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Issue 142 JULY 2016

ARCHDIOCESE OF LIVERPOOL

FREE

A celebration of the Diaconate Inside this issue: Walking for the Right to Life

St Marie’s celebrate 175 years

Father Tom at 100


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contents Welcome There is a theme of service running through this month’s edition of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’. Father Tom Kennedy provides our profile as he celebrates his 100th birthday on Saturday 2 July. He hasn’t retired and is still in active ministry as Parish Priest of Blessed English Martyrs in Haydock. Just a month ago he celebrated the 73rd anniversary of his ordination to the priesthood at St Patrick’s College, Carlow on 3 June 1943 and last February he celebrated 43 years in the service of the people of Haydock. Thank you Father Tom and a very Happy Birthday. Our main feature concentrates on a ‘Threefold Celebration of the Diaconate’. Last month Archbishop Malcolm ordained Jim Byrne and Joe Morgan to serve as Deacons. The Mass in the Metropolitan Cathedral also marked the fortieth anniversary of the diaconal formation programme in Liverpool and the retirement of Monsignor Austin Hunt, who has directed the programme throughout that time. In those forty years Monsignor Hunt has overseen the training of well over 100 Deacons. At the Mass he received a Papal Blessing ‘in recognition of his many years of devoted service to the formation of permanent deacons in the Archdiocese.’ Thank you Monsignor.

From the Archbishop’s Desk Recently I was in Rome at the Pontifical Beda College where I ordained ten men to the diaconate amongst whom was one for this archdiocrese. Inevitably I was mindful of the importance of the diaconate for the church. When the early church was suffering growing pains and clearly not attending to the needs of the widows of the Greek speaking Jewish Christians, it elected seven worthy men, to attend to them, to serve at table. This is the traditional understanding of the origin of the diaconate. This ministry of service of others in the church is one of the four fundamental functions of the church. The others are proclamation, liturgy and fellowship (or communion).

Contents 4

Main Feature Threefold celebration of the Diaconate Forty years of service

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News From around the Archdiocese

14 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life 15 Nugent News Don’t turn a ‘blind eye’ to those in need 16 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese

Jesus’ expressed his own love for his disciples by washing their feet. Every Maundy Thursday the Pope washes the feet of twelve poor people of Rome, to do this he dresses in a dalmatic, the deacon’s vestment. Service or ministry is at the heart of what we do as Christians. It is our culture. Did you know that a bishop should wear a dalmatic, the vestment of service, under his mass vestments to remind himself of this?

19 Profile Father Tom Kennedy Our oldest Parish Priest

The liturgical value of a deacons role; attending at the table of the Eucharist, breaking the bread and expounding the Gospel through preaching, can be empty and deficient of meaning unless it is based on service to the people of God. So getting this balance right is key to a successful diaconate in a diocese. In this archdiocese we have been blessed by forty years of the restored permanent diaconate under the watchful eye of Monsignor Austin Hunt who is retiring from this post. Let us thank God for the service he has given those ordained to serve.

25 Cathedral Record A busy end to the term

Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool Editor Peter Heneghan Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk Pictures: Cover and Main Feature Nick Fairhurst. Profile: Peter Heneghan Advertising Andrew Rogers 0151 709 7567 Publisher 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

21 Animate Youth Ministry God at the centre

26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC 28 Pic Life Pilgrims on a ‘Walk of Like’ 29 Join In Family Fun and More Mullarkey

Copy deadline August issue 8 July 2016 CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

30 Justice and Peace Respect for human dignity

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Right: Monsignor Austin Hunt with the Papal Blessing

Threefold celebration of the Diaconate Forty years of service

This year there were two men to be ordained: Jim Byrne from St Oswald’s, Ashton-in-Makerfield and Joe Morgan from St Aloysius’ in Huyton. They were joined by their families and by coachloads of friends and parishioners. Archbishop Malcolm, presiding at the Mass, spoke of the long journey of formation these men had undertaken, the vital support of their wives, families and friends throughout that process and his confidence that the support will continue as they carry out their ministry of service in their parishes, at work and in the wider community. Like all the permanent deacons in the Archdiocese, Joe and Jim were presented for ordination to the Archbishop by Monsignor Austin Hunt.

Derek Worlock as Liverpool’s first Director for the Permanent Diaconate. Although restored by Vatican II, the permanent diaconate was then still in its infancy in England and Wales, so Father Hunt visited many dioceses in Europe and the United States to learn from their experience of selecting, forming and deploying deacons. With the help of many dedicated tutors and speakers, he developed a programme of formation, initially based at the Metropolitan Cathedral, which led to the ordination of the first permanent deacons in 1979, including Deacon Leo McNicholas, who proclaimed the Gospel at this anniversary Mass. Father Hunt has overseen the formation of more than 100 deacons, tirelessly visiting candidates and ordained deacons at home and arranging events for them and their wives and families. His dedication was recognised with the title ‘Monsignor’ in 1992. As a member of the International Diaconate Committee, he addressed several international conferences and the Liverpool diaconal community has happy memories of hosting the International Diaconate Conference in 1995. As the permanent diaconate developed in this country, Monsignor Hunt chaired the National Conference of Diaconate Directors and Deacon Delegates for England and Wales, and he also shared his knowledge and enthusiasm about the diaconate with bishops in Scotland and Ireland.

Archbishop Malcolm paid tribute to Monsignor Hunt’s dedication in guiding the diaconal programme since his appointment in 1976 by Archbishop

At the end of the Ordination Mass a Papal Blessing for Monsignor Hunt was read out, commending the contribution he has made to the permanent

by Father Chris Fallon Director of Formation for the Diaconate

ore than 500 people gathered at the Metropolitan Cathedral on Sunday 12 June for the annual celebration of the ordination of permanent deacons, but this year there were two more reasons to celebrate: the fortieth anniversary of the diaconal formation programme in Liverpool and the retirement of Monsignor Austin Hunt, who has directed the programme for all those forty years.

M

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diaconate in Liverpool and extending Pope Francis’s blessing to all those who were present at the celebration. At the reception in the Cathedral’s Pontifical Hall, the Archbishop read out a personal message to Monsignor Hunt from Cardinal Vincent Nichols, who helped to develop the first diaconate programme in Liverpool. Whilst regretting that he could not be present at the celebration the Cardinal wrote: ‘It gives me great pleasure to write this personal message of congratulations to you as you begin your well-earned retirement, or should I say, prepare to gracefully fade into the background! I thank God for all the gifts that he has given you and I thank you for your generosity in sharing those gifts so readily with others. You have done a remarkable job in directing the Diaconate programme, in the Archdiocese of Liverpool, over these past forty years.’ Commenting that behind every good man is a good woman, Archbishop Malcolm presented flowers to Jim Byrne’s wife Barbara and to Joe Morgan’s wife Julie, before paying tribute to the good woman behind Monsignor Hunt, his sister Barbara, who has tirelessly supported him throughout the forty years of his leadership of the diaconal programme and continues to care for him. The Archbishop also thanked Bridget Alexander, who has voluntarily provided such efficient administrative support to the programme during the last seven years. This celebration marks an important milestone in the history of the diaconate in Liverpool, which continues to grow and develop. There are currently nine men in the formation programme, a further nine in the selection process to begin formation this September, and many others who are considering whether God may be calling them to this particular form of service in the Church. Like all formation processes in the Church, the diaconal


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feature ‘You have done a remarkable job in directing the Diaconate programme, in the Archdiocese of Liverpool, over these past forty years.’

programme is a continuous process of discernment which has a number of different stages. It begins with the Enquiry Period, which, like the enquiry period for the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults, can be a short or a long process, providing time for the candidate and his family to find out about the diaconate and to think, pray and consult others as to whether God might be calling him to this ministry, and for the formation team to get to know him and to help with his discernment. This is followed by the Introductory Period, a year of further discernment and introduction to formation, partly within the Archdiocese and partly shared with other Northern dioceses, leading to a three year programme of study, prayer and practice of the ministry of Word, Altar and Charity.

