l y the eyes exposed, while testifying against her uncle and a cousin whom she claims sexually assaulted her when she was a child. The woman, who can only be identified as N.S. due to a publication ban, said her religious beliefs dictate that she wears the veil in public or in the presence of men who aren’t “direct” members of her family. The two accused claimed that the Charter of Rights and

Freedoms allowed them to confront their accuser and observe her facial expressions as she testifies. But the woman’s lawyers said facial expressions can be misleading. They said Muslim sexual assault victims will hesitate to g o t o p o l i c e i f t h e y ’ re b a r re d from wearing a niqab while testifying in court.

Detroit-area Jews, Muslims take part in annual ‘Mitzvah Day’ Christmas volunteer effort WEST BLOOMFIELD, Mich. (AP) — Jews and Muslims planned to visit nursing home p a t i e n t s i n t h e D e t ro i t a re a , serve holiday meals, deliver toys to needy children and take part in other projects so Christian volunteers and workers can celebrate Christmas Day with their families. The activities are part of the annual Mitzvah Day — the largest day of volunteering by Detroit’s Jewish community. Vo l u n t e e r s w i l l w o r k w i t h 40 social service agencies at 40 sites. It’s the program’s fourth year. S o m e g r a n d p a re n t s , p a re n t s and children will volunteer as families. Some volunteers will sort books at Bookstock Depot in

West Bloomfield, prepare meals at a shelter in Oak Park and sort food at a food bank. Mitzvah Day is presented by the Jewish Community Relations Council and the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit.

U.S. in contact with family claiming Iranian-American pastor held in Tehran DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The U.S. State Department says it is in contact with the family of a man described by activists as an Iranian-American Christian pastor jailed in Tehran. S t a t e D e p a r t m e n t spokeswoman Victoria Nuland s a i d T h u r s d a y i n Wa s h i n g t o n that officials were “aware of the case,” but could give no further details due to “privacy considerations.” Rights groups say the pastor, Saeed Abedini, has been held since late September after b e i n g a r re s t e d w h i l e v i s i t i n g family. Specific charges are unknown and Iranian officials have made no comment. Some activists believe Abedini, who became a U.S. citizen in 2010, was jailed for trying to convert Muslims — a crime in Iran that could

lead to capital punishment. Idaho TV station KBOI reports Abedini attends a church in Boise and returns regularly to his native Iran.

Cuban Jewish leaders bring jailed American Alan Gross latkes, prayers to celebrate Hanukkah H AVA N A ( A P ) — A n American man imprisoned in Cuba for crimes against the state has received another visit from Jewish leaders on the island. Adela Dworin is president of the Jewish Community of Cuba. She said Thursday that she met w i t h M a r y l a n d re s i d e n t A l a n G ro s s f o r a n h o u r a n d a h a l f Monday to mark Hanukkah. They prayed, lit candles and shared latkes, a potato-pancake dish traditionally eaten during Hanukkah. A photo showed a slenderlooking Gross with Dworin and Community vice president David Prinstein. He held a hand-lettered sign in Spanish that read “I (heart) Judy” — a reference to Gross’ wife. Gross was sentenced to 15 years for his work on a USAID democracy-building program in Cuba.

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Center Grove Presbyterian

NEW BETHEL UNITED METHODIST 131 N. Main St., Glen Carbon, IL Rev. William Adams Church Phone: 288-5700 Sunday Morning Worship 8:30 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. Adult & Children’s Sunday School 9:40 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. Nursery 8:30 a.m. to Noon Senior High Youth Group Sunday at 7:30 p.m. Senior High Bible Study Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. Fully Accessible Facilities www.newbethelumc.org e-mail office@newbethelumc.org

MOUNT JOY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH OF EDWARDSVILLE

6279 Center Grove Rd., Edwardsville Phone: 656-9485 Worship, 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11:00 a.m. Wed. Eve. Bible Study/Prayer, Choir Children & Youth Ministries

327 Olive Street • Edw, IL 656-0845 Steve Jackson, Pastor

Rev. Anthony J. Casoria, Pastor www.centergrove.org Presbyterian Church in America

Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship: 10:45 a.m. Wed. Early Morning Prayer: 5:00 a.m. Wed. Bible Study: 7:00 p.m.

Located 1 Block North of Post Office Early Worship: 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages: 9:15 a.m. Child/Youth Choir: 10:15 a.m. Late Worship w/Chancel Choir: 10:45 a.m. For Music and Other Activities

Sunday Schedule Sunday School - 9:30 am Worship Service -10:45 am Wednesday Schedule Bible Study - 6:00 pm Wheel Chair Accessible www.edfbc.org office@edfbc.org

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ST. BONIFACE CATHOLIC CHURCH 110 N. Buchanan Edwardsville 656-6450 Very Reverend Jeffrey Goeckner

Saturday Vigil - 4:15 pm Spanish Mass - 6:15 pm Sunday Mass 8:15 am, 10:15 am, 5:15 pm Daily Mass Schedule Mon., 5:45 pm Tues., Thurs., Fri. 8:00 am Wed., 6:45 pm

Traditional Worship: 9:00 a.m. Coffee Fellowship: 10:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday School: 10:30 a.m. Youth: 6:00 p.m. Dr. Brooks, Lead Minister Jeff Wrigley, Youth & Children’s Director www.fccedwardsville.org

EMMANUEL CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST 33 . ro n treet d ar ds ille 0 Pastor Carlos Bryant 618-931-3707

Sabbath Morning 9:30 A.M. Sabbath Evening 6:00 P.M. Wednesday Evening 7:00 P.M.

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All Are Welcome

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Rev. Jackie K. Havis-Shear

9:30 a.m. ~ Contemporary Worship 11:00 a.m. ~ Traditional Worship Free Friday Lunch - 11:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

www.immanuelonmain.org

407 Edwardsville Rd. (Rt. 162) Troy, IL 62294 667-6241 Dennis D. Price, Pastor Sunday Worship: 8 a.m., 9 a.m., & 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Worship: 6:30 p.m.

www.troyumc.org

“God has endowed man with creation so that he may illumine the world with the flame of brotherhood and express the utmost state of unity and accord. ” ~ Baha’u’llah Illuminate the world everyday! The Bahá’is of Edwardsville warmly welcome and invite you to investigate the teachings of the Bahá’i Faith.

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800 N. Main Street Edwardsville (618) 656-4648

Holy Eucharist at 10:30 a.m.

310 South Main, Edwardsville, 656-7498

1914 Esic Drive, Edwardsville, 656-0918 “Loving People to Jesus” Shane Taylor, Senior Minister Matt Campbell, Youth and Worship Minister Shawn Smith, Family Life Minister Sunday Schedule: Worship at 9:30 am and 11:00 am

Rev. Tony Clavier

“Where Jesus Christ is Celebrated in Liturgy and Life.”

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FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF EDWARDSVILLE 534 St. Louis Street Edwardsville, IL (618) 656-1008 Rev. Stephen Disney, Pastor

Summit at School Street Glen Carbon, IL 288-5620

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First Presbyterian Church 237 N. Kansas Edwardsville, IL

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January 3, 2013

For more information call (618) 656-4142 or email: Bahai.Edwardsville@sbcglobal.net P.O. Box 545 Edwardsville, IL 62025 www.bahai.us

ST. PAUL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 3277 Bluff Rd. Edwardsville, IL 656-1500

Rev. Diane C. Grohmann September - May Worship 10:15 a.m. June-August Worship 9:30 a.m. Our Facility is Handicap Accessible

www.stpauledw.org

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Movies

QuickGlance Movie Reviews

“The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”

Stuffed with Hollywood’s latest technology, Peter Jackson’s “The Lord of the Rings” prelude is some eye candy that truly dazzles and some that utterly distracts, at least in its test-run of 48 frames a second, double the projection rate that has been standard since silent-film days. It’s also overstuffed with prologues, flashbacks and long, boring councils among dwarves, wizards and elves as Jackson tries to mine enough story out of J.R.R. Tolkien’s mythology to build another trilogy. Remember the interminable false endings of “The Return of the King,” the Academy Award-winning finale of Jackson’s “Lord of the Rings”? “An Unexpected Journey” has a similar bloat throughout its nearly three hours, in which Tolkien’s brisk story of intrepid little hobbit Bilbo Baggins is drawn out and diluted by dispensable trimmings better left for DVD extras. Two more parts are coming, so we won’t know how the whole story comes together until the finale arrives in summer 2014. Part one’s embellishments may pay off nicely, but right now, “An Unexpected Journey” looks like the start of an unnecessary trilogy better told in one film. Martin Freeman stars as homebody Bilbo, the reluctant recruit of wizard Gandalf (Ian McKellen) on a quest to retake a dwarf kingdom from a dragon. The 48-frame version offers remarkably lifelike images, but the view is almost too real at times, the crystal pictures bleaching away the painterly quality of traditional film and exposing sets and props as movie fakery. RATED: PG-13 for extended sequences of intense fantasy action violence, and frightening images. RUNNING TIME: 169 minutes. ASSOCIATED PRESS RANKING: Two and a half stars out of four.

