Issuu on Google+

Jean-François Brochet

The All   Together Learning and Activities book develops all three ESL competencies and follows the Progression of Learning. The material in this collection offers engaging themes, provides teacher-directed learning opportunities, and allows students to take ownership of the English language.

• • • •

Pedagogical notes and answer key for each unit A CD of all the stories and listening activities Teacher’s Observation Sheets Reproducible sheets for games, activities and end-of-unit tests

Digital Versions Teacher’s Copy • Available on several platforms: USB key, MyCECZone (for PC, Mac, iPad and Android) • For whole-class use, the digital version allows you to: – project, take notes and flip through the entire Learning and Activities book – show the answer key – access all reproducible material – do interactive whiteboard activities that are compatible with NotebookTM and ActivInspire®. • Also available but only on the MyCECZone platform, you can: – share teacher’s notes and documents with your students – correct your students’ answers directly on their digital versions of the Learning and Activites book

Student Learning and Activities Book • Available only on MyCECZone (for PC, Mac, iPad and Android) • This digital version allows students to flip through the book, take notes and write in their answers.

English as a Second Language • Elementary Cycle Three, Grade 6

Teacher’s Copy

Learning and Activities

A useful Pre-unit to review Cycle Three, Grade 5 outcomes Six rich and visually-appealing units A wide variety of activities for oral interaction and written production Engaging stories for reading comprehension Practical grammar presentations and oral interaction activities Integrated writing activities Extra grammar pages for independent practice Self-monitoring activities and competency-based self-evaluations for monitoring progress

Elementary Cycle Three

Learning and Activities

Learning and Activities Book • • • • • • • •

English as a Second Language

CONFORMS TO THE PROGRESSION OF LEARNING


Pre-unit

What’s New?

Grammar Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Self-evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

1 Back together . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Getting to know you . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Unit 4

3 Meet the characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4 Describing what you like . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

1 Great teams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 2 Teamwork in sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

5 Project: Introduce your partner . . . . . . . . 12

Self-evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Unit 1

Getting to Know You

1 Derek’s pen pal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2 Origins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3 Thanks for asking! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 4 Nice to hear from you! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 5 Story time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 6 Amazing landscapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 7 Project: Write to a pen pal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Grammar Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Self-evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Unit 2

Real-life Heroes

1 Outstanding people . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 2 Using the past . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 3 Story time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 4 We’re all heroes! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 5 Heroes in action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 6 Project: Write a biography

about your real-life hero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Grammar Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Self-evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

Unit 3

Amazing Inventions

1 Inventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 2 Let’s compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 3 Story time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 4 Giving instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 5 Rube Goldberg machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 6 Project: My invention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

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All For One

3 Playing together. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 4 Planning ahead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 5 Planning fundraising events . . . . . . 78 6 Story time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 7 Project: Plan your own

fundraising event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Grammar Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Self-evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

Unit 5

It’s a Flea Market!

1 Buying and selling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 2 Money-wise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 3 Story time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 4 Demonstratives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 5 Shopping basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 6 Project: A classroom

flea market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Grammar Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Self-evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103

Unit 6

Unforgettable

1 Years to remember . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104 2 We are who we are . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 3 And the winner is … . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 4 Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 5 A bright future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113 6 Making memories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115 7 Project: The yearbook . . . . . . . . . . . . .116

Yearbook Award. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118 Grammar Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119 Self-evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121

Resources

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122

Table of Contents three

3


Pre-unit

1

Back together A New this, new that! • Read the dialogue. • Think about what is new in your life. Hi Ana, it’s good to see you again!

Hello Miguel, it’s good to see you too! What’s new?

Nothing much! What’s new with you?

Well, I have a new friend, a new hat, new activities, a new house, and a new favourite book!

That’s almost a new life, Ana!

Exactly!

B Last summer survey • Read the Key Language questions and answers. • Find someone in your class who has something new from the list below. • Fill in the chart.

Questions

Answers

Do you have a new friend? Do you have new clothes? Do you have a new pet? Find someone who... has a new book

Yes, I have a new friend. Her name is Sarah. Yes, I have new shoes and a new hat! No, I have the same old dog, Sammy. Name Stacey

Details

Smile, by Raina Telgemeier

has a new friend has new clothes has a new pet has a new favourite song has a new favourite movie 4

four Pre-unit

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PERSONAL PRONOUNS AND POSSESSIVE ADJECTIVES Personal pronouns are the subject of a verb.

Possessive adjectives come before a noun.

I have a new jacket.

My friend has new clothes.

Singular 2nd person

You are at school.

Your teacher is funny.

3rd person

He/She/It is fun.

His/Her/Its hair is brown.

1st person

We are back together.

Our teacher is great this year.

2nd person

You have a lot of books.

Your desks are messy.

3rd person

They are in English class.

Their classroom is small.

1st person

Plural

C Survey report • Write complete sentences using the information in the chart in Activity B. • Use possessive adjectives. Example: Stacey has a new book. Its title is Smile. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

D Personal pronouns • Rewrite the sentences by replacing the subjects with personal pronouns. 1. Josh is wearing new running shoes. 2. Katy and Luke are new friends. 3. Raphael and I have new bicycles. 4. Our school has two new teachers. 5. Emmy has a new DVD.

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Pre-unit

fi ve

5


2 Getting to know you A Introductions • Practise introducing yourself to a partner. • Then, introduce your partner to other partners in the class. • Use the Key Language box to help you.

Introducing yourself Hi! My name is Lucas. What’s your name? My name is Luisa. It’s nice to meet you!

Introducing others Hi Luisa, welcome to our class!

Ben and Claire, this is Luisa. Thanks. It’s nice to meet you.

B Introducing each other • Complete the introductions in the dialogue boxes. • Use the Key Language box to help you. Hello, Hi,

! It’s

.

Justin, this is

Thanks!