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feature

Barbara Byrne, Deacon Jim Byrne, Deacon Joe Morgan and Julie Morgan

‘This celebration marks an important milestone in the history of the diaconate in Liverpool, which continues to grow and develop.’ 6

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Throughout the formation process each man has the support of a Spiritual Director and is tutored and mentored by the formation team. Since it is a two-way process of discernment, at any point the candidate is free to withdraw from the programme and equally the Archbishop can decide at any point that he believes God is calling the candidate in some other direction rather than the specific ministry of diaconate.

the first weekend in September at Leeds Trinity University with the title ‘Justice in Action – The Joy of the Gospel’. Leading speakers will explore this theme and deacons involved in many different kinds of charitable work will lead workshops on how their ministry is bringing the Good News to the people who need it most. The conference is open to anyone interested in the diaconate. Details are available from deaconconf16@gmail.com.

The ministry of the deacon has had a varied history in the life of the Church, taking different forms at different times and in different places and almost disappearing for long periods in the Western Church. This means that it can be flexible in responding to the specific needs of our time. It was reintroduced after Vatican Two, not because of a shortage of priests, but because of the new challenges of bringing the Good News to the modern world, and those challenges have become even greater in the years since Vatican II.

Edward Echlin, writing in 1971 about the restoration of the diaconate, described it like this: ‘The deacon has returned to his ministry to meet the unprecedented needs of alienated societies in a world where instant communications have telescoped the universe, where technocratic societies fear the future, and where the Church is groping for a key to unlock the door that bars the Church from relevance to the world.’ He believed that the diaconate could be that key.

The specific ministry of the deacon will be explored in a National Assembly on

To find out more about the diaconate in Liverpool, contact Father Chris Fallon, tel. 07932 648221, email c.fallon@rcaolp.co.uk


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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

Celebrating 40 years at All Hallows 500 people gathered in the Sports Hall of All Hallows Catholic High School, Penwortham, to take part in a Mass of Thanksgiving for 40 years of education at the school. The Celebrant was Archbishop Malcolm McMahon, who was making his first visit to All Hallows. Among the concelebrants were Father Gerald Anders, Father Austin Griffin, Father Philip Inch, Father Jean-Paul Ilunga and Father John Moriarty. Pupils from partner primary schools St Mary Magdalen’s, St Oswald’s, St Teresa’s and Our Lady and St Gerard’s also took part in the celebration as well as many current and former pupils. Former Headteacher, Mr Flynn, was in attendance, as were members of the family of the school’s first Headteacher, Mr Melling. After the Eucharistic celebration, Archbishop Malcolm led a procession outside where he blessed the new Chapel windows, which were installed as lasting symbols of the 40th anniversary year.

Golden evening at St Albert’s

Peter Kwater, Mayor of Knowsley: Councillor Frank Walsh and Parish Priest Father David Potter. As part of the Golden Jubilee celebrations for their church parishioners from St Albert’s, Stockbridge Village, were treated to an evening of music with a concert given by the Choir of St Bartholomew’s, Rainhill. The programme included works by Bruckner, Elgar, Purcell, Franck, Rutter and Handel culminating in the ‘Hallelujah Chorus’ from the ‘Messiah’. The Choir sang under their Musical Director, Peter Kwater, and was accompanied by Carol Ann Wareing. The Mayor of Knowsley, Councillor Frank Walsh attended the concert.

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Mr Chris Riding (Headteacher), Archbishop Malcolm, Dan Antonio (Lay Chaplain)

Father Taras ordained

On Sunday, 5 June Father Taras Khomych was ordained to the priesthood at the Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral in London. He is a Lecturer at Liverpool Hope University and lives with his wife and children in St Wilfrid’s Parish, Widnes. One of his children is a member of the Metropolitan Cathedral Choir. (Eastern Rite married men can be ordained to the priesthood). He will be working in the Ukrainian Catholic Parish in Manchester.


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Becoming a Dementia Friendly Church By Maureen Knight Over 130 attended a conference on ‘Becoming a dementia Friendly Church’. The day began with a beautiful prayer service led by Father Chris Thomas, about everyone being welcome, in which we were all given a white rose and invited to place it in the central focal point as a symbol of our care for people living with dementia. Father Chris Fallon reported on the four key points of the Archdiocesan action plan and the progress that had been made since the Archdiocese joined the Dementia Action Alliance. You can read all about that on the Dementia Action Alliance website where it is listed as Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Liverpool: www.dementiaaction.org.uk/local_alliances/3012_liverpool_dementia_action_alliance The four main sessions were led by June Andrews, Professor Emeritus at Stirling University, former director of the Dementia Services Development Centre and author of ‘Dementia: The One Stop Guide’. In the morning Professor Andrews spoke about understanding dementia and the experience of people with dementia. After lunch Gina Shaw, the ‘poster girl’ for the Alzheimers’ Society Dementia Friends movement, spoke about her own experience of living well with dementia. Professor Andrews helped to reflect on the role of parishes and chaplaincies in the pastoral and spiritual care of people with dementia and their carers, and what a dementia friendly parish might look like. Here are a few examples of the ideas that people attending the conference took away with them: • Let people know we want to be a dementia friendly parish • Hold Dementia Friends sessions for everyone in the parish, especially those who visit the sick • Improve the lighting and signage in our churches and community rooms • Don’t stop visiting because someone has dementia – maintaining relationships is vital • Recruit more Dementia Champions • Sing one old hymn at every service • Train all hospital visitors to make sure patients keep drinking to maintain their hydration • Start a ‘cuppa and natter’ group or a community choir, open to everyone, including those living with dementia and their carers If you would like to know more, to volunteer to arrange a Dementia Friends session in your parish or to train as a Dementia Champion, contact Maureen Knight, Pastoral Formation, Tel: 0151 522 1046, email m.knight@rcaol.co.uk

Michelle Davies (Alzheimer’s Society and Archdiocesan Dementia Working Group), Father Chris Fallon, Father Chris Thomas, Professor Emeritus June Andrews, Maureen Knight)

Obituary of Canon Roger Daley Canon Roger Daley who served in the Metropolitan Tribunal of the Archdiocese for 38 years died on Monday 23 May at the age of 85 and in the 55th year of his priesthood. Roger Austin Daley was born in Liverpool on 11 January 1931, the son of Thomas and Catherine Daley. He attended Notre Dame and St Francis Xavier’s, Liverpool and then read for a law degree at the University of Liverpool. He studied for the priesthood at Campion House, Osterley, and the Venerable English College, Rome. He was ordained priest in Rome on 29 October 1961. In November 1962 he was appointed as assistant priest at St Clare’s, Liverpool. With his legal background it was not surprising that in the autumn of 1964 he was sent to Rome to study for a licentiate in Canon Law at the Gregorian University. On completion of his canonical studies he returned to the archdiocese in 1966 to take up an appointment as assistant priest at St Alban’s, Liverpool, during which time he was also appointed as a Diocesan Notary. The following year he was appointed as assistant priest at St Nicholas, Liverpool, and remained there until January 1973, a period which included the closure of the old Pro-Cathedral. From 1968 he combined his parish duties with the post of Diocesan Advocate in the Metropolitan Tribunal. From 1973 until 1982 he ministered in All Saints’ parish, Liverpool, again combining parochial and tribunal work. In February 1977 he succeeded Father Kevin O’Connor as ViceOfficialis. He became a parish priest for the first time in March 1982, with his appointment to St Hugh of Lincoln, Liverpool. It was during his tenure there that he succeeded Canon Brian Mullan as Officialis in 1984. For more than twenty years he continued to lead the Tribunal in its work with his customary quiet, assiduous and unassuming manner. Throughout this time he continued to exercise pastoral ministry beyond the offices of the Tribunal: as chaplain at the Good Shepherd Convent, Liverpool from 1988 to 1993, parish priest at St Mary’s, Little Crosby from 1993 to 1999, supernumerary priest at St Paul’s, West Derby in 1999 and at Our Lady of Good Help, Liverpool from1999 to 2004, and chaplain at the Cenacle Convent, Liverpool from 2004. After he retired in February 2006 he continued to live at West Derby, Liverpool, until increasing frailty necessitated his move to Ince Blundell. For his outstanding services to the archdiocese he was appointed an Honorary Canon of the Metropolitan Cathedral Chapter in November 1989. Canon Daley’s Funeral Mass was celebrated at Holy Family church, Ince Blundell, followed by interment at Allerton Cemetery, Liverpool.