“Les Miserables”

Tom Hooper’s extravaganza, big-screen telling of the beloved musical is as relentlessly driven as the ruthless Inspector Javert himself. It simply will not let up until you’ve Felt Something — powerfully and repeatedly — until you’ve touched the grime and smelled the squalor and cried a few tears of your own. It is enormous and sprawling and not the slightest bit subtle. But at the same time it’s hard not to admire the ambition that drives such an approach, as well as Hooper’s efforts to combine a rousing, old-fashioned musical tale with contemporary and immediate aesthetics. There’s a lot of hand-held camerawork here, a lot of rushing and swooping through the crowded, volatile slums of Victor Hugo’s 19th-century France. Two years after the release of his inspiring, crowd-pleasing “The King’s Speech,” winner of four Academy Awards including best picture, Hooper has vastly expanded his scope but also jettisoned all remnants of restraint. But he also does something clever in asking his actors to sing live on camera rather than having them record their vocals in a booth somewhere as is the norm, and for shooting the big numbers in single takes. The intimacy can be uncomfortable at times and that closeness highlights self-indulgent tendencies, but the meaning behind lyrics that have become so well-known shines through anew. Hugh Jackman, Anne Hathaway and Russell Crowe star. RATED: PG-13 for suggestive and sexual material, violence and thematic elements. RUNNING TIME: Running time: 158 minutes. ASSOCIATED PRESS RANKING: Two and a half stars out of four.

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“The Impossible”

Based on the true story of a family swept away by the deadly tsunami that pummeled Southeast Asia in 2004, director Juan Antonio Bayona’s drama is about as subtle as a wall of water. The depiction of the natural disaster itself is visceral and horrifying — impeccable from a production standpoint. And Naomi Watts gives a vivid, deeply committed performance as the wife and mother of three young boys who finds the strength to persevere despite desolation and debilitating injuries. But man, is this thing heavy-handed. Watts and Ewan McGregor play Maria and Henry, a happily married British couple spending Christmas at a luxury resort in Thailand with their three adorable sons. (The real-life family whose story inspired the film was Spanish; changing their ethnicity and casting famous people to play them seems like a rather transparent attempt to appeal to a larger audience.) During a quiet morning by the pool, the first massive wave comes ashore, scattering the family and thousands of strangers across the devastated landscape. “The Impossible” tracks their efforts to survive, reconnect, find medical care and get the hell out of town. The nearmisses at an overcrowded hospital are just too agonizing to be true, and the uplifting score swells repeatedly in overpowering fashion to indicate how we should feel. Surely, the inherent drama of this story could have stood on its own two feet. RATED: PG-13 for intense, realistic disaster sequences, including disturbing injury images, and brief nudity. RUNNING TIME: 107 minutes. ASSOCIATED PRESS RANKING: Two stars out of four.

“Jack Reacher”

The idea of watching a movie in which a sniper methodically manufactures his own bullets, practices weekly at a gun range, then waits quietly in an empty parking garage before shooting five people dead may not sound like the most appealing form of entertainment during these tragic days. Nevertheless, it’s important to assess “Jack Reacher” on its own terms, for what it is and what it isn’t. Besides being caught in some unfortunate timing, it’s also clever, wellcrafted and darkly humorous, and it features one of those effortless bad-ass performances from Tom Cruise that remind us that he is indeed a movie star, first and foremost. OK, so maybe Cruise doesn’t exactly resemble the Reacher of British novelist Lee Child’s books: a 6-foot-5, 250-pound, blond behemoth. If you haven’t read them, you probably won’t care. Even if you have read them, Christopher McQuarrie’s film — the first he’s directed and written since 2000’s “The Way of the Gun” — moves so fluidly and with such confidence, it’ll suck you in from the start. Jack Reacher is a former military investigator who’s become a bit of a mythic figure since he’s gone off the grid. When the deadly shooting occurs at the film’s start, authorities believe they’ve quickly found their man: a sniper who’s ex-Army himself. He reveals nothing during his interrogation but manages to scribble the words “Get Jack Reacher” on a notepad before winding up in a coma. But when Reacher arrives and reluctantly agrees to help the defense attorney (Rosamund Pike) investigate, he finds the case isn’t nearly as simple as it seems. RATED: PG-13 for violence, language and some drug material. RUNNING TIME: 130 minutes. ASSOCIATED PRESS RANKING: Three stars out of four.

January 3, 2013

“On the Road”

Walter Salles’ adaptation of Jack Kerouac’s famous novel was made with noble intentions, finely-crafted filmmaking and handsome casting, but, alas, it does not burn, burn, burn. This first ever big-screen adaptation of the Beat classic doesn’t pulse with the electric, mad rush of Kerouac’s feverish phenomenon. Salles (”The Motorcycle Diaries”) approached the book with reverence and deep research, and perhaps that’s the problem — that its spirit got suffocated by respectfulness and affected acting. If anything has made “On the Road” so beloved, it’s not its artful composition, but its yearning: the urgent passion of its characters to break free of themselves and post-war America. As our Dean Moriarty, Kerouac’s stand-in for Neal Cassady, Garrett Hedlund (”Tron”) gives his all in an ultimately failed attempt to find Moriarty’s wild magnetism within him. As the center of the book and the film — the Gatsby to our narrator Sal Paradise (Sam Riley) — he’s crucial to “On the Road” working. The women, afterthoughts in the book, have more fire. Salles has focused particularly on the carnality of Kerouac’s tale, and it threatens to overtake the film. As Moriarty’s first wife, Marylou, Kristen Stewart has a slinky sensuality that briefly dominates the movie. But her character is never developed beyond her sexy bohemia. In a few scenes as Moriarty’s heartbroken second wife, Kirsten Dunst makes the strongest impression. Elisabeth Moss, also as one left behind, excels, shouting: “They dumped me in Tucson! In Tucson!” Viggo Mortensen, Steve Buscemi, Terrence Howard and Amy Adams all make cameos, mostly suggesting the prestige of the project. RATED: R for strong sexual content, drug use and language. RUNNING TIME: 123 minutes. ASSOCIATED PRESS RANKING: Two stars out of four.

“This Is 40”

Every inch a Judd Apatow movie, from the pop culture references and potty mouths to the blunt body humor and escapist drug use. And like all of Apatow’s movies, it’s a good 20 minutes too long. But within that affectionately messy sprawl lies a maturation, an effort to convey something deeper, more personal and more substantive. That goes beyond the casting of his real-life wife, Leslie Mann, as half the couple in question, and the Apatow children, Maude and Iris, as the family’s daughters in this sort-of-sequel to the 2007 hit “Knocked Up.”. As writer and director, Apatow seems more interested in finding painful nuggets of truth than easy laughs. Much of the banter between longtime Los Angeles marrieds Pete (Paul Rudd) and Debbie (Mann) can be very funny, but frequently it’s raw and painful as they have the kind of conversations about kids, finances and sex that might make many people in the audience feel an uncomfortable shiver of recognition. The film takes place during the three-week period when Pete and Debbie are both turning 40 (although Debbie likes to pretend she’s still 38). Birthday parties, fights about money, school confrontations, bratty kid flare-ups and awkward attempts at reconciling with parents are among the many events that occur during this vulnerable time of transition. The strong supporting cast includes Albert Brooks, John Lithgow, Jason Segel and a surprisingly funny Megan Fox. RATED: R for sexual content, crude humor, pervasive language and some drug material. RUNNING TIME: 133 minutes. ASSOCIATED PRESS RANKING: Three stars out of four.


Movies

Associated Press

This image from Universal Pictures shows Isabelle Allen, left, as a young Cosette and Hugh Jackman as Jean Valjean in a scene from "Les Misérables.”

