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Edition F i n e A r t P h o t o g r ap h y ISSUE#003


Edition F i n e A r t P h o t o g r ap h y ISSUE#003

Editorial team Tori Best Rebecca Whitcombe Techincal team Michael Daglish Web Creator Natasha Wood Special thanks to University of Sunderland, Photography, Video and Digitial Imaging Students for their submissions.


Edition Edition is a fine art photography magazine from students at Northern Centre of Photography, University of Sunderland, Photography, Video and Digital Imaging BA (Hons). This magazine acts as a platform for our students to get their work out to a wider audience. In this issue we showcase a range of students’ work across all three years working in a variety of different mediums; ranging from traditional chemical and digital through to alternative processes. We would like to thank everyone for the continued success of Edition. We also want to congradulate the level 3 students on their degree show and wish them luck for the future. More work can be found over on the Edition website; www.edition-magazine.co.uk Edition editorial team


Diligence The North has been in constant flux since the heavy industries closed; the places were raw, emotional and most importantly alive, with these tensions forming the image of the North. It has taken a lot for it to recover from the downturn created by these closures, with former industrial towns and sites seen as ideal locations to impose the new identity industry of the North. Business parks have come and conquered the region. To make ends meet people now work a lot longer and later into the night and although these buildings are seen to be alive it’s completely opposed to that of the heavy industries. This technological age, fits harmoniously with the promise of the business park lifestyle: clean, friendly, purpose built spaces with emotive dÊcor, providing the comfort, security and promise of extra hours to allow people to live out their dreams. Beyond the highly sanitised spaces, people are expected to start work early, take shorter dinners, forget about breaks and not even begin to think about leaving work on time. For all they have their benefits of cleanliness and on site facilities, people are expected to be inhumanely efficient and the work to life balance ratio swings unduly towards work, with traditional social interaction and community spirit fading, we find this emerging generation much more involved with creating an identity and establishing a reputable presence within the digital realm. Times have changed in a rapid way, but this is not to say that business parks should be forgotten as un-lively, unsociable communities where one minute conformed chaos is meeting business needs and the next minute the spaces stand eerily quiet and still. These are home to a globalised generation where social interaction is merely played out over a different scale. Today’s workforce who populate the business parks, move between the many different sites on offer; there appears to be no day and night in these homogenous environments. From a distance the parks appear alive and working in the dead of night long after the workforce are gone, but it is not until we take a closer look that the eerie qualities can be appreciated.


Ladine Cook

diligence


ladine cook

diligence


Anna "You feel alone even in a crowd full of people." This image was part of a piece of work looking at the breakdown of family relationships and the harrowing feeling of loneliness which depression brings. This image forces the reader to question and think about why there is a separation between the 'every day crowd' and this one ordinary woman who is shopping just like the others. Perhaps it makes you reflect on how you feel whilst doing ordinary tasks such as shopping or sight seeing. To those that do not know the exact nature of the project they can reflect on other causes or situations which results in such isolation.


leah parker-turnock

anna


Beth Parnaby

Dreams In dreams, we are in a limitless place and there are things we can do there that would hardly be possible in reality. Through insomnia we experience sleeplessness and restlessness from the inability of remaining in a slumber for a desired duration of time.

Dreams


Beth Parnaby

Dreams


michelle forbes

Paralysed

Paralysed “I could hear everything around me, but I couldn’t move or wake up. It was if time was moving by and I was just stuck there”


michelle forbes

paralysed


janina sabaliauskaite

maturing gracefully

Maturing Gracefully This work concerns individual identity through exploring the human body with dignity and respect; with emphasis on age, pride and raw beauty - the sheer physical harmonious form, portraying the fragile yet forceful textures of the skin. Special thanks to Carole Luby


Caitlin Purvis

The Language of Flowers

The Language of Flowers We use flowers as a means to convey our emotions and to show empathy with others through various stages in life, including commercial occasions.We cultivate and consume flowers as a mass produced product, but also a  ppreciate them as a symbol of beauty through our artistic and literary practices. This series is informed by our relationship with flowers both as an idolised s ymbol of nature, but also as an item that can be used to express our own social communications and aesthetic needs. The images draw reference from the use of flowers as metaphorical objects within literature including D.H. Lawrence’s Sons and Lovers, the social use of flowers in The Victorian Dictionary of Flowers by Mandy Kirkby that explores the connotations of each individual species, and 17th Century Dutch still life paintings such as Roelandt Savery’s ‘Flowers in a Glass’ (1613).