6

six Pre-unit

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C Welcome to the class • Listen to the teacher interview two new students. • Record the information in the chart below. Daria

Andrew

Age Town or street Lives with

Additional information

D Preferences • Look at the Vocabulary box below. • With your partner, talk about all the activities you like. • Use the Key Language box to help you.

What activities do you like? I like to play hockey and Phoebe likes to design clothes. What about you? I like to listen to music.

play hockey

design clothes

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play video games

listen to music

read books

Pre-unit

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7


E Ask your classmates • Ask your classmates about two activities they like. • Fill in the chart below. NAME

ACTIVITIES • • • • • • • • • •

F Who likes what? • Write about the activities that you and your classmates like to do. 1. I like to ride my bike 2. My classmate 3.

and play badminton (name)

.

likes to and

.

likes to and

.

4. . 5. .

I practise. I take risks. I speak English in class. + ++ +++ 8

eight Pre-unit

+ ++ +++

+ ++ +++

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3 Meet the characters THE SIMPLE PRESENT

In general, add s or es in the 3rd person singular.

I/you/we/they like he/she/it likes He likes to read. I/you/we/they go he/she/it goes She goes to school.

A Ana and friends • Read the text. • Highlight all the verbs in the simple present.

Some verbs are irregular and do not follow the same rule.

This is Miguel. He lives on Brian Street and he really likes to listen to music. He has a new MP3 player and he listens to it all the time!

To be: I am you/we/they are he/she/it is He is active. To have: I/you/we/they have he/she/it has She has brothers. Do you know Mila? She is very active and loves to play sports. She also watches sports on tv. Her new favourite sport is basketball.

Hello! My name is Ana and I am 11 years old. I like to watch movies. I am proud of my new glasses. They look really cool!

This is Derek. He is 12 years old and he plays an instrument. His new guitar is amazing!

B Show you understand • Answer the questions about the text. • Use the simple present and replace the names with pronouns. • Use the Grammar box above to help you. 1. Who are Ana’s three friends? 2. What does Derek do? 3. What does Miguel like? 4. What is Mila’s new favourite sport? 5. How old is Ana?

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Pre-unit

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4 Describing what you like A Adjectives • Look at the adjectives in the Vocabulary box below. • Try to find activities that can be described by these adjectives.

exciting

fascinating

stimulating

interesting

fun

relaxing

B Why do you like it? • With a partner, talk about the reasons why you like your favourite activities and complete the table below. • Use the Key Language box and the Vocabulary box above to help you.

I like to skateboard. What activity do you like?

Why?

Activities I like

10

ten Pre-unit

Because it is so much fun!

Reasons why

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Adjective:

C Category race

Person:

• Race to complete the charts for each adjective.

Adjective:

Place:

Person:

Object: School subject:

science

Adjective:

Place:

Manon museum reading computer

Activity:

exciting

stimulating

fascinating

Person:

Activity:

Place:

Object:

Activity:

School subject:

Object:

Adjective:

fun

School subject:

Person:

Adjective:

Place:

Person:

Activity:

Place:

Object:

Activity:

School subject:

Object:

interesting

School subject:

D Tell me why • With your partner, give the reasons for your answers in Activity C. • Use the Key Language box to help you.

Why is a museum stimulating?

Because there is so much to see!

Yes, I agree.

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Pre-unit

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5 Project: Introduce your partner A Interview • Ask your partner the questions below. • Write down your partner’s answers. 1. Introduction What is your name?

Take notes Select and write down the most important information.

2. Personal information How old are you? Where do you live? Who do you live with?

3. Preferences What activities do you like? Why?

4. What’s new in your life?

B Presentation • With your partner, get into a group of four. • Take turns introducing each other’s partners. • At your teacher’s signal, form a new group of four and repeat the activity.

Checklist I introduced myself and my partner. I gave information about him or her (age, where he/she lives, who he/she lives with). I talked about what activities my partner likes and why. I talked with my partner about something that is new in my life. 12

twelve Pre-unit

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Self-evaluation C1: Interacts orally in English • I participated in partner and group activities.

yes 

sometimes 

no 

• I used English vocabulary and expressions during the activities.

yes 

sometimes 

no 

C2: Reinvests understanding of oral and written texts • I listened and read carefully in order to understand and complete the activities.

sometimes  sometimes 

no 

• I was able to identify specific information.

yes  yes 

no 

• I used what I know to complete the activities.

yes 

sometimes 

no 

• I followed instructions and I checked my work. yes  • I took notes to help me introduce my partner. yes 

sometimes  sometimes 

no 

no 

C3: Writes texts

My progress Trying hard +

Getting better ++

Much better

Doing great

+++

++++

I can use the simple present. I can use personal pronouns and possessive adjectives. I can introduce myself and someone else. I can talk about acitivities I like. I can use adjectives to explain my opinion. I can give reasons why. I can talk about what’s new in my life. My signature  My parent’s signature 

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Date 

Pre-unit 

thirteen

13


Unit 3

1

Inventions A At the science fair

It’s the Alarm Fork! It helps you eat slower. It’s more fun than a regular fork.

What is this? It looks so cool!

• Read the dialogue. • Think about an object you would like to invent.

Ana, let’s invent an object too!

B Inventions and

What inventions help heat food?

their functions • With your class, think of one or two inventions for each function below. • Use the Key Language box and the dictionary to help you. Function helps heat food

And a stove, too!

A microwave helps heat food.

Invention a microwave, a stove

helps travel fast helps listen to music helps find information helps light the room helps clean the house helps reach high places 50

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C Describing inventions • With your partner, take turns using the adjectives from the Vocabulary box to describe the inventions from Activity B. • Use the Key Language box below to help you.

useful: can be helpful; practical

fast: can move at high speed

high-tech: uses new technology

safe: not dangerous; can protect its users

sturdy: solid; strongly made

portable: easy to carry or move

complex: has many connected parts; is hard to make or use

simple: has few parts; easy to make or use

An MP3 player is a high-tech invention because it uses new technology.

That’s right! It’s also portable because you can carry it in your pocket.