Hooper's "Les Miserables" is relentless By CHRISTY LEMIRE Associated Press Tom Hooper ’s extravaganza, big-screen telling of the beloved musical “Les Miserables” is as relentlessly driven as the ruthless Inspector Javert himself. It simply will not let up until you’ve Felt Something — powerfully and repeatedly — until you’ve touched the grime and smelled the squalor and cried a few tears of your own. It is enormous and sprawling and not the slightest bit subtle. But at the same time it’s hard not to admire the ambition that drives such an approach, as well as Hooper ’s efforts to combine a rousing, old-fashioned mus i c a l t a l e w i t h c o n t e m p o r a r y a n d

immediate aesthetics. There’s a lot of handheld camerawork here, a lot of rushing and swooping through the crowded, volatile slums of Victor Hugo’s 19th-century France. Two years after the release of his inspiring, crowd-pleasing “The King’s Speech,” winner of four Academy Awards including best picture, Hooper has vastly expanded his scope but also jettisoned all remnants of restraint. But he also does something clever in asking his actors sing live on camera, rather than having them record their vocals in a booth somewhere as is the norm, and for shooting the big numbers in single takes. The intimacy can be uncomfortable at times and that closeness highlights self-indulgent tendencies, but the meaning behind lyrics which have

become so well-known shines through anew. You’d probably heard “I Dreamed a Dream,” the plaintive ballad of the doomed prostitute Fantine, sung countless times even before Susan Boyle unfortunately popularized it again in 2009. An emaciated and shorn Anne Hathaway finds fresh pain and regret in those words because her rendition is choked with sobs, because it’s not perfect. That’s definitely part of the fascination of this version of “Les Miserables”: seeing how these A-list stars handle the demands of near-constant singing. Hugh Jackman, as the hero and former prisoner Jean Valjean, is a musical theatre veteran and seems totally in command (although the higher part of his register gets a bit nasal and strained). Amanda

Seyfried, as Fantine’s daughter, Cosette, whom Jean Valjean adopts, had already proven she can sing in “Mamma Mia!” but hits some freakishly high notes here — which isn’t always a good thing. Eddie Redmayne is a lovely surprise as the love-struck revolutionary Marius. And of course, Samantha Barks gives an effortless performance as the lonely and doomed Eponine — everyone here is doomed, it’s “Les Miserables” — a role she’d performed on the London stage. And then there’s Russell Crowe as the obsessed lawman Javert, who has pursued Jean Valjean for decades for breaking his parole and insists he’s still a dangerous man, despite the pious and prosperous life Valjean has forged.

"This is 40" an above-average effort By ROBERT GRUBAUGH For The Edge At this crucial point in the year, a very busy week between the hustle of Christmas and the bustle of a new year, I am burdened by these two thoughts: how can I possibly see and/or review as many movies as are being thrown into release during the last ten days of the year? And should I? I might be better poised to write a year in review column that sums up the 2012 campaign instead of bringing one more picture into the debate. My practical side won out, I'm glad to say. How can I review an entire year a full week before it ends? You'll have to wait one more week for that great honor. Instead, I'll share with you some keen insights into Judd Apatow's newest movie,

"This Is 40," a movie that has a pretty good grasp on the reality of parenthood, self-doubt, small business ownership, and a handful of other milestones of aging already. 2007's "Knocked Up" was my favorite movie of that year; I keep track of those types of things. If you have any recollection of it at all, you'll recall that it centered on a mismatched couple played by Katherine Heigl and Seth Rogen who wind up getting to know each other a little better than they expected after their drunken one-night stand results in an unplanned pregnancy. It's a stoner sex comedy full of nuance and heart. You can't go wrong with it. It also featured a pair of secondary characters that were friends of theirs named Pete (Paul Rudd) and Debbie (Leslie

Mann, wife of the director) and seemed like they had it all together compared to the lovable oaf Rogen played. In this "sortof sequel", This Is 40 tells their story. And let me tell you, gentle reader, Pete and Debbie have just as little clue as the rest of us. P e t e ' s re c o rd i n g s t u d i o , a haven for indie rock labels that sell very few records, and Debbie's boutique, a clothier staffed with the odd comic duo of Charlyne Yi and Megan Fox, are traps that absorb so much of their time. During the late December week when both main characters are set to turn forty years-old, both businesses fall on hard luck and put them in the unpleasant position of lying to each other about the bleakness of their prospects. It's bad enough that they have to survive

Debbie's sudden depression over aging - and doing so without any grace at all. Colonoscopies, mammograms, and aversion therapy over Pete's cupcake habit become de rigueur for what ails them. Stress and stressors are what really sell this story. As parents to two girls (played by Maude and Iris Apatow, daughters of the director and leading lady), Pete and Debbie often find themselves at crisis crossroads over rearing the pair in a technologically dialed-in universe. They never disagree where their kids are concerned, which is refreshing, but there are numerous scenes in this movie that prove that a united front alone is barely enough to qualify yourself as a good parent. I will refer you t o t h e d i s a g re e m e n t b e t w e e n

January 3, 2013

Pete and the mother (Melissa McCarthy) of another student picking on his oldest. It descends into hilarious madness as it goes along, but you won't be sorry that you see it. You can rest assured that they didn't learn their parenting skills from any paragon of the generation before. Albert Brooks and John Lithgow star as father figures both cold (hers) and calculating (his) and perfect models for how not to behave with your own children. "This Is 40" lags at times, but it's also full of sly chuckles that are grounded, as Apatow does best, in reality. "This Is 40" runs 146 minutes and is rated R for sexual content, crude humor, pervasive language, and some drug material. I give this film two stars out of four.

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The Arts EAC to host "Pre-Columbian Mayan Artifacts" By KRISTA WILKINSON-MIDGLEY Of The Edge So the world didn’t end on Dec. 21, 2012 as the ancient Mayans predicted it would, which leaves the rest of us with plenty of time to view the “Pre-Columbian Mayan Artifacts” exhibit on display Jan. 4 through Feb. 8 at the Edwardsville Arts Center. The exhibit features ancient and beautifully-crafted Mesoamerican and South American art and artifacts from the University Museum at SIUE. This is the second time the EAC has partnered with the University Museum to showcase items from its collection. Last year, the two worked together to bring about the “Art of Asia” exhibit. A special reception will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 4 to officially open the exhibit. Curator Eric Barnett said the success of “Art of Asia” prompted organizers to come up with an idea for another exhibit with the EAC. The museum’s extensive collection of Pre-Columbian artifacts seemed perfect for it. The EAC exhibit also gives the museum an opportunity to interact with some elementary and high school students. This played a big part in the “Art of Asia” exhibit, which saw students writing haikus that, in turn, helped Barnett determine which pieces

to select for the exhibit. It was a huge success and helped forge a stronger relationship between the university and younger students in the community. Barnett said the organizers hope to achieve that same kind of collaboration with younger students with this exhibit. “We’re going to find ways to integrate this exhibit with what other teachers are doing in the schools,” he said. The “Pre-Columbian Mayan Artifacts” exhibit will contain approximately 100 pieces in the exhibit with most of them ceramics and some volcanic stone and precious stones like jade and small “gingerbread” figures. “The best of them are very nice sculptural ceramics primarily from the western parts of Mexico and some plainware,” said Barnett. While the exhibit will include a small selection of Mayan artifacts, it will also include items from other cultures such as the Olmec. Barnett described the Olmec civilization as the “mother culture” of Mesoamerica, which predates both the Mayans and Aztecs. The University Museum acquired its Pre-Columbian collection thanks to the generous donations of private collectors over the years. These included Irvin and Margaret Dagan, Milton K. and Doris T. Harrington and Dr. David L. “Doc” Harner. Visitors to this exhibit will have

the opportunity to view a wide range of rare and beautiful ancient artifacts from the university’s

collection that they might not otherwise have come across. “I think what people will find

interesting is the variety of the forms,” said Barnett. “We have a couple of burial masks that we’re going to show. They are just stunningly beautiful.” Barnet said his personal favorite item from the collection is the Colima dog effigy, which depicts a pot-bellied miniature dog with ears pricked up and its teeth bared. “What is amazing is how wellmade some of these things are. It’s only when you hold them you feel how light and perfectly formed they are,” said Barnett. However, Barnett said that not everything from the university’s collection will be on show in the exhibit. In particular, the Peruvian textiles in the collection are far too delicate and not yet ready to be displayed publicly. Additionally, art work from Liberty Middle School students will be featured in the EAC’s Student Gallery. The EAC, located at 6165 Center Grove Road (on the campus of Edwardsville High School), is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and is closed Sunday through Tuesday. Call the EAC for more information at 655-0337 or visit the center’s website at ArtForEdwardsville.com.

Pictured are two examples from the “Pre-Columbian Mayan Artifacts” exhibit. Photos for The Intelligencer.