CAITLIN PURVIS THE LANGUAGE OF FLOWERS


CAITLIN PURVIS

THE LANGUAGE OF FLOWERS


Phoebe Friggens

a little love and death

A Little Love and Death “I’m not afraid of death; I just don’t want to be there when it happens.” Woody Allen In our western culture today we are reluctant to talk about death. We embrace and document birth, yet death is seen as morbid and depressing. The Victorian tradition of memento mori, a visual chronicling and celebrating of passing on, is full of images that have evolved to become frivolous properties in the horror movie genre. For this project I have taken the Victorian tradition of romantic and sentimental commemoration, which embraces the religious and superstitious, because the end of the nineteenth century has a visual mystery as a result of the impact of early photography. I have always been intrigued how we readily embrace birth and its associated anticipation then celebration and yet forsake our involvement with death, resulting in it being hidden and disengaged. This project reflects my interest in this change in tradition which results in a rich legacy of images that are peculiar to an era we no longer fully understand. This series of images lift the lid on that which the victorians readily adopted and explore it as my own. I aim to encourage debate around the revised notion of death. The objects here have personal resonance as they chronicle moments of my personal experience. Death’s transition presents moments of visual possibility and my experience provide properties that are relevant to me and to this turning point in life.


phoebe friggens

a little love and death


phoebe friggens

a little love and death


samantha robson a state of transformation

A State of Transformation This series of portraits is a representation of the emotions we feel when coming to an end. Moving on to the next stage in life, whatever that may be. For the most part, it is an insecurity, an uncertainty of the unknown ahead. As an emerging artist, moving from education into the professional world, I feel an overwhelming sense of anticipation. Unsure of where I will go with my practice, and how I might contribute to society. Upon discussion I discovered I am not alone in this fear of the unkown ahead. As a result I have developed a series of portraits, displaying the raw emotion and insecurity of a group of people, about to take the next step in life. Reflecting upon our time in the educational system, and questioning whether we are ready to leave it behind. Having had one structure for most of our lives, leaving behind our routine. We embark onto the next stage of our lives with anticipation, not quite sure what’s around the corner.


samantha robson

a state of transformation


DEAN NUGENT

THE LOGGED ON GENERATiON

The Logged-On Generation The screen has become a big part of society within the 21st century to point where it is hard to find a place without some form of screen-based technology. The constant technological advancements being made to these technologies has made them capable of accessing an infinite number of things either online or through applications through these devices. Now they are used for both recreational and educational purposes allowing even children to easily access them to learn and play with other children. Today’s young generation can often be seen interacting with screen-based technologies more so than past generations. Children aged 5-10 seem to be more ‘technologically savvy’ than their parents and are growing up within a screenbased world. There are now many different technologies such as television screens, games consoles, laptops, tablets, hand held games consoles and smartphones that today’s generation use on a regular basis. How long does the generation of today actually spend with these different screens and what do they access? These are just two questions that are being raised in what seems to be a new pandemic in the 21st century; too much screen time for children? It is not strange in society today to see many children interfacing with screenbased technologies but this interfacing has slowly taken over what seems to be the traditional sense of childhood. Previous generation can remember their childhood differently but there are many things in common such as playing with others outside, interacting with traditional toys, reading books etc. With constant advancements in technology this sense of childhood has almost disappeared. Now this current generation can spend most of their childhood within a screen separating themselves from the real world and becoming isolated in their digital world, logging onto different systems to access a multitude of things. The gaze that a child has while looking into a screen can be un-nerving as they seem to be removed from the world and becoming ‘The Logged-on Generation’.


Dean Nugent

The Logged on generation


Dean Nugent

The Logged On Generation


Helen dorans

selfies

Selfies “Pictures taken of oneself while holding the camera at arms length� Selfies have become a popular way of taking portraits. Selfies tend to be images where we can see ourselves and the angles we look good at. Although we look good in the photos we are taking what do we really look like when we’re taking these photos? Most selfies are taken outside, on public transport or in the comfort of their home. I wanted to take people who take selfies and post them on the internet to let me photograph them in a studio in a portrait environment. With people now being able to take their own portraits and see how they look, will this affect portrait photographers?