D Using adjectives • Complete the sentences using the adjectives in the Vocabulary box. 1. This helmet is

. It protects your head if you fall.

2. My pencil case is

. I can carry it everywhere.

3. This computer is

. It uses all the new technologies.

4. This machine is

. It only has five parts.

5. My multi-tool knife is very 6. The internet is

. I can do a lot of things with it. . You can find information in seconds.

7. I’m glad we have a new ladder. It is 8. Satellites are © 2014, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

.

. They have many small connected parts.

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2 Let’s compare COMPARING ADJECTIVES Short-word adjectives: For one-syllable adjectives, add –er than to the adjective. A car is faster than a bicycle. For two-syllable adjectives ending in y, change the y to i and add –er than. A truck is sturdier than a scooter. Long-word adjectives: For adjectives with two or more syllables, add more before and than after the adjective. Your invention is more portable than mine. Exception:

better

Replace good by better. A safe invention is gooder than a dangerous one. To compare things that are the same, use as. My bike is as fast as yours.

A Practise comparing page 65

• Compare these inventions using the adjectives from the Vocabulary box on page 51. • Use the Grammar box to help you. high-tech

simple

simpler than

A broom is a vacuum.

A space shuttle is a toy rocket.

fast

sturdy

Airplanes are cars.

A steel bridge is a rope bridge.

portable

good

An MP3 player is a cellphone.

The new bike is the old one.

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Unit 3

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B Robots • Look at the legend below each robot. • Write sentences to compare the three robots. • Use the Grammar box on page 52 to help you. XV14

Miko

Yod

Fast

Fast

Fast

High-tech

High-tech

High-tech

Sturdy

Sturdy

Sturdy

Example: Miko is faster than Yod. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

C Compare objects around you page 65

• With your partner, practise comparing objects in the classroom. • Use the adjectives from the Vocabulary box on page 51 or other adjectives you know. • Use the Key Language box to help you. Object eraser

The blue pencil is longer than the red one. True, but yours is sturdier.

Really?

pencil And your watch is more complex than my watch.

watch poster book

There are over 2.5 million different parts in a space shuttle. Now, that’s a complex invention!

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Unit 3 fifty-three

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3 Story time A Get ready

Predict: Look at the title, the pictures and the keywords to help you guess what the text is about.

• Scan the texts on pages 54 and 55 and answer the questions below. 1. Predict what the texts are about.

Hmm, I think that this is about a soccer game.

People who made mistakes at work. Inventions made by mistake. Students who made inventions during their English class. Dangerous inventions that were a big mistake. 2. Who was the inventor of the ice cream cone? A famous chef.

A mechanic.

An ice cream lover.

A man who sold waffles.

3. How was the Popsicle invented?

B Stories:

A boy forgot a drink outside and it froze.

Someone wanted to invent a new kind of drink.

Crushed ice cubes were left outside in a bucket.

A North Pole explorer brought back a treat.

Mistakes that Succeeded

• Read the texts. The Ice Cream Cone Ernest Hamwi was a waffle maker who lived in Saint-Louis, in the United States. In 1904, he was working next to an ice cream seller who ran out of cups to serve his desserts. When Ernest saw this, he rolled a waffle into a cone shape and put a scoop of ice cream on top of it. The first ice cream cone was invented!

GLOSSARY seller: a person who sells things ran out: had no more; used up

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Unit 3

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Moulding Paste In 1944, James Wright wanted to replace rubber in his products because rubber was too expensive. He mixed some ingredients but the result of his experiment was a soft, elastic paste that bounced. James Wright thought he had failed. Six years later, Peter Hodgson played with the paste and discovered that it was both safe and fun. He decided to make a toy with it and called it “Silly Putty.” This moulding paste became one of the most popular toys in the world!

GLOSSARY freeze: to become solid because of the cold temperature nickname: humourous name; not a real name

The Slinky® The Slinky® was invented by mistake by Richard James in 1943. James wanted to fix a machine on a ship when a spring suddenly fell to the floor. He liked the way the spring flip-flopped. When he went home he experimented making springs using long, thin wire. He decided to make a simple and fun toy with it. His wife Betty called it a “slinky.” One day, he went to a toy store and presented his invention. Children and adults loved it and the Slinky® became a favourite toy for millions.

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GLOSSARY rubber: a soft, elastic material used to make tires, erasers, shoes, etc. bounce: to jump up and down

The Popsicle Frank Epperson invented the popsicle in 1905 when he was only 11 years old. One night, Epperson forgot a drink with a stick in it outside. The temperature was colder than usual and the drink froze. The next morning, Frank found his frozen drink on the porch. He lifted it out of the glass by the stick and tasted it. It was delicious. When he grew up, he started to sell his treats in different flavours and beautiful colours. His children called them popsicles because of his nickname, “Pop.”

GLOSSARY ship: a big boat flip-flop: to move back and forth

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C Show you understand 1. Use complete sentences to answer the questions below. a. When and where was the first ice cream cone invented?

b. Why did Ernest Hamwi roll a waffle into a cone shape?

c. What did James Wright want to invent?

d. How was the first popsicle invented?

e. What did Richard James like about the spring that fell to the floor?

page 65

2. Compare the objects below. Use the Grammar box on page 52 to help you. Example: A popsicle and a drink: Possible answer: A popsicle is colder than a drink. a. A waffle and a cup: b. Rubber and Silly Putty: c. A Slinky® and a spring: d. An ice cube and ice cream:

I predict. + 56

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++ +++ Unit 3

I use resources. +

++ +++

I accept that I don’t understand everything. +

++ +++

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4 Giving instructions THE IMPERATIVE We use the imperative to give instructions or warnings. When using the imperative, we use the verb without a subject. Observe what happens. Build a simple machine. Be careful! In the negative, we add don’t or do not before the verb. Don’t touch the moving parts. Do not forget to turn it on.

A How to use a new laptop

computer for the first time

page 66

• Complete the sentences using verbs in the imperative from the word bank.

plug • remove • select don’t spill • click • have • wait don’t push • place • press

1.

the computer from the box.