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January 3, 2013


The Arts Touhill will present "Moulin Rouge – The Ballet" By KRISTA WILKINSON-MIDGLEY Of The Edge

E

xperience the color, romance and allure of Paris during its La Belle Epoch heyday when “Moulin Rouge – The Ballet” high kicks its way into St. Louis later this month. Dance St. Louis continues its 2012-2013 “Powerhouse Season” by bringing Canada’s Royal Winnipeg Ballet to St. Louis for the first time to perform “Moulin Rouge – The Ballet” at 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 25 and at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 26 at the Touhill Performing Arts Center. “It’s colorful and very exciting and a kind of work that everyone is familiar with because they have heard the music at one time or another,” said Dance St. Louis Artistic and Executive Director Michael Uthoff. “It’s a love story set in a time and a period that fascinates everybody. It’s very, very exciting dancing carried out by superb performers.” Uthoff described the performance as a highly enjoyable evening at the theater for everyone, even those who may never have been to the ballet before. “You just sit back and relax and let the entire story bathe you in the colors, amaze you in the music and take you to places that you’ve never been before. It’s quite exciting,” he said. “It’s a great date ballet.” The Royal Winnipeg Ballet commissioned Jorden Morris, a choreographer and former principal dancer of the company, to create “Moulin Rouge - The Ballet” in celebration of its 70th anniversary season. The company was founded by Gweneth Lloyd and Betty Farrally in 1939 and holds the double distinction of being Canada's premier ballet company and the longest continuously operating ballet company in North America.

For The Edge

Pictured are two scenes from "Moulin Rouge – The Ballet." “Moulin Rouge – The Ballet” features high-kicking choreography, French period music and an original new love story told entirely though dance. The ballet’s eclectic score mixes classical music by Strauss, Debussy, Ravel, Offenbach and Massenet with popular melodies such as “La Vie en Rose,” the

signature song of French singer Édith Piaf. According to program notes, the ballet tells the romantic and tragic story of two innocents - Matthew, a struggling artist, and Nathalie, a cancan dancer – who are drawn to fin-de-siècle Paris in search of romance and stardom. Their

passion ignites a powder keg of emotion and ultimate heartbreak in the most glittery and infamous of cabarets—the Moulin Rouge. They also befriend French painter Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, who historically was a denizen of the cabaret and vividly portrayed its performers and patrons in his art.

January 3, 2013

Vibrant and beautiful set design brings Parisian streets, stone staircases, towers and the shadow of the famous Moulin Rouge windmill to the stage. The lavish sets and rainbow-ruffled costumes “evoke the heady world of turnof-the-century Paris, where excess ran hand in hand with poverty, and the elixir of personal freedom bred lifestyles that were reckless and addictive,” states the press release. “Moulin Rouge – The Ballet” premiered in 2009 and since then it has been seen by more than 100,000 people in more than 30 cities across North America. Canada’s Royal Winnipeg Ballet is the first ballet company in the world to collaborate with the famous Moulin Rouge in Paris and has been granted the rights to use its trademarked name for the title of the performance. Patrons who wish to gain a deeper appreciation of the show can attend the free program, “Marjorie Orgel Speaking of Dance Series,” hosted by Michael Uthoff in the Touhill’s Terrace Lobby at 7:15 p.m. prior to the 8 p.m. performances and at 1:15 p.m. prior to the Saturday 2 p.m. performance. Tickets range from $35 to $55 for the evening performances and all tickets are $35 for the Saturday matinee. Tickets are available at the Dance St. Louis box office at 3547 Olive St. in the Centene Center for Arts and Education in Grand Center, by calling (314) 534-6622, or by visiting dancestlouis.org.

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The Arts Peabody goes back to the '80s with "Flashdance ‑ The Musical" By KRISTA WILKINSON-MIDGLEY Of The Edge Dig out that ripped sweatshirt from the back of the closet, slap on your sweatband and get ready for “Flashdance – The Musical,” which runs Jan. 8 through 13 at St. Louis’ Peabody Opera House. Celebrating its 30th anniversary, the original 1983 film was a worldwide smash hit that became a pop culture phenomenon, grossing over $150 million and featuring a Grammy Award-winning soundtrack. Now, the all-new stage musical revisits the story of Alex Owens, a Pittsburgh steel mill welder by day and a bar dancer by night with dreams of one day becoming a professional performer. When romance with her steel mill boss Nick threatens to complicate her ambitions, Alex learns the meaning of love and its power to fuel the pursuit of her dream. Broadway’s Emily Padgett and Matthew Hydzik will star as “Alex” and “Nick” in the world premiere of “Flashdance – The Musical.” Padgett and Hydzik will be joined on stage by Rachelle Rak in the role of “Tess.”  DeQuina Moore is a multitalented performer originally from Houston, Texas, and now based in New York City. She plays the role of flashdancer “KiKi” in the show. “Kiki is a lot of fun. Very sassy and very sexy,” said Moore. “Every time she hits the stage in Harry’s Bar she comes alive. She gets to live out her [dance] fantasy.”

missed. “The writing and the music is absolutely wonderful,” she said. “The audience is just going to go crazy.” Fans of the film will be happy to know that all of their favorite songs are featured in the stage

Moore describes “Flashdance – The Musical” as a “truly magical story” that audience members will be able to immediately relate to with its Cinderella tale about a workingclass girl who achieves her dance dreams. “This dream seems far off, which a lot of us [performers] can relate to,” she said. “We’ve all heard ‘no.’” Moore said perfecting the show’s signature dance routines has been intense, requiring regular Epsom salt baths. “It’s so much fun. I’ve never danced as hard,” she said. According to Moore, “Flashdance – The Musical” is a show not to be

show. “Flashdance – The Musical” features a score including the hit songs from the movie, all of which became Top Ten hits on the radio around the world  including the Academy Award-winning title song “Flashdance – What a Feeling,” “Maniac,” “Gloria,” “Manhunt,” “I Love Rock & Roll.” In addition to these hits, 16 brand new songs have been written for the stage with music by Robbie Roth and lyrics by Robert Cary and Robbie Roth. The show is directed and choreographed by Sergio Trujillo, who is known for his work with “Jersey Boys,” “The Addams

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For The Edge

Pictured are three scenes from "Flashdance – The Musical."

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Family” and “Memphis.” The book was written by Robert Cary and Tom Hedley, who co-wrote the original screenplay along with Joe Eszterhas. Other creative credits include lighting design by Howell Binkley, scenic design by Klara Zieglerova, projection design by Peter Nigrini and costumes by Paul Tazewell with sound design by John Shivers, hair design by Charles LaPointe, and make-up design by Cookie Jordan.  The production also features music arrangements and supervision by Jason

January 3, 2013

Howland, orchestrations by Doug Besterman, dance arrangements by Jim Abbott. “Flashdance” kicks off its national tour Jan. 1 at Heinz Hall and continues on to more than 20 cities, including St. Louis with additional bookings to be announced. In addition to the U.S. touring company, a second company will be assembled for the creatively reworked production of “Flashdance,” which will begin performances on Broadway in August 2013 for an open-ended engagement.

“Flashdance – The Musical” will run from Jan. 8 through 13 at the Peabody Opera House, located at 1400 Market St. in St. Louis, Mo. Tickets are on sale now and may be purchased online by visiting www.saint-louis-theatre.com or charge by phone by calling (800) 430-8903. For more information about the show, visit www. flashdancethemusical.com or follow updates on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ flashdancemusical.


The Arts Arts calendar **If you would like to add something to our arts calendar, email it to theedge@edwpub.net.

Thursday, Jan. 3 Wicked, Fox Theatre, St. Louis, 1:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. The Repertory Theatre presents Good People, Loretto-Hilton Center Mainstage, St. Louis, 8:00 p.m. Generating the Future: Edna Patterson Petty, COCA, St. Louis, 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Runs through January 13, 2013. Arnold Newman: Luminaries of the Twentieth Century in Art, Politics and Culture, Sheldon Art Galleries, St. Louis, Noon to 5:00 p.m., Runs through January 19, 2013. Federico Barocci: Renaissance Master, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through January 20, 2013. Drawn in Copper, Italian Prints in the Age of Barocci, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through January 13, 2013. Al Hirschfeld's Jazz and Broadway Scrapbook, The Sheldon Art Galleries, St. Louis, noon to 5:00 p.m., Runs through Jan. 5, 2013. Notations: Contemporary Drawing as Idea and Process, Kemper Art Museum, St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Runs through January 7, 2013.

