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Issue 143 AUGUST 2016

ARCHDIOCESE OF LIVERPOOL

FREE

Welcome Father Dominic Inside this issue: Celebrate the Child

Saints Peter and Paul College at the Cathedral

Jade Till Cafod Communicator


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contents Welcome The month of August is traditionally a time of rest and relaxation for many and a time too for visiting new places. As I write our young people have just left for Krakow and Lourdes, a reminder that the summer is a time of pilgrimage. Yesterday morning a group from Animate Youth Ministries flew from Manchester to Krakow to begin their World Youth Day pilgrimage. The first days will be spent staying with local families in the town of Jaworzno in the Polish Diocese of Sosnowiec. They will then move to Krakow, where Bishop Tom Williams will join them, for the main celebrations culminating in a Vigil and Mass with Pope Francis. This morning 475 of our young people began the annual Lourdes Pilgrimage led by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon. Nine coaches left very early in the morning for the 26 hour journey so that they will arrive in time to greet and help the main pilgrimage of over 1,300 people arriving tomorrow. The September ‘Catholic Pictorial’ will carry reports from both pilgrimages, for now let us give thanks for the work of so many in organising these journeys and for the many gifts which our young people offer us.

From the Archbishop’s Desk We are all assessing how the referendum will affect our daily lives so perhaps we should use the summer months for some prayerful reflection on this issue. Whatever happens to our country in the future we should keep the human person at the centre of our thoughts and actions. On World Peace day, 1993, Saint John Paul II made this appeal: 'If you want peace, reach out to the poor.' Throughout the world, and on our streets, it is possible to detect an undeniable relationship between that low self-esteem and poor selfimage engendered by the denial of basic human rights and decent employment to generations of families, and that violent unrest which is an increasingly frightful reality, both at local and global level. There are all too many left destitute in the gutter of a fast moving world; rejects expelled from the 'have-have not' schools of thought. Such a world moves too fast for the unemployed and the poor, for the weak and defenceless, for the old, the sick and the unborn. Human beings are treated with growing contempt; men, women and children are valued only in so far as they are regular devotees at the many shrines erected to honour the cult of money and pleasure; and only worthwhile in so far as they are consumers.

Contents 4

Main Feature Welcome Father Dominic ‘Being with the people is what I’m looking forward to’

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News From around the Archdiocese

14 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life 15 Nugent News Award for Nugent Volunteer Kerryann Corkery 16 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese 19 Profile Jade Till Cafod Communicator 21 Animate Youth Ministry God at the centre 25 Cathedral Record Farewell Richard

The human person’s rightful place at the heart of creation has been usurped at the whim of market forces and a perverse notion of development. Who can deliver us from such a climate, save our loving and faithful God, who knows each one by name?

26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC

Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool

28 Pic Life A lesson from the jury room

Editor Peter Heneghan Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk Pictures: Cover and Main Feature Nick Fairhurst. Profile: Peter Heneghan Advertising Sales team 0151 709 7567 Publisher CPMM 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

Copy deadline September issue 8 August 2016 CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

29 Join In Family Fun and More Mullarkey 30 Justice and Peace Is this a time of opportunity?

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‘Being with the people is what I’m looking forward to’ The Archdiocese of Liverpool welcomed a new priest into the fold in July with the ordination of Father Dominic Risley. by Simon Hart ather Dominic Risley is remembering the conclusion of the prayer of consecration during his Ordination Mass at St Edward’s Parish Church in Wigan. ‘I had my eyes closed and when I opened them, I thought, “That’s it, I’m a priest now”.’

F

It might have been just a fleeting moment but this was the culmination of a long road travelled – and the departure point for his new life as a priest in the Archdiocese of Liverpool. The 27-year-old’s ordination took place on Saturday 9 July at his home parish. Next month he will embark on his first assignment, as an assistant priest at the Metropolitan Cathedral. For now, though, he is getting used to ‘the newness of it all’ during a summer of helping out at St Edward’s, his home parish, and participating in the World Youth Day activities in Krakow. Before departing for Poland he found the time to reflect on how it felt to take that final step to the priesthood – and the challenges faced and decisions made in the years leading up to his ordination. ‘It was almost like a day that was

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happening around me. I blinked at the end and thought, “It’s all over”.’ His big day might have been a blur but when Father Dominic stood looking at the altar during his Ordination Mass, he could see quite clearly the role played by four priests in his development, now standing there before him. Father John Causey, parish priest at St Edward’s, ‘has helped me a lot over the years with bits of advice’, he explains, and so too Father Pat Sexton from St Monica’s in Bootle whom Father Dominic first met during his first year as a seminarian at Ushaw. ‘We always knew the door was open at St Monica’s if we needed any help or somewhere to relax,’ he says. There was also Father Mark Beattie, with whom he worked during his four-month placement as a fourth-year student at St Oswald’s and St Sebastian’s in Liverpool. ‘He really did mentor me,’ says Father Dominic. ‘I learned a lot by watching him with people and in other parts of parish life – I saw things where I thought, “I want to do that, I want to be like that”. He was a great example to me.’ Finally there was his good friend Father Matt Jolly, who was ordained in July last

year. ‘He was in the year above me and helped me all the way through seminary, not just by being a friend but also somebody who would tell me things he thought had worked or not. He’d tell me, “This is what I’ve done and it’s gone wrong”. During the Mass, he helped vest me with Father Pat.’ ‘It was lovely to be back in my home parish as I felt that is where my vocation had been nurtured without me realising it.’ St Edward’s was the parish church where Father Dominic had his first experiences as a young Catholic. It was there that he went to Mass with his father Chris, mother Anne and sister Bernadette – and there that he served on the altar for many years. ‘I carried on during the teenage years when a lot do drop off,’ he remembers. Recounting his journey to the priesthood, Father Dominic cites as a key staging post his trip to Lourdes in the summer of 2005. He had just left St Thomas More High School and was about to begin his A Level studies at St John Rigby College in Wigan. ‘Lourdes was a turning point where I thought, “Maybe….”,’ he explains. ‘I’d thought the priesthood was somehow above me and I couldn’t do it but when we went to Lourdes, I thought maybe there is something in this. In Lourdes I said, “God if this is something you want me to do, then you’ll make it happen and I left it in God’s hands.” There was the beginning of something.’ After his A Levels, he studied Theology at Leeds Trinity & All Saints – now Leeds Trinity University – and it was during his time as a student that he encountered another influential figure, Monsignor Paul Grogan, then vocations director for the Diocese of Leeds. ‘He saw a young man sitting at the back of the chapel week in, week out and thought maybe there was something there. He brought up the question


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feature ‘It was almost like a day that was happening around me. I blinked at the end and thought, “It’s all over”.’

again about the priesthood. That was when I started to discern a bit more seriously.’ ‘There were little moments where I thought, “I don’t think I can do this”.’ Father Dominic began his studies for the priesthood straight after finishing his degree course. He spent his first year at Ushaw College before the closure of the seminary there led him down the motorway to Oscott College. He reflects on the moments of selfdoubt that he experienced during his time at Oscott – ‘little moments’ as he calls them. ‘There were little moments where I thought, “I don’t think I can do this, I haven’t got the confidence to do this or the discipline to do that”. A particular concern was his anxiety over the ‘performance’ aspects demanded by priest’s central role in the Mass. ‘Homilies were always a big fear because I used to dread speaking

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publically. I still do get a little nervous sometimes. Towards the end of the second year everyone had to give a homily or reflection at Mass so standing in front of everybody in the chapel was a terrifying experience. Singing was another of those things that at the beginning, when you just start, is absolutely petrifying. But by the end you’re so used to being in the community and being in the house that you think, “If it goes wrong, it goes wrong” so you become a bit hardened to it.’ ‘The Archbishop said, “I hope St Dominic Savio will help to keep you young”.’