2.

the computer on a flat surface.

3.

the power cable into the wall.

4.

the power button to turn the computer on.

5.

for the home screen to appear.

6.

a program or application.

7.

on it with the touchpad or mouse.

8.

too hard on the keys when you type.

9.

food or liquids on it.

10.

fun with your new computer!

B Following instructions • Look at the list of instructions your teacher gives you. • With your partner, take turns giving each other instructions using the imperative. • Use the Grammar box to help you. Am I there yet?

Okay, turn left and walk 10 steps. Almost. Now turn right and pick up a piece of chalk.

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C Help, please! page 66

• Imagine you are giving instructions to your grandmother on how to use an MP3 player. • Write complete sentences using words from the word bank.

take • choose • plug listen • press

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

D Warnings • Look at the photos and give a warning. • Use the Grammar box on page 57 and the Key Language box below to help you.

Give a warning Be careful when you use tools. Stay away from the traffic. Watch out! There is a cat on the road.

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Unit 3

Don’t touch this, it’s hot. Don’t forget to wear gloves. Do not use a radio near the bathtub.

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E Play with inventions • Read the instructions in the centre of the game board. • Play the game in teams of four.

I landed on a warning sign. How about:

I think that’s a good warning.

“Be careful! Don’t play with the knife.”

Start

4

3

2

1

5

15 Rules: oving your token. • Take turns rolling the die and m mmand. • Look at the icon and follow the co

6

Compare the inventions using adjectives.

14

Give a warning.

7

Give an instruction to match the illustration.

13

he Move back or ahead according to t . row e ar n th es o number of spac

12

11

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10

8

9

Unit 3 fifty-nine

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5 Rube Goldberg machines A About Rube Goldberg • Listen to the story and read along. RUBE GOLDBERG (1883-1970) wrote for a newspaper. In his spare time, he liked to draw cartoons. He showed them to the editor of the newspaper until they were finally published. In his cartoons, Goldberg liked to invent extremely complex machines to do very simple things. Here is a typical Rube Goldberg invention: the self-operating napkin. Its function is to clean your face while you eat! His inventions use everyday objects to do simple tasks. They are silly because they are more complex than they need to be.

Every year, students around the world create their own inventions inspired by Rube Goldberg. There is even a competition called the Rube Goldberg Machine Contest where students try to build silly machines.

GLOSSARY cartoon: funny drawing typical: a common thing or activity inspire: to motivate someone to do something positive

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B Show you understand • Use complete sentences to answer the questions below. 1. What did Rube Goldberg like to do in his spare time? 2. What is the function of the self-operating napkin? 3. What do students build for the Rube Goldberg Machine Contest? 4. What makes Rube Goldberg’s inventions silly?

CONNECTING WORDS We use connecting words to express the order of events or to give instructions. 1

2

3

4

5

First

Then

Next

After that

Finally

For instructions that are more than 5 steps, we repeat the connecting words from steps 2, 3 and 4 in that order. How to operate a remote control car 1. First, place the remote control car on the ground. 2. Then, press the power button. 3. Next, turn on the remote control. 4. After that, wait for the green light to go on.

5. Then, press the “forward” button. 6. Next, move the “direction” lever to change direction. 7. Finally, take your finger off the “forward” button to stop.

C Putting things in order page 66

• Look at the Grammar box. • Add connecting words to the instructions. How to ride a bike 1.

, sit on the bike.

2.

, place one foot on a pedal and the other one on the ground.

3.

, press on the pedal to make the bike go forward.

4.

, place your other foot on the other pedal.

5.

, keep pedaling to stay up.

6.

, turn the handlebars to change direction.

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D The hair cutter • In groups of four, take turns describing how this machine works. • Use connecting words. • Use the Grammar box on page 61 and the Key Language box below to help you.

Legend: A. customer B. hand C. box of mothballs D. basket

E. rabbit F. dog G. treadmill H. mower

A. First, the customer sits in the chair. B.

I have the first step. It’s “the customer sits in the chair.”

C.

And the next step is “the hand goes up.”

D. Okay, let’s write this down.

E. F. G. H.

Keeping Track I cooperate. + 62

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++ +++ Unit 3

I speak English in class. +

++ +++

I practise. +

++ +++

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6 Project: My invention A Now, you’re the inventor • Invent an object or a machine. • Describe how it works. • Prepare to present it at a science fair. 1. Draw your invention.

2. Name your invention. 3. Explain the function of your invention.

4. Give instructions on how to use your invention. Use the imperative and connecting words. • • • • • •

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5. Give two warnings about your invention. Use the imperative. • •

6. Compare your invention to two other objects. Use adjectives.

B At the science fair • Ask your classmates about their inventions. • Take notes. Classmate

Object

Function

How it compares to other objects

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Checklist I named my invention. I explained its function. I gave instructions on how to use it. I gave warnings about my invention. I compared my invention to two other objects. I asked my classmates about their inventions. 64

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Grammar Practice A Comparing objects • Write sentences to compare the inventions in the pictures. • Use adjectives of your choice. Example: A snowmobile is faster than snowshoes.