Helen Dorans

Selfies


Unexpected Roots As consumers, we discard the fact of the truth and the false advertising that comes to potentially attract and allure ourselves when it comes to buying food. The facts and figures relating to food miles and food wastage are alarming as our food is grown all over the world and freighted to us, yet we do not realize the process that goes into maintaining the produce. There are the hidden secrets that producers will do to help keep and preserve the shelf life of fresh produce before they appear on our supermarket shelves


Kirsty Shek

unexpected roots


Kirsty Shek

unexpected roots


Robbie purvis

the m62 corridor

The M62 Corridor The M62 Corridor is a trans-Pennine motorway, running laterally across Northern England between Liverpool and Hull. Bisecting the heartland of English rugby league, the M62 connects the league strongholds of; Hull, Castleford, Wakefield, Leeds, Bradford, Huddersfield, Salford, Wigan, Warrington, Widnes and Saint Helens. Presented is an insight into Rugby League in the Northern Hemisphere. Following the Bradford Bulls through Super League XIX this project depicts the ‘greatest game in the world’. Photographs of: the blood and guts, the heartbreak, the terraces, the turf, and the turmoil; are presented alongside archival photographs and snapshots, programmes and ephemera. The M62 Corridor explores the transience of glory and the shortcomings of rugby league, however crucially it shows northerners, their sport and their character; unyielding and stoic.


Robbie Purvis

the m62 corridor


robbie purvis

the m62 corridor


Kristina Tiffin

beyond the body

Beyond the Body When we think of diseases that affect the body we rarely consider the affect on the mind. Like many conditions, Multiple Sclerosis comes in various forms and with it comes an array of symptoms. Because of this we can’t simply use MS to define all sufferers of the condition as no two individuals have the same experience. Through this series of portraits the focus is taken away from the physical side of the condition and instead turned to explore the emotional. To represent all individuals as being sufferers of Multiple Sclerosis, the images have been consciously composed to maintain a uniformed stature. Yet, to ensure this element was consistent, the distance between subject and camera differed, which in turn reflects the difference in personal experience with the condition.


Ethereal "Extremely delicate and light that seems to not be of this world". There is always that lingering feeling that is somewhat indescribable. The body is there yet the conscience feels as if it's drifting far away. It is a reminder that you are alive.


vikki scott

ethereal


Lucy o’donnell

diagnosis

Diagnosis There is no other relationship similar to that of a mother and daughters. I spent most of my childhood and life with just my mum, and to witness one of the strongest role models in my life succumb to an exhausting illness and the path she went down, was hard. Through 4 years of misdiagnoses and being undiagnosed, hospitalisations and countless hospital and doctors’ visits, I saw the decline in my mum’s health. Witnessing her in pain and complete lack of energy is nothing a daughter should have to see. This piece is a visual representation of the emotional relationship between mother and daughter created by an illness and it’s struggle.


Lucy O’Donnell

Diagnosis


steffi kammeier

buysr

BuySR Chainstores and large retailers have recently been taking over our highstreet. ‘BuySR’ aims to encourage support for our local retailers. Shopping with smaller businesses means there are more jobs available for local people and therefore, there is more money getting put back into our local economy. See project website for further information. www.buysr.weebly.com


Unknown “There are known knowns; there are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns; the ones we don't know we don't know.” Donald Rumsfeld, Former United States Secretary of Defence. In response to threats by the Nazi Regime in the mid 1930’s, Britain prepared for possible invasion, mobilising large-scale divisions of military and civilian personnel. Recovering from the defeat of the British Expeditionary Force in France, over 15,000 men were enrolled as part-time soldiers to help with the countries contingency plan. The construction of field fortifications and escape tunnels from the capital, were built to secretly move British troops around quickly and effectively. Very little remains of Britain’s anti-invasion preparations, just a few reinforced concrete pillboxes around the countryside. However, there have been recent discoveries of particular escape tunnels that were not for civilian use.


Nicole jenkinson

unknown


Nicole Jenkinson

unknown


kevin chalmers

Groverake Mine

Groverake Mine Having the natural desire to explore the British landscape, I feel compelled to visit and photograph rural areas that were once tainted by the addition of industrial architecture and are now facing dereliction. I chose to work at Groverake Mine for this series of pictures. Initially a lead mine in the 18th century, the shafts reaped the benefits of Fluorspar until 1999, when the site was closed and has remained untouched since. I travelled to the disused mine on a succession of clear nights, using nothing other than the full moon to light the landscape. These pictures demonstrate the powerful capabilities of the long exposure, allowing the camera to capture an otherwise unachievable impression of daylight.


