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20p from each sale goes to your parish Issue 103 APRIL 2013

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ARCHDIOCESE OF LIVERPOOL

Welcome Pope Francis How the world welcomed Pope Francis

Catholic Pic Holy Land Pilgrimage


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contents Welcome A Happy and Blessed Easter to all. As we celebrate the greatest Feast in the calendar of the Church we can reflect on the many historic events of these last weeks. Pope Benedict XVI announced his resignation, Pope Francis was elected and locally Archbishop Patrick became Archbishop Emeritus as he began his own retirement. As in previous years events surrounding the Conclave in the Sistine Chapel became the focus for the world’s media. As white smoke billowed from the chimney on the roof of the Chapel people across the world waited eagerly to find out who had been elected as the 266th successor of St Peter. When the announcement came, as so often in the past, it was a complete surprise. As Jean Louis Cardinal Touran proclaimed Jorge Mario Bergoglio Archbishop of Buenos Aires as Pope Francis many uttered the simple word ‘who?’ It did not take long for people to find out and within a matter of hours many felt that they had known him, first Jesuit Pope, for years. His simplicity of style and concern for the poor has captivated many and this month we take a closer look at all the momentous happenings of these historic few weeks. As we celebrate the Risen Lord let us pray for Pope Francis.

From the Bishop’s desk Spring, the Easter Season, a time of new life and new growth, of spring cleaning and fresh starts, a new financial year. A time of endings and beginnings, many are confused. Where’s the money coming from, and what about our jobs? Instead of newness, it often feels more like survival and struggle. Many people are still experiencing ‘their Agony in the Garden’. They, like the experience of Jesus, are feeling betrayed and mocked, scourged by others that they are not doing their jobs properly. Who would want to be a teacher or a nurse...or a priest? For many carers, it’s still a cold, frosty world out there. What then of Easter? Well, Easter is Resurrection, New Birth, the empty tomb was not hopeful expectation, but a fact. The Disciples ‘saw, and they believed’. What convinced them? Was it the simple things: the way the cloth was folded, the tell-tale signs that only Jesus could make. Whatever it was, it struck a chord that changed the essence of their being, turned their mourning into dancing. Made them want to run back and tell everyone the Good News. For all those who care and are carers, please don’t let despair win, look for the tell-tale signs: proclaim Hope and new beginnings. Defrost those parts of your lives that are negative and cynical, listen to the Good News and not the voices of despair and avarice, of greed and mockery. Open your hearts to the message of love and hope that Jesus brings, and maybe, just maybe we can become the answer within our society, and not part of the problem. Jesus said, ‘Do not let your hearts be hardened. Trust in God still and Trust in me’. It’s not what you hear that should make the difference: it’s who you listen to. A Happy and Peaceful Easter to you all. Editor Peter Heneghan Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk Pictures Cover, Main Feature and Profile: PCCS_VA Advertising Andrew Rogers 0151 709 7567 Publisher 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

Contents 4

Main Feature Habemus Papam Welcome Pope Francis

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News From around the Archdiocese

14 Spotlight Read all about it 15 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life 16 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese 18 Animate Youth Ministry Seeking the truth behind the image 19 Profile Pope Francis ‘a very powerful and prophetic voice’ 25 Cathedral Record Who should sing? 25 Justice and Peace Visit to Bamenda 26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC

Copy deadline March issue 16 April 2013

28 Pic Life Praying for our priests

CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

29 Join In Family Fun More Mullarkey

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Habemus Papam! Welcome Pope Francis by Martin O’Boyle he appearance of white smoke from the Sistine Chapel at 6.06 pm on Wednesday 13 March, ensured that the world’s Catholics would be in for an unforgettable evening, which was certainly the case in the Archdiocese of Liverpool.

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The bells of the Metropolitan Cathedral rang out in communion with St Peter’s, as news of the imminent announcement spread. The world was waiting. While most families sat in front of television sets eating their evening meals, the Cathedral was a hive of activity. A decision was made to hastily organise a solemn Mass to celebrate the election of the new Pope, while the media made dozens of calls to register their interest in gaining the reaction from the Archdiocese’s bishops and laity as soon as the proclamation was made. With the helping hand of the local newspapers and radio stations, not to mention announcements on social media sites and good old-fashioned word of mouth, a congregation of approximately 200 flocked to the mother church of the Archdiocese. Through the ages, the faithful on the move would have learned of the announcement through newspapers, transistor radios or text messages from friends or family, but in 2013 the faithful, waiting patiently on pews in the Blessed Sacrament Chapel, watched the events as they happened on their mobile phones. 4

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Behind the scenes, Archbishop Emeritus Patrick Kelly and Apostolic Administrator Bishop Tom Williams gathered together to watch the announcement from Rome. With the Vatican estimating that it would take approximately 45 minutes from the smoke emerging to the ‘Habemus Papam’ announcement. Yet, over an hour passed without an introduction. The first sign came when the lights were turned on in the balcony room at 7.07 pm and, five minutes later, Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran (a visitor to Liverpool last year), proclaimed to the world that the Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio had been elected as the 266th successor of Peter and had chosen the name Francis. As the new Pontiff gave small waves to the joyous crowd of approximately 250,000 which had assembled before him, the phones, like the bells rang incessantly. The ‘Liverpool Echo’, BBC and ITV were all seeking reaction to the news from our city. However, just as the announcement took the media by surprise, those gathered in Cathedral House were also trying to learn more about the new Pope. Thanks to the internet, facts were quickly established and relayed: ‘He’s 76, the first Pope from Latin America, the first from the Jesuit order, and the first Francis. He’s known to take public transport, to cook his own meals and he has a commitment to social justice.’

Archbishop Emeritus Patrick Kelly, who was present in St. Peter’s Square for the election of John XXIII, immediately noticed signs which led him to believe that the new Pope had qualities of simplicity and humility. He told the Pic: ‘The absence of the red cape made things less ostentatious, his first words “Buona Sera” (Good evening), the fact that he immediately began with a prayer for his predecessor and then the staggering moment in which he asked the people to bless him before he blessed them was incredibly powerful. The other point, which may be of bigger significance, is that he uses the title “Bishop of Rome” more than he uses the title “Pope”. He is giving some very powerful signals. I think he means it when he says ‘a church of the poor, for the poor.’ Bishop Tom has been similarly stuck by Pope Francis’s ‘ordinariness’. ‘All of his simple gestures, such as paying his hotel bill, his warmth when greeting people from the sick to heads of state, show that he is man of Christ-like actions. I think that will have a profound effect. What he has been doing is so full of common-sense, so full of ordinariness, but you wouldn’t expect that of the Pope.’ Mass at the Cathedral began slightly later than scheduled and the delayed appearance on the balcony caused the service sheets to be printed without the Pontiff’s name. The Archbishop’s homily summed up the celebratory mood


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feature ‘He is giving some very powerful signals. I think he means it when he says ‘a church of the poor, for the poor.’

of the congregation: ‘Tonight, walk home with a spring in your step,’ he said. ‘It surely is wonderful that one man, our new Pope, can achieve two thirds of the votes of 115 people, coming from more or less every country in the globe. It’s all so very difficult, but the confidence that should give us that there is that two thirds saying: “Yes. This is the one the Lord has chosen.” ‘The one, if you like, who can make his own the Psalm which we said: “I have found David my servant and with my holy oil anointed him.” I always love it when it is a total surprise. I didn’t see his name on any of the lists, it really is rather nice, and who expected the name Francis? I think something new is happening for which we have every reason to be grateful.’ The days following the election only served to emphasise this point. The stories about Pope Francis greeting commuters, paying his own hotel bill and cancelling his papers back in Buenos Aires were all well received by Catholics and the wider world who found the Argentine’s simplicity both endearing and exciting.

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feature

On his visits throughout the Archdiocese since the election, the Archbishop Emeritus believes that the people of Liverpool are easily identifying with the new Pope. ‘Wherever I’ve been, people are buzzing,’ he said. ‘They really are buzzing. They are enjoying his sense of fun and people, myself included, all get the feeling that we know him. I heard somebody say that he used to ride by bus around the city. I feel quite chuffed by that: so do I, so at least I’m affirmed in retirement!’