B All you can compare • Choose two inventions from the words below. • Compare the inventions using adjectives. video game console • MP3 player • electric guitar • train • video camera • bicycle bus • space shuttle • boat • airplane • computer • tablet • book • clothes • tools Example: A book is more useful than a video game console. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

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C The imperative • Write an instruction for each word below. Example: press, negative: Don’t press the button. 1. choose, affirmative: 2. drop, negative: 3. take, affirmative: 4. use, negative:

D Connecting words • Read the instructions on how to drive a car. • Put the instructions in order and add the appropriate connecting words. put the car in gear press the brakes to slow down or stop start the engine

push on the gas pedal sit in the car turn the steering wheel to change direction

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

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Self-evaluation C1: Interacts orally in English • I cooperated with others.

sometimes  sometimes 

no 

• I spoke English in class.

yes  yes 

no 

• I used key language to participate in discussions.

yes 

sometimes 

no 

C2: Reinvests understanding of oral and written texts • I predicted the content of the texts.

yes  • I accepted that I did not understand everything. yes 

sometimes  sometimes 

no 

no 

• I used what I know to complete the activities.

yes 

sometimes 

no 

• I followed instructions and I checked my work. yes  • I used resources (Resources section, Grammar boxes, dictionary, etc). yes 

sometimes 

no 

sometimes 

no 

C3: Writes texts

My progress Trying hard

Getting better

Much better

Doing great

+

++

+++

++++

I can compare objects using adjectives. I can give instructions and warnings. I can use the imperative. I can use connecting words. I can create an invention. I can describe inventions using adjectives. My signature  My parent’s signature 

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Date 

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Unit 5

1

Buying and selling A At the local flea market • Read the dialogue. • Think about creating your own flea market.

I love this flea market. We can buy so many different things and people can sell what they want!

Me too! It’s a fun place to shop. I have an idea! Let’s organize a flea market at school! Ana and I can sell some of our old clothes.

That’s a great idea! I can sell my games that I don’t use anymore.

B Places to shop • Write the type of store under each illustration. • Use the word bank and a dictionary to help you. grocery store • department store • pharmacy • gift store • clothing store • bookstore toy store • sports store • electronics store • shoe store • online • jewellery store

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Where can we buy a dictionary?

At the bookstore.

C Where can we buy one? • With your group, discuss where you can buy each of the articles in the chart below. • Match the letter of each article with the type of store where it can be bought. Article

Type of store

A toothpaste

toy store:

B board game

shoe store:

C bottle of juice

jewellery store:

D pair of running shoes

sports store:

E bicycle

grocery store:

F set of speakers

electronics store:

G necklace

pharmacy:

H bag of lollipops

online:

I

gift store:

dictionary

Right. Let’s put the letter “I” next to bookstore.

J birthday card

department store:

K fresh fruit

clothing store:

L pair of jeans

bookstore: I

D Where do they like to shop?

• sports store • Listen to the conversation between Mrs. Willock and her students. • gifts • Complete the sentences using the word bank. • a set of speakers 1. Ana likes to shop at the . • grocery store there. She can buy • department store 2. Derek likes to shop at the . • electronics in the summer. He buys store • fresh fruit 3. Mila prefers to shop . She can • clothes and for her family and friends. buy accessories • online 4. Miguel’s favourite store is the . • running there. He can buy shoes 5. Mrs. Willock likes to buy at the .

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2 Money-wise A Pocket money • Look at the Vocabulary box. • Read the descriptions and write the total amounts.

nickel

dime

quarter

loonie

toonie

bill

Description

Amount 55¢

1. Two quarters and a nickel

$1.85

2. One loonie, three quarters and a dime 3. One toonie, one loonie and two nickels 4. Two loonies and six dimes 5. Seven quarters, two dimes and a nickel 6. Six loonies, three quarters and two dimes 7. A five dollar bill, a toonie and three nickels 8. A ten dollar bill, two dimes and two nickels

I need one $5 bill, one loonie, one quarter and two dimes.

What do you need to make $6.45 (six dollars and forty-five cents)?

B Show me the money

• Choose amounts between $1 and $100 (including cents) and write them in the “Amount” column. That’s • With your partner, take turns asking right! Now it’s each other what combination of bills your turn. and coins adds up to each amount. • Write down your partner’s answers and check to see if they are correct. Amount

$20

$10

$5 1

1. $6.45

toonie

loonie quarter 1

1

dime

nickel

2

2. $__ __ . __ __ 3. $__ __ . __ __ 4. ¢___________ 5. $__ __ . __ __ 6. $__ __ . __ __ 7. ¢___________ 8. $__ __ . __ __ 88

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QUESTIONS WITH HOW How many…? To ask about something we can count.

How much…? To ask about a price.

How many coins do you have? I have three coins. I have one quarter and two dimes.

How much is that game? It’s $15.65. How much are those sunglasses? They cost $52.50.

C Let’s practise • Complete the sentences by adding How much or How many. • Use the Grammar box to help you. 1.

is the pair of black pants?

2.

nickels are there in a quarter?

3.

soccer balls do you have in stock?

4.

are these books?

5.

litres of milk can I buy for $10.00?

6. I like this.

does it cost?

D Question the answer page 101

• For each answer, write a question using How much…? or How many…? • Use the Grammar box to help you. 1. This video game is $24.75. 2. I have three $20 bills. 3. The USB keys are $33.50 for two. 4. You need three quarters to make 75¢. 5. For $100, you can buy three games.

Really?

The origin of the name “piggy bank” has nothing to do with a pig! Around the year 1600, people made jars with a type of clay called “pygg.” When they started to put money in those jars, they called them “piggy banks.”

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E Price-tag talk page 101

• With your partner, imagine you own a clothing store. • Choose a price for each of the articles below. • Write your price on the “Me” part of the tag. • Write down your partner’s price on the “My partner” part of the tag. • Use the Key Language box to help you.

How much is your hoodie?

It’s $74.80 (seventy-four dollars and eighty cents). How much is yours?

It’s $64.35 (sixty-four dollars and thirty-five cents). How much are your jeans?

Me:

Dre

ss

$__ __._ _ My part

Belt

Jeans

Hoodie Me:

Me:

$ 64 . 35

$

Me:

.

My partner:

My partner:

$ 74 . 80

$

$

ner:

$__ __._ _

.

Me

:

My partner:

.

$

$ My

.

$

.

tne

r:

.

T-s

hir

Socks Me:

par

t

for 20$

My partner: for 20$

Hairbands Me:

for 20$

My partner: for 20$

Jacket Me: $ My partner: $

90

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Unit 5

. .

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F Is the price right? • Look at your partner’s prices in Activity E. • Take turns agreeing or disagreeing on the prices you chose. • Use the Key Language box to help you.