‘It was lovely to be back in my home parish as I felt that is where my vocation had been nurtured without me realising it.’ 6

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It is one specific homily – that delivered by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon during his Ordination – that Father Dominic is talking about now. The Archbishop referred to two different Dominics as he preached during the Ordination Mass on 9 July. ‘He mentioned the two saints named Dominic and he said, “I hope St Dominic Savio will help to keep you young”, which I liked. That got a laugh.

He said too that he hoped Dominic, founder of the order of preachers, would help draw me closer to God’s word.’ Archbishop Malcolm also quoted a Dominican priest, Herbert McCabe, in his homily, as Father Dominic explains: ‘He said, “To love is to be crucified but not to love is to be dead already”. I’d never heard that before and that struck a chord with me.’ These words will stay with Father Dominic when he embarks on his work at the Metropolitan Cathedral in September. He is ready to embrace the challenges that will come his way. ‘I’m very excited because you are finally able to do what you’ve been training for all these years,’ he says, adding with a laugh: ‘You feel you’re actually doing proper work now. You can go out and finally try and put the theory into practice. ‘Being with the people, is what I’m looking forward to because you’re able to be with them in their good times and their bad times, you’re able to bring God to them in the sacraments.’


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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

Follow the Liverpool Lampedusa Cross In the Year of Mercy, Catholic agencies are helping deepen our understanding together of Pope Francis’s call to ‘Welcome the Stranger’. Based on real refugees’ experience and Catholic Social Teaching, the Lampedusa Cross Pilgrimage can help us grow in a faith that does justice. The Liverpool Lampedusa Cross was made by Francisco Tuccio, the carpenter on the island of Lampedusa near Malta where hundreds of people have been drowned trying reach safety in overcrowded boats. Touched by the experience of Eritrean Christian survivors, Mr Tuccio salvaged wood from their wrecked boat and made crosses of hope

for them. He gave Pope Francis a cross when he visited Lampedusa and Catholic agencies of England and Wales asked him to make more for the Year of Mercy. Archbishop Malcolm has blessed the Liverpool Lampedusa Cross and with it comes his encouragement for all parishes and schools across the Archdiocese to hear the invitation to join in the Cross pilgrimage. This simple and moving liturgy is like a mini-Stations of the Cross and follows the experiences of refugees. Small groups, schools, convents, nursing homes, etc. could hold it, in one room or walking between schools or parishes or Pastoral Areas. At the end, we are invited to write short Messages of Hope for Cafod

First Solemn High Mass Picture: John Aron

On Sunday 11 July newly ordained Father James Mawdsley FSSP offered his first Solemn High Mass at St Mary’s Shrine in Warrington at which the Choir sang William Byrd’s ‘Mass for five voices’. Father Mawdsley was ordained for the Priestly Fraternity of St Peter on Saturday 2 July in Bavaria by Archbishop Guido Pozzo, Secretary of the Pontifical Ecclesia Dei Commission. James Mawdsley grew up in the north of the Archdiocese in the village of Mawdesley, Lancashire. He spent some years abroad as a human rights activist and later trained for the priesthood with the Priestly Fraternity of St Peter in Germany. He spent his diaconal stage in St Mary’s Shrine Church, Warrington, from last Christmas until Easter, and is now assigned to Warrington as Assistant Priest.

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to send onto refugees. The Archbishop’s message was, ‘Keep going – we support you’. Contact Cafod Liverpool Tel: 0151 228 4028 liverpool@cafod.org.uk to book the Cross and copies of the resources can also be downloaded from http://cafod.org.uk/Events/Lampedusapilgrimage

Joint Schools Celebration

Liverpool’s three joint Church of England and Roman Catholic Primary Schools held a celebration in Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral on Wednesday 29 June 2016. Bishop Tom Williams was present as pupils from Faith School, Liverpool; Emmaus School, Croxteth Park and Hope School, Huyton took part in a musical celebration of unity.


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Our Lady’s, Gateacre Parish Assembly

One hundred and fifty people from Our Lady of the Assumption Church, Gateacre gathered together for a day entitled ‘Dream Dreams’, the aim of the day was to develop a parish vision and to renew the spiritual, social outreach and pastoral life of the parish. The day was led by external facilitators who enabled important conversations to happen. Parish Priest, Father Stephen Pritchard commented, ‘preparation for the Parish Assembly began months ago and it is wonderful to see how many people from the parish and schools, young and old alike have come together to share their dreams, hopes, joys and concerns for the future. It has been an inspiring experience.’ Twenty parish groups had stalls and displays as well as diocesan groups such a Animate, Vocations, Irenaeus, Separated and Divorced Group and Pastoral Formation. The ideas from the Assembly will form the basis of a five year Parish Development Plan.

St Patrick’s, Peel celebrates 150 years Parishioners from St Patrick’s, Peel, Isle of Man celebrated the 150th anniversary of the building of their church with the blessing of a new statue placed beside the church and in front of the parish hall. A Mass of Thanksgiving was celebrated by Parish Priest, Father Brian O Mahony, CSSp followed by the blessing of the statue. The four feet high figure in white Sicilian marble has been donated by the Buckley family in memory of Kathleen and Matthew Buckley who were devoted parishioners of St Patrick’s for many years. They are remembered with much affection and respect by their fellow parishioners and in the Peel community as a whole. Matthew died in 2009 and Kathleen in 2015. Their

daughter, Mrs Mary Wilson, was present for the Mass and Blessing. Father O Mahony expressed his and the parishioners thanks to Mary and her family for the statue saying that he hoped it would stand for the next 150 years.