‘His warmth when greeting people from the sick to heads of state, show that he is man of Christ-like actions.’ 6

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Further endearing him to the watching world were his pastoralstyle addresses to the congregation at his first Angelus and at his Mass of Inauguration. Indeed, on the Feast of St Joseph, the co-Patron of the Liverpool Archdiocese, a solemn Mass was arranged at the Cathedral, mirroring the celebration in St. Peter’s with music by Duruflé and Palestrina. Present at the Thanksgiving Mass were Liverpool’s Bishops, with the Archbishop Emeritus appealing to the congregation to continue their prayers for Pope Francis, just as the new pontiff had done on his first

appearance on the balcony of St. Peter’s. Of all the challenges Pope Francis faces, the Archbishop identified one in particular when he said in his homily: 'With very good reason we accompany our thankfulness with a pledge of prayer because in the end fidelity to the loving wisdom of God, the wisest love, the generous love of our God made flesh in Jesus is the really massive challenge which Pope Francis embraces in the power of the Holy Spirit.’ Following the Mass, a member of the congregation leaving the Cathedral said: ‘Although it’s early days, all that we’ve seen from Pope Francis so far fills me with hope for the future. His words, but more so his actions are like a breath of fresh air to me. I heard someone say: “What John Paul II told, Benedict explained” and I think Francis will show us all how to put things into practice.’ Time will tell if this is indeed the case, but our prayers will go with Pope Francis as he continues his new ministry.


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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: post@merseymirror.com

Hope+ Foodbank Liverpool’s two Cathedrals have teamed up with faith partners across the City to launch a new City Centre foodbank. Hope+ Foodbank, named after the street that connects the two Cathedrals, has also been given a £49,770 set up grant from Mayor Joe Anderson’s Mayoral Fund.

The founding of the foodbank comes after reports of increasing levels of poverty in the wake of local government and public sector funding cuts, highlighted in January at a conference for council and community leaders hosted by Bishop James Jones and Mayor Anderson.

New portrait for Bootle At the beginning of March after the end of our Sunday morning parish family Mass, a very special event took place to mark our contribution to the Year of Faith writes Father Gerry O'Shaughnessy of St James, Bootle. A specially commissioned portrait of Blessed John XXIII was unveiled by one of our youngest parishioners, five year old Antonia O'Brien. The beautiful portrait was the work of hugely talented local artist, John Kelly, who has already contributed wonderful paintings of St James and St John Bosco to the church. Antonia is too young to remember the great work begun by Blessed John in calling the Second Vatican Council, whose fiftieth anniversary is marked by the Year of Faith. However, we all have reasons to be grateful for the short, but deeply powerful, pontificate of John XXIII. As a Church we are still coming to grips with the far sighted and pastoral direction that Vatican II called us to walk in, as fellow pilgrims. To commemorate the Pope's desire for unity, and the work of ecumenism, John Kelly has incorporated both the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, the Anglican Cathedral of Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary in the background of his portrait. A special prayer card was been given to every parishioner to mark the day.

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The two Cathedrals are working with the Anglican St Luke in the City Team (which includes St Luke’s, St Bride’s, St. Dunstan’s, St Michael’s and St Stephen with St Catherine’s) and St Vincent de Paul RC Church to run the foodbank, which will provide essential food for those referred by partner agencies such as Social Services, GPs, CAB, and other charities. Both Cathedrals will support the administration of the foodbank and act as a depository for the food which will be distributed from churches around the city centre on different days. Dean of Liverpool Pete Wilcox said: ‘What we as a cathedral cannot do is ignore levels of deprivation on our doorstep. In reaching out to those in need, we are responding to the challenge Christ gave to his followers in Matthew 25:35, “I was hungry and you gave me food; I was thirsty and you gave me drink”. As a cathedral we have both a duty to serve Liverpool in this way, and the privilege of doing so.’ Canon Anthony O'Brien, Dean of Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral said: ‘Our two Cathedrals have a long track record of working together to witness the values of the Gospel, and of co-operating with other agencies for the common good of our City and local communities. In response to an increase in poverty and unemployment within the city areas the Hope+ Foodbank is an initiative to provide basic food essentials to families and individuals who are not able to afford them within our local area. It is a practical response to help our neighbours at a time of need and in the words of Jesus “in so far as you did this to these brothers and sisters of mine you did it to me”’.


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news diary

Wonderful World of Reading in Leigh

St Joseph's Catholic Primary School in Leigh held a ‘Wonderful World of Reading Week’ in school last month. During the week there was a visit from a published author, grandparents went into school to read to the children, lots of fun reading activities and quizzes took place. For World Book Day the theme was Willy Wonka's Choocolate Factory, with Headteacher, Paul Ackers, dressed as Willy Wonka and all the staff dressed as Oompa Loompa's while all the children dressed as a character from their favourite book. Governors judged the costumes and prizes were given to the best dressed. Even the kitchen staff were involved by serving a special Wonka Chocolate lunch. It was enjoyed by all and a very memorable day for all the children.

Obituary of Monsignor Anthony Stringfellow

A former National Chaplain of the Apostleship of the Sea who devoted twenty-five years of his ministry to the service of seafarers died on Monday 11 March at the age of 83 in Ince Blundell. A native of Hindley, Wigan, Monsignor Anthony Stringfellow served for over 51 years as a priest of the Archdiocese. He was born in Hindley on 30 June 1929, the son of John and Edith Stringfellow and was educated at St Benedict’s School, Hindley, and Thornleigh College, Bolton, before undertaking his seminary formation at St Joseph’s College, Upholland. He was ordained priest in the College Chapel on 27 May 1961 by Archbishop John Carmel Heenan. Following his ordination he was briefly assistant priest at Our Lady’s, Prescot, before moving in October 1961 to Sacred Heart, Liverpool. In June 1964 he began work as a Port Chaplain, based firstly at Atlantic House and then, from 1968, at Stella Maris, Bootle. He returned to Atlantic House in 1974 to become the Senior Port Chaplain. In 1983 he was appointed as National Chaplain of the Apostleship of the Sea and was appointed a Chaplain of Honour of His Holiness the following year. He returned to parish life in August 1989, when he became parish priest of Holy Family, Cronton, where he remained until his retirement in November 2007. In retirement he lived in Southport and latterly at Ince Blundell where he died. His Funeral Mass was celebrated in his home parish of St Benedict, Hindley, followed by burial in Hindley Cemetery.

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Bulgarian Headteachers at Our Lady’s

At the beginning of March four headteachers from Bulgaria visited Our Lady’s School, Prescot, to see the wonderful work the children do there. The headteachers were on a four day visit to Merseyside for an international education conference with the theme ‘All our futures’ organised by Aspire Creative Enterprises. Our Lady’s was one of only two primary schools in

Knowsley and six in total across Merseyside that the delegates to the conference visited. Our Lady’s headteacher, Haydn Boyle said, ‘We hope that the visit will further strengthen our international school links’. Before leaving the visitors were treated to lunch hosted by Our Lady’s Parish Priest, Monsignor Anthony Dennick.

A day of refreshment and renewal for women As the Roman Catholic Church celebrates a Year of Faith during the fiftieth anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council, the National Board of Catholic Women together with the Pastoral Formation Department of the Archdiocese of Liverpool are holding a day of refreshment and renewal for women with the theme ‘Living Hope in the Church Today’. The day will take place on Saturday 27 April at the Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation from 10.00 am to 4.00 pm. The main speaker for the day will be Dr Oonagh O’Brien who is the Principal of the Cambridge-based Margaret Beaufort Institute for Theology. She will be speaking on themes from the Second Vatican Council document ‘Gaudium et Spes’. Sister Pauline Darby of the Society of the Holy Child Jesus will lead periods of reflective sharing and prayerful celebration.

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Pearl Clarke, President of the National Board of Catholic Women and Veronica Murphy Coordinator for Adult Faith Formation Archdiocese of Liverpool say: ‘We are looking forward to celebrating with you the role of women in the church at this exciting time in its history. The day will provide space to reflect together on opportunities and challenges for the future.’ The cost for the day is £10, including refreshments and lunch, to book contact Julie Cassidy at LACE, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool, L17 1AA or tel: 0151 522 1040, email: j.cassidy@rcaol.co.uk Bookings must be received by Wednesday 17 April 2013.

‘I Believe’ Jo Boyce and friends in concert Appearing live, Jo Boyce (from popular Catholic Duo 'Boyce and Stanley') and friends are performing 'I BELIEVE', a concert of music to celebrate The Year of Faith. The concert is at St Margaret Mary's Church, Pilch Lane, Huyton on Saturday 27 April at 7.00 pm. Doors open 30 minutes before the performance begins. Jo frequently appears on BBC's ‘Songs of Praise’ and not only did she lead the worship in the build-up to the Beatification Mass on Sunday morning during Pope Benedict's first visit to the United Kingdom, but she also took the unprecedented step of sending album on an iPod for the Papal seal of approval and secretly hoped that Pope Benedict might even enjoy listening to it. Tickets are priced at £3 (discounted from £6; no concessions) and are available by sending a stamped addressed envelope to David Cotterill, 3 Zander Grove, Liverpool L12 0QP (enclosing a cheque for the full amount made payable to ‘St Matthew's Church') For further information please contact Dave Cotterill on 077353 85955.