Agreeing

Disagreeing It’s $500. It’s a good price. What do you think?

How much is your coat?

They are 10 pairs for $20. Do you think it’s a reasonable price?

How much are your socks?

I disagree. It’s too expensive. I can’t buy a coat for $500!

Yes, they are inexpensive.

G Give your opinion • Use what you know to agree or disagree about the prices below. • Use the Key Language box to help you. 1. $30 for a pair of shoes is reasonable. I agree. Some pairs of shoes are over $100. 2. $75.95 for a pair of socks is too expensive. 3. $9.99 for an MP3 player is reasonable.

4. These ice skates are $730. They are inexpensive.

5. $200 for a bicycle helmet is inexpensive.

Keeping Track I practise.

I take risks.

+

+

++ +++

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I use what I know.

++ +++

+

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3 Story time

Use what you know

A Get ready

I get money from doing chores. We learned about chores in Grade 4.

Where do you get money to shop?

1. Use what you know. • Answer the questions using complete sentences. a. Can you name a store near your home?

b. Do you sometimes have money to shop? If so, where do you get it? c. Where can you buy a gift for a friend?

2. Predict. • Scan the story on pages 92 and 93. • Choose the statement below that best describes what the text is about. Gabriella goes shopping for a jacket.

Zoe goes shopping with Gabriella for her birthday.

Gabriella works at a toy store.

Gabriella goes shopping to find a gift for her best friend.

B Story: Shopping for a Gift • Read the text.

I’m looking for a gift for my friend. How much is that board game?

Gabriella has an after-school job. She earns money by babysitting her younger neighbours. Today, Gabrielle wants to spend some of her money on a gift for her best friend, Zoe. Zoe’s birthday is next weekend. Gabriella is going to the shopping centre and hopes to find something Zoe likes. Zoe loves to play board games, so Gabriella first goes to the Okay, thank you. toy store.

I will not buy it. Have a nice day!

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It’s $65.25.

Oh, that is too expensive! All I have is $45. Is that your final price?

Yes it is, I’m sorry. I can’t negotiate.

GLOSSARY negotiate: to discuss a price in order to agree on it © 2014, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited


Next, Gabriella goes to the electronics store. Zoe loves music. Maybe Gabriella can find something there? What is this?

It’s an MP3 player. It’s on sale for $79.85.

I only have $45. What about $69.85? That’s a very good price.

I disagree. It’s too expensive for me. I can’t buy it. Thanks anyway.

After shopping for hours, Gabriella still does not buy anything. Before she leaves the shopping centre, she stops at the sports store. She knows her best friend likes sunglasses. How much are those sunglasses?

Right now they’re three pairs for $150. They are usually $55 each!

How many pairs can I have for $45? None. Each pair is $50. I can’t buy them at that price. Can I have a discount? It’s for my friend’s birthday.

Okay, you can have one pair for $45. That’s inexpensive.

I agree. I will buy them! She will be so happy!

GLOSSARY on sale: selling at a special price none: zero, nothing discount: reduced price

Gabriella goes back home at the end of the afternoon. She is tired but very proud of her gift for Zoe. She carefully wraps the sunglasses and hides them in her bedroom. They will certainly be a nice surprise for Zoe! © 2014, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

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C Show you understand 1. Put the events in order. Write the numbers from 1 to 5. Gabriella buys a gift for her best friend. She sees an MP3 player. Gabriella goes to the shopping centre. She negotiates at the sports store. She doesn’t have enough money to buy a game. 2. What is Gabriella’s after-school job? 3. Why doesn’t Gabriella buy the board game? 4. Why does the seller say that 3 pairs of sunglasses for $150 is inexpensive? 5. For each article in the chart below, write its final price and the number of coins and bills needed to buy it. 6. Write down if you think these prices are expensive, reasonable or inexpensive. Article

Final price

Coins and bills

Board game

$20 bills $10 bills $5 bills

toonies loonies quarters

dimes nickels

expensive reasonable inexpensive

MP3 player

$20 bills $10 bills $5 bills

toonies loonies quarters

dimes nickels

expensive reasonable inexpensive

Sunglasses

$20 bills $10 bills $5 bills

toonies loonies quarters

dimes nickels

expensive reasonable inexpensive

D Practise negotiating • With your partner, practise negotiating prices for articles in the classroom. How much is the interactive whiteboard? How much is your English binder?

I agree, but I only have 50¢. Will you take that?

It’s $1.00. It’s a very good price. Okay, sold!

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It’s $200. It’s inexpensive. What about $150?

I disagree. It’s too expensive. That’s reasonable, but I will not buy it.

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4 Demonstratives DEMONSTRATIVE PRONOUNS We use this to talk about something that is near.

We use that to talk about something that is far.

What is this? It’s a magazine. This magazine is very funny.

What is that? It’s a smart watch. That smart watch is expensive.

We use these to talk about many things that are near.

We use those to talk about many things that are far.

What are these? They are books. These books are interesting.

What are those? They are board games. Those games are inexpensive.

A Choose the right one page 102

• Complete the sentences using demonstrative pronouns (this, that, these or those). • Use the Grammar box to help you. 1.

shoes are on sale this week.

2.

cakes look delicious.

3. Can I have

4. © 2014, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

lion?

is for you.

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B Using demonstrative pronouns page 102

• Write one or two sentences about what is happening in the pictures using this, that, these or those. • Use the Grammar box on page 95 to help you. 1.

2.

3.

4.

C Demonstrative pronouns game • With your group, cut out the cards your teacher gives you and place them in a pile. • Take turns picking a card and asking the person on your left a question about the item picked. It shows many coins What do you say, Mila?

Ana, it’s your turn. Pick a card.

I ask, “What are those?” Now, it’s my turn to pick a card.

Keeping Track I pay attention + 96

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++ +++ Unit 5

I speak English in class. +

++ +++

I take risks. +

++ +++

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5 Shopping basics A Questions and answers • Match the questions to the answers by writing the letter of the correct answer on each line. Question

Answer

1. Hi, can I help you?

a. It’s $5.70.