Obituary of Rev Kevin Mulhearn Father Kevin Mulhearn, former RAF Chaplain and Parish Priest of St Joseph’s, Wrightington for over 30 years, died on Monday 20th June at the age of 89 and in the 63rd year of his priesthood. Kevin James Francis Mulhearn was born in Liverpool on 12 August 1926, the son of John and Catherine Mulhearn. He attended St Teresa’s School, Norris Green, and St Edward’s College, Liverpool. Between April 1944 and January 1948 he served successively in the Royal Navy, the Fleet Air Arm and the King’s Liverpool Regiment. After a few months at Campion House, Osterley, he began studies for the priesthood at St Joseph’s College, Upholland, in September 1948. He was ordained priest by Archbishop William Godfrey on 12 June 1954 in the college chapel at Upholland. In August 1954 he was appointed assistant priest at St Vincent’s, Liverpool, where he remained for four years. A brief curacy followed at St Mary’s, Blackbrook, St Helens, from 1958 until 1961, when he was invited to become a chaplain in the Royal Air Force. Although he entered the forces on a shortservice commission, his aptitude for this kind of pastoral ministry was quickly recognised. Monsignor John Roche, the Vicar General for the RAF, writing to Archbishop Heenan in February 1963 commented that, ‘...he has proved to be very adaptable, a quality which is particularly necessary in a chaplain, and he is above all a fine priest,’ and he requested that Father Mulhearn be allowed to apply for a permanent commission. Archbishop Beck confirmed this arrangement upon his appointment in 1964 and so Father Mulhearn served until 1977 as an RAF chaplain at the following bases: RAF Cosford (1961); RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus (1963); RAF Lyneham (1965); RAF Henlow (1968); RAF Muharraq, Bahrain (1970); RAF Laarbruch, Germany (1971); RAF Cosford (1974); RAF Brampton (1975) and RAF Halton (1976). He also had various tours of duty in Malaya, Hong Kong and the Gulf. In October 1977 he retired from the RAF with the rank of Group Captain and then served for a few years in parishes in Bahrain and Qatar. Upon his return to the archdiocese, Father Mulhearn took up his appointment as parish priest at St Joseph’s, Wrightington, in June 1981. He ministered there with great fidelity for well over thirty years until his retirement in September 2013. He continued to live at Wrightington in retirement until earlier this year, when his increasing frailty necessitated a move to Ince Blundell. His Funeral Mass was celebrated at St Joseph’s, Wrightington, on Thursday 30 June followed by interment in the churchyard.

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news diary Lourdes thanks from Skelmersdale Just before the departure of the Lourdes Pilgrimage it was with great sadness the Skelmersdale Lourdes Association was wound up after nearly 40 years of fundraising with jumble sales, book stalls, car boot sales, sponsored walks, ladies nights and bingos to send people to Lourdes. In common with many charities fundraising has become increasingly difficult in recent years. A Mass of Thanksgiving was celebrated at St Francis of Assisi church after which a cheque for the remaining funds of £9,550.00 was presented to HCPT, (Handicapped Children’s Pilgrimage Trust) for them to continue sending children to Lourdes each Easter. The lady representing HCPT, a teacher at one of our schools, brought several of the children to the Mass and presentation and judging by their happy faces they enjoyed being there too.

Celebrate the Child

Pupils raise money for Cancer Research Archbishop Malcolm together with the priests from the St Thérèse of Lisieux Pastoral Area celebrated the Annual ‘Celebrate the Child’ Mass at St Paschal Baylon Primary School, on a beautiful sunny day The Mass celebrates the work undertaken with and for children in the Archdiocese with children and adults from a number of parishes across the archdiocese attending. This year’s theme was ‘Spread the Good News’. Before Mass children took part in many activities they wrote prayers that were offered up during Mass and came up with ideas on how they can spread the ‘Good News’. As people arrived at the school playground where the Mass was celebrated they all said a prayer of mercy, specially prepared for the day and walked through a gated entrance of coloured balloons. At the end of Mass children released many more balloons into the blue skies spreading the good news across the archdiocese. Many people stayed after the Mass to enjoy a picnic in the school grounds and to play games. Next year the Mass is to be celebrated at St Anne’s Parish, in Ormskirk on Sunday 2 July, for further information please contact the Safeguarding Department on 0151 522 1043 or email safeguarding@rcaol.co.uk 10

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The children of Blessed Sacrament Catholic Primary School in Aintree have put their running shoes on and raised over £8,000 for Cancer Research UK. Every child from nursery through to Year 6 took part in a sponsored ‘Race for Life’ at which they were encouraged to run as far as they could for a special person or people in their lives. The success of the event on 20 May was far beyond expectations, with the school – which had pledged to raise at least £700 – eventually presenting a cheque for £8,233 to Jennifer Drury, a representative of Cancer Research, at a school assembly in June. Chris Davey, the school’s head teacher, said: ‘We are extremely proud of our children and their parents for their generosity in raising such an outstanding amount and would like to say a huge thank you to the whole Blessed Sacrament Community. Cancer Research clearly touches the heart of our community and we are still receiving donations to pass on to the charity.’


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Hillsborough memorial garden opens at St Margaret Mary’s Pupils at St Margaret Mary’s Catholic Junior School in Pilch Lane, Huyton celebrated the official opening of a commemorative garden for the 96 victims of the Hillsborough disaster last month. The idea for the garden came from the pupils themselves and it was developed with the support of the school gardener, Simon Lyon, prior to its opening on 1July. Father Mark Moran, parish priest of St Margaret Mary’s, led prayers and a blessing at the opening at which the Liverpool anthem You’ll Never Walk Alone was sung. The Mayor of Knowsley, George Howarth MP, was present together with representatives from the Hillsborough Family Support Group and from both Liverpool and Everton Football Club. The memorial garden has been carefully designed and created in memory of the 96 Liverpool supporters who lost their lives at Hillsborough. It includes 96 planters which sit around the garden. At its centre is a carved stone bearing the number 96 along with a 96 emblem made up of plants. All those present at the opening ceremony were invited to place one of the 96 planters into the garden. All the plants and other material were the garden were donated to the school, whose head teacher, Marcella Armstrong, spoke about the impact it had already made on the pupils. ‘We feel the garden, which all the children can access at all play times, is a wonderful way to ensure that the ninety-six are never forgotten,’ she said. ‘The pupils really enjoyed getting involved in the planning and

planting and they are very proud of what they have created. It is a great tribute and a lovely space that all five hundred pupils at our school will enjoy for a long time to come.’

Junior J&P group make their mark From supporting people in Zimbabwe to welcoming child refugees to Merseyside – these are just two of the activities already undertaken by a new Justice and Peace youth group in south Liverpool. The still-growing group from the parishes of Our Lady of the Annunciation, Bishop Eton and St Mary’s, Woolton comprises over thirty children aged between nine and 15 and is supported by eight youth leaders aged 16-18 and over 20 adult helpers. Meeting every fortnight, they have performed some impressive work during less than six months working together: from raising £260 for a Zimbabwe project with the sale of unwanted Christmas presents via collecting money for the Red Cross to organising a collection of books for Oxfam The junior J&P group is an active presence in its two parishes, inviting grandmothers from Bishop Eton and St Mary’s to a ‘Knit and Natter’ event whereby the youngsters, in exchange for tea and cake, received lessons in how to

knit and crochet squares in order to begin making blankets for homeless people and neo-natal wards. They have also turned their attention to welcoming child refugees to the city by creating welcome packs – brightly coloured shoe bags filled with items that the children might find helpful along with a postcard from the group. These items were donated by parishioners from Bishop Eton and St Mary’s as well as St Clare’s,

Arundel Avenue, another parish eager to get involved. Together the three parishes gathered one hundred packs – including toiletries, toys, pencils and colouring books – along with 500 nappies and wipes, which were gratefully received by the Merseyside Refugee and Asylum Seekers Pre and Post-Natal Support Group (MRANG ) and the Belvidere Family Centre (Whitechapel Centre).