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news diary Obituary of Rev Joseph Keller

Outstanding at Our Lady’s, Parbold Our Lady and All Saints Primary School, Parbold, has been judged ‘an outstanding school in all areas’ the highest Ofsted can award, following a recent inspection. There have only been seven schools in Lancashire judged ‘Outstanding’ since Ofsted introduced its new framework last year. The report assessed pupils’ behaviour and achievement, the quality of the teaching as well as the leadership and management and found all areas ‘Outstanding’. The inspectors’ observations included outstanding teaching, pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural and development is excellent and their attitudes to learning are outstanding and that parents fully support the school and its aims. The report concluded that the first-class management of teaching and learning was central to the school’s success. Claire Griffin, headteacher, said: ‘I am absolutely delighted that we have been judged to be outstanding in all areas by Ofsted. I am proud to be Headteacher here. The staff, parents, governors and the Parish of Our Lady and All Saints make this school a very happy place to be.’ The full Ofsted report can be found on the school website at www.ourladyallsaints.lancs.sch.uk

‘My Guide’ volunteers wanted ‘Guide Dogs’ is looking for people who want to make a difference to the lives of the blind and partially sighted in Liverpool and are now recruiting volunteers to offer a few hours a week for up to six months. The aim of the ‘My Guide’ programme is to reduce the sense of isolation experienced by so many people with sight problems, by helping them regain their confidence and sense of independence. ‘Our volunteers will make a very real difference to the lives of blind and partially sighted people, learn new skills and give something back to the community,’ said Vicki Bennett, Sighted Guide Ambassador at Guide Dogs. More information on how to become a ‘My Guide’ volunteer is available from Gaynor Monaghan, Guide Dogs Liverpool on 0845 372 7420 or gaynor.monaghan@guidedogs.org.uk

The former manager of the Metropolitan Cathedral Bookshop and retired Parish Priest of St Bernadette’s, Allerton, Father Joseph Keller, died on the morning of Saturday 2 March after suffering a stroke. Joseph Anthony Keller was born in Liverpool on 26 April 1941, the son of Joseph and Bridget Keller. He was educated at St Anne’s Primary and Secondary Schools, Liverpool. Between 1958 and 1966 he worked for a bookseller, before obtaining a job at the Cathedral bookshop, eventually becoming its manager. In the late 1970s he applied to begin training for the permanent diaconate and was ordained deacon by Archbishop Derek Worlock at the Metropolitan Cathedral on 19 July 1981. He ministered in the parish of St Anne, Liverpool, for a number of years before going on to Ushaw College to complete his studies for the priesthood. Archbishop Worlock ordained him priest at St Anne’s Church, Liverpool, on 31 October 1993. Following his ordination he was appointed assistant priest at the parish of St Jude, Wigan, where he remained until July 1998. Between 1998 and 2001 he was seconded to the Diocese of Portsmouth to cover for a priest who had been appointed to the teaching staff at Ushaw College. During this time he served as priest in charge of St Michael and All Angels, Havant, Hampshire. Upon his return to the archdiocese he was appointed parish priest of St Bernadette’s, Liverpool, a post he held until his retirement in July 2010 due to ill-health. He continued to live in retirement in the presbytery at St Bernadette’s. Following Requiem Mass at St Bernadette’s Church he was buried at Allerton Cemetery.

Bronze for Cathedral servers Knitting in

Three young servers from the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King have been presented with Guild of St Stephen Bronze medals. Ameh, A group of local residents fromPhillip Whiston (pictureda holding haveRuby beenWood busy knitting range ofher baby sister) were woollen hatsand andMaelona scarvesDimatteo to keep the presented with medals by Father Ged homeless people of the Liverpool warm Callagher mark their first year as altar during the coldtoweather. servers. was However, before the The initiative the brainchild of the presentation there Avenue was oneSheltered final test for members of the South themwhich as Father Ged the Scheme, is part of asked the Knowsley congregation whether they'd behaved Housing Trust. The products of the themselves well enough. Luckily, and group’s hard work have now been with more than a little encouragement presented to the Missionaries of Charity from the young servers, the congregation in Seel Street, who will distribute them werethose unanimous in their approval. amongst they support.

Knowsley

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news diary St Mary’s at the Phil The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Hall was the venue for a gathering of over 150 musicians from St Mary’s College, Crosby for this year’s Annual Festival of Music. The event brought together members of the College’s award winning Symphony Orchestra, Symphonic Wind Band, Stage Band, Baroque Consort, Chamber Choir: and the Mount’s Concert Choir. Roger Phillips of BBC Merseyside was Master of Ceremonies for the evening. ‘Our Philharmonic concerts have been one of the highlights of the school calendar for some fifteen years now, and once again the event proved to be a big success,’ said college Director of Music, Andrew Byers. ‘As usual the pupils involved were very excited about playing at such a famous venue, and they put a huge amount of time and commitment into preparing for the concert. The finesse and musicianship they displayed justifiably received a standing ovation from the appreciative audience.’

South Liverpool School present £2,414 to cancer charity

Ten Ten visit Crosby Staff and pupils from Great Crosby Primary School, enjoyed a visit by the London based theatre group Ten Ten, as part of the school’s ‘Friendship Week’. The group, established in 2007, have produced a programme in Relationship Education for children in primary schools, their parents and teachers; they gave performances on topics related to the whole experience of friendship. ‘They were stunning,’ said Head Teacher, Pat Speed. ‘One of the shows was about “how small things matter in friendship”, and another about “how actions can make people miserable, if you don’t think”.’ They also worked with the school’s parents, on the subject of ‘parenting in challenging times’, which they address in their booklet, ‘Being a Parent Today: Children, Faith and Family Life’. The group draw their name from John 10:10 ‘I have come that you may have life, life to the full’.

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Teachers at Enterprise South Liverpool Academy have presented a £2,414 donation to Marie Curie Cancer Care after a weekend of fundraising fun writes Emma Griffiths. To raise this much needed support, the 18 strong group took part in the Liverpool-Chester-Liverpool Bike Ride, a 50 mile race across motorways and through the Mersey tunnel, organised a charity ‘frog racing’ event and spent a day bagging groceries at their local supermarket. The funds were raised in honour of a fellow ESLA teacher, recently diagnosed with cancer and now, fortunately, in remission. ‘We were thrilled to see all of the support from our fellow colleagues, students and friends to support this important cause and our colleague in his fight against cancer,’ said Simon Holme, Assistant Curriculum Director of PE at the Academy. ‘Marie Curie Cancer Care hospices and nurses do wonderful work for terminally ill patients across the UK and we are proud to have supported its charitable activities along with its research and development’. In addition to the money raised for Marie Curie, the team at ESLA raised an additional sum of over £2,000 to go directly to their colleague and his family to help during that difficult time.


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justice & peace

A course with a difference – My trip to Cameroon, Part I By Steve Atherton, Justice and Peace fieldworker In February, while it was snowing here in the UK, I had the great privilege of working for a week in Cameroon facilitating the Craighead Institute’s Integrating Life and Faith (ILF) programme alongside Joan Sharples, who used to be the J&P worker in the Shrewsbury diocese. We went there to run a six-day course in the northwest town of Bamenda, attended by a group of 26 people – 19 religious sisters, three religious brothers, two lay women and two lay men – brought together, and funded, by the Tertiary Sisters of St Francis (TSSF), Cameroon’s largest women’s congregation. The visit had been months in the planning although we did not get confirmation of the funding till a few weeks before we were due to fly out. I had started to assume that it would not happen and was just getting on with life as normal – including leaving last month’s Catholic Pictorial contribution until the last minute (hence no piece) – when suddenly the funding did come, visa did arrive and before we knew what had happened we were 3,500 miles away, stepping off the plane into the tropical hustle and bustle of Douala, Cameroon’s biggest city. We spent our first night in the TSSF’s convent on the top floor of the Padre Pio Maternity Hospital which they run in the city. The air conditioning was stamped ‘Made in the USSR’ and was so noisy it