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news diary St Marie’s on the Sands celebrates 175 years A special thanksgiving Mass has taken place in the Southport parish of Saint Marie on the Sands to celebrate both its 175th anniversary and the wider Catholic life of the town since the church opened on 20 May 1841. The Mass was presided over by the Archbishop of Liverpool, Malcolm McMahon, together with the Archbishop Emeritus, Patrick Kelly, and parish priest Father John Heneghan on the evening of Friday 20 May. It was an occasion for the parish community to give thanks for the wonderful gift of 175 years of the Catholic Church in Southport. As such, the Mass and refreshments that followed formed part of the Festival of Faith initiative involving Southport’s Our Lady of Walsingham pastoral area: the parishes of Holy Family, Southport; Our Lady of Lourdes, Hillside; St Joseph, Birkdale; Sacred Heart, Ainsdale; St John Stone, Woodvale; St Patrick, Churchtown; St Teresa of Avila, Birkdale; and of course St Marie on the Sands. The Mass was held on the exact anniversary of the 1841 opening of a church designed by Augustus Welby Pugin, the great Victorian architect; its inauguration came 12 years after the Catholic Emancipation Act of 1829, which had fully restored the civil rights of Roman Catholics and paved the way for the reestablishment of England’s Catholic

hierarchy in 1850. Originally the church was often called St Mary’s, before becoming more commonly known as St Marie’s or St Marie’s on the Sands. School buildings and a presbytery were added as well as a house that became a convent for the Sisters of Charity of Saint Paul. The school, started in 1876, served the parish until 1968. As the population of Southport increased through the second half of the 19th century and beyond, other parishes were opened. The last of these additions, St John Stone, was inaugurated in 1967, bringing to eight the number of Catholic churches in Southport. Meanwhile, religious Sisters continue to bless the town’s Catholic community with the

presence of the Daughters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul and the Sisters of Notre Dame. The story of the Catholic Church in the centre of Southport continues with St Marie’s open daily from 9am until 4pm. The old school/parish centre operates as a Marian centre for evangelisation; the old presbytery and parish hall have been converted into homes for retired priests; while after the Sisters left, the old convent became the parish house and parish priest’s residence. These bare facts are merely a flickering glimpse of the goodness and generosity lived out by countless priests, nuns and lay people during the last, faith-filled 175 years.

‘Mariapolis’ returns to Liverpool Liverpool is welcoming the ‘Mariapolis’ event again this year. It will be three days of spiritual reflection, creative workshops, trips and games hosted at Liverpool Hope University from Thursday 28 July to Sunday 31 July. Open to people of all ages, from all backgrounds, religious beliefs and none, the Mariapolis has been dubbed ‘a meeting place for people who believe in the good of others’. It’s part of something of an international phenomenon, as there are Mariapolis events every year in countries as diverse as Tanzania, the Czech Republic, Mexico, New Zealand and Indonesia. Some are small, just a few families together in Siberia, for example, while others are larger. Wherever it takes place, each Mariapolis shares its roots in a ‘spirituality of unity’ which emerged from Chiara Lubich and a group of young people living in the northern Italian town of Trent in the 1940s, who sparked a surge of gospel-based living within the Catholic Church and beyond. This year the theme will be ‘Unity’ and will include contributions from local people from all over the North West, some of whom have been drawing insights from the Focolare’s ‘spirituality of unity’ for over fifty years, when the first Focolare centre in Britain

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opened in Liverpool. Information at www.focolare.org/gb. Separate programmes will be available for children. Focolare centres are in Roby and Wavertree. Contact: 0151 482 6674 or 0151 722 3981.


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Clergy Appointments The following appointments will become effective during September 2016 unless otherwise noted: Archbishop’s Council: Canon Joseph Kelly will retire as Episcopal Vicar for sick and retired clergy and will be succeeded by Rev Stephen Maloney. Canon Kelly will continue to serve as Parish Priest of St George’s, Maghull and Father Maloney will continue to serve as Parish Priest of All Saints, Anfield. Rev John McLoughlin will stand down as Episcopal Vicar for Formation and will be succeeded by Rev Matthew Nunes. Father Mcloughlin will become Parish Priest of St Stephen, Warrington and Father Nunes will move from St Wilfrid, Widnes to become Parish Priest of St John Vianney, Halewood. Parish Priest Rev Gordon Abbs Rev Roy Cooper Rev Graeme Dunne Rev Michael Fitzsimons Rev Mark Madden

Rev John McLoughlin Rev Vincent McShane Rev Matthew Nunes Rev William Simpson

Additional Responsibility: Rev Martin Caddell (June/July 2016) Rev John Heneghan Rev Philip Inch Monsignor John Walsh Administrator: Rev Gerard Callacher

Chaplaincy: Rev James Claffey OP (July 2016) Monsignor Peter Fleetwood

Retirement: Monsignor Stepehen Alker Rev John Bradley Monsignor John Butchard Monsignor Michael McKenna Other Appointments: Rev John Paul Ilunga (1 June 2016) Rev Ian McParland Rev Andrew Robinson

From: To: From: To: From: To: From: To: From: To:

To:

St Stephen, Warrington St Sylvester, Liverpool St Peter and St Paul, Crosby St John the Evangelist, Kirkdale St Sylvester, Liverpool St Gregory, Weld Bank, Chorley St John the Evangelist, Kirkdale St Wilfrid, Widnes St Patrick, Southport Our Lady, Queen of Peace and English Martyrs, Litherland Chaplain Maryton Carmel St Stephen, Warrington St John Vianney, Halewood Holy Rosary, Old Roan St Wilfrid, Widnes St John Vianney, Halewood Our Lady, Queen of Peace and English Martyrs, Litherland St Chad, South Hill, Chorley

To:

St Helen, Crosby

To: To: To:

St Patrick, Southport St Oswald, Longton St Anne, Freshfield

From: To:

Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King St Francis de Sales, Walton

To:

Liverpool Universities

From: To:

Holy Family, Southport Maryton Carmel and Aintree Hospitals

From: From: From: From:

Germany St Anne, Freshfield Holy Rosary, Old Roan St Gregory, Weld Bank, Chorley

From: To: From: To: From: To:

St Oswald, Longton Leave of Absence Liverpool universities Sabbatical Leave St Chad, South Hill St Mary’s College, Oscott

From: To: From: To: From: To: From:

Jubilee for Deacons

Deacons and their families from all around the world were invited by Pope Francis to make a pilgrimage to Rome from 27 to 29 May to participate in the Jubilee for Deacons as part of the Year of Mercy. Among the 2,000 Deacons were Rev Kevin Duffy and his wife Pat, Rev Tony Kerrigan, and Rev Stephen Crowther and his wife Patricia from the Archdiocese of Liverpool. The Deacons were divided into different language groups to hear a series of talks, the first of which was: ‘The Deacon: Image of Mercy for the Promotion of the New Evangelisation’. Deacon Greg Kandra of the Diocese of Brooklyn, New York, said a deacon is called by the church to be on the ‘front line... to be a witness to compassion’, helping those who are hungry or poor, whether materially or spiritually. On Saturday following a pilgrimage through the Holy Door a number of Cardinals provided catechesis on ‘The Deacon: Called to be a dispenser of Charity in the Christian Community’. Cardinal Peter Turkson based his reflections on Hebrews Chapter 3 and using Moses and Christ as a model he said that all clergy, Deacons, Priests and Bishops should aspire to be a ‘Faithful servant’ which is often translated as ‘trustworthy’ to whom God will be able to surrender his people. The pilgrimage concluded with Sunday Mass celebrated by Pope Francis in St. Peter's Square. The Holy Father focused on the fact that Deacons must be good and faithful servants, he said: ‘One who serves is not a slave to his own agenda, but ever ready to deal with the unexpected, ever available to his brothers and sisters and ever open to God’s constant surprises’ and speaking off-thecuff, ‘A servant’, he said, ‘knows how to open the doors of his time and inner space for those around him, including those who knock on those doors at odd hours, even if that entails setting aside something he likes to do or giving up some well-deserved rest…Dear Deacons, if you show that you are available to others, your ministry will not be selfserving, but evangelically fruitful’.