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Pastoral Letter Dear friends, Over the last several years our archdiocese has been discerning the best way to prepare children and families for the Sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation and Eucharist. Our Baptismal resource is now well established in several areas of the archdiocese and the ‘With You Always’ programme in preparation for Reconciliation, Confirmation and First Eucharist has brought Family Catechesis into the forefront of our diocesan life. As part of this process the Sacrament of Confirmation was brought forward from the teenage years to be celebrated before First Holy Communion. Having visited many parishes and listened to priests, deacons, religious, teachers, catechists and parents, I have decided to move Confirmation back to the teenage years. Despite this creating yet another change in our sacramental practice it will allow us a pastoral opportunity to engage with teenagers and to help them respond to the demands of their Christian calling at a very crucial moment in their lives. It also allows for a greater sense of unity with the other dioceses in England and Wales many of whom celebrate Confirmation in the teenage years. I will also restore the role of bishop as the primary minister of the Sacrament of Confirmation - given the fact Confirmations will no longer be restricted to a particular time of year Bishop Tom Williams and I will have a greater freedom to visit your parish and confer the Sacrament of Confirmation for you.

The following Pastoral Letter from Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP was read at all Masses in the Archdiocese of Liverpool on the weekend of 16/17 July 2016.

These last few years have taught us much about how best to prepare for and celebrate Christian Initiation. We have been reminded that the sacraments are gifts given not things to be earned or merited like an award or a graduation. It will be important to keep this in mind when preparing teenagers and young adults to receive Confirmation in the future. Our time of reflection and discernment has also reminded us of the call made by the Second Vatican Council to put families at the centre of passing on the Faith to their children. The Council Fathers put it like this: ‘Graced with the dignity and office of fatherhood and motherhood, parents will energetically acquit themselves of a duty which devolves primarily on them, namely education and especially religious education.’ (Gaudium et Spes, 48) In practice what this means is that Family Catechesis is here to stay. From September the year-long ‘With You Always’ programme will continue to be used but solely for the preparation of the Sacraments of Reconciliation and First Holy Communion. The ‘With You Always’ resource has been adapted to accommodate this change and it will be available for order soon in the normal way. As the first large groups of 13 year olds to be confirmed will not take place until 2020 we have plenty of time before then to reflect and prepare a new Confirmation preparation resource to be used in the parishes of the archdiocese. In the meantime confirmations will still be a part of diocesan life because some teenagers will have missed Confirmation at an earlier

age, and there are always adults to be confirmed. As we have seen in recent years the method of family catechesis in the ‘With You Always’ resource has led many parents and adults to request confirmation for themselves. My hope is that by offering the Sacrament of Confirmation to our teenagers they will deepen their love of the Eucharist, and that their faith in our Lord Jesus Christ will be strengthened. With my prayers and every good wish for you and your families for the summer months ahead.

Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool

Widnes College celebrate at the Cathedral Pupils, members of staff, governors and friends of Saints Peter and Paul Catholic College, Widnes travelled to the Metropolitan Cathedral for a Mass to celebrate the 20th anniversary of being at the centre of Catholic education in Widnes. The Mass was celebrated by Father Joe Bibby and among those attending were Civic Dignitaries and former headteachers. Students took a full part in the Mass providing the music, reading and leading the Prayer of the Faithful. Right: Mr Mike Glover (Former Head), Mr Jim Wilson (Chair of Governors), Ms Rosalin Wong (Mayoress of Halton), Mrs Wendy White (College Principal), Councillor Ged Philbin (Mayor of Halton), Fr Joe Bibby (Celebrant), Mr Gus Van Cauwelaert (Former Head).)

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sunday reflections On a liturgical note The Liturgy is for us a school of prayer. That is to say, it is a place where we learn – both individually and as a community – what are the values and virtues of the Kingdom of God, and how best we can put those values and virtues into practice each and every day. When we look back on our school days we realise that it has been a period in our lives which has afforded us space and time and the possibility of learning and developing and growing our own skills, characters and potential: it has laid the foundations for future growth. So it is with the Liturgy; it grounds us in our relationships – the relationship we have with God (in worship of God's majesty and power, forgiveness and tenderness), with ourselves (as Newman said, ‘God has created me to do Him some definite service’), and with the family and society of which I form a part (‘Love one another as I have loved you’). The Liturgy of the Church – with that rich combination of words and

Sunday thoughts Many people of my age who were brought up as Catholics no longer practise. Conversations with them follow a pattern. Reaching teenage years they left their childhood faith behind – ‘all that stuff’. The world view presented by Catholicism did not stand up to rational scrutiny. They view their rejection of the faith as an inevitable and commendable rite of passage. Faith is a gift. But that statement alone does not absolve us from taking a look at how we come to adult faith. Christianity versus scientific truth is a false dichotomy. It’s ‘apples and oranges’. They are not issues of the same order. The weather forecast may provide a helpful illustration. It’s a sunny day. Why? Is it because God has blessed us with sunshine or because a high-pressure weather system is coming up from Spain and France? These are not alternatives. Both explanations can be held simultaneously. Science

Canon Philip Gillespie

rituals, music, space and seasons – affords us the possibility to learn and to grow into the best and most perfect people we can be. We have to use words like possibility and potential because, just as in any school, we can choose not to engage, not to be fully present to the opportunities, not to ‘seize the day’ which is offered to us. In this month of August, many of our local school buildings are closed for the summer holidays: not so with that school which is the Liturgy, though! It places before us the themes of Transfiguration (6 August), the glory given to the Blessed Virgin Mary (15 August), and the memory of one of our local martyrs (Saint Edmund Arrowsmith, 30 August). We are invited to learn the lessons from these feasts which will benefit and instruct us in Christian living.

Mgr John Devine OBE

does not trump faith, or vice versa. I can hold down a job at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and still say the rosary. The second reading from the Letter to the Hebrews for the 19th Sunday of the Year tells us: ‘Only faith can guarantee the blessings that we hope for, or prove the existence of the realities that at present remain unseen.’ Even a Nobel prize-winning scientist need have no problem with that. If faith is not the antithesis of scientific truth, what is it? There may be a clue in the Gospel Reading for the same Sunday: ‘There is no need to be afraid little flock for it has pleased the Father to give you the Kingdom.’ The antithesis of faith is not ‘objective’ reasoning. It is fear. Our faith can embrace both scientific rigour and a childlike trust in God.

Weekly Reflections are on the Archdiocesan website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/reflection 14

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United we stand I was recently talking to a man from Romania who sells the Big Issue not too far from where I live. He told me that since the referendum on Europe he was constantly being taunted by groups of young people who were telling him he’d soon be going home and he had no place in this country. As he shared this with me, the tears were tripping down his face and I couldn’t help but feel a deep sense of shame that we have come to this. Whatever stance you might have taken on our place in Europe, the Gospel invites us always to be compassionate, loving and on the side of those in need. Not to take that stance, even in these troubled times, is to be less than faithful to the call of the Gospel. It can never be right to be angry, bitter and exultant at other’s misfortune, which is the experience my Romanian friend is having. It strikes me that in the heart of God there is no room for separation or division. God is perfect unity and we, as individuals and a community, are made in the image and likeness of God. Blame, separation and scapegoating never show the face of God to the world. So how can we let suspicion and fear rear its ugly head? How can we let struggles for power, jockeying for position and wanting our own way destroy the simple call to be united in love? How can we create camps of the like-minded that become exclusive rather than inclusive when all the time that fails to show God’s face to the world? I guess that’s why I think we need to hear again the call to unity, to come together and do as much as we possibly can to stand against the scandal of disunity. To live a fully Christian life is to give our lives for unity. That will change our image of God. It will challenge us deep within as we have to let go of our need to be right and for others to be wrong. It will call us into relationship with others who see things differently but it will bring us and others life and we will show the face of God to the world. So, in our troubled times, let’s mirror the reality of God and work for unity and all that means. Let’s give our lives for acceptance of difference, welcome and compassion. Father Chris Thomas


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nugent news Nugent Volunteer Kerryann Corkery takes third place On July 11th Sir Martin Narey released his anticipated report on the quality of children’s homes in England. He spent three months preparing this report, to which Nugent Care contributed.