sounded as though there was a tank rolling down the street. We left before dawn the next morning. It was National Youth Day and we hoped to travel the 300 miles to Bamenda before the streets filled up with parades of singing children. We nearly made it but just outside Bafousam, the capital of Cameroon’s western region, we had to stop while group after group of uniformed children marched along the side of the road, singing loudly as they waited their turn to cross and join the throng already in place. I remember Whit Walks but they were never like this. As a uniformed and armed soldier waved us through, a young man on a motorbike nipped in ahead of us, only to get whacked across the head before he sped away, looking back over his shoulder to grin at us. Cameroon is beautiful but the roads leave a lot to be desired. We travelled north with the strange feeling of being in the Lake District but with palm trees and bananas instead of pine trees and oak. We were welcomed into Bamenda by Sr Alphonsa Kiven, a former provincial now on the TSSF’s Generalate in Rome. We had last seen her before Christmas in Glasgow in the darkness of a British winter. She had had the initial idea of a leadership training course and found the funding for it, before Sr Priscilla YenWul then took charge of the planning, booking the premises at the Bamenda Archdiocesan Pastoral Centre and speaking to the Cameroonian Conference of Religious to bring together a group of community leaders. The course that followed proved

hugely rewarding – as we will explain in next month’s issue. • The ILF programme is the legacy of Sr Christine Anderson’s days with the Craighead Institute before she moved to the Faithful Companions of Jesus (FCJ) mother house in Rome. We have our own ILF course running in Liverpool Archdiocese at Loyola Hall on the weekend of 20-21 April. There are only a few places left so interested parties should ring the Justice and Peace desk at LACE (0151 522 1080/81) or email s.atherton@rcaol.co.uk.

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spotlight

Read all about it by Martin O’Boyle As the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics awoke on Thursday 14 March, they would have noticed that the election of Pope Francis made front page news. From Seattle to Sydney, the media were all eager to portray their first impressions on the man who the Cardinals had elected. Many hailed him as a pope of firsts: the first non-European for over a thousand years, the first from the new world, the first Jesuit, the first to choose the name of Francis, and the first whose inauguration was attended by the Patriarch of Constantinople since the schism of 1054. ‘The Guardian’ greeted his election with the headline: ‘Buona Sera, Pope Francis’, echoing his first words on the balcony of St Peter’s. ‘Bergoglio has a reputation for both political canniness and reforming drive,’ wrote John Hooper. ‘As the first pontiff to take that name – [it is] an early indication perhaps of a reign he hopes will be marked by inspirational preaching and evangelisation.’ Nick Squires, writing in the ‘Daily Telegraph’, also drew on the significance of his choice of name. ‘His decision to pick the name Francis was interpreted as a sign of his desire to embrace simplicity and humility, in what could be an epic shift for the Church,’ he wrote. ‘His personal style is said to be the antithesis of Vatican pomp and the name he has chosen is fitting for a man known for catching the bus and eschewing the luxuries of high office.’

afield, ‘The Australian’ newspaper’s foreign editor, Greg Sheridan voiced his admiration for the Pope’s ‘hands on’ approach to issues of social justice. ‘His own example is salutary,’ he wrote, ‘Despite being archbishop of Buenos Aires; he lived humbly and spent much of his own time with the poor. In Francis, the cardinals have elected a pope who truly has mud on his boots.’ In South Africa’s national Catholic weekly newspaper, ‘The Southern Cross’, Pope Francis’s commitment to social justice was also perceived to be a major positive. Their editorial commented that a Pope who ‘tirelessly promotes justice and peace’ is an absolute necessity in many parts of the world where ‘war has become the norm, and where even nuclear war is not only thinkable but a real possibility.’ Back in Pope Francis’s home city, Carolina Barros of the ‘Buenos Aires Herald’ wrote: ‘[The fact that] the shoes of the fisherman will now be worn by a Latin American heralds not just a new stage for the Catholic Church, but a realignment within the world of this region where over 40 per cent of the population are Catholics.’ There were negative reactions from certain sections of the world’s press, most notably pointing to the former Cardinal Bergoglio’s age and relationship with the Argentine government. But, as ever, these can be taken with a pinch of salt. Back in 2005, Pope Benedict XVI’s election was met by some journalists with a gloomy

prediction that a ‘hardline conservative’ had been placed in charge of the Catholic Church. His first encyclical was about love, his second on hope and a third about the Church’s social teaching: his writings making a mockery of those early warnings.

Further Yet generally, the public’s positive reception of Pope Francis has been mirrored in the press. This was summed up well by Cristina Odone in the ‘Daily Mirror’. ‘The new Pope is a Jesuit, an order famed for its rigour,’ she wrote. ‘But in minutes last night he had cracked a joke. He told the 100,000-strong crowd: “You must be wondering why, to find the Bishop of Rome, the cardinals had to go to the ends of the Earth.” ‘This was real warmth. What better way to celebrate a fresh start?’

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sunday reflections On a liturgical note Happy Easter! You may think me a little behind the times in wishing you this, but Eastertide is 50 whole days, so the greeting which is customary in some of the Eastern Churches at this time of year will serve well here: Christ is risen, He is risen indeed. The whole of the liturgical year is celebrated with this as the permanent perspective: the Lord IS risen, and the fact of the Resurrection changes everything – the way in which we pray, the way in which we celebrate, the way in which we live, and indeed the way in which we die, for ‘dying you destroyed our death, rising you restored our life…’. It is amazing (or startling) how the year flies by. It may well feel that once we have celebrated the Feast of Pente-cost, the 50th day after Easter – this year on 19 May – then our TVs will soon be wooing us with the ‘must have’ present for Christmas 2013! Yet hopefully somewhere, somehow, we become

Sunday thoughts The manager of a health club confided in me that the average length of membership is six months; most people have stopped attending after three months and health clubs derive most of their income from members who never show up. My own experience confirms this. Over the years I have been a member of each of the health clubs in Warrington. Some months ago one health club chain went bust. I assumed it was because people were cutting back in hard times. But this week a new health club is to open its doors. Running machines are already in place. They fill the plate glass windows that look out on to the main road. Members will huff and puff in full view of passing traffic. As I passed this new club this morning I reflected that gyms are like bottled water, a marketing con. We pay more for bottled water than for the equivalent quantity of milk. Water is free from the tap. Each

Canon Philip Gillespie

that bit wiser, that bit closer to God, and that bit more able to witness to the never-changing reality of the Resurrection, and the gift of the Holy Spirit which is the very lifeblood of the Church. Well, that is the hope, anyway. The reality we may feel is very different, even though often we are our own worst critics. This Eastertide, be grateful for the many ways in which in the past, present and – we hope – future, the lifegiving Spirit has guided us to make the best use of the many gifts and talents we have received from the gracious hand of God. We may sometimes be the last person to actually recognise these gifts we have, so may we always be ready and open to what others recognise and suggest for us – and willing to put our gifts at the service of the Family of Faith, for God loves a cheer ful giver!

Mgr John Devine OBE

bottled water plant has such a tap in its production line. I have discovered an alternative, a personal trainer. I have spent a fraction of healthclub membership on a rescue dog – Lottie, a fouryear-old Staffordshire bull terrier. Pavements and parks are free. Early in the morning, late at night and at odd moments during the day I pound the pavement for free. And If I don’t feel like it one morning I cannot just roll over. The consequences would involve 20 minutes with a mop and bucket. I don’t have to suffer music at earshattering levels either. As I walk I reflect on life in general, the new Pope and the day’s liturgical readings, interrupted only by acknowledgements from other dog walkers.