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new diary Obituary of Rev Francis Smith Former Parish Priest of St Patrick’s, Newton-le-Willows for 36 years, Father Frank Smith, died on Thursday 19 May aged 92 and in the 68th year of his priesthood. James Francis Smith was born at Upholland on 21 July 1923, the son of Joseph and Gertrude Smith. He was educated at All Hallows, Roby Mill, St Cuthbert’s, Pemberton, and St James, Orrell. He studied for the priesthood at St Cuthbert’s College, Ushaw, where he was ordained priest on 25 July 1948. For 28 years following his ordination he served as assistant priest in the following parishes of the archdiocese: St Gregory’s, Chorley from September 1948; St Patrick’s, Widnes from February 1953; St Stephen’s, Warrington from September 1956; St Austin’s, Thatto Heath from October 1962; St John’s, Wigan from 1964 and St Joseph’s, Chorley from April 1969. In May 1976 Father Frank was appointed parish priest of St Patrick’s, Newton-le-Willows, a place he would call home for almost the next forty years. He retired as parish priest at the end of November 2012, but continued to live in the presbytery in retirement. Only relatively recently had he moved into Cardinal Heenan House at Roby Mill, Upholland. His older brother, Kenneth, also served as a priest of the archdiocese from 1946 to his death in 2011. Father Frank's Funeral Mass was celebrated in St Patrick’s Church, Newton-le-Willows, followed by interment at Parbold.

Spirituality within our Schools

The winners of the Student Photography Competition organised by the Liverpool Archdiocese Secondary Schools’ Partnership have been announced at a presentation ceremony in the Metropolitan Cathedral where their works were on display. With the competition split between lower school (Years 7 to 9) and upper school (Years 10 to 13), there were pupils honoured in each age category: Lower School: 1st Place - St John Fisher, Wigan - Hannah Pointon (Year 8). 2nd Place - St Peter's Orrell Katie Wilson (Year 8). 3rd Place - St John Bosco, Liverpool - Caitlin Smart

Golden Jubilee Celebrations

On Saturday 4 June Monsignor John Butchard, parish priest of Holy Rosary, Aintree, celebrated the Golden Jubilee of his ordination to the Priesthood on 4 June 1966. Father John was joined by family, friends, invited guests and parishioners, and celebrated 6.00 pm Mass, followed by a reception in the Parish Centre. Father John is pictured with his family, who had travelled from all over the country to be with him. 12

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and Chloe McLoughlin (Year 9) Upper School: 1st Place - Christ the King, Southport - Gabrielle Bradley (Year 12). 2nd Place - St John Rigby, Wigan - Samantha Roberts (Year 12). 3rd Place - Hope Academy, Newtonle-Willows - Sungeida Miah (Year 11). The theme was 'Spirituality within our School', with an optional focus on the Year of Mercy, and each photo had a short description interpreting the theme. Secondary schools, academies and sixth-form colleges throughout the Archdiocese took part, representing Liverpool, Sefton, Knowsley, St Helens, Lancashire, Wigan, Warrington and Halton. The pictures exhibited in the Cathedral elicited praise from visitors leaving comments such as: ‘Lovely to see so many young people interpreting spirituality in so many ways. It shows how much their faith means to them.’ Paul Greenall, Director of the Liverpool Archdiocese Secondary Schools' Partnership said, ‘This has been an excellent opportunity for schools to celebrate much of what they stand for and are about. Our students have responded tremendously to this task and, supported by their teachers, have produced images that reflect the ethos and culture that exists within our schools. This has also enabled the public visiting the exhibition to gain an understanding of the students' emotional and spiritual development that is such an important aspect of life in a Catholic school.’


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Please contact Fr. John at johnmcgowan50@gmail.com Preston 01772 779143

5-9 September £579 19-23 September £559

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StCatholic Vincent de Paul Primary School

ROME by Air from Manchester 19-22 September £579 19-23 September £645 Half Board - Basilica’s Excursion

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Fax 0151 707 8942 email: vincent-ao@st-vincentdepaul.liverpool.sch.uk Catholic Pictorial

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sunday reflections On a liturgical note As a rule we do not generally like change because it can bring with it the notion of uncertainly and instability – sometimes even carrying the idea that what went before was not good. Perhaps rather than change, let us use the word ‘development’ for the fact that, from this coming 22 July, Saint Mary Magdalene will be celebrated in the universal church as a Feast rather than a Memorial. Hardly earth-shattering you might say – the only difference many of us will notice is that at the Mass there will be a Gloria and also (when it is officially translated from the Latin and published for use) a Preface proper to the Feast. However, Pope Francis’s decision to raise Mary Magdalene to the level of a Feast in the Liturgy speaks volumes about his understanding of the importance of mercy and love. Mary Magdalene was the one who, in tradition, is the one who anointed the Lord’s feet with perfume, the one ‘who so loved Christ and was so greatly loved by Christ’. What is certain is that Mary Magdalene was part of the group of

Sunday thoughts

Canon Philip Gillespie

Jesus’s disciples; she accompanied him to the foot of the Cross and – in the garden where she met him at the tomb – was the first ‘witness of Divine Mercy’. Saint Mary Magdalene is an example of a true and authentic evangeliser – that is, an evangelist who announces the central joyful message of Easter, giving her the title of ‘Apostle of the apostles’ and therefore making her almost a patron Saint for all missionaries and catechists and evangelisers because she invites us to share with her not only the joy of finding Jesus (‘He whom my heart loves’ as we read in the Old Testament Song of Songs, which is given to us for the Feast) but also the joy of sharing with others the Good News of the fullness of life and love which He brings to each and every one of us. Which of course begs a question: how will you and I be good news to people whom we meet today?

Mgr John Devine OBE

The words of Speaking in a recent radio Jesus in the broadcast to mark the 400th Gospel for 3 July anniversary of the death of hit the nail on Shakespeare, an English the head: ‘I am Literature teacher confessed his sending you out frustration at teenagers. ‘Once like lambs they hit cynical’, he said, ‘they among wolves.’ don’t want to know.’ I was That can be how reassured. Engaging the young it feels. But Jesus goes on: ‘Carry (and not so young) in the no purse, no haversack, no sandals.’ mysteries of our faith is also He seems to suggest that there are challenging. no slick strategies that will take I celebrate baptisms, weddings and away my sense of helplessness and funerals for groups of people who irrelevance. That is the way it is regard Christian worship as a turnsupposed to be. off. The glazed-over indifference of a And so I painstakingly negotiate congregation is as challenging to with families over funerals. I wait the priest as a Year 10 class to a patiently at the ward station while hapless teacher. the nurse studiously buries her head Do I give in to those who would in her paperwork. I say hello to prefer a ‘This is your Life’ memorial strangers in hospital beds. The service, downloaded from the amazing thing is that, just internet, to a service with scripture occasionally, I meet a nurse who readings and prayers? When I face says, ‘We don’t see enough of you’ indifference and low-level hostility or a discharged patient (whom I on walking into a hospital ward can’t remember) who says, ‘Thanks should I walk out? Carry on for visiting me in hospital, Father’. regardless? Does my faith demand something more positive? Weekly Reflections are on the Archdiocesan website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/reflection 14

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The Passion of God A few years ago I was sitting in my friend George’s house in East Jerusalem watching ‘Spiderman’ with his little boy Rafi. George went out to get some shopping and when he came back, Rafi, who was about seven at the time, jumped off the settee and threw himself at his dad. He was so excited to see him that he could hardly get the words out and he kept saying over and over, ‘Abba, Abba’. George dropped the shopping and swept Rafi up into his arms. It was a wonderful moment to watch and drew me again into the reality of the relationship between us and Abba – Father. At the heart of the Scriptural message is the truth that an infinite God seeks and desires intimacy with the human soul. One of my favourite books is by a Jesuit called Peter McVerry. The book is called ‘Jesus – Social Revolutionary?’ and in it, he writes: ‘I believe that Jesus came to tell us only one thing: who God is. He didn’t come to tell us about the past or the future, about heaven or hell, just who God is. ‘This was Jesus’ charism. He had come from God, He knew God intimately as son of God and He came to reveal that God to us, God's yearning, God's desire, God’s passion.’ God’s passion is God’s children, you and me. God is passionate about us. God’s concern is for us. God desires that intimacy with us that our hearts desire. Yet we have created a system which says that some are acceptable to God and some unacceptable. That is not the Gospel. It is a parody of it and yet it is the maxim that most people live by. The God whom Jesus revealed is a God of love. It is when we get off the roundabout and stop trying to earn love that we fall in love with God, that we can do nothing else but love the Lord our God with everything that we are. Richard Rohr, the Franciscan friar, says: ‘Once you experience such intimacy, only the intimate language of lovers describes what is going on for you: mystery, tenderness, singularity, specialness, changing the rules “for me”, nakedness, risk, ecstasy, incessant longing, and, of course also suffering.’ We were created to enter into intimate relationship, to know the passionate desire of God for us and for every human being. My prayer for each of us is that the passionate embrace of God will energise us, free us, and empower us to be good news for the world. Father Chris Thomas