Friday, Jan. 4 Wicked, Fox Theatre, St. Louis, 8:00 p.m. The Repertory Theatre presents Good People, Loretto-Hilton Center Mainstage, St. Louis, 8:00 p.m. Opening Reception: PreColumbian Mayan Artifacts, E d w a r d s v i l l e A r t s C e n t e r, Edwardsville, 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Generating the Future: Edna Patterson Petty, COCA, St. Louis, 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Runs through January 13, 2013. Arnold Newman: Luminaries of the Twentieth Century in Art, Politics and Culture, Sheldon Art Galleries, St. Louis, Noon to 5:00 p.m., Runs through January 19, 2013. Federico Barocci: Renaissance Master, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Runs through January 20, 2013. Drawn in Copper, Italian Prints in the Age of Barocci, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Runs through January 13, 2013. Al Hirschfeld's Jazz and Broadway Scrapbook, The Sheldon

Art Galleries, St. Louis, noon to 5:00 p.m., Runs through Jan. 5, 2013. Notations: Contemporary Drawing as Idea and Process, Kemper Art Museum, St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Runs through January 7, 2013.

Saturday, Jan. 5 The Repertory Theatre presents Good People, Loretto-Hilton Center Mainstage, St. Louis, 5:00 p.m. In the Loop Dance Concert, COCA, St. Louis, 2:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. Pre-Columbian Mayan Artifacts, E d w a r d s v i l l e A r t s C e n t e r, Edwardsville, 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Runs through February 8. The Progress of Love, Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through April 20, 2013. Wicked, Fox Theatre, St. Louis, 2:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. Arnold Newman: Luminaries of the Twentieth Century in Art, Politics and Culture, Sheldon Art Galleries, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., Runs through January 19, 2013. The Progress of Love, Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through April 20, 2013. Federico Barocci: Renaissance Master, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through January 20, 2013. Drawn in Copper, Italian Prints in the Age of Barocci, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through January 13, 2013. Al Hirschfeld's Jazz and Broadway Scrapbook, The Sheldon Art Galleries, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Notations: Contemporary Drawing as Idea and Process, Kemper Art Museum, St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Runs through January 7, 2013.

in the Age of Barocci, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through January 13, 2013. Notations: Contemporary Drawing as Idea and Process, Kemper Art Museum, St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Runs through January 7, 2013.

Monday, Jan. 7 Notations: Contemporary Drawing as Idea and Process, Kemper Art Museum, St. Louis, 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Juan William Chรกvez: Living Proposal Pruitt-Igoe Bee Sanctuary, Laumeier Sculpture Park, St. Louis, 8:00 a.m. to Sunset, Runs through January 20.

Tuesday, Jan. 8 Flashdance - The Musical, Peabody Opera House, St. Louis, 8:00 p.m. The Repertory Theatre presents Good People, Loretto-Hilton Center Mainstage, St. Louis, 7:00 p.m. Juan William Chรกvez: Living Proposal Pruitt-Igoe Bee Sanctuary, Laumeier Sculpture Park, St. Louis, 8:00 a.m. to Sunset, Runs through January 20. Young Artists Celebrate the Centennial, Sheldon Art Galleries, St. Louis, Noon to 8:00 p.m., Runs through February 9.

Wednesday, Jan. 9 Flashdance - The Musical, Peabody Opera House, St. Louis, 8:00 p.m. The Repertory Theatre presents Good People, Loretto-Hilton Center Mainstage, St. Louis, 1:30 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. The Progress of Love, Pulitzer

Foundation for the Arts, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through April 20, 2013. Pre-Columbian Mayan Artifacts, E d w a r d s v i l l e A r t s C e n t e r, Edwardsville, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Runs through February 8. Young Artists Celebrate the Centennial, Sheldon Art Galleries, St. Louis, Noon to 5:00 p.m., Runs through February 9. Generating the Future: Edna Patterson Petty, COCA, St. Louis, 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Runs through January 13, 2013. Arnold Newman: Luminaries of the Twentieth Century in Art, Politics and Culture, Sheldon Art Galleries, St. Louis, Noon to 5:00 p.m., Runs through January 19, 2013. Federico Barocci: Renaissance Master, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through January 20, 2013. Drawn in Copper, Italian Prints in the Age of Barocci, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through January 13, 2013. Juan William Chรกvez: Living Proposal Pruitt-Igoe Bee Sanctuary, Laumeier Sculpture Park, St. Louis, 8:00 a.m. to Sunset, Runs through January 20.

Thursday, Jan. 10 Flashdance - The Musical, Peabody Opera House, St. Louis, 8:00 p.m. The Repertory Theatre presents Good People, Loretto-Hilton Center Mainstage, St. Louis, 8:00 p.m. Generating the Future: Edna Patterson Petty, COCA, St. Louis, 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Runs through January 13, 2013. Pre-Columbian Mayan Artifacts, E d w a r d s v i l l e A r t s C e n t e r,

Edwardsville, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Runs through February 8. Young Artists Celebrate the Centennial, Sheldon Art Galleries, St. Louis, Noon to 5:00 p.m., Runs through February 9. Arnold Newman: Luminaries of the Twentieth Century in Art, Politics and Culture, Sheldon Art Galleries, St. Louis, Noon to 5:00 p.m., Runs through January 19, 2013. Federico Barocci: Renaissance Master, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through January 20, 2013. Drawn in Copper, Italian Prints in the Age of Barocci, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through January 13, 2013. Juan William Chรกvez: Living Proposal Pruitt-Igoe Bee Sanctuary, Laumeier Sculpture Park, St. Louis, 8:00 a.m. to Sunset, Runs through January 20.

Friday, Jan. 11 Flashdance - The Musical, Peabody Opera House, St. Louis, 8:00 p.m. The Repertory Theatre presents Good People, Loretto-Hilton Center Mainstage, St. Louis, 8:00 p.m. STOMP, Fox Theatre, St. Louis, 8:00 p.m. Pre-Columbian Mayan Artifacts, E d w a r d s v i l l e A r t s C e n t e r, Edwardsville, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Runs through February 8. Generating the Future: Edna Patterson Petty, COCA, St. Louis, 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Runs through January 13, 2013. Young Artists Celebrate the Centennial, Sheldon Art Galleries, St. Louis, Noon to 5:00 p.m., Runs through February 9.

Sunday, Jan. 6 The Repertory Theatre presents Good People, Loretto-Hilton Center Mainstage, St. Louis, 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. In the Loop Dance Concert, COCA, St. Louis, 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Wicked, Fox Theatre, St. Louis, 1:00 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Federico Barocci: Renaissance Master, St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Runs through January 20, 2013. Drawn in Copper, Italian Prints

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On the Edge of the Weekend

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The Arts Artistic adventures Community Arts Access Grant cycle now open at Jacoby Jacoby Arts Center participates in the Community Arts Access (CAA) program that is sponsored by the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency. Community Arts Access grant funds are available through the Jacoby Arts Center to individual artists, units of government, and 501(c)3 nonprofit organizations to help fund art programs focusing on community participation and involvement taking place between September 15, 2012 through August 31, 2013. A total of $8,750 will be re-granted from Jacoby Arts Center to other organizations. Those interested in being considered for the Jacoby Arts Center ’s 2013 Community Arts Access re-granting program need to submit a 2-page narrative that clearly outlines their proposed project, its needed funding, and the impact it will have on the community if delivered. I n t e re s t e d a p p l i c a n t s m u s t submit their 2-page narrative by no later than 5 p.m. on Friday, January 4, 2013. Applicants may submit their narrative via email at melissa.mustain@jacobyartscenter. org with “CAA” in the subject line or via postal mail, postmarked by the deadline, to Jacoby Arts Center, Attention: CAA, 627 East Broadway, Alton, IL 62002. They may also be dropped off by the deadline at the Center during normal hours of operation. These submissions will be reviewed by a panel of community members who will then recommend applicants for completion of a full application package. The 17 Illinois counties served by Jacoby Arts Center in the CAA program include Madison, Bond, C a l h o u n , C l i n t o n , C r a w f o rd , Edwards, Effingham, Fayette, Jasper, Jersey, Macoupin, Monroe, Montgomery, St. Clair, Wabash, Washington, and Wayne. The Community Arts Access program endeavors to create a better network for funds disbursement at the local level, to enrich arts programming, and to promote increased community involvement in the arts. The Illinois Arts Council and Jacoby Arts Center share in the goal to connect with small volunteeroriented art projects in counties that may not have access to other funding sources. Located at 627 East Broadway in Alton, Illinois, Jacoby Arts Center is open Tuesdays-Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with late hours on Thursdays until 8 p.m. The Center is closed on Sundays and Mondays. For more information, visit www. jacobyartscenter.org or call 618-4625222. Jacoby Arts Center is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to foster the artistic development and

economic success of artists, and to expand accessibility to the arts through programs that promote education, participation and exploration.