L to R - Emily Nolan (Nugent Care), Normandie Wragg (CEO Nugent Care), Kerryan Corkery, Lindsey Harrison (KCVS), and Leanne Corkery (Nugent Care).

Our Befriending Volunteer Kerryann Corkery has been awarded third place in the 2016 ‘Volunteer of the Year Awards’ run by Knowlsey Council for Voluntary Service. Kerryann enjoyed a successful career in domiciliary care for a number of years, and developed a passion for supporting and caring for older people; it was the right place for her, with her mantra being, ‘when they smile, I smile.’ Following a long period of recuperation from emergency back surgery Kerryann found herself out of work and at a low point in her life, a normally colourful and bubbly personality, she found herself wearing dark colours and not going out much. It was at a physio session, during chair exercises, that Kerryann recognised that many older people where in the same position she was, feeling isolated and alone. This led her to seek out an opportunity with Nugent Care to befriend local people who are living alone and to provide support to them. Since then, Kerryann has found a new lease of life, and says that ‘working as a volunteer befriender in my local community has helped me get my confidence, and self-esteem back, it’s given me the courage to start my life again and get back to being me. I have been inspired by the change I have been

instrumental in bringing about for other people.’ One of these people is a disabled woman, who is a wheelchair user and relied heavily on others to help her shop and go out socially, she had become housebound and was afraid to go out on her own and hadn’t been out for years. With Kerryann’s support and encouragement she is now able to leave the house, do her own shopping and meet people, her life is full again. Kerryann has given her the confidence and support to do that, and she now goes out to meet friends socially every Saturday. Kerryann is looking for new challenges and is planning to add to her work with Nugent Care and has become a volunteer with Marie Curie caring for the terminally ill. ‘We are very proud of Kerryann, and the work she does. She is an inspiration and has proved how volunteering not only helps those you work with but can be therapeutic and life changing for the volunteer too. We hope that next year she’ll be awarded first place.’ said Normandie Wragg, CEO Nugent Care. Kerryann volunteers on the opening doors project, this service is funded by Knowlsey Council and run by Nugent Care. If you live in the Knowlsey area and would like to find out more please give Emily Nolan a call on 0151 261 2000.

This was a very positive report that highlighted that the children that are living in care homes across England are ‘treated overwhelmingly well’. This assessment, of course, is our experience. The Narey report also highlighted 34 recommendations for improving care, and of course, we consistently look towards guidance to continuously improve our services and therefore the children we serve. We have often had conversations about what size of a home is ‘just right’. Is it a home with 2 beds, 3 beds or 6 beds? Should each room have ensuite, or not? What would be best for the children living at our homes? Should we look to work with local authorities who are within the Archdiocese or should we look further afield? The Narey report indicated that the right placement for a child was more important than location and that small homes are not necessarily better than larger homes. Again, it is what is right for a particular child or grouping of children. This sentiment resonates with us here at Nugent Care. Children’s homes are staffed by kind, skilled and considerate care givers, who often spend their entire career, ensuring the safety and promoting the life chances of the children in their care. Within Nugent, we have twelve children’s homes across the Archdiocese. All of our children’s homes are regulated by Ofsted and receive regular oversight from both the relevant local authority and of course our internal Quality Assurance processes. Archbishop Emeritus Patrick Kelly is often quoted as having said during his time as Chair of our Board, ‘whatever is in the best interest of the child’. It seems we have been working with this guidance for years. This report will certainly aid the positive care provided across England and here in the Liverpool area. Normandie Wragg Chief Executive – Nugent Care

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what’s on Tuesday 2 August Support Group for people living with dementia and their carers 2.00 pm at Our Lady Help of Christians, Portico Parish Hall, Prescot, L34 2QT. Details: Joan O’Hanlon Tel: 07984 735590. Everyone welcome. Thursday 4 August Agape Mass 8.00 pm at St Mary’s, Prescot Road, Aughton, L39 6TA. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286.

The Marriage and Family Life Department of the Archdiocese offers support meetings for Divorced and Separated Catholics. These begin on Wednesday, 7 September. We welcome Catholics and other Christians who are divorced or separated (recently or in the past) or who are experiencing the breakdown of a marriage or a long term relationship. The small groups are informative, affirming, free and confidential. For information about the meetings and the venues and dates or to book a place please contact Frances Trotman Tel: 0151 727 2195. General enquiries may be directed to Maureen O’Brien at LACE Tel: 0151 522 1044 Email: m.obrien@rcaol.co.uk

Saturday 6 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: James Devor (Brentwood Cathedral) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses.

Saturday 20 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Richard Sutton (Dulwich College) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses.

Sunday 7 August Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286.

Sunday 21 August Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286.

Saturday 13 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Edmund Aldhouse (Ely Cathedral) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses.

Saturday 27 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: James Hutchinson-Bazely (RNCM Organ Prize Winner) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Sunday 28 August Prayer Meeting led by

Various dates

World of Atherton Sunday 14 August

Sunday 14 August Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

‘I hope Our Lady doesn’t come out of Europe before we go’

Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286.

website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/holyweek2016 16

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Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Monday 29 August Pilgrimage Mass in honour of Blessed Dominic Barberi 12.00 noon in the Church of St Anne and Blessed Dominic, Monastery Road, St Helens, WA9 3ZD. Celebrant and preacher: Rev Martin Newell, CP.


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august Looking ahead: September 2016 Thursday 1 September Agape Mass 8.00 pm at St Mary’s, Prescot Road, Aughton, L39 6TA. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Sunday 4 September Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Tuesday 6 September Support Group for people living with dementia and their carers 2.00 pm at Our Lady Help of Christians, Portico Parish Hall, Prescot, L34 2QT. Details: Joan O’Hanlon Tel: 07984 735590. Everyone welcome. Wednesday 7 September UCM Bi-monthly Mass 7.30 pm at St Margaret Mary’s, Pilch Lane, Liverpool, L14 0JG.