We have hope in Jesus Just recently I was sitting in the kitchen of a presbytery in Nottingham where we were leading a Parish Mission. It was snowing heavily outside and it looked pretty miserable, matching my mood as I wondered how we were going to get back to Liverpool in time for Palm Sunday. As I contemplated gloomily the prospect of a journey across the country in the midst of snow I noticed along the edge of the garden snowdrops and crocuses bravely poking their heads above the snow and my mood lifted a little. They reminded me that there are always signs of hope even in the darkest moments of life, not that the prospect of a difficult journey was really a dark moment in life! We have just celebrated the Easter story. The Jewish Sabbath is over and the women arrive to anoint Jesus on this first day of the week just as the sun is rising. I love that phrase ‘just as the sun is rising’. Out of the darkness the light illuminates the world. The Son rises from the dead, the light shines in the darkness and the darkness cannot overpower it. He is alive. It is a very evocative image. As the women walk toward the tomb they are saying to each other, ‘Who will roll away the stone?’ That question is as real now as it was that first Easter day. Who will roll away the stone of our blockages and our blindness, our pain and our bitterness? Who will roll away the stone? The risen Jesus is the eternal icon of what God is going to do everywhere for everybody now and forever. At the very beginning of the book of Genesis you discover that God is the creator of something out of nothing. The spirit hovered over the darkness, out of chaos comes order. That is really what grace is – the desire of God, the heart of God, to make something out of nothing, to bring potential to fruition. The risen Jesus stands forever as God’s promise and guarantee of what God has always been doing and will always do. God will bring order out of chaos, light out of darkness, life out of death. God will even, as Richard Rohr says, ‘turn crucifixions into resurrections’. That is our hope even in the darkest places of our lives. Whatever struggles you may be facing – sickness bereavement, unemployment – and however difficult things may be, we have hope. Jesus Christ is Lord over everything that brings death and creates something out of nothing. Fr Chris Thomas

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FEAST OF DIVINE MERCY Sunday 7th April 2013 Our Lord asked Saint Faustina to promote the devotion to His mercy saying. “The soul that will go to Confession (within the octave of the feast) and receive Holy Communion on the Feast day, shall obtain complete forgiveness of sins and punishment” St Faustina confirms Our Lord’s command to her ‘If I cannot show mercy, by deeds or words, I can always do so, by prayer. My prayer reaches out even there, where I cannot reach out physically.’ Archdiocese venues celebrating the Feast of Divine Mercy - start time Our Lady Star of the Sea, Seaforth 1.30pm Devotions, Confession Mass 4 pm (Peter -Divine Mercy shop bus 53 from Lpool ) St Francis of Assisi, Garston, Liverpool 1.00 pm talk by Marino Restrepo, 2pm Devotions, Confession, talk St Monica’s, Fernhill Road, Bootle 2.00pm Confessions, 3pm Devotions Mass 3.15pm St Aloysius, Huyton, Liverpool 2.00pm Devotions, Confession Mass 5.00pm Holy Spirit, Ford 3.00pm Devotions St Clares, Arundel Avenue, Liverpool 3.00pm Devotions, Exposition, Confessions Our Lady of the Annunciation Bishop Eaton, Lpool 3.00pm Devotions Confessions Mass 3.45pm St John Stone, Woodvale, Ainsdale (Augustinian) 1.30pm opens - Confession 2pm, Devotions, Mass 3.15pm St Mary’s, Broadfield Drive, Leyland 2.45pm Devotions Confessions Healing Service Mass 5.00pm Sacred Heart, Brooke Street, Chorley 3.00pm Exposition, Confessions Devotions Mass 4.00pm SS Peter & Paul, Haresfinch, St Helens 2.15pm Confession, 3 pm Devotions Holy Family, Cronton 2.30pm Devotions Benediction St Mary’s, Standishgate, Wigan 3.00pm Devotions Mass 4.30pm Holy Family, New Springs, Wigan 3.00pm Devotions Holy Family, Pensby Road, Pensby, Wirral 2.30pm Devotions, Confession Mass 5.15pm Our Lady Star of the Sea, Ramsey, Isle of Man 2.30pm Devotions

DIVINE MERCY SHOP for leaflets, Divine Mercy pictures etc.

Unit 2, 37 London Road, Liverpool (Four cabins behind a bus shelter - opposite ‘Cash Converters shop’, near to Lime Street) Open Mon– Fri 10.30-4.30 except Wed – closed Sat 10.30-3.30

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VOLUNTEER MISSIONARY MOVEMENT Christians Wanted for Overseas Development VMM is a Christian charity that organises volunteer placements with Diocese and NGO partners to work in areas of high poverty in Africa. VMM recruits to health, finance, education, construction, IT and development posts VMM organises the placements, covers most of the associated costs and provides an allowance. See our website www.vmminternational.org for further details.

VMM INFORMATION DAY Saturday 18th May 2013 – 12pm to 3pm Hope University, Liverpool Speak to VMM staff members or returned volunteers about the current vacancies and the process of becoming a volunteer. To book a place on the event RSVP by telephone on 0151 291 3438 or via email to recruit@vmminternational.org.

uncle sam presents

HOORAY FOR THE USA! WITH THE ROYAL LIVERPOOL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

DING INCLU RSHOP BARBE JAZZ UALS SPIRIT RS LEADE R E E H C

SATURDAY 18TH MAY 2013, 7.30 PM LIVERPOOL PHILHARMONIC HALL Tickets : £12, £17, £23, £25, Box £30 Children & NUS Card Half Price Soprano : Deborah Norman Conductor : Keith Orrell Tickets available from Mavis Owens; Tel: 0151 652 6374; e-mailmavis@lwcu.freeserve.co.uk also from the Philharmonic Hall box office; Tel 0151 709 3789


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Catholic PIC Holy Land Pilgrimage In February, to celebrate The Pic's 50th Anniversary, Options Tours arranged a week long tour to the Holy Land. Under the spiritual guidence of Father Peter Morgan and Father David Gamble, some 75 pilgrims from the Archdiocese and beyond walked in the footsteps of the Lord, sailed on the Sea of Galilee prayed and shared together. Ask anyone their highlight and you will get 75 different answers. Here are some of the pictorial highlights.

Mass on the shores of The Sea of Galilee with Fr Michael McCormick, Fr David Gamble, Fr Peter Morgan and Fr Melville Wright

• Look out for our next issue for further pictures

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Fr Peter Morgan addresses pilgrims on the Sea of Galilee

Tour guide Usama Salman brings history to life

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Pilgrims renew their wedding vows at Cana

The Trinity of trees planted in 2012 to mark the Golden Jubilee of Archbishop Patrick Kelly by Bethlehem University

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Pilgrims meet students at Bethlehem University

Fr Michael McCormick enjoying his pilgrimage

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youth ministry

Seeking the truth behind the image By Sarah Beatty March began with our new-look Youth Alive. Soul Food, the evening for over-18s, took place on Saturday 2 March and featured guest speakers from the Chemin Neuf community. This is a community spread across the world and our speakers, Tim and Kate from the Liverpool base, discussed their life and work. Chemin Neuf has a varied membership – people who single, married, priests and members of religious orders – and there are also youth missionaries, who organise and run an International Youth Festival which is happening this summer at Hautecombe Abbey in France. Our Super Sunday retreat the next day looked at the scripture reading of the Woman at the Well. We based the day around that passage and reflections on image. After an introductory video about the scripture reading, we looked at some famous faces to consider what perfection means – being made in God’s image and likeness is the perfection we should aim for but media pressure can sometimes make us feel far from perfect when our hair doesn’t turn out like Cheryl Cole’s when we use L’Oreal! But some celebrities can be an example

to us. For instance, Barbra Streisand was told she would never make it unless she had a nose job; she didn’t and became one of the most famous women in the world. We also asked what we wanted to be known for. Do we want to be remembered as someone who stands up for what they believe in, or as someone who gives in to pressures and changes who they are? March also brought a school mission at Bellerive FCJ College in Liverpool – a particular treat for Becca as she is a past pupil there. With Year 8, we focused on the theme ‘We are all made in God’s image and likeness’, taking inspiration from the story of creation in Genesis. We had a values auction, looking at what the girls

valued in their lives. We considered inspirational figures such as Mother Teresa and examples of how to live a Christian life and had a fashion show where the girls had to create this season’s fashions from cardboard, newspaper, bin bags and the like. The point of all of this was summed up in our final session: we are all created in God’s image and likeness, and are all children of God. We should not judge others by how they look or dress, we should truly get to know them. We can place a higher value on materialistic things and forget what is really important. So to be the children of God, we should try not to judge others, and instead look after the things and people that we care about. We also had a session with the Bellerive sixth formers, titled ‘Stepping out in Faith’ and looking at how our faith can be there as a guide for us in life. The team had a great day few days at Bellerive, and we thank the enthusiastic pupils and staff for that. Dates for the diary 6 April – Soul Food, Life and Soul Café, 6pm Gerard Humphries is giving a presentation on the Trial of Christ from the eyes of Roman and Jewish law. Anyone over 18 is welcome. 7 April – Super Sunday, Life and Soul Café, 12 noon Our Super Sunday day retreat is open to anyone of high-school age and above. If you would like to be involved in the planning of Mass, or the Mass itself, come along at 2pm. Mass will begin at 3pm. Next month’s Soul Food is on 4 May, with Super Sunday on 5 May