"Stomp" will invade The Fox "Stomp," the international percussion sensation, is making its triumphant return to the Fabulous Fox Theatre January 11-13, 2013. From its beginnings as a street performance in the UK, "Stomp" has grown into an international sensation over the past 20 years, having performed in more than 50 countries and in front of more than 24 million people. And now "Stomp" returns to St. Louis with new surprises. Created by Luke Cresswell and Steve McNicholas, "Stomp" continues its phenomenal run with four global productions: the ongoing sell-out production at New York's Orpheum Theatre, a permanent London company, and North American and European tours. Throughout its life, the show has continued to change by creating new material; next year, it will incorporate two new pieces. It is safe to say you will never again look at supermarket carts or plumbing fixtures the same way…or paint cans, or kitchen sinks or… "Stomp," an overwhelming success marked by rave reviews, numerous awards, and sell-out engagements, is the winner of an Olivier Award for Best Choreography (London's Tony Award), a New York Obie Award, a Drama Desk Award for Unique Theatre Experience, and a Special Citation from Best Plays. In addition to the stage shows, "Stomp" has received an Academy Award nomination, four Emmy nominations and one Emmy Award for their acclaimed HBO special "Stomp Out Loud." Noteworthy television appearances include The London 2012 Olympic Games Closing Ceremony, The Academy Awards (produced by Quincy Jones), Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, and a series of award-winning international commercials. The performers “make a rhythm out of anything we can get our hands on that makes a sound,” says co-founder/director Luke Cresswell. A unique combination of percussion, movement and visual comedy, "Stomp" has created its own inimitable, contemporary form of rhythmic expression: both household and industrial objects find new life as musical instruments in the hands of an idiosyncratic band of body percussionists. It is a journey through sound, a celebration of the everyday and a comic interplay of characters wordlessly communicating through dance and drum. Synchronized stiff-bristle brooms become a sweeping orchestra, eight Zippo lighters flip open and closed

to create a fiery fugue; wooden poles thump and clack in a rhythmic explosion. "Stomp" uses everything b u t c o n v e n t i o n a l p e rc u s s i o n instruments - dustbins, tea chests, radiator hoses, boots, hub caps - to fill the stage with a compelling and unique act that is often imitated but never duplicated. Critics and audiences have raved: “'Stomp' is as crisp and exuberant as if it had opened yesterday,” says The New York Times. The San Francisco Chronicle declares “'Stomp' has a beat that just won’t quit!” The Los Angeles Times exclaims: “Electrifying! Triumphs in the infinite variety of the human experience.” “A phenomenal show! Bashing, crashing, smashing, swishing, banging and kicking – a joyous invention!” says the Chicago Tribune. "Stomp" returns to the Fabulous Fox Theatre for four performances only January 11-13, 2013. Performance times are Friday at 8pm, Saturday at 2pm & 8pm and Sunday at 2pm. To purchase tickets, visit metrotix. com, call 314-534-1111 or visit the Fox Box Office. Ticket prices start at $23. Prices are subject to change; please refer to fabulousfox.com for current pricing. The Fox Theatre is located in Grand Center at 527 North Grand Boulevard.

The Sheldon to feature works by Arnold Newman The Sheldon Art Galleries presents Arnold Newman: Luminaries of the Twentieth Century in Art, Politics and Culture.  The exhibition runs through January 19, 2013, is organized by art2art Circulating Exhibitions and is part of the American Arts Experience, St. Louis.  The exhibition is made possible by Chris Kaplan and Barbara and Arthur McDonnell.  Gallery hours are Tuesdays, Noon – 8 p.m.; We d n e s d a y s , T h u r s d a y s a n d Fridays, Noon – 5 p.m.; Saturdays,

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10 a.m. – 2 p.m. and one hour prior to Sheldon performances and during intermission.  Admission is free.  For more information on the exhibition, visit the galleries’ website at www. thesheldon.org/galleries.asp. Arnold Newman: Luminaries of the Twentieth Century in Art, Politics and Culture features photographs of some of the most innovative minds and personalities that defined a century as seen through the eyes of one of its own: Arnold Newman.  With over 60 images, this collection features portraits of those who gave rise to the ideas and concepts that have shaped our world, including Pablo Picasso, Piet Mondrian, Marcel Duchamp, Igor Stravinsky, Jackson Pollock, Salvador Dali, Alexander C a l d e r, Ay n R a n d , L a n g s t o n Hughes, Martha Graham, Man Ray, Leonard Bernstein, Georgia O’Keeffe, Andy Warhol, John F. Kennedy, Philip Glass and Woody Allen, among many others.  With a career spanning 60 years, Newman’s body of work reads as a roll-call of the most influential names of the 20th century. Arnold Newman (1918-2006) is acknowledged as one of the great masters of photography, and his work has changed the photographic portrait.  Recognized as the “Father of Environmental Portraiture,” Newman was influenced by early photographers like Alfred Stieglitz and the school of Modernism.  He quickly developed his own unique visual style and technique, placing his subjects in the midst of the stuff of their genius.  His portraits at once speak to his talent as a photographer and his unparalleled ability to capture the personality of his subjects. Born on March 3, 1918 in New York City, Newman was raised in Atlantic City, New Jersey and Miami Beach, Florida.  From 1936 – 1938, he studied art at the University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, where he received a scholarship.  Newman began his career in photography

in 1938 working at chain portrait studios in Philadelphia, Baltimore a n d We s t P a l m B e a c h , b u t immediately began working in abstract and documentary photography on his own.  In June of 1941, Beaumont Newhall of the Museum of Modern Art and Alfred Stieglitz “discovered” him, and he was given an exhibit with Ben Rose at the A.D. Gallery. In 1945, his oneman exhibit, Artists Look Like This, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, attracted nationwide attention.  Well established, he moved to New York in 1946, opened a studio and became a member of the American Society of Magazine Photographers (ASMP). Newman has been profiled extensively in domestic and international magazines and is featured in photographic books, histories of photography and television documentaries.  His work has been the focus of twelve monographs, and he was an important contributor to magazines like Life, Holiday, Look, Vanity Fair, Scientific American, Town and Country, Esquire, Travel and Leisure, Harper’s Bazaar, The New Yorker and others.  Newman’s work has been the focus of many solo exhibitions both nationally and internationally and is found in private and public collections including the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; Art Institute of Chicago; Philadelphia Museum of Art; International Museum of Photography at George Eastman House, Rochester, New York; Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona, Tucson; National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; the Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Australia National Gallery, Canberra; Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Tel Aviv Museum, Israel; Nihon University Collection of Art, Tokyo; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; International Center of Photography, NYC; and many others.

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On the Edge of the Weekend

January 3, 2013


Music Tuning in Daughtry, 3 Doors Down to perform at Peabody M u l t i - p l a t i n u m ro c k b a n d s Daughtry and 3 Doors Down have announced plans to continue their joint co-headline tour into 2013. The excursion began November 17 in Tunica, MS at 3 Doors Down's 9th Annual Better Life Foundation event, and night after night has attracted packed houses in venues across The U.S.. Leg one of the tour will wrap on 12/15 at Anaheim's Theatre at the Honda Center, with Fresno, CA at the Save Mart Center on 12/13 and a national live AXS TV appearances in Broomfield, CO at 1st Bank Center on 12/11. Tickets for the Jan. 30, St. Louis show at Peabody Opera House are on sale now. Tickets are $81, $61, $51, and $41. Tickets may be purchased at the Ford Box Office at Scottrade Center, all Ticketmaster Ticket Centers, by phone at 800-7453000, or online at ticketmaster.com. There is a facility fee on all tickets purchased at all locations, including at the Scottrade Center Box Office. Additional Ticketmaster service charges and handling fees apply to all tickets purchased through Ticketmaster outlets, by phone or online. For disabled seating, call 314622-5420 The first ever co-headline U.S. tour will resume on January 25th at the Verizon Theatre in Dallas, and continue in to March, 2013. The opening act will be Aranda. "We're very happy to continue the tour with 3 Doors Down, and look forward to getting this show to the fans that we missed on the first leg of this tour!" says lead singer Chris Daughtry. 3 Doors Down singer Brad Arnold shares, "This tour with Daughtry has been amazing, and we are excited to keep it rolling

into 2013! See you on the road my friends!" Daughtry's set features the band's new single "Start of Something Good," from their new gold certified album Break The Spell along with a plethora of smash hits and fan favorites including “Home,” “It’s Not Over,” “Feels Like Tonight” and “No Surprise” from platinumselling Leave This Town and its blockbuster-selling and recordbreaking self titled debut. 3 Doors Down has just released the quintet's first ever Greatest Hits package, and the band's set brings repertoire from their nine #1 chart-toppers to the stage, including "Kryptonite," "It's Not My Time," "When I'm Gone, "Here Without You" alongside others and new tracks "One Light" and "Goodbyes." The band's lead single from The Greatest Hits "One Light" has hit the Top 15 at Active Rock radio and continues to make strong moves at the format.