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nugent news Don’t turn a ‘blind eye’ to those in need On Wednesday 4 May, we welcomed hundreds of pupils and staff from many of our schools across the Archdiocese to our annual Good Shepherd Appeal Mass at St Mary’s Church, Leyland. Nugent Care’s Good Shepherd Appeal is the charity’s biggest fundraising initiative throughout the year. Pupils, teachers and the wider school community, including families, raise funds to support our vital services. This Mass is a wonderful celebration to recognise and congratulate our children and young people for their kind and generous efforts for the good of others. Some of the fabulous fundraising activities include: sponsored walks, cake sales, crazy legs and non-uniform days. The theme for this year’s Good Shepherd Appeal is ‘The Holy Year of Mercy;’ the work of Nugent Care is very evident in the corporal and spiritual works of Mercy. Some of our core values at Nugent Care are showing compassion and care towards those in need as well as treating everyone with dignity and respect. These similarities are evident in our services to help people of all ages affected by homelessness, disability, discrimination and to assist people living in poverty. Shaun Barratt a student from Leyland St Mary’s Catholic High School who took part in the drama performance reflects on the school’s interpretation and enactment of the story of Blind Bartimaeus from Mark’s Gospel, as it challenges us not to turn a ‘blind eye’ to those in need.

Liverpool based Mashbo and Bread Media were commissioned in March to work with us to develop a marketing and communications strategy, new website, and a fresh new look for our brand. ‘I really enjoyed the experience of being involved in the dramatisation of the Gospel. I liked the fact that we reinforced the Gospel reading in a fun way with a modern twist that didn’t just aim at younger people but for all the congregation. I liked how we linked in the Year of Mercy to the Gospel as it reminded us all how to be merciful in different situations throughout life and how easy it is to achieve this. We worked well as a team to develop the script and the drama as we wanted to have a big impact but in a simple yet effective way. It made me think deeper about the Gospel message and how, with the drama, it opened our eyes to God’s endless love and Mercy.’ The second Good Shepherd mass took place in the Metropolitan Cathedral in June and over 1,500 children attended. The Good Shepherd Appeal has been helping local people in need for over 110 years and continues to support Nugent Care to deliver much needed services to 6,000 local children and adults each year. We would like to thank all of our schools for continuing to support our work.

Following a period of research and development, including visiting our services and consultation with stakeholders, service users, staff, our Governing Body and Board of Trustees, our exciting new brand and website are close to completion. The proposals for a refresh of Nugent Care’s brand have been received very positively by all with recognition of the need for this on-going development. ‘Blowing away the cobwebs and allowing us to stand proud in the market place and make a bold statement about who we are and where we are going’ Key to the new brand is a dynamic new way of talking about our work with the removal of the word ‘care’ and development of a ‘family’ of services, Education, Residential, Community, Family and Support. This will provide people with an easier route to understanding what we do. This new approach is brave and bold and reflects our ambitious strategic plan’s aims and objectives. ‘If we follow the brand journey across previous years, and brand versions, it makes sense to now become “Nugent”, and to drop “Care” from the brand, to allow our services to come to the fore” ‘The concept of ‘together we are Nugent’ … is great’ ‘I like the move away from ‘Care’ to Nugent. Really like the idea of sub-branding’ The new brand will be finalised across the next few weeks, during which time we will develop a strategic plan for the roll out of brand guidelines that will involve everybody in this exciting process of change. Normandie Wragg Chief Executive – Nugent Care

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what’s on Friday 1 July First Friday Vigil Mass for the Year of Mercy 8.00 pm at St Joseph’s Prayer Centre, Blundell Avenue, Freshfield, Formby, L37 1PH. Tel: 01704 875850 Email: theprayercentre.stj@gmail.com

Wednesday 13 July Dementia Community Choir 11.00 am at St Thomas of Canterbury, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Everyone welcome especially people living with dementia and their carers. Details: Irenaeus Tel: 0151 949 1199.

Sunday 3 July ‘Celebrate the Child’ Mass 2.30 pm at St Pascal Baylon Primary School, Chelwood Ave Liverpool, L16 2LN. Details Tel: 0151-522-1043 or email: safeguarding@rcaol.co.uk

‘Stories to live by.’ Reflections on the Parables Summer Scripture Evening at Irenaeus. 7.30 pm at 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk

Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Tuesday 5 July Support Group for people living with dementia and their carers 2.00 pm at Our Lady Help of Christians, Portico Parish Hall, Prescot, L34 2QT. Details: Joan O’Hanlon Tel: 07984 735590. Everyone welcome. Thursday 7 July Agape Mass 8.00 pm at St Mary’s, Prescot Road, Aughton, L39 6TA. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Friday 8 July (evening) to Sunday 10 July LOYOLA-metro Living Theology 2016 At St Francis Xavier Church and Hope University, Everton. Cost : £65. Details Tel: 0151 298 1911 or email d.reynolds@sfxchurchliverpool.com Saturday 9 July Car Boot Sale 8.00 am onwards in the Cathedral Car Park. Pitches £10. Details from Claire Hanlon 0151 709 9222, Ext. 201 or c.hanlon@metcatherdal.org.uk

Sunday 10 July

Lourdes and World Youth Day Pilgrimage Departure Mass 6.30 pm at St Mary’s, Lowe House, St Helens, WA10 2BE. Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Monday 11 July to Sunday 17 July Individually Guided Retreat Led by Sister Margaret O'Shea SMG at St Joseph’s Prayer Centre, Blundell Avenue, Freshfield, Formby, L37 1PH. Tel: 01704 875850 Email: theprayercentre.stj@gmail.com Tuesday 12 July Time Out on Tuesdays 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Open to all who are involved in any form of ministry or service to others, giving time for silence and personal reflection. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com

World of Atherton

‘Summer Serenade’ Concert with the Cathedral Orchestra Conductor: Stephen Pratt, and the Cathedral Cantata Choir, Director: Richard Lea. 7.30 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Tickets and details Tel: 0151 707 3525 or www.cathedralconcerts.org.uk Sunday 10 July Sea Sunday

website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/holyweek2016 16

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UCM Bi-monthly Mass 7.30 pm at St George, Station Road, Maghull, L31 3DF. Thursday 14 July Summer Afternoon Tea 2.00 pm at LACE for all Funeral Ministers, Parish Bereavement Care Teams and Dementia Champions. There will be a marketplace and the input for the afternoon will be: End of life care. Details and booking contact Maureen Knight Tel: 0151 522 1046 or email m.knight@rcaol.co.uk Saturday 16 July ‘Door of Grace’ Catholic Youth Convention Led by Sehion UK. 10.00 am to 4.00 pm at Sacred Heart church, Low Hill, L7 8TN. Details Justine Tel: 07990 623054 or Sharon Tel: 07712 472609. Sunday 17 July St Joseph’s Hospice (Jospice) ‘Reflections on the River’ sailing (in partnership with Willowbrook Hospice) departing from Liverpool Ferry Terminal at 7.00 pm. During the cruise, families will


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july take time out to remember their loved ones and will scatter rose petals in to the water to remember all they shared. Refreshments available on board and tickets are priced at a suggested donation of £15 for adults and £5 for children. Bookings Tel: 0151 932 6046/6035 or email community.fundraisers@jospice.org.uk Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Wednesday 20 July ‘Stories to live by.’ Reflections on the Parables. Summer Scripture Evening at Irenaeus. 7.30 pm at 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Friday 22 July to Friday 29 July Archdiocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes Sunday 24 July Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie

Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Monday 25 July Quiet Day 10.30 am-3.00 pm at Sandymount Retreat Centre, 16 Burbo Bank Road, Blundellsands, Liverpool, L23 6TH. Details at www.sandymountretreats.org.uk Tel: 0151 924 4850 Email: info@sandymountretreats.org.uk Thursday 28 July to Sunday 31 July ‘Unity.’ Mariapolis: reflection, interest groups, creative workshops, trips and relaxing evenings with the Focolare at Liverpool Hope University. Details Website: www.focolare.org/gb or from the Focolare centres in Roby and Wavertree. Contact: 0151 482 6674 or 0151 722 3981. Saturday 30 July Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Jillian Gardner (Baylor University, Texas) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses.