2. Do you have skipping ropes?

b. Okay, you can have it for $12.

3. How much are those books?

c. Two: black and beige.

4. How many colours do you have?

d. I’m sorry, we don’t.

5. How much is this key chain?

e. They are 3 for $76.

6. Can I have a discount?

f. Yes, I’m looking for earrings.

7. How many lollipops can I have for $5?

g. Of course you can!

8. Do you need anything else?

h. You can have ten.

9. Do you like these?

i. No, thanks. I found everything I need.

10. Can I try it?

j. Yes, I like them a lot!

B Sweet deal! • Listen to the dialogue. • Answer the questions. 1. Where does Dave go shopping? 2. What is he looking for? 3. Why does he think they are too expensive? 4. Why does he decide to buy some anyway? 5. How many sticks does he buy?

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C Shopping dialogues • Complete the shopping dialogues. • Use the questions and answers in Activity A to help you. looking for • these • help you • $10 • buy too expensive • those • discount • $15.90

No problem.

?

Hi, can 1

Do you like

Yes, I’m

No, sorry. How much are

ski googles.

They are

?

?

What about

.

?

It’s a very good price. Oh! That’s

.

Can I have a

?

Okay, I will them!

D Let’s pretend • With your partner, play the role of a seller or a buyer. • Use the sheet your teacher gives you to write a dialogue. 98

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6 Project: A classroom flea market A Our store • With your partner, create a store for your classroom flea market. • Sketch a sign that will attract buyers. Sellers: Name of store: Type of store: Articles for sale: Article

Price

Article

Price

Sketch of our sign:

Checklist We cooperated to create a store. We chose a type of store. We decided which articles we will sell and at what price. We sketched a sign for our store. © 2014, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

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B Shopping together • Split the class into two groups: the buyers and the sellers. • Follow the instructions according to your role. • When buyers have visited all the stores, change roles: sellers become buyers. If you’re a seller: • Help buyers who come to your store. • Suggest articles using demonstrative pronouns. • Negotiate prices.

If you’re a buyer: • Ask about the articles using demonstrative pronouns and questions with how much or how many. • Negotiate prices. • Pretend to buy what you like. • Complete the table in Part C.

C Shopping report • Write the name of the articles you bought, the name of the stores, the quantity and the prices. Article

Store

Quantity

Price

Checklist I played the role of a seller and the role of a buyer. I used demonstrative pronouns. I asked questions with how much and how many. I negotiated prices. I completed the shopping report. 100

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Grammar Practice A Questions with how • Complete the sentences using how much or how many. 1.

books are in your bookstore?

2. I don’t know

coins I have in my wallet.

3.

is that car?

4.

stores did you visit?

5.

do two quarters, a dime and a nickel make?

6.

toonies do you need to make $14?

7. Those soccer shoes are perfect.

are they?

8. I really like these.

do they cost?

9. I want to know 10.

apples I can have for $2.10. do you want for this beautiful coat?

B What’s the question? • Look at the price list. • For each answer, write a question using how much or how many.

1. It’s $37.25

ELECTRONIC PARADISE

Today’s specials

Wireless mouse Laptop computer USB keys (box of 3) Video games Digital camera card Cellphone

$37.25 $659 $50 2 for $39.95 $20 $375

2. You can have 2 video games for that price. 3. They are $50. 4. There are 6 items on the list. 5. 2 items are over $100. 6. You need $20 to buy one.

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C Demonstrative pronouns • Look at the pictures. • Complete the sentences using this, that, these or those. 1.

gift is for you.

2. Can I try

3.

dress?

coins are loonies.

4. Can I have

cookies?

D Write questions • For each picture, write a question using demonstrative pronouns. 1. What is that store?

2.

3.

4.

5.

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Self-evaluation C1: Interacts orally in English • I participated in exchanges. • I used key language to participate in discussions. • I took risks to communicate.

yes 

sometimes 

no 

yes  yes 

sometimes  sometimes 

no 

no 

C2: Reinvests understanding of oral and written texts • I predicted the content of the story.

yes 

sometimes 

no 

• I listened and read carefully to help me complete the activities.

yes 

sometimes 

no 

yes  yes 

sometimes  sometimes 

no 

no 

Trying hard

Getting better

Much better

Doing great

+

++

+++

++++

C3: Writes texts • I used what I know to write sentences and make predictions. • I used resources (Resources section, peers). My progress

I can create a store at a flea market. I can talk about places to shop. I can talk about money. I can negotiate prices. I can use demonstrative pronouns (this, that, these, those). I can use questions with how (how much, how many). I can participate in a classroom flea market. My signature  My parent’s signature 

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Date 

Unit 5 one

hundred and three

103


nts Table of Conte

Word order Pronouns Possessive forms (adjectives) Adverbs of frequency There is / There are Articles Adjectives Comparing adjectives

Prepositions of location Connecting words Plural nouns

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123 123 123 123 124 124 124 124

125

125 125

Resources

The verb to be The verb to have Regular verbs Irregular verbs in the simple past Functional language Asking questions Strategies Comprehension strategies Communication strategies Problem-solving strategies Reflective strategies

My personal dictionary

126 127 128 129 130 131 132 132 133 134 134 135

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Word order A simple sentence has a subject (pronoun or noun), a verb and often an object (pronoun, noun). S V  O Jack loves Kate.

S  V O He eats blueberries.

 S V O The sun shines in the sky.

Pronouns Singular

Plural

1st person 2nd person 3rd person

I am at school. You go to soccer practice. He / She / It loves cookies.

1st person 2nd person

We can’t play today. You have swimming lessons. They need their coats.

3rd person

Possessive forms (adjectives) Singular

1st person 2nd person 3rd person

My mother works late. Your homework is done. His / Her / Its toy is lost.

Plural

1st person 2nd person 3rd person

Our friend is sick. Your parents have to sign this. Their brother is going to a movie.