Before You Exit to perform at Fubar The pop/rock trio, know as Before You Exit, have announced that they will be joining Action I t e m ' s ' T h e R e s o l u t i o n To u r ' kicking off on January 4th, 2013. These young pop-rockers combine catchy hooks, charm, with the great musicianship to make an adorable group you will be seeing everywhere in 2013! They will be performing at Fubar on February 2nd. See full tour dates below and watch the bands' video announcement here: http://bit. ly/SSLuEE. To purchase tickets, please visit: BeforeYouExit.com/ tour. The Orlando-based band began a few years ago with brothers Connor McDonough, 19, (Vocals/ Guitar) and Riley McDonough, 17, (Vocals), only recently did the

band bring in younger brother Toby McDonough, 14, on vocals. The trio gigs live augmented by Thomas Silvers (Drums) and Braiden Wood (Guitar). Unlike many bands of brothers, Oasis and The Black Crowes come to mind, the trio work harmoniously. "We actually get along really well. We all have our thing and work in categories by preference," Connor says. "I write vocal melodies, Riley writes lyrics, and Toby helps with both. There are never fights because each of us can do our own thing, but also contribute to each other." Set to release their brand new EP in February 2013, the three brothers have crafted a soaring p o p ro c k a l b u m o f u p l i f t i n g relationship songs that effortlessly blend sharp hooks with bright and buoyant rock. The album standout and first single, "I Like That", is a tune with tenderly romantic lyrics and big pop-rock beat. Ryan Daly and Anthony Improgo, along with Connor McDonough, produced t h e n e w a l b u m . " T h e y re a l l y listened to what we wanted to do and let us try out our ideas, no matter how crazy," Connor says laughing. "Because of that, we feel really connected to the way the recording turned out," Riley adds. Before You Exit released their debut EP, Letting Go, in March 2011, which has been critically acclaimed by the likes of MTV, J-14, Seventeen, Just Jared, just to name a few. After the release, the

band has been gaining great buzz from touring in support of Allstar Weekend and All Time Low.

Bon Jovi to perform in St. Louis As Bon Jovi gears up for a monumental year, the all-American rock icons have announced the first set of U.S. dates, taking them from coast to coast on their “BON JOVI Because We Can – The Tour.”  The tour will kick off in Uncasville, Conn., on February 9, treating fans to one-night-only performances in U.S. arenas nationwide, plus multiple stadium shows including a two-night stand at MetLife Stadium in the band’s home state of New Jersey.  The tour will roll through St. Louis on March 13 for a performance at the Scottrade Center. Ensuring that there is truly something for every fan, Bon Jovi is offering a wide range of ticket options, starting at $19.50 (plus service charges). Tickets will go on sale in select markets beginning Friday, November 30. Visit www. BonJovi.com for up-to-date information. #BecauseWeCan “As AEG Live embarks on its fourth collaboration with one of today’s greatest original rock bands, it is no surprise that they are going to sell out stadiums and arenas around the globe, since Bon Jovi has consistently delivered the goods to their hardcore and new fans alike,”

said Randy Phillips, President & CEO of AEG Live.  “‘Because We Can - The Tour’ will again showcase Bon Jovi’s immense catalog of hits and some incredible new music from the forthcoming What About Now album and the signature state-ofthe-art production that have become the hallmarks of Bon Jovi tours.” Overwhelming demand for the band’s previously announced Canadian dates has already led to second shows in Montreal and Toronto, and Bon Jovi has plenty more in store. The band will expand their current tour schedule with additional North American dates including Gillette Stadium in Foxboro, MA; Ford Field in Detroit, MI, and many more. The current tour itinerary is listed below, with further details to come. The tour, promoted by AEG Live in the U.S., Canada and the U.K., will debut brand new songs from Bon Jovi’s upcoming album What About Now, to be released in Spring 2013, loading even more ammunition into the band’s huge arsenal of hits.  The group’s return to the road in 2013 will launch the latest chapter in an ongoing blockbuster run which has already secured Bon Jovi’s status as the essential live rock band – having performed more than 2,700 concerts in over 50 countries for more than 35 million fans. “BON JOVI Because We Can – The Tour” will make its way across the globe with dates in Europe, the Far East, Africa, Latin America and Australia.

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On the Edge of the Weekend

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Music Music calendar **If you would like to add something to our music calendar, email it to theedge@edwpub.net.

Thursday, Jan. 3 Chase Rice & Russell Dickerson, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. Gregory Porter, Jazz at the Bistro, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Ultraviolets, Fast Eddie's Bon Air, Alton, 7:00 p.m. Best Friends, Flawless, Fubar, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. Snooty and the Ratfinks, Lankford w/Sleepy and the Bedtimes, Cicero's, University City, Doors 6:30 p.m.

Friday, Jan. 4 Jack Grelle and the Johnson Family Band w/Erin Rae, Johnny Appleseed, Plush, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m. Gregory Porter, Jazz at the Bistro, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. American Idle, Fast Eddie's Bon Air, Alton, 8:00 p.m. Jake's Leg, Cicero's, University City, Doors 9:00 p.m. The Manchurian Incident, Hank, Avalon Cinema, The Few, Fubar, St. Louis, 7:00 p.m. The Hipnecks w/The Reeling Gilly, Mercer & Johnson, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. Drop Avenue w/The Weekend Routine, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m.

Saturday, Jan. 5 Schlafly's 21st Birthday Party feat. The Bottle Rockets Woe, Is Me w/Texas in July, Capture the Crown, Skylines, Project Emira, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 6:00 p.m. Gregory Porter, Jazz at the Bistro, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Scott and Karl, 3:00 p.m. / American Idle, 8:00 p.m., Fast Eddie's Bon Air, Alton Guitars on Fire: The Skynyrd Experience, Blueberry Hill, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m. Krotchripper, Drag the Dead, Eternium, Animated Dead, Fubar, St. Louis, 5:00 p.m. Dirt Nasty w/DJ Deks & VDJ Jay-E, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 9:00 p.m. Tough Luck, Out of Time w/A Death A Promise, Cathedral Fever, Cicero's, University City, Doors 8:00 p.m.

Sunday, Jan. 6 Blackberry Smoke w/Jake White, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. Scott and Karl, 2:00 p.m. / Ultraviolets, 7:00 p.m., Fast Eddie's Bon Air, Alton Acedia, Warseid, Mirrorscape, Suffer the Wrath, Fubar, St. Louis, Doors 5:00 p.m. Open Mic Night, Plush, St. Louis, 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Gregory Porter, Jazz at the Bistro, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.

Tuesday, Jan. 8 The Schwag, Old Rock House, St. Louis, Doors 9:00 p.m. Father John Misty w/Magic Trick, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 8:00 p.m. Destruction of a King, Goliath, Skywalker, Fubar, St. Louis, Doors 6:00 p.m.

Wednesday, Jan. 9 Jay N Waylon, Fast Eddie's Bon Air, Alton, 6:00 p.m.

Thursday, Jan. 10 Grace Potter & The Nocturnals w/Langhorne Slim, The Pageant, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. Carter Hulsey w/Blackwater '64, The Plasmids, The Mellow D's, The Firebird, St. Louis, Doors 7:00 p.m. Featherstone Drive, Fast Eddie's Bon Air, Alton, 7:00 p.m.

Friday, Jan. 11 Javier Mendoza's Latin Jazz Experiment, Jazz at the Bistro, St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Under the Willows w/From Distant Shores, LzBnz, Cicero's, University City, Doors 8:00 p.m.