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what’s on Sunday 7 April Divine Mercy Service 3.00 pm at Sacred Heart, Brooke Street, Chorley, PR6 0NG. 3.00 pm Chaplet of Divine Mercy, followed by Confessions, Rosary and Mass at 3.45 pm. Monday 8 April Feast of the Annunciation Tuesday 9 April Ministry Day 10.00 am-4.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A day for people in full-time or part-time ministry with input and sharing and time for quiet prayer and reflection. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk

day of quiet with input including guidance in prayer and sharing on a theme, ending with Mass. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Wednesday 17 April Easter to Pentecost 2 Evening course 7.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A series of six Wednesday evenings. Input with time for personal prayer and reflection. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Thursday 18 April Newman Circle Talk: ‘On being a Catholic Working in the Media’. Speaker: Frank Cottrell-Boyce. 7.30 pm at St Helen's Parish Centre, Alexandra Road, Crosby L23 7TQ. Friday 19 April to Sunday 21 April ‘The Lord is my Salvation’ A Journey through the Book of Exodus. Irenaeus Scripture Weekend led by Father Chris Thomas at St Joseph’s Prayer Centre Blundell Ave Formby L37 1PH. Details Tel: 0151 949 1199. Email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk

Wednesday 10 April Clergy Day 10.30 am-3.30 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A short presentation, prayer and discussion including Exposition and an opportunity for the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Easter to Pentecost 1 Evening course 7.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A series of six Wednesday evenings. Input with time for personal prayer and reflection. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Saturday 13 April Car Boot Sale 8.00 am onwards in the Cathedral Car Park. Pitches £10. Details from Claire Hanlon 0151 709 9222. Cursillo ‘Taster Day’ At St Patrick’s, Park Place, Liverpool, L8 5RA. Sunday 14 April Loyola Day 10.00 am-4.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A

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Friday 19 April Healing Mass On the anniversary of the death of Canon James Collins (Father Jimmy). 7.00 pm at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool. Celebrant Father Peter Morgan. Sunday 21 April Fourth Sunday of Easter World Day of Prayer for Vocations Tuesday 23 April Feast of St George Wednesday 24 April Easter to Pentecost 3 Evening course 7.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A series of six Wednesday evenings. Input with time for personal prayer and reflection. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk

Friday 26 April Ceili To raise funds to take the sick on pilgrimage to Our Lady's Shrine Banneux, Belgium. 7.30 pm at St Helens Social Club, Alexandra Road , Crosby, L23 7TQ. Tickets £10.00 from Sister Catherine Tel: 0151 924 0706 or 07703 769903; St Helen's Parish Office Tel: 0151 924 3417 or from Monica Tel: 01695 571962. Wednesday 24 April to Friday 26 April National Scripture Conference at Ushaw College, Durham Celebrating Scripture at the heart of the Church for the Year of Faith. Speakers include: Father Timothy Radcliffe OP, Michelle Moran, and Father Henry Wansbrough OSB. Details: ‘Word of the Lord’, Bible Society, Stonehill Green, Westlea, Swindon, SN5 7DG. Tel: 01793 418222 (reference ‘Word of the Lord Conference’). Email contactus@biblesociety.org.uk Saturday 27 April A Day of Refreshment and Renewal for Women Organised by the National Board of Catholic Women and the Pastoral Formation Department. Speaker: Dr Oonagh O’Brien (Margaret Beaufort Institute for Theology). 10.00 am-4.00 pm at the Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation. Cost £10. Details: Julie Cassidy, LACE, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool, L17 1AA. Tel: 0151 522 1040, email: j.cassidy@rcaol.co.uk Bookings must be received by Wednesday 17 April 2013. ‘I Believe’: Jo Boyce in Concert Music to celebrate the Year of Faith. 7.00 pm at St Margaret Mary's Church, Pilch Lane, Liverpool, L14 0JG. Tickets (subsidised) £3 (no concessions) from: David Cotterill, 3 Zander Grove, West Derby, Liverpool, L12 0QP (enclose sae and make cheques made payable to ‘St Matthew's Church'). Further information from Dave Cotterill Tel: 077353 85955. Sunday 28 April Healthcare Service 3.00 pm at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool. Tuesday 30 April Cursillo Ultrya 7.30 pm at St Michael and All Angels, Kirkby, L32 0TP.


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april Looking ahead: Wednesday 1 May Easter to Pentecost 4 Evening course 7.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A series of six Wednesday evenings. Input with time for personal prayer and reflection. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk UCM Bi-monthly Mass 7.30 pm at St. Philomena's, Sparrow Hall Road, Liverpool, L9 6BU. Saturday 4 May Choral Workshop led by James Macmillan A rare opportunity for singers of all ages to work with one of the UK’s foremost composers, and explore a selection of his sacred and secular works. 9.15 am at St. Mary’s Church, Buttermarket Street, Warrington, WA1 2NS. For more information and registration Tel: 0161 434 4194 or email: music@stmaryswarrington.org.uk Website: www.stmaryswarrington.org.uk Tuesday 7 May Ministry Day 10.00 am-4.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A day for people in full-time or part-time ministry with input and sharing and time for quiet prayer and reflection. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Wednesday 8 May Easter to Pentecost 5 Evening course 7.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A series of six Wednesday evenings. Input with time for personal prayer and reflection. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Sunday 12 May Loyola Day 10.00 am-4.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A day of quiet with input including guidance in prayer and sharing on a theme, ending with Mass. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Wednesday 15 May Clergy Day 10.30 am-3.30 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A short presentation, prayer and discussion including Exposition and an opportunity for the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Easter to Pentecost 6 Evening course 7.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A series of six Wednesday evenings. Input with time for personal prayer and reflection. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Saturday 18 May Volunteer Mission Movement Information Day 12.00 noon-3.00 pm at Liverpool Hope University. Information sessions for people interested in volunteering abroad. Contact: 0151 291 3438 or recruit@vmminternational.org Friday 24 May to Monday 27 May Cursillo Three day Retreat At Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ.

There are still places on the Animate team for volunteer roles starting September 2013. If you know anyone aged between 18 and 25, looking to do something different for a year, let them know. For more information, contact Father Simon Gore at s.gore@animateyouth.co.uk

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profile

Pope Francis

‘a very powerful and prophetic voice’ by Martin O’Boyle He’s the public-transport taking, football-loving, Argentine tango dancing Pope who has a deep commitment to social justice. But what else do we know about Pope Francis? Born on 17 December 1936 in Buenos Aires to an Italian father and Argentine mother, Jorge Mario Bergolio grew up supporting his local football team, San Lorenzo de Almagro, who are nicknamed ‘the Saints.’ He attended a Salesian primary school and graduated from secondary school with a chemical technician’s diploma. At the age of 21 he contracted a life-threatening bout of pneumonia which necessitated the removal of part of his lung. A year later he entered the novitiate of the Society of Jesus and studied humanities and philosophy before teaching in secondary schools in Santa Fe and Buenos Aires. Bergoglio was ordained as a priest on 13 December 1969. He was novice master at the Theological Faculty in San Miguel, where he also taught theology and was Jesuit Provincial for Argentina from 1973 to 1979 and Rector of the Philosophical and Theological Faculty of San Miguel

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from 1980 to 1986. After completing his doctoral dissertation in Germany, he served as a confessor and spiritual director in Córdoba. On 20 May 1992 he was appointed titular Bishop of Auca and Auxiliary of Buenos Aires, and was ordained Bishop on 27 June. On 3 June 1997 he was appointed Coadjutor Archbishop of Buenos Aires and succeeded Cardinal Antonio Quarracino on 28 February 1998. During his time as Cardinal, he lived in a small apartment, rather than in the elegant bishop’s residence in the suburb of Olivos. He often rode the bus to work, cooked his own meals and regularly visited the slums of Argentina’s capital. He told Argentina’s priests last year: ‘Jesus teaches us: Go out. Go out and share your testimony, go out and interact with your brothers, go out and share, go out and ask. Become the Word in body as well as spirit.’ At his first media audience, the Saturday after his election, Francis told journalists that he had chosen the name in honour of Saint Francis of Assisi, and had done so because he was especially concerned for the wellbeing of the poor. ‘The man who gives

us this spirit of peace, the poor man,’ and added: ‘Oh, how I wish for a Church that is poor and for the poor.’ His motto: ‘Miserando Atque Eligendo’, comes from a homily by St. Bede on the Gospel account of ‘The Call of St. Matthew’. It means ‘because he saw him through the eyes of mercy and chose him.’ Catholic journalist and author Dr. Matthew Bunson is writing a biography about the new Pope and has been carrying out extensive research on his life. When asked about some of the most striking features about the new Pope on Vatican Radio, he said that the first two words ‘that spring to mind’ are ‘authenticity and mercy’. Among his many qualities, Bunson points to Pope Francis’ capacity for deep pastoral leadership and ‘his thirst for holiness.’ Bunson believes that Cardinal Bergoglio served ‘as the conscience of the nation’ during his priestly ministry in Argentina and was a ‘very powerful and prophetic voice and an immensely popular one’. He believes that the former Cardinal ‘proved very much a bridge-builder’ among the different social classes in his homeland and in that sense ‘became the moral voice for the nation’.