Looking ahead: Tuesday 2 August Support Group for people living with dementia and their carers 2.00 pm at Our Lady Help of Christians, Portico Parish Hall, Prescot, L34 2QT. Details: Joan O’Hanlon Tel: 07984 735590. Everyone welcome. Thursday 4 August Agape Mass 8.00 pm at St Mary’s, Prescot Road, Aughton, L39 6TA. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Saturday 6 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: James Devor (Brentwood Cathedral) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Sunday 7 August Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Saturday 13 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Edmund Aldhouse (Ely Cathedral) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses.

Sunday 31 July to Sunday 7 August Preached Retreat Led by Father Ian Kelly at Sandymount Retreat Centre, 16 Burbo Bank Road, Blundellsands, Liverpool, L23 6TH. Details at www.sandymountretreats.org.uk Tel: 0151 924 4850 Email: info@sandymountretreats.org.uk (Suggested offering £440.00) Sunday 31 July Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286.

Friday 28 - Sunday 31 July

Sunday 14 August Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Saturday 20 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Richard Sutton (Dulwich College) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Sunday 21 August Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Saturday 27 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: James Hutchinson-Bazely (RNCM Organ Prize Winner) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Sunday 28 August Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286.

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Augustinian Nursing Sisters

Ince Blundell Hall Nursing Home We are seeking qualified Registered General Nurses

Ince Blundell Hall provides a home and care to 22 residents, this includes caring for the sick priests of The Liverpool Diocese. The ideal candidate will be a committed professional who strives for excellence. The care and work we provide offers excellent opportunity for innovation and development. We offer competitive rates of pay and are looking to fill full and part time positions. We have vacancies for both day and night work.

Please contact Angela Francis Email: a.m.francis@outlook.com •

Tel: 0151 929 2596

School Chaplain, St Helens Dates: Salary: Location: Contract type: Contract term:

Closing date 04/07/16 SCP26-28 (£23,166-£24,717) pro rata De La Salle School, St. Helens 37 hours per week, term time plus 3 weeks Fixed Term to 31st August 2017

We are seeking to appoint a school chaplain who feels called to make a significant and exciting contribution to the faith journey of every member of our distinctive Lasallian community. The successful candidate will be a practising Catholic with a strong personal faith and a passion for encouraging young people in their faith. You will be able to develop a strategic, systematic and inspiring plan for the students’ spiritual development in keeping with our Lasallian tradition. Inspired by the example of St. John Baptiste De La Salle, our school strives to pursue excellence in all that we do. “Pupils... expressed the view that De La Salle is ‘a family school’.” – Ofsted March 2016 For further information and for an application pack, please go to the school's website at www.delasalle.st-helens.sch.uk to download and complete the application form. Please submit all applications via email to Joanne Peet at peetj@sthelens.org.uk Please note we are unable to accept CVs. Closing date: Monday 4th July 2016, 4.00pm The school is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children. To ensure that this is achieved we expect all employees and volunteers to share this commitment and staff will be recruited and selected in line with safer recruitment policy and practice. The successful applicant will undertake an enhanced DBS check.

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profile

Father Tom Kennedy e celebrated his 100th birthday on 2 July yet Father Tom Kennedy has no plans to stop being an active priest at his parish of English Martyrs in Haydock.

H

The oldest priest in the Archdiocese of Liverpool has one good reason for this, as he explains: ‘I found out the reason I never retired is I liked the people I worked with and they liked me – at least they said they did anyway!’ If that quote tells us his sense of humour is very much intact, the wisdom accumulated during his century on this planet is quite evident also. Consider his key to happiness: ‘I always found that falling out with people was wrong. If you fell out with somebody it was easier to go and talk to them. I always found that you leave your cards straight on the table.’ It is an approach that has obviously served him well. Born in Ireland, in the village of Shillelagh in County Wicklow, where his father was head teacher at the local school, Father Tom Kennedy has been a priest in the Archdiocese of Liverpool for 73 years. He arrived here in August 1943, two months

100 not out for Archdiocese’s oldest priest by Simon Hart after his ordination on 3 June that year, following the completion of his studies for the priesthood at St Patrick’s College, Carlow. He served initially as curate at St James’, Bootle, then moved to St Luke’s, Whiston in 1952, where he had a close association with the hospital during his six years there. ‘They only had huts in the field for a school,’ he adds. ‘The church was only just built at the time.’ He has seen so many changes, not least during his initial, ten-year stint at English Martyrs from October 1958. It was during this period that he witnessed the transformation effected by the Second Vatican Council. ‘We found it very hard at the beginning because we knew had trained for Latin,’ he recalls, ‘but then the changeover to English was a Godsend really because people could understand what you were doing. We said Masses so the people could hear them.’ His ‘wonderful’ parish priest at English Martyrs was Father Gray. He explains: ‘When he walked into a house, he’d ask,

‘Could I have a cigarette?’ and he’d sit down in the house and talk. The parishioners got to love him because he talked to them man to man. He didn’t make a matter of religion.’ In 1968 Father Tom moved to the new parish of St David’s, Newton-le-Willows. ‘I had no church for a time and had to say Mass in the hall,’ he remembers before offering a recollection of the pet dog he adopted during that period. ‘There was a family trying to get rid of their dog so I got it for nowt – she was a Labrador and we called her Snowy. I used to go down the back of the railway line in Newton, and Snowy always came with me wherever I went – she’d be ten yards in front of me if there was anyone in front, or ten yards behind if there was someone following me. The dog would watch them the whole way.’ Since 1973, Father Tom has been back at English Martyrs – and remains involved in parish life still today. ‘Oh yes, anything they ask for, they can come and see me,’ says a priest still reluctant to hang up his bat, despite reaching his century.

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youth ministry

Finding my way through youth ministry By Lauren Lynch, Animate Youth Ministries team member When I was younger I had this passionate dream of living on a canal boat with a border collie and working in teaching. As I grew up, though, I realised that life does not always go as planned and found myself very distant from my faith and studies in my second year of college. During this time I was offered a place to work up in the Lake District, at a Catholic retreat centre called Castlerigg Manor. I knew the centre very well, having gone up there in my younger years – coming from Lancaster Diocese, I could hardly not know it! In truth, I messed up my second year of college and left myself in a difficult

position, facing an uncertain future. When this voluntary position was proposed to me I thought it would be an easy job, which would give me time to work out my next step. How wrong could I be? Having joined the centre I was suddenly working and living with people whom I did not know. I had to acknowledge and respect other people’s opinions. Moreover, I had to work hard to allow the young people present to get all they could from the retreats which we planned and delivered. I found myself working very late hours and asking challenging questions about the job I found myself doing. It is difficult to explain what youth ministry is, but ultimately I feel it represents an opportunity seldom found in other jobs.