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Dining Delights New Orleans restaurants revive Creole custom By STACEY PLAISANCE Associated Press NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Christmastime for Tyson and Ginny Graham means driving nearly 300 miles south of their Columbus, Miss., home to New Orleans for shopping, holiday concerts and the highlight of their trip — indulging in a grand reveillon dinner. The elaborate meals, which stem from the old French tradition of eating a lavish meal after midnight Mass on Christmas Eve, have become a popular draw for visitors to New Orleans during the holiday season. I n t h e w e e k s s u r ro u n d i n g Christmas, some 50 restaurants offer four- to five-course meals of panroasted oysters, braised pork belly, duck confit, foie gras beignets and other holiday delicacies. The recipes have roots that date back to the beginning of the French city’s nearly 300-year history. Though some restaurants serve reveillon dinners after midnight Mass on Christmas Eve and after midnight fireworks on New Year’s Eve like in the old days, most offer the special menus during regular dinner hours. “Thank goodness,” Tyson Graham, 71, said with a laugh. “After midnight is a little late for me.” Graham said since he and his wife of 45 years, Ginny, discovered the city’s reveillon dinners about 15 years ago, they’ve been to New Orleans almost every December. “It’s been a great way for us to experience all the restaurants we’ve frequented over the years, but we get to have something a little different,” he said. The way it works: Restaurants offer fixed-price reveillon menus on top of their regular dinner menu starting in the weeks before Christmas and continuing through New Year’s Eve. Reveillon dinner prices can range from $35 to $90 a person depending on the restaurant. John Magill, a historian and curator at The Historic New Orleans Collection museum and research center in the French Quarter, says reveillon is French for “awakening” and was a term used by early Creoles to describe a meal that followed an evening event. In the 1700s and 1800s, that could be as simple as beignets and cafe au lait at the French Market after a night out at the opera. “You would eat to revive yourself after an evening event,” Magill said. “It didn’t always have to be a big heavy meal.” Reveillons surrounding Christmas and New Year ’s Eve, however, were grand affairs, he said. Families would spend days preparing a menu of comfort foods such as grits and grillades, gumbo, cakes and pastries, and the New Year ’s Eve spread would be even more decadent, with oysters, duck and lamb. The Christmas reveillon would traditionally take place after a full day of fasting for communion at midnight services. Magill talks about reveillons in the 2009 book he co-wrote titled, “Christmas in New Orleans,” which also touches on the longheld tradition of holiday shopping on streetcar-lined Canal Street, caroling in the French Quarter and worshipping at St. Louis Cathedral. Richard Stewart, a fifth-generation New Orleanian who is Catholic, says he wasn’t familiar with the old tradition of reveillon until the mid-1980s, when French Quarter restaurant owners began reviving the practice as a way to get more diners

Associated Press

In this Dec. 7 photo, executive chef Kristin Butterworth prepares her braised pork belly with gulf shrimp, white bean cassoulet, garlic jus and fried baby sage, at the Grill Room of the Windsor Court Hotel in New Orleans. Roughly 50 restaurants in New Orleans are reviving an old Creole custom called reveillon, which stems from the old French tradition of eating a lavish meal after midnight Mass on Christmas Eve. during the holidays. “In December, you were lucky if you got 10 people a night in your restaurant,” said Stewart, co-owner of the Gumbo Shop in the French Quarter for 30 years before selling

the establishment four years ago. Stewart became fascinated with the fancy meals and even hosted one for his family in 2009. He said the five-course meal took weeks of research and days of preparation,

To d a y S t e w a r t s e r v e s o n a committee that oversees the city’s reveillon menus to make sure the chefs are using ingredients that would have been used in the early days.

with a menu that included an oyster soup and daube glace — braised short-ribs chilled to a gel form, then sliced and served with crackers or thin toasted French bread.

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®

(618)656-2278 (800)338-3401 www.brownrealtors.com

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated Scan the QR-code using your mobile device to view Open Houses near you!

Thursday, January 3, 2013

OPEN HOUSE

Open Sunday 1:00 - 3:00 Hosting Agent: Sook-Hee Hensiek 25 Olivia Lane, Glen Carbon $228,000 4BR/3BA, inground pool!

Open Sunday 1:00 - 3:00 Hosting Agent: Carrie Caton 49 Glendale, Glen Carbon $159,900 3BR, 3BA near interstate.

NEW LISTINGS

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

NEW LISTINGS

8925 Wheat Drive, Troy 1.5 story, 4 bedroom/3 bath home with 3 car garage. $299,900

660 Lincoln Avenue, East Alton 2 bedroom/1.5 bath with lots of updates. $64,900

FEATURED LISTINGS

4541 Walter, Granite City 3 bedroom/2 bath home with patio & fenced yard. $38,500

1013 S. Church, Belleville 2 bedroom brick combo home with Sunroom! $31,500

15554 Rita, Gillespie 1 bedroom/1 bath home in Gillespie. $29,000

609 E. Garfield, Belleville 4 bedroom/2 bath home with fenced yard. $26,500

353 Johnson Road, Shiloh 28 acres lake, 25F Homes, wooded private! $560,000

230 N. Kansas, Edwardsville Historic Edwardsville home with charm & character! $498,000

9 Forest Hill Lane, Edwardsville 4BR/2.75BA all brick updated ranch, private backyard! $384,900

303 Thomas Terrace, Edwardsville 5BR/5BA lakefront home with open floor plan. $355,000

6515 Fox Lake Drive, Edwardsville Elegant Condo overlooking lake and golf course! $339,000

981 Holiday Point, Edwardsville 3BR/2BA lakefront stunner! $299,900

8721 Wildewood, Worden Lakefront 4BR/3BA with updates & walk out. $274,500

1028 St. Louis St., Edwardsville Fabulous 3BR/3BA home on Historic St. Louis Street! $269,000

439 Country Club View, Edwardsville Spacious Move In Ready Condo. Great Location! $265,000

8739 Wendell Creek, St. Jacob Attractive new construction! Open plan & finished LL. $249,900

234 Sturbridge Blvd., Glen Carbon 5BR/4BA walkout in Edwardsville School District! $229,900

305 Washington, Hamburg Original schoolhouse updated to 3BR home. $220,000

6407 Oak Drive, Moro Brick ranch 3 bedroom/3 bath, inground pool. $214,900

240 Glen Carbon Rd., Glen Carbon Sophistication & class in 3BR/3BA ranch. $214,900

28 Dogwood Terrace, Maryville Contemporary ranch with open floor plan. $200,000

5729 Old Alton Edwardsville Rd., Edw. Historic 3 bedroom/2 bath on 2+/- acres. $195,000

153 Rolling Oaks Dr., Collinsville One owner villa with 3BR/3BA. $165,000

225 E. Pearl, Staunton Updated Victorian 3BR/2BA, open staircase, large yard! $164,900

1225 Chancellor Drive, Edw. 3BR/3BA Condo close to everything! $157,000

150 S. Kingdom Street, Bethalto Spacious 4BR, 2BA home, move in ready! $145,000

3 W. Beacon Hill, Fairview Heights Ranch home on a lake! $149,900

810 Valley, East Alton This beautiful home is larger than it looks! $144,900

31 Tickey Point Ln., Coffeen Lake Coffeen in your backyard! $130,000

28 White Lily, Collinsville 4BR/4BA open floor plan on 1/2 acre. $129,900

13 Biscayne, Edwardsville 3BR/1BA home in Edwardsville! $121,600

233 Commercial St., Edwardsville Charming updated 2BR/2BA move in ready! $115,000

Lots & Acreage

2137 Cleveland, Granite City Single family with income potential! $57,000

1610 N. Main, Edwardsville Adorable bungalow with income potential. $44,900

1221 Central, Alton Great potential in spacious 2 story. $19,900

2995 Madison Ave., Granite City COMMERCIAL: 200 SF high traffic, good parking, multi business. $79,000

BROWN REALTORS® Independently Owned and Operated

2771 Route 66 Business Park, Edw. All masonry building located off I-270. $595,000

24

1922 Edwardsville Club Plaza, Edw. Class A office space available. Convenient to Sunset Hills Country Club. $18/sq.ft. gross lease available. $560,000

3 157 Center, Edwardsville Class A office space includes 4 private offices, large training room & access controlled entrance area. $395,000

xxx Fairmont Ave., Collinsville 23.25 acres +/close to major highways. $1,100,000 5729 Old Alton Edw. Rd., Edw. Beautiful 16 +/- acres. Rolling tree-lined. $255,000 xxx Libra Rd, New Douglas Quiet, wooded 9 acres. Close to interstate. $77,400

(618) 692-7290

January 3, 2013

2205B S. State Route 157 Edwardsville, IL 62025

brownrealtors.com/commercial

2701 Route 66 Business Park, Edw. Prime commercial lot off I-270. 2.10 acres. $500,000

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

xxx Misty Meadow Dr., Wood River 4.31 acres zoned MR-4 Multi-family. $240,000

www.brownrealtors.com On the Edge of the Weekend

109 Koala Cove (lot 36), Marine Rolling 2.2 acre building lot. $64,900 77 Kingsley Way, Glen Carbon One of the last lots in prestigious Fields Crossing! $62,500 xxx Outback Trails Subdv., Marine 20 lots, minimum of 2 acres each. Varies

496 Regency Park, O’Fallon Commercial Corner Lot N of I-64. Entrance of Regency Conference Center. Zoned B-3 Hwy Business. $1,227,564


010313 Edge Magazine