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First place for Bellerive Choir A delighted Senior Choir from Bellerive fcJ Catholic College in Liverpool celebrated first place in the Youth Choir Class at the Wirral Festival of Music, Speech and Drama in March. Their repertoire consisted of two pieces: “You Raise me Up” and “The Lord’s

Prayer” taken from “African Sanctus” by David Fanshawe. Both were two part arrangements. The adjudicator was very complimentary and described Bellerive’s performance as “real choral singing”. She also commented on how well the voices

blended and how well they captured the mood of both pieces. The 30 strong choir, with Members from Years 8 to 11, rehearse once a week and perform regularly at events, trained by an ‘extremely proud’ Mrs Winstanley.

World Book Day at St John Bosco St John Bosco, once again had another successful world book day with both the teachers and the students participating with fantastic costumes. Every year, year 7 students dress up as their favourite book character to celebrate the day but

this year we were joined by year 8s in the celebration. The fun activities celebrated and emphasised the importance of reading, the ‘drop and read’ event gave students the chance to read a book of their choice. Despite the

fantastic costumes that everyone fashioned, the best dressed prizes awarded each student from each form class with the most creative imaginative design. Congratulations to all the winners of the best dressed awards!

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come & see

Introducing Pat Kennedy… Nationally she is part of the steering committee for the Catholic Women’s League and a member of the national service team for charismatic renewal For many years Pat worked closely with Fr Sean Conaty until his recent death. Together they were much in demand around this country and across Europe, particularly in Germany and Gibraltar. She will bring to Come and See a wide experience of the healing ministry in all its forms and a great sense of humour and practical wisdom. We look forward to all she will share with us.

This year we welcome Pat Kennedy to Come and See. Pat is from the Diocese of Hexham and Newcastle where she is very well known, having worked for many years in the area of catechesis at a diocesan level. Her desire is that every baptised person should know the vocation and ministry that comes from their baptism. She has been involved in the lay council of the diocese since its inception and is part of the team responsible for the training of deacons.

Obituary of Canon William O’Sullivan Former Parish Priest of Holy Rosary, Old Roan and Our Lady, Queen of Martyrs, Croxteth, Canon William O’Sullivan, died on Saturday 23 March at the age of 89. William O’Sullivan was born in Farrangore, County Kerry, on 4 October 1923, the son of Daniel and Mary O’Suillivan. His early education took place at St Brendan’s Seminary, Killarney, before completing his ecclesiastical studies at St Kieran’s College, Kilkenny. He was ordained priest at St Mary’s Cathedral, Kilkenny, on 7 June 1947. He was incardinated the following day into the Archdiocese of Liverpool. Following his ordination he was appointed assistant priest at St Cuthbert’s, Edinburgh. In September 1949, following a brief period of illhealth, he was moved to St Mary of

the Isle, Douglas. He returned to the mainland in October 1956 to become assistant priest at St Michael’s, Liverpool, before moving in October 1962 to English Martyrs, Litherland. In October 1969 he was appointed national chaplain to the Catholic

Men’s Society, whilst continuing to live at English Martyrs. Upon relinquishing his chaplaincy role he was appointed parish priest at Our Lady, Queen of Martyrs, Croxteth, in July 1974. His final parish appointment came in September 1985, when he was transferred to Holy Rosary, Old Roan. His services to the archdiocese and to the wider Church were recognised in February 1991, when he was appointed an honorary canon of the Cathedral Chapter. He retired in September 2000, moving shortly afterwards to St George’s Court, Maghull. He celebrated the Diamond Jubilee of his ordination in June 2007. His Funeral Mass was celebrated at Holy Rosary, Old Roan, on Tuesday 2 April followed by burial at St Anne’s, Ormskirk.

Dancing for Nugent Staff and students from Sacred Heart high School, Crosby, took part in a Nintendo Wii ‘Dancethon’ to raise money for Nugent Care. The event was organised by members from 12 D and 12 R, and followed on from the successful disco that the school held in December which raised £700 for Jospice. ‘It was great fun and hopefully we will raise lots of money for Nugent Care,’ said Mrs Bennett, from the school.

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cathedral

Who should sing? Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean

Christopher McElroy continues the series which so far has looked at why we should sing, and when we should sing, today we look at who should sing? At first this may seem like a strange question: obviously the people who go to Mass! However, by briefly examining the functions of the various people who take part in liturgy we can re-evaluate this question. The liturgy is structured in a hierarchical form, with several ‘key players.’ These include readers who proclaim the word of God; the psalmist who sings the words of the Jewish song book; the choir which leads the congregation both in singing and the raising of sung prayer to God; the priest who presides over the congregation, acting both in the name of Christ and in our name to God the Father. In introducing the importance of singing in the Liturgy the instruction to the Missal says: ‘Great importance should therefore be attached to the use of singing in the celebration of the Mass…In choosing of the parts actually to be sung, however, preference should be given to those that are of greater importance and especially to those sung by the priest or the deacon or the lector, with the people responding, or by the priest and people together.’ We can see here that several of our key players are mentioned by name as those who should sing. Priest and people together singing in dialogue. Just think of a school

teacher walking into a classroom and saying ‘Good morning Year 5’ to which the children respond’ Good morning Mrs Jones.’ Dialogue invites response, what better to set the tone than to sing such dialogue? The priest doesn’t have to be the world’s greatest singer; he has a God made voice just like the rest of us. A prime example of this dialogue in the liturgy is the preface dialogue (‘The Lord be with you’/ ‘And with your spirit’.) The Psalmist: the psalms are the songbook of the Jewish faith handed down from generation to generation. How can we speak the words ‘I will sing to the Lord, glorious his triumph’? Psalms were written to be sung. Ideally a psalmist (or small group) lead the singing of the responsorial psalm. The choir has a two-fold role to play. Firstly, to lead the rest of the community in singing. Secondly, enhancing the liturgy with choral music appropriate to the celebration. You may recall the three ministerial functions discussed in the ‘why sing’ article. Leading the congregation in song ‘fosters a oneness of spirit’ whilst enhancing the liturgy with choral music ‘adds delight to prayer’ and ‘invests the rites with greater solemnity.’ Congregation: not everything needs to be sung by everyone all of the time. We need to be able to assimilate all of our senses in liturgical prayer. Whilst we sing, we also need to listen, to smell (incense etc), see, feel, taste etc. Ritual music sung by heart will allow worshipers to experience all of these other aspects of our liturgical offering.

Easter greetings and blessings. If we are allowed a wish for Easter mine would opt for a change in the weather to milder, warmer temperatures. I have had enough of the freezing cold draughts that circulate around our Cathedral. It would be a relief, after such a long cold spell, to celebrate Mass without getting a mild dose of frostbite during the Easter Season. The irony here is that due to the under floor heating design the cars in the car park bask in warmth while we freeze above. April and May seem to be in vogue this year for weddings and we have Nuptial celebrations every weekend throughout the Easter Season, continuing throughout the Summer months. The other theme to events in April is that of Healing and Health. On 19 April at 7.15 pm there is the Annual Mass of Healing at the Cathedral, this year Father Peter Morgan is the main Celebrant and Preacher. Beginning on 21 April the Annual Conference for the Royal College of Nursing is to be held in Liverpool and they are holding a Service in the Crypt late that afternoon prior to the start of the Conference. The following week, 28 April, the Annual Ecumenical Healthcare Service takes place in our Cathedral this year at 3.00 pm. It is an opportunity for all involved in hospital chaplaincy and service to the sick locally to come together in prayer. On 21 April at 3.00 pm, following a shorter form of Evening Prayer, the Choirs of both Cathedrals will join together to per form the second half of Handel’s Messiah.