Over the course of my time at Castlerigg I came to discover just how vital it is to be in these young people’s lives. To be among individuals wishing to know more about faith led me to want to do the same: these young people were directing me on a path closer to God. I found myself questioning many things during this time: ultimately, who is it that God wants me to be? As you can probably tell, before entering youth ministry I was very focused on myself; putting my needs first was my priority. Spending a year focusing on prayer, world issues and thinking about other people’s needs led me to see the world very differently. ‘What you do to the least of my brothers, you do unto me’ is a strong message which led me to try and start to put others first. I also found that I loved being an inspiration for these young people. I loved sitting down and chatting with them, but most importantly I loved that God was starting to become the centre of it all. Youth ministry was never a job I wanted to do, yet I find myself sitting in front of this computer knowing I will be starting my third year of youth ministry with Animate. I have learned that life can surprise us, leading us to unexpected places. Yet these unexpected places might be the very destination God has called us to reach. Upcoming events • Nightfever – 2 July, 7-10pm, at Blessed Sacrament Shrine, Dawson Street, Liverpool • Faith In Action follow-up meeting – 7 July, 5.30-7pm, at Lowe House, St Helens, WA10 2BE • Life & Soul – 7 July, 7-8pm, at Lowe House, St Helens, WA10 2BE • Lourdes Youth Departure Mass – 10 July, 6.30pm, St Mary’s, Lowe House Keep up to date with the Lourdes and World Youth Day Pilgrimages on social media: Facebook: Animate Youth Ministries Twitter: @animateyouth Instagram: @animate_youth Website: www.animateyouth.org

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cathedral

A busy end to the term Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean

As a result of being in the heart of the University area of the city, for a few weeks of July we are caught up in the festive atmosphere of the various graduation weeks.

by Dr Christopher McElroy Director of Music, Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral July brings the academic year to a close and allows the choirs a Summer break before returning in September fully refreshed. We are very lucky at the Metropolitan Cathedral to be one of only two English Catholic Cathedrals to have a ‘choir school’ in which are choristers are educated. The advantages of this are several: the opportunity for the choristers to rehearse together each morning between 8.00 and 9.00 am before lessons start; the opportunity for the choristers to bond as a group both in and out of school and the strong relationship between the choir school and the Cathedral. I say choir school, but in fact we have two choir schools. Boys aged 7-11 attend Runnymede St Edwards School, and boys aged 11-14 and girls aged 1115 attend St Edwards College. The Cathedral maintains a close relationship with both schools and is very grateful for their support in maintaining the choral foundation of the Cathedral. This summer will see the retirement of Mr John Waszek, Principal of St Edwards College after 24 years in post. To mark his distinguished service, and to give thanks for the role our choir schools play in the life of the Cathedral a special act of thanksgiving will take place during Evening Prayer on Sunday 10 July. For some the last week of term might be a time to wind down, but for the

cathedral music department it is one of the busiest weeks of the year with the voice trials for girl choristers. Earlier in the year we successfully recruited ten new boys to start in September 2016, so we are very much now hoping to fill the available six places for girls. Two full days of auditions mark the first round of the voice trials, with a small number of girls called back for a second round later in the week before a final selection is made. To date the Metropolitan Cathedral is the only Catholic Cathedral in the UK to offer girl choristers the opportunity to rehearse and sing in the Cathedral on a nearly daily basis: this is a great honour for us, and so we look forward to hearing the next generation of girl choristers in the forthcoming auditions. This Summer we bid farewell to a very long standing member of staff in Richard Lea. Richard has been involved with music at the Metropolitan Cathedral for over 30 years successively as Organ Scholar, Sub-Organist and Organist. Richard has played the organ for many of the most important liturgies in the Cathedral over that time in addition to being involved in many other local musical activities. In September Richard will take up the post of Organist at Buckfast Abbey in Devon, where they are taking delivery of a new £2.5 million pipe organ built by the Italian firm Fratelli Ruffatti in 2017. We will be very sorry to see Richard leave, but we are very grateful for all he has done for the Cathedral and know that he will be a regular visitor back here in the future.

This year we are not hosting any graduation ceremonies but it still means lots of evening receptions in the Crypt and an influx of visitors to the Cathedral from across the world. These graduation weeks are an opportunity for the city to promote itself and also bring in a great deal of revenue to Liverpool businesses. This year for the week of John Moores University graduations, 11-15 July Hope Street will be closed to traffic with on street entertainment and stalls as a trial GradFest week. Even though most of the deanery pilgrimage visits to the Cathedral for the Holy Year have taken place we are still receiving a considerable number of groups coming on pilgrimage. During this month a number of school groups are taking advantage of the end of the school year to come through the Holy Door, walk the ‘Stations of Mercy’ and attend the midday Mass. Perhaps small groups or individuals might like to consider visiting the Cathedral in this way during the summer holidays to make their own pilgrimage. Next year our Cathedral celebrates its fiftieth anniversary and we are in the planning stages trying to arrange a number of celebratory events to mark our special jubilee year. There will be more information about this in subsequent months but just to mention that we are looking for any gifted flower arranging teams or individuals from across the diocese who would be prepared to take part in a flower festival within the Cathedral over our main celebratory weekend 3/4 June 2017.

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Pic extras Mums the Word The Union of Catholic Mothers celebrated their annual conference at Swanwick in Derbyshire from 16-18 May. Each diocese takes a turn at hosting the conference and this year it was Liverpool’s turn, meaning our committee and helpers had the task of organising, directing and cajoling the 120 members and guests who attended. As well as hearing from our national officers about the work carried out on our behalf by the UCM both nationally and internationally, we had two addresses from Bishop Williams – one from our own Bishop Tom, the other from Bishop Alan Williams, who is the national spiritual adviser. Our own spiritual adviser, Father David Potter, celebrated Masses and also compered the evening entertainment which we were obliged to provide. The audience clapped and laughed in all the right places – whether from enjoyment or sympathy I will leave to your imagination! At the conference, delegates were presented with a lovely booklet of poems and stories compiled by Kate Moss from issues of the Catholic Mother newspaper from 1950 to 2000. It is well worth a read and copies will be available for all to see at future business meetings. • Many congratulations go to Alex Krol, son of Joyce, a member of Holy Rosary foundation. Alex won a gold medal for wheelchair tennis doubles at the Invictus Games in Florida. An ex-Marine, he helps young people overcome their disabilities by taking part in sport. • Archbishop Malcolm McMahon celebrated the UCM Annual Mass at the Metropolitan Cathedral on Wednesday 8 June. We were joined by guests from other dioceses, the Anglican Mothers’ Union, the Salvation Army and ladies from the Liverpool Jewish Representative Council for a wonderful celebration featuring music from the Cathedral choristers and a procession of foundation banners. The sun shining through the stained glass completed a beautiful evening. Wishing you all a holy, happy and safe UCM pilgrimage to Walsingham from 4-6 July. God Bless, Madelaine McDonald, Media Officer 26

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News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

Knights assist with fundraising for child’s heart operation The far-reaching efforts of Liverpool members of the KSC were underlined at a recent meeting of the provincial council when Brother Pat Foley – our provincial grand knight – read out a letter from a woman in the Philippines. The letter, received by Brother Peter Cherry, was from Raquel Aquino Gonzalvo, mother of a two-year-old boy, Lucas, who requires surgery for a severe congenital heart condition known as Tetralogy of Fallot. The Knights have been raising funds for this cause and around £9,000 is needed for the operation in addition to the cost of hospitalisation. A fundraising campaign – involving the sale of ‘Heart Warrior’ t-shirts and mugs – is being conducted by the family, but they need more support. To date the Knights have contributed £300 and will continue to seek further funds to support the family. The letter sent to Brother Cherry was in response to an initial donation of £200 and it read: ‘Thank you so much for your generous donation of £200 to Lucas. Your donation was added to the savings for Lucas’s open heart surgery. Again many thanks for your support. It means the world to us. Yours truly, Raquel Aquino Gonzalvo, Heart Mom.’ Our photo shows Lucas with his mother Raquel and family friend

María. If anyone wishes to donate to this worthy cause please contact Michael Cherry via merseymuppet@btinternet.com. • We are pleased to welcome three new members who were admitted to the Order during Mass at St Richard’s, Bootle on Sunday 29 May. They are Thomas Lonan, Vincent Gilligan and Terence Noonan, pictured below with fellow members following the ceremony. Websites: www.ksc.org.uk www.kscprov02.weebly.com www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk Email: dpokeane@aol.com