Friday 9 September to Sunday 11 September ‘Women at the Well.’ A weekend of reflection for women led by Sister Moira Meeghan. at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Tuesday 13 September Time Out on Tuesdays 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Open to all who are involved in any form of ministry or service to others, giving time for silence and personal reflection. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com Saturday 17 September Quiet Day 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Time to be quiet, reflect and pray. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com

A new logo for St Joseph’s Hospice It opened on the feast of St Joseph in 1974 and now Merseyside’s oldest and largest hospice has a new brand identity to better reflect not just its origins but its location and purpose too. The Thornton-based hospice known locally as ‘Jospice’ has a logo featuring its full name – St Joseph’s Hospice – following a design process in which all the staff and trustees were involved. The green design reflects the natural woodland surrounding the hospice while the simple heart shape around the name of the hospice captures the love, care and compassion which St Joseph’s Hospice provides. The new brand will be feature initially on the hospice’s digital channels and on signage at St Joseph’s. It will be rolled out at its nine hospice shops when the existing signage needs replacing. Chief executive Mike Parr said: ‘As a charity, we want to be able to support as many people living with life-limiting conditions as possible and to offer them a wide range of specialist care and support services. ‘In order to do this, we need to attract more funding and a clear, strong brand that is fit for the future, and can stand alongside other hospices and charities,

will really help us to shout louder about St Joseph’s Hospice and the fantastic longterm, specialised end-of-life care provided by our nursing teams. ‘Our new brand will be evolutionary rather

than revolutionary as we roll it out as and when older materials need replacing in order that we don’t incur any unnecessary costs.’

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profile

Jade Till AN individuals make a difference? Jade Till, Cafod’s regional communications coordinator, certainly thinks so. She took part in the Pilgrimage2Paris last November, a two-week walk from London to the French capital ahead of the United Nations Climate Change Conference – and knows the efforts of those who walked did not go unnoticed. She heard as much from Christiana Figueres, the woman who, as executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, received a petition directly from the Paris pilgrims in the form of a long scroll bearing 1.8million signatures, all demanding climate justice. ‘I was at a lecture she gave recently at Imperial College London and she was asked in a Q&A about how individuals can help and she mentioned this pilgrimage and how we had met her and it was inspirational for her, and that was lovely to hear,’ she explains. Jade’s involvement in that Paris walk, which was supported by Cafod, Christian Aid, Tearfund, and the Church of England has made a difference on a personal note too, opening the door to her current role. ‘I saw the position was open and as

C

Aiming to make a difference with Cafod by Simon Hart I’d been doing social media on the way to Paris, I thought I could now engage with Cafod in the wider work they are doing,’ she explains. Jade took part in the Pilgrimage2Paris after winning a Church of England competition to produce a video diary and blog about the impact of climate change on poor communities. For this, the bubbly 27-year-old drew on some of her experiences of working overseas – specifically her time in Ethiopia, volunteering at two children’s homes at the time of the drought in 2011, and in the Middle East, both on a kibbutz in Israel and at the Palestinian Museum of Natural History in Bethlehem. A graduate in Third World Development and International Relations from Derby University, she gained an MA in Humanitarianism and Conflict Response at the University of Manchester before embarking on a series of enriching foreign placements. Jade, who also taught English in South Korea for a year, spent four months on a European Voluntary Scheme project in the Russian city of Petrozavodsk. ‘I was working with schools and young people on environmental projects such as recycling and finding ways to promote the

environment in their schools,’ she says. ‘Petrozavodsk is towards the Arctic Circle and I was there in winter so we had four hours of sunlight a day. It was minus thirty and they said it was a warm winter!’ All these experiences should serve her well in her work with Cafod, as she acknowledges. ‘It’s great because it combines all my passions,’ she says, ‘and you also see the passion of the supporters, fundraisers, and the volunteers I have met. The enthusiasm and experience of the staff is enriching. ‘It’s such a great atmosphere and no day is the same. One day I might be talking to someone who is running the London marathon and the next I might be talking to someone over in Kenya who is looking at water projects. We’re now seeing people migrate because of the climate, rather than war and conflict, and it’s great to be able to help them have their voices heard.’ • Cafod, as part of the Climate Coalition, is leading a week of action and local lobbying on climate and energy from 8-16 October. For details on how to get involved, visit: www.cafod.org.uk/Campaign/OneClimate-One-World/Speak-Up-weekof-action

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youth ministry

‘It has been an incredible year’ Gemma Smith reflects on a year of living and learning with the Animate Youth Ministries team. I’m coming to the end of my gap year at Animate and yet it feels like I’ve only just begun. It has been such an incredible year and I have learned so many lessons that I’ll be taking with me to university and beyond. I have loved working with the young people I have met this year – indeed the experience has given me a new appreciation of my faith and of how I can help others see they can have their own faith journey. In many cases, the youngsters I have worked with would come in thinking that faith was some far-off thing not for them and yet time and again they were amazed by how ordinary we were, which I think is a key part of peer ministry. We show them that you can have a laugh, you can have hobbies and interests, you can get excited about your passions … and you can still have a faith. Every day at Animate has been different – from working in private schools to disadvantaged areas, from dealing with sixth formers to Year 5s. I have loved working with the primary schools as the pupils’ energy is fantastic and they always throw themselves into the fun-packed days, exploring a theme like ‘Let Your Light

Shine’ or “Living the Christian Life’. Equally high schools have been interesting to work with as well. You can have deeper discussions on faith and the future. Often we would have group discussions which I found important in my ministry. Although we can speak to teenagers for days on different themes and what we believe, they should feel able to talk about their beliefs as well – whether that be Christianity, Islam, agnosticism, atheism, etc. This is part of their development into adults and so they should be listened to, which is a key part of youth ministry. The other major aspect of the Animate gap year has been living in community. This was particularly strange for me at first as I do not have brothers and sisters so it was strange to always have a lot of people in the house. Like anyone who has lived in community or in university halls, there can be pros and cons – such as petty arguments over who’s not washed the dishes – but living in community at Animate has been a

privilege. I’ve been surrounded by supportive people who have not only helped my faith journey but also my own personal development. Not only have I learned how to cook, do my laundry and other practical things, I’ve also learned how to work and live with the same people, and it really does feel like a family. I feel more ready to start University in October than I did a year ago and I’d encourage anyone who’s thinking about joining the team to at least come and give Animate a visit. I hope I’ve made a positive impact on the thousands of young people I’ve worked with this year and wish them all the best in the future. ‘Let no one despise you for your youth, but set the believers an example in speech, in conduct, in love, in faith, in purity.’ 1 Timothy 4:12

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Ince Blundell Hall provides a home and care to 22 residents, this includes caring for the sick priests of The Liverpool Diocese. The ideal candidate will be a committed professional who strives for excellence. The care and work we provide offers excellent opportunity for innovation and development. We offer competitive rates of pay and are looking to fill full and part time positions. We have vacancies for both day and night work.