Adverbs of frequency Adverbs of frequency are used to talk about how often an event happens. Never

Rarely

not at all

not often

We put the adverbs before most verbs • I always walk to school. • We never take the plane.

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Sometimes from time to time but

Often

Always

many times

all the time

after the verb to be. • You are often scared at night. • They are always ready to have fun.

Resources one hundred and twenty-three 123


Functional language Delaying speaking

Asking for permission

• • • • •

• • • • •

Just a minute. Wait a minute. I’m not sure, let me think. I’m not ready. Hold on.

Asking for help or clarification • • • • • • • •

Can you help me, please? I need help. I have a problem. Can you repeat that, please? I don’t understand. How do you say that in English? What’s for lunch? How do you spell your name?

Identifying • • • • • • • •

I can climb a tree. I can’t run very fast. Can you play hockey? I’m good at skating. I’m not good at swimming. I know how to ride a bike. I don’t know how to drive a car.

Agreement, disagreement, opinion • • • • • • • •

That’s right! I agree. Maybe. I disagree. Do you agree? I think so. In my opinion, it’s not right. What do you think?

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• • • • • •

I’m happy / sad / angry. Do you like broccoli? I like / love / dislike / don’t like peas. What’s your favourite sport? My favourite sport is running. I prefer team sports.

Greetings and introductions Hi! Hello! Good morning / afternoon / evening / night. Hi, nice to meet you. Good-bye. See you later. My name is Mallory. What’s your name?

Working with partners

Capabilities • • • • • • •

Feelings, interests, tastes, preferences

• • • • • • • •

What’s this? This is an apple. It’s a train. There is a boy. There are two boys. My name is Tara. Who is it? I am a girl.

May I borrow an eraser? Can I use your pencil? Can I go to my locker? May I go to the washroom? May I go drink water?

Resources

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Do you want to work with me? Do you want to be my partner? Do you want to be in our group? It’s my turn. / It’s your turn. What do you think? That’s a good idea. Well done. You’re a good partner. Great teamwork! Not too loud. Let’s go, there are only five minutes left. Let’s get back on track. Do we have our materials?

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Asking questions Question words Who (person) • Who likes apples? • Who thinks it’s a good idea? • Who wanted to go to the movies?

Jim likes apples. I do. We wanted to go!

What (noun or action) • What is that? • What are you doing? • What time was the movie at?

It’s a book. I am watching television. It was at 4 o’clock.

Where (place) • Where is the washroom? • Where do you live? • Where are you going on vacation?

It is down the hallway. I live in St-Laurent. We’re going camping in Ontario.

When (time) • When is your birthday? • When will you eat supper? • When did you learn how to read?

My birthday is October 4th. We will eat supper around 6 o’clock. I learned how to read in Grade 1.

Why (reason) • Why are you late? • Why are you excited? • Why are you eating?

I’m late because I missed the bus. I’m excited because I won the soccer tournament. I’m eating because I am hungry.

How • How do you feel when you get a trophy? • How much is it? • How many times did you see the movie?

I feel proud. It is five dollars. I saw it three times!

Yes / No questions In general, add do or does at the beginning of a sentence to form a question. • Do you like strawberries? Yes, I love strawberries. • Does he want to go to the movies? No, he doesn’t want to go to the movies. For sentences with the verb to be, inverse the pronoun and verb. • Is it cold outside? Yes, it is freezing outside! • Were you feeling okay this morning? No, I was not feeling well. • Are you eating supper at home? Yes, I am eating supper at home. For the future tense, put will at the beginning of the question. • Will you go to the movies? No, I will not go to the movies.

© 2014, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

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Strategies Comprehension strategies Predict: Look at the title, the pictures and the keywords to help you guess what the text is about. Hmm, I think that this is about a soccer game.

Infer: Use the keywords or the information to make an intelligent guess about something.

Scan: Search for specifi c information in the text. Where does he live?

Pay attention: Actively look and listen to help you understand.

Hmm, they are black and they have sharp blades. Skates? Yes, they are probably skates.

Skim: Quickly go through the text to get a general idea of what it is about.

Take notes: Select and write the most important information. It says “Halloween is celebrated in Canada and the United States on October 31st.”

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Okay, so I will write: Where? Canada and USA. When? October 31st.

© 2014, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited


Jean-François Brochet

The All   Together Learning and Activities book develops all three ESL competencies and follows the Progression of Learning. The material in this collection offers engaging themes, provides teacher-directed learning opportunities, and allows students to take ownership of the English language.

• • • •

Pedagogical notes and answer key for each unit A CD of all the stories and listening activities Teacher’s Observation Sheets Reproducible sheets for games, activities and end-of-unit tests

Digital Versions Teacher’s Copy • Available on several platforms: USB key, MyCECZone (for PC, Mac, iPad and Android) • For whole-class use, the digital version allows you to: – project, take notes and flip through the entire Learning and Activities book – show the answer key – access all reproducible material – do interactive whiteboard activities that are compatible with NotebookTM and ActivInspire®. • Also available but only on the MyCECZone platform, you can: – share teacher’s notes and documents with your students – correct your students’ answers directly on their digital versions of the Learning and Activites book

Student Learning and Activities Book • Available only on MyCECZone (for PC, Mac, iPad and Android) • This digital version allows students to flip through the book, take notes and write in their answers.

English as a Second Language • Elementary Cycle Three, Grade 6

Teacher’s Copy

Learning and Activities

A useful Pre-unit to review Cycle Three, Grade 5 outcomes Six rich and visually-appealing units A wide variety of activities for oral interaction and written production Engaging stories for reading comprehension Practical grammar presentations and oral interaction activities Integrated writing activities Extra grammar pages for independent practice Self-monitoring activities and competency-based self-evaluations for monitoring progress

Elementary Cycle Three

Learning and Activities

Learning and Activities Book • • • • • • • •

English as a Second Language

CONFORMS TO THE PROGRESSION OF LEARNING


All Together 6e