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Pic extras Mums the Word It is a known fact that the more things alter, the more they stay the same. I have been reading a ‘Report adopted at a UCM Liverpool Rally’, dated May 1936. It makes fascinating reading. If the UCM was in some ways very different then, it was in other ways basically the same as today. Subscription was 2d (old pence) but some members paid, voluntarily, a bigger special subscription. There were 29 foundations listed, six of which are still active today – St Oswald’s, St Teresa’s, Norris Green; St Helen’s, Crosby; St Edmund’s, Waterloo; St Margaret Mary’s; and St Thomas of Canterbury – though whether they have been continually active in the intervening years I do not know. St Teresa’s was the largest foundation with 267 members. The report is very formal, with all officers referred to by their title, initials and surname. At this stage the UCM was still under the umbrella of the Catholic Women’s League and the concerns raised at the Rally were similar to our concerns today. The Archbishop of Liverpool, Dr Richard Downey, was the main speaker and offered his reflections on ‘Modern Social Evils’. Other speakers (not named) discussed direct and indirect propaganda regarding birth control; today it is abortion. Archbishop Downey, like Archbishop Kelly, was very supportive of the UCM. And UCM meetings were, like today, both a spiritual and social gathering: benediction was followed by afternoon tea, and pilgrimages ended with a social evening nearby. We are very good at praying and can be devout, but we also enjoy a party. I would hope that, with the help of God and his Blessed Mother, there will be someone writing on the activities of the UCM in 2090. • Tickets for our reception at the Adelphi at Saturday 15 June are available at a cost of £17.50 from Kate Moss. Her contact number is 01925 411156. God Bless, Ann Hogg, media officer

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News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

New provincial council installed We celebrated in March the installation ceremony for our new provincial council. According to the rules of the Order, council officers hold office for a maximum of three years and must be re-elected annually, and this year’s elections took place at St Anne’s Rock Ferry on 3 March. Office bearers must be installed into their positions at a church ceremony, which took place during 11 am Mass at Our Lady Star of the Sea, Seaforth on Sunday 17 March. We are grateful to Fr Tom Wood, our provincial chaplain, for his part in the ceremony and for granting us the use of his parish church. The installations were performed by Bro Harry Welch, deputy supreme grand knight, and Bro Peter Kinsey, past provincial grand knight. Our picture shows: (back row, l-r) Peter Kinsey, John Hamilton, Ray Pealing, Mike Nolan; (front row l-r) John Church, Brian Mangan and Harry Welch. • Last month we highlighted the marvellous work undertaken by the Knights on the Wirral with their management of the Tuesday Club for the Less Able. The club has

been in existence for over 40 years and Wirral Council recognised its importance by providing an annual grant of £3,000. Unfortunately, due to the need to save money and the cuts imposed by national government this grant has now ended. The provincial council has donated £2,000 as a temporary measure while the club seeks more secure sources of funding to keep this valuable community resource in existence. Any help would be gratefully received and if you would like to make a donation please write to Mr H Grunnill, 14 Upton Court, Wirral, CH49 6LS (phone 051 677 2794). Cheques should be made payable to ‘Wirral Tuesday Club’. • We congratulate Bro John Quinn of Isle of Man council who has been appointed Acting Attorney General by the Manx government. The Isle of Man council has been busy fundraising, meanwhile, and presented a cheque for £874 to Manx Decaf, which supports those with dementia and memory loss. Website: www.ksc.org.uk Email: DPOKeane@aol.com

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PIC Life Praying for our priests By Moira Billinge Decades ago, a newly ordained priest would serve a long ‘apprenticeship’ as a curate under the direction and scrutiny of his parish priest. It was not unusual to have two or three curates living and working in the same parish, and the palatial presbyteries which still exist offer a reminder of how plentiful the vocations to the priesthood once were. Most priests were educated in seminaries from the age of 11, and after ordination, their gentle introduction into parish life together with the camaraderie and on-going support of their fellow curates was, for the most part, a fulfilling and happy time. Things are very different today and junior seminaries are a thing of the past. Priests hail from all walks of life and have usually pursued a career prior to offering themselves for the priesthood. Some come with a wife and family in tow, having been vicars before their conversion to Catholicism. Vocations to the priesthood have greatly decreased, and the training is now a matter of just a few years, yet almost before the chrism oils of their ordination have dried, many will find themselves in charge of one or even more parishes. The experience of work in the ‘outside world’ prior to ordination can be a useful preparation for some of the problems, awkward situations and characters that they will inevitably deal with, but priests must, for the most part, learn on the job. Following all the negative publicity the Catholic Church has received in recent times, it is now more important than ever to give priests our love and support and to let them know that we still believe in them and appreciate all that they do for us.

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Our April Prayer We thank you Lord for the gift of every day – for the many blessings of health, family and friends. Help us to be more aware of your presence within us We want to make each day count We want to follow you all our lives Help us dear Lord Send your favourite prayer to: Catholic Pictorial, 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

Perhaps the pedestals that we put our priests on in the past were too high, and they are now at a more realistic level so that we can see them as the human beings that they are, with the same faults, vulnerabilities, uncertainties, fears, sorrows and breaking points that the rest of us have, and who need the help of the Holy Spirit to remain faithful to their calling. The priesthood does not provide an automatic immunity from sin or temptation so we must pray for our priests each and every day and give them the help that they need to support their ministry and to accomplish the mission that God has given them. Daily prayer for Priests (St Therese of Lisieux) O Jesus, I pray for your faithful and fervent priests; for your unfaithful and tepid priests; for your priests labouring at home or abroad in distant mission fields. for your tempted priests; for your lonely and desolate priests; For your young priests; for your dying priests; for the souls of your priests in Purgatory. But above all, I recommend to you the priests dearest to me: the priest who baptised me; the priests who absolved me from my sins; the priests who gave me Your Body and Blood in Holy Communion; the priests who taught and instructed me; all the priests to whom I am indebted in any other way O Jesus, keep them all close to your heart, and bless them abundantly in time and in eternity. Amen

Worth a visit This month is the perfect time to reflect on the Easter message with a trip to a religious site which has known much turbulence, writes Lucy Oliver. The parish church of St Mary Magdalene at Lanercost Priory was originally founded in 1169 as a monastery following the rule of St Augustine, whose conversion began when he heard a divine voice speak to him. In the tranquil environment of the priory today, God speaks in the silence – a constant throughout the building’s troubled history. Situated near to Hadrian’s Wall, the priory suffered frequent attacks during the AngloScottish wars. It was besieged by Robert Bruce, but also provided a resting place for King Edward I. Today it is one of the best-preserved monasteries in Cumbria, with a dramatic triple tier of arches and beautifully peaceful cloisters, and its grounds are open for walkers to wander and reflect. There is a tearoom too for light refreshments. A short drive away in Brampton, you will find other Cumbrian treasures including St Martin’s church, famous for being the only church designed by pre-Raphaelite architect Philip Webb and renowned for the beauty of its stained-glass windows. For more information call 0870 3331181 or visit www.lanercostpriory.org.uk


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join in Eating Out

Children’s word search Try your luck with our clues to St George’s Day word search his feast is 23rd April

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More Mullarkey From Johnny Kennedy The young curate loves to hear tales of Father Mullarkey’s childhood in Galway. ‘Tell me about your Uncle Mick.’ ‘Ah, he was a great man, I loved him,’ replied the auld fella. ‘Mind you, if I’d listened to him I’d have been a bookie instead of a priest! ‘He didn't go to church much, but my Aunt Kathleen who was devout, sometimes dragged him along to Mass. And when the church went on a pilgrimage to Italy she nagged him until he agreed to go.’ ‘And did it change his life?’ asked the YC. ‘You must be jokin',’ said Fr Mullarkey, ‘he spent most of the time in Italian bars.’ ‘Did he get drunk?’ ‘Well, I couldn’t say for sure, but when they went to see the Leaning Tower of Pisa, he was the only one who couldn’t see anything wrong with it!’

The longer days hopefully with some sun should encourage us to take a drive out and enjoy eating at one of our listed restaurants. Jasmine Tree Chinese Restaurant Union Street, Southport 01704 530141 Claudes of Churchtown Botanic Road, Churchtown 01704 228334 Greek Taverna South Road, Waterloo 0151 293 3229 Galleria Warrington Road, Rainhill 0151 430 9212 Hen & Chicken Prescot Road, Maghull 0151 520 1121 Plough Inn Spa Lane, Lathom 01695 722322

Recipe from the Monastery Kitchen

Audio copy of the Pic out now An audio version of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ is available free of charge, compiled by students, technicians and Chaplain, Helen Molyneux, at All Hallows RC High School, Penwortham Anyone interested in receiving the audio copy should contact Kevin Lonergan Tel: 01772 744148 or 01772 655433 (home).

Poached egg on cheesy crumpets Toast crumpets on one side and butter untoasted side. Spread on a mixture of cottage cheese with spring onions, a small amount of mustard and mayonnaise. Place under a hot grill until cheese is bubbling. At the same time poach eggs, drain and serve with green salad.

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Catholic Pic April 2013 issue