Please contact Angela Francis Email: a.m.francis@outlook.com • 22

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Tel: 0151 929 2596


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cathedral

Farewell Richard! Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean

by Dr Christopher McElroy Director of Music, Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral Richard Lea has been associated with the music at Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral for 32 years, successively as Organ Scholar, Sub-Organist, Assistant Director of Music and Finally Organist. He has served the liturgy of the Cathedral with distinction during this time, having played for many notable occasions such as Archbishop Worlock’s Funeral and the installations of Archbishops Kelly and McMahon. Richard has been a tremendous advocate for the Cathedral and its unique organ. Built in 1966/67 the organ is a very fine example of English organ building of the period and speaks very well into the unusual shape of our Cathedral. During his time at the Cathedral Richard has made numerous broadcasts and has recorded three discs of the music of Lefébure Wély (featured in BBC Radio 2’s ‘The Organist Entertains’), the complete organ works of the Welsh composer William Mathias and the World Premiere recording of Sir John Tavener’s ‘Requiem’ (on EMI with the

RLPO and Choir conducted by Vasily Petrenko). Reviews include - ‘it is Richard Lea’s superb playing that steals the show’ (‘Organists’ Review’) ‘really first rate playing’, ‘masterful’ (‘Gramophone’), ‘Here is music and playing that will lift your spirits (‘American Organist’), ‘the performances are brilliant…and genuinely moving’ (‘International Record Review’), ‘exemplary performances – 5 stars’ (‘Orgelnieuws’). He has recently released a DVD, receiving great reviews – ‘Bravado performances’, ‘This is one of the most outstanding instrumental releases on DVD this year’ (‘International Record Review’), ‘Virtuosic and riveting’, ‘Highly recommended’ (‘Organists’ Review’). In September Richard will take up his new post as Organist of Buckfast Abbey in Devon, a Benedictine monastic community, where where they are taking delivery of a new £2.5 million pipe organ built by the Italian firm Fratelli Ruffatti in 2017. Liverpool’s loss is Buckfast’s gain, but we are very grateful for all Richard has done and given to the Cathedral over the last 32 years.

The month of August at the Cathedral tends to be a time for us to catch up on maintenance work and various checks on the condition of the building. Fortunately we have recently had some good news that we are to receive an important grant award and are hopeful of another that we have applied for The Getty Foundation, which is a USA charity that offers grant support for the preservation of contemporary art and architecture, has awarded the Metropolitan Cathedral the first grant for a building in the UK in its ‘Keeping it Modern’ campaign. This is for further research into the preservation of the coloured block glass (known as dalle de verre) which adorns the Cathedral Lantern and throughout the lower areas of the building. Not only does this provide some much needed financial support for what seems to be a considerable maintenance and repair challenge but it raises the profile of our building as one of the most significant modern buildings of the twentieth Century. The second application was to the Government’s grant fund for Cathedrals. This is for a larger amount of money to enable us to carry out considerable external repairs to the Cathedral and to resolve problems of ingress of water into the sacristy and archive areas from the paving around the Cathedral Podium. Hopefully we will be hearing within the next few weeks if we have been successful or not when the results will be announced. As we approach our fiftieth anniversary next year it is important for us all in the diocese to recognise that without the continued support of these outside agencies along with the Cathedral fund raising initiatives and the many parishioner contributions and occasional legacy we would not have survived fifty years let alone look forward to the next half century. In gratitude we offer Mass every week for all our founders and benefactors.

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Pic extras Mums the Word On Monday 4 July a happy band of 36 Liverpool UCM members set off for the annual national pilgrimage to Walsingham – a gathering of 700 women from all over the country. It was a spiritually uplifting experience and it began with Mass. A service that evening at the Slipper Chapel was followed by a candlelit procession back to the village, led by our national spiritual adviser, Bishop Alan Williams, through beautiful countryside, in the fading light. Tuesday saw us head back to the shrine, which was designated a minor basilica last December by Pope Francis, to attend an open-air Mass concelebrated by Bishop Alan and many UCM chaplains from around the country. Following a picnic lunch we walked in silent procession along the Holy Mile to the abbey grounds where diocesan banners were paraded, prayers said and hymns sung with gusto. The national president, Val Ward, gave a very encouraging address and we all affirmed our commitment to the aims and objectives of UCM. Monsignor Michael McQuinn then delivered a reflection followed by benediction. At the end of this special day we bade farewell to friends, old and new. Before returning to Liverpool the next day, we took a trip a few miles along the road to Wells-next-the-Sea where we saw the beach and the sea (but no royalty or corgis) and had our lunch. We then completed our return journey. Everyone who went received many blessings and came home refreshed and we all thank our Walsingham organiser, Margaret McDonald (no relation), for her hard work and successful planning. Next year’s pilgrimage runs from 3-5 July and Liverpool will be the lead diocese so we would love to see as many of you as possible joining us for this enriching experience. Please get your reservations in early. Madelaine McDonald, Media Officer

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News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

National Memorial Mass celebrated at Cathedral Every two years the Knights of St Columba hold a National Memorial Mass for deceased members. This takes place at the Metropolitan Cathedral in Liverpool where the Book of Remembrance kept in the Columba Chapel is taken out and carried in procession to the altar and returned to the Chapel immediately after Mass where family members have the opportunity to see the names of their loved ones inscribed therein. This year’s Mass took place on Saturday 18 June, celebrated by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon, the national spiritual adviser to the Order. With it being the Year of Mercy, the Mass provided an opportunity also for KSC members and their families to make a pilgrimage to the Holy Door of the Cathedral. Our picture (below) shows a section of the procession before the beginning of Mass.

• A special event took place during Mass at St John the Evangelist Church, New Ferry on Saturday 4 June when our long-serving member from the Wirral, Bernard McGuigan, was presented with a certificate to mark the attainment of 60 years’ dedicated service to the Order, during the course of which he has held most council offices as well as serving as provincial grand knight. Pat Foley, the current provincial grand knight, presented the certificate to Bernard at a Mass arranged and celebrated by Father Bernard Forshaw (all pictured).

Websites: www.ksc.org.uk www.kscprov02.weebly.com www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk Email: dpokeane@aol.com


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Open Evening for entry to Year 7 in 2017

Tuesday 27th September 6.00-8.00pm

Bellerive is a popular choice for girls from across Liverpool and beyond. Come to the Open Evening and ďŹ nd out why it is such a unique and oversubscribed school. inspiring academic + personal excellence

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PIC Life A lesson from the jury room By Moira Billinge With the passing of the years, I had begun to believe I had escaped being called for jury service – a huge relief as this was something that I dearly wanted to avoid. Despite my maternal great-grandfather having been a barrister and my great-greatgrandfather a judge, I have failed to inherit any of their legal genes and I wasn’t remotely interested in taking on what is often described as being ‘one of the most important civic duties that a citizen will ever be asked to perform’. Recently, however, I received an officiallooking letter – my jury summons. In my shock and disbelief I attempted to think of anything which might exclude me from serving but could not find a get-out clause which would legitimately apply to me. Even the word ‘summons’ sounds daunting, but it is accurate. The process defies any other description because it is not a request or an invitation but a command, and failure to comply without good reason incurs a £1,000 fine. Individuals are selected at random by computer from the Electoral Register and the minimum time of jury service is two weeks. When the day arrived, I approached it with a sense of gloom. I felt rather as if I had been press-ganged into the whole thing. I know Jesus wasn’t referring to jury service when he said to Saint Peter that ‘someone else will tie a belt around you and take you where you do not want to go’ but, on my way to court that first morning I considered the passage to be an apt description which perfectly suited my mood. Just one of the most stringent rules – almost a court mantra – documented in the literature sent to jurors prior to their service (and highlighted on posters

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dotted around the building and reenforced at each trial by every judge) is that nothing about the case must be discussed anywhere outside of the jury deliberation room, during or after the trial – not even with close family or friends. Going online to search for any additional information about the case is also completely forbidden. Breaching any of these rules is so extremely serious that it carries the utterly enforceable penalty of imprisonment. We know how unscrupulous the media is, and the information gleaned from the internet, or the opinion offered by a relative or friend, might affect our judgement more than the actual evidence presented at the trial and, ultimately, prejudice our verdict. The only way a defendant can have a fair trial is if the jurors hear only the evidence put before them in the courtroom. The rigidity of this and other court rules, is absolute and as it should be. The patient, detailed and courteous explanations given at the start of each new trial by the judges make total sense. If the same rules were to be applied in our normal day-to-day lives, our world would be a much kinder place. Reputations are destroyed by lies and hearsay, and in this age of the internet ‘the lie is half way around the world before it’s even put its boots on’ (Mark Twain). The victims of gossip may never be able to fully reverse the damage that has been inflicted upon them. Even if we think we know everything there is to know about a story – we don’t. A jury may give their verdict, a judge may pass sentence, but only God knows the whole picture and the heart and soul of each individual. I may have railed, initially, against my jury service but I completed it with a new respect for the integrity of our courts and the fairness of our justice system.