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PIC Life Pilgrims on a ‘walk of life’ By Moira Billinge Despite the grid-locked motorways marking the start of the half-term holiday, the majority of our 120 walkers managed to defy the odds by arriving on time for the annual sponsored walk for Right To Life in Clitheroe on Bank Holiday Monday, 30 May. We were very grateful to Archbishop Emeritus Patrick Kelly, Bishop John Arnold of Salford, and Lord David Alton of Liverpool for joining us for the event once more, and they addressed those gathered prior to the start of the walk. Lord Alton outlined the most recent matters being dealt with via the All Party Parliamentary Pro-Life group and spoke of the relentless threats to human life in all its stages, including the determined push for abortion up to birth for any reason. The Royal College of Midwives have – surprisingly – officially supported the campaign, though this position was adopted in isolation by the CEO of the RCM without any consultation with their membership. Lord Alton highlighted the proposed introduction of pre-natal testing that will lead to a profound reduction in the number of children with Down’s syndrome. This will worsen the current situation for this community with over 90 per cent of UK families with a diagnosis with the syndrome already choosing to go on to have an abortion. He spoke of the ‘Don’t Screen Out Campaign’ which is attempting to delay implementation of the new tests until it can be assured that they will not have a detrimental effect on the population of people with Down’s syndrome and their families and he called for support for initiatives to mark the 50th anniversary, in 2017, of the Abortion Act and the subsequent death of over eight million unborn babies. Archbishop Emeritus Patrick Kelly in his address quoted Saint Paul in his second letter to the Corinthians: ‘Do I make my

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Quote from Pope Francis for the Year of Mercy “Perfect families do not exist. This must not discourage us, quite the opposite. Love is something we learn. Love is something we live. Love grows as it is forged by the concrete situation which each particular family experiences”.

Worth a visit plans like a worldly person, ready to say Yes and No at once? As surely as God is faithful, our word to you has not been Yes and No. For the Son of God, Jesus Christ, whom we preached among you ... was not Yes and No; but in him it is always Yes. For all the promises of God find their Yes in him. That is why we utter the Amen through him, to the glory of God.’ He gave this quote to ‘put a spring in our step today and all that today affirms’ and added that ‘the walk will open up to us creation in all the vitality and joy and exuberance of the Ribble Valley’. He completed his address with a prayer and asked everyone to join in with him and sing, ‘Laudato si, mi Signore’. Many were singing it for the first time and there was no rehearsal – yet it was both uplifting and beautiful. Bishop John Arnold of Salford, prior to imparting his blessing on those present, described the event as not just a walk but a ‘pilgrimage’ in recognition of the sanctity of life. Our kind hosts were, for the seventh consecutive year, the parishioners of Our Lady of the Valley (Saint Michael and Saint John). Their parish priest, Monsignor John Corcoran, led the walkers along the eight-mile circular route, which he had marked out with yellow ribbons. The stewards from the Knights of Saint Columba ensured everyone’s safety and the ladies of the parish pulled out all the stops, yet again, to provide us with the most wonderful afternoon tea. It was a very blessed day and to the many who prayed for the success of the event and the safe travelling of the participants, thank you; your prayers were answered and the event was indeed a huge ‘Yes’ to Almighty God!

This month, take a visit to a beautiful priory in the Yorkshire Dales, writes Lucy Oliver. A short drive from the bustling market town of Skipton, Bolton Abbey presides over peaceful parklands and is ideal for summer walks. The surviving church is nestled among the ruins of a 12th century Augustinian priory, providing a stunning outline against the natural beauty – and a wonderful place to explore. The grounds of the abbey feature cafes and picnic areas on the banks of the River Wharfe – and a tearoom surrounded by a walled garden. One major point of fascination has to be the 57 stepping stones across the river. Used in medieval times by visitors as the only access to the priory, they are attempted by many today with varying degrees of success… Luckily, a nearby rope bridge offers an alternative route! Strid Wood, an ancient woodland, offers sightings of deer, otters and wildflowers and a walk here leads to the Strid, a natural wonder formed by water flowing rapidly through a narrow point. From 23 July to 7 August, performances of the beloved children’s book ‘The Wind in the Willows’ are taking place at the abbey and are sure to be mesmerising. For more information, visit www.boltonabbey.com.


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join in Eating Out

Children’s word search

Eat out during July at one or more of our listed restaurants.

July 29 is the Feast of Saint Martha, learn more about her from our clues.

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BETHANY PRAYING FAITH

JESUS FRIEND

Malmaison Brasserie William Jessop Way, Liverpool 3 0844 693 0655 Fraiche Rose Mount, Oxton, Birkenhead 0151 652 2914 Brasserie at Richmond Hotel Hatton Garden, Liverpool 3 0151 236 1200 Cottage Loaf Telegraph Road, Thurstaston, Wirral 0151 648 2837 Chaophraya Level 1, Liverpool 1 0151 707 6323 Chy Restaurant Renshaw Street, Liverpool 1 0151 708 7787

More Mullarkey From Johnny Kennedy One of the parishioners has given the young curate an old guitar. The YC hopes that when the youth club hear him play they’ll think he’s cool. Trouble is, he can’t play it yet, and his early efforts have been pretty painful. Father Mullarkey can knock a tune out of the guitar and the young curate seeks his advice. ‘It’s not easy, is it?’ he said to Father Mullarkey. ‘I can’t remember where to put my fingers for the different chords. What do you think I should do?’ ‘Well, I think you should cut six inches off the neck of the guitar,’ said Father Mullarkey. ‘Will that make it easier to play?’ ‘No,’ he replied. ‘But it will fit in the bin easier!’

Greeting Cards from Carmel

Audio copy of the Pic out now An audio version of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ is available free of charge, compiled by students, technicians and Chaplain, Dan Antonio, at All Hallows RC High School, Penwortham Anyone interested in receiving the audio copy should contact Dan Antonio on 01772 746121

The selection of cards on sale at Maryton Carmel are truly lovely. If you haven’t seen them do try and check them out. From Ordination, Priestly Jubilee, Birthday, Get Well, Thinking of You, they are all at Carmel for you to see. Visit the Monastery at: Maryton Grange, Allerton Road, L18 3NU. Telephone the card office on 0151 724 7102 or Email the Sisters at marytoncards@outlook.com You will be delighted

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justice & peace

What are the principles of good governance? By Steve Atherton, Justice and Peace fieldworker The campaign that led up to the referendum on membership of the European Union has raised questions for me about the way we do politics here in the United Kingdom. I wrote in the Pic a few months ago that most of us vote with our feelings, making our decisions on emotional rather than intellectual grounds. This has been borne out by the level of debate during the campaign. In Switzerland they hold a referendum whenever there is a big decision to make but, thank goodness, our democratic system is different. We elect representatives to Parliament where they hold debates, both in the chamber and in committees, and make decisions on our behalf. We have access to our MPs and can vote them out at election time. The horror of the murder of Jo Cox brought home that most of our politicians are honest and trustworthy. When we invoke democracy as a precious and integral part of what it means to be a modern state, we mean more than being asked to vote on every single issue that needs a decision. We use the word ‘democracy’ as shorthand for the values we take for granted: a country that is secular, progressive, liberal and free. A democracy provides

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freedom to walk the streets safely, to bring up a family, to worship in accordance with our beliefs, to be protected from poverty, to have access to health care, to be treated equally under the law, to disagree with the government and to do so in public. Democracy protects our freedoms.

the common good and the preferential option for the poor. What would our way of doing politics look like if we used these principles as our measure for how we behave as a nation?

The secular state is important because it creates the space where all religious beliefs can be held rather than only the state religion. (There are many countries at the moment where it is dangerous to be Christian.)

Human dignity: all life is to be cherished, from conception to natural death; all people have equal dignity regardless of talents, race, gender or other accidents of birth; people are to be encouraged to become the best possible version of themselves.

Within our secular state of the UK we are free to promote the deeply challenging principles that CST helps to make clear: respect for human dignity,

The Common Good: the goods of the world are gifts from God to be enjoyed by all, not by a chosen few; we are called to work for this, not to leave it for someone

else to do; this will not be easy because it goes against our selfish instincts. It asks us to be universal in our view of the inheritance of the world’s goods. It asks us to take risks. It asks us to trust. The Preferential Option for the Poor: we look after the weakest members of society; the broken, the damaged, the lost and abandoned are to be our priority because we too are all of those things but for the gifts we have been given. This is the hardest to put into practice – but it was the practice of Jesus. This article was written before the EU referendum result was known.


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Profile for Educate Magazine

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Catholic news from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

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Catholic news from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

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