Quote from Pope Francis for the Year of Mercy “May the Lord help us to be sharers in the prophecy of peace, of tenderness and affection in the family. May his word help us to share in the prophetic sign of watching over our children and our grandparents with tenderness, patience and love”

Worth a visit

For visitors to France this summer, the village of Ars-sur-Formans opens a window on to the life of Saint John Vianney, writes Lucy Oliver. Ars lies an hour’s drive from Lyon in eastern France and the village’s two churches both bear witness to the works of this patron saint of parish priests, whose feast day falls on 4 August. There is a 12th-century church where Saint John preached and a newer basilica where his body is preserved in glass. In the nearby Presbytery of Saint Curé d’Ars – now a museum – the saint’s enlarged heart is preserved. Saint John was raised in agricultural France during the time of the Revolution, when Mass had to be celebrated in secret. During his years studying to become a priest, he failed the necessary exams twice, yet from these humble beginnings, this devout young man from Dardilly was sent to Ars and succeeded in restoring many souls to God. From 1830 onwards, hundreds of people flocked to Ars to have their confessions heard. The self-sacrificing saint was known to sleep only a few hours a night, spending long days serving those who had travelled to the village. For more information, visit www.arsnet.org


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join in Eating Out

Children’s word search The Feast of Our Lady of the Assumption is August 15 - look at our clues to find out more about this special feast day.

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HEAVEN GLORIFIED SIGN

MOTHER ALLELUIA

Enjoy a meal at one or more of our listed restaurants during August. Britannia Spice The Parade, Parkgate 0151 336 1774 Wahaca College Lane, Liverpool L1 0151 541 9174 Blackburne Arms Catharine Street, Liverpool 0151 709 9159 Buyer Club Hardman Street, Liverpool 1 0151 709 2400 Barbacoa Mersey View, Waterloo L22 0151 924 0445 Deli Sabrosa Railway Road, Ormskirk L39 01695 570330

More Mullarkey From Johnny Kennedy

Greeting Cards from Carmel

There had been a wedding at the church and the young curate was intrigued by the name of the bridegroom. ‘That’s the first time I’ve ever met anybody with the name of Rock,’ he said to Father Mullarkey. ‘It’s a good name with Biblical connections,’ said Fr Mullarkey. ‘Upon this rock I will build my church.’ ‘And Moses getting water from the rock in Horeb,’ said the YC. ‘And sugar in the rock,’ said the auld fella. ‘Where's that from?’ ‘Blackpool,’ replied Fr Mullarkey.

Audio copy of the Pic out now An audio version of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ is available free of charge, compiled by students, technicians and Chaplain, Dan Antonio, at All Hallows RC High School, Penwortham Anyone interested in receiving the audio copy should contact Dan Antonio on 01772 746121

The selection of cards on sale at Maryton Carmel are truly lovely. If you haven’t seen them do try and check them out. From Priestly Jubilee, Birthday, Get Well, Thinking of You, they are all at Carmel for you to see. Visit the Monastery at: Maryton Grange, Allerton Road, L18 3NU. Telephone the card office on 0151 724 7102 or Email the Sisters at marytoncards@outlook.com You will be delighted

Catholic Pictorial

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justice & peace

Is this a time of opportunity? By Steve Atherton, Justice and Peace fieldworker The result of the referendum on membership of the European Union took most of us by surprise, horrifying some and delighting others, and causing political upheaval for both main parties. The Brexit campaign has been widely accused of oversimplification of complex issues, misinformation about the likely consequences and an underlying racial prejudice. Whatever the reasons for the vote, ‘Brexit means Brexit’. Those trying to understand why it happened suggest that politicians have been despised as being out of touch and serving only the interests of the powerful. By this account, the vote was a protest against the political establishment by people who felt abandoned and forgotten. The referendum was a rare opportunity when politics allowed them to be heard. If the sense of being ‘abandoned and forgotten’ is a correct analysis, then politics needs to do more than change party leaders. It needs to change for the better. It needs to find a way of connecting with ordinary people. Although the Conservatives restored order very quickly, through a system that relied on the influence of an elite few, it seems as though Labour’s reliance on a democratic process has thrown it into a tumultuous power struggle that will last for months. Some are even predicting that the reemergence of the hard left has put the party’s very survival into question. It would be unfortunate if autocracy restored order while democracy caused chaos. When we turn to our faith for help in understanding what a change for the better might look like, Catholic Social Teaching offers the concept of subsidiarity to help us think about how political and economic power should be exercised. In Laudato Si, Pope

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Francis recommends ‘the principle of subsidiarity, which grants freedom to develop the capabilities present at every level of society’ and calls for ‘new forms of co-operation and community organisation’. A new form of politics sounds very welcome in our turbulent times but it poses a huge question. Who is going to make this new form of politics in which all of us have our questions answered, our needs addressed and our talents developed? I’m afraid there is only one answer. We are. Each one of us needs to be involved. But we can’t do this on our own. ‘I’ needs to become ‘we’. ‘I will do it’ needs to become ‘We will do it’. The time is ripe for people of faith to take an active part in the way our country is organised at all levels, local and national. We in our families, our schools, our parishes, our church communities, our deaneries, and our diocese can take an active role in what is happening in our areas. We need to talk to each other, to our local communities, our councillors, our MPs,

and to take an active part in protecting the interests of all. This is a time of opportunity if we have the courage and the energy to get involved. This is a new opportunity to make sure that the changes in Britain’s role in the world do not condemn us to increased privilege for the rich and more misery for the poor. The future needs us.

Could you help host a Syrian family? Do you remember September last year when Pope Francis appealed to all churches to take in a refugee family? The government has officially launched the Syrian Vulnerable Person Resettlement scheme that allows ordinary people to get involved in sponsoring vulnerable refugee children and their families. It is a big task. The sponsoring group must provide a house, have a ring-fenced income of £9,000 to use if necessary, have the agreement of the local authority and approval of their local MP, and be able to find appropriate school places. A housing association could help with finding a house and maybe a group of churches could raise the money together. If you would like to know more, please: • Find a group of like-minded people • Get the approval of your parish priest • Contact Steve Atherton at LACE for a full explanation of the process.


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Catholic Pic August 2016  

Catholic News from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

Catholic Pic August 2016  

Catholic News from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

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