kevin chalmers

Groverake Mine


kevin chalmers

Groverake Mine


Extinguished Extinguished is the architectural and cultural study of the night clubs and bars of a generation burdened with the pressures of a conservative government who sought to relinquish Northern England of all it had. Extinguished speaks of a generation who reacted to such pressures by expressing themselves through music, fashion and art in a way that has arguably not been seen since the nineteen eighties and has certainly not been achieved in this generation; the post internet, post aids generation in which culture and expression are nostalgic terms. The work is a comparative piece that discusses both the expression and individuality of those coming of age in the nineteen eighties and this generation’s lack of said individuality and it’s cultural plateau that is largely the result of our reliance on the internet and our complacency with the mediocre and oversaturated. Whilst Extinguished concerns in particular Newcastle upon Tyne, the redevelopment of locations formerly fundamental to a generation’s expression into locations devoid of such meaning and impact to this generation speaks of much of Northern England.


vinnie murphy

extinguished


vinnie murphy

extinguished


Aaron Adlington

Sanctum

Sanctum We may think of ourselves as above all else that inhabits our planet. But we must not forget that deep within our highly-developed selves, lies a simple mammal that once lived without the commodities we rely upon so much today. Stepping away from the man-made and engaging with the more natural environments we once called home opens up this inner spirit, allowing us to better realise, understand and contemplate with our true selves. We tune in and our imagination reclaims the mind that has been suffocated by the fumes of society, being told what is expected of us; we begin to think like a child again, where fairies lived at the bottom of the garden and elves beyond that. Like a child we begin to appreciate the simple: the sound of birdsong, the aromas of the forest and the light that dances upon the forest floor as clouds move over the sun, it's radiance breaking through the ceiling of trees as it passes by the sky. It's within this rhythmic, fleeting movement of light that hypnotises us, we inhale and exhale as the light comes and goes, we almost forget to breathe, we forget about the time constraints we, as a race, have placed upon ourselves. Constraints that we struggle to keep up with; constraints that the planet can't keep up with. It's in this seldom moment that we begin to realise that our surroundings are being encroached upon, not by the trolls and ogres of the forest, but by us. Like a cancer we're eating away at the lungs of our planet, choking it until one day it stops breathing.


Aaron Adlington

Sanctum


naTasha wood

lighting up the night

Lighting Up the Night In the 2000s, only 11% of England still had truly dark night skies according to a survey done by the Campaign to Protect Rural England. This is the root of this project, as to see the full extent of our stars, you need to have truly dark skies. The set of images provides the viewer with photographs of the night sky that represent the effect light pollution has, as well as why you may wish it not to be there. Stepping back from the cause of the pollution allowed me to capture the two scenarios. You are given the opportunity to go through the pollution and see the stars appearing above, where it does not reach.


natasha wood

lighting up the night


paddy blundell

Kosovo

Kosovo I spent my time out of education working in Kosovo, alongside the youth of the YMCA. This body of work was the documentation of the 3 months in which I worked for the ‘Roma film festival’, the people pictured were a select community that I got to know well, building friendships that I’ll never forget. Still in recovery from the war, a lot of the community were youth, all whom had been affected with loss. Their progression of moving on was very direct, coming together and helping build community projects in order to support those still struggling. This is my time with them, showing the joy they brought to others.


paddy blundell

kosovo


paddy blundell

kosovo


Ladine Cook Diligence ladineann@live.co.uk www.ladinecook.co.uk

Leah Parker-Turnock Anna leaaahh-pt@outlook.com www.facebook.com/Leah.pt.photography

Beth Parnaby Dreams bethparnaby@hotmail.co.uk www.bethparnaby.com

Michelle Forbes Paralysed shelldon25@gmail.com

Janina Sabaliauskaite Maturing Gracefully jsabaliauskaites@gmail.com


Contributors Caitlin Purvis The Language of Flowers

#003

bg13hj@student.sunderland.ac.uk

Phoebe Friggens A Little Love and Death phoebefriggens@yahoo.co.uk

Samantha Robson A State of Transformation samantha.robson91@hotmail.co.uk. www.samantharobson.webs.com

Dean Nugent The Logged On Generation bg10kx@student.sunderland.ac.uk

HelenDorans Selfies bg13nt@student.sunderland.ac.uk


Kirsty Shek Unexpected Roots kirstyshek@yahoo.co.uk

Robbie Purvis The M62 Corridor robbiepurvis1309@hotmail.co.uk www.robbiepurvis.co.uk

Kristina Tiffin Beyond the Body kristina0592@ymail.com

Vikki Scott Ethereal xvikkiscott@hotmail.co.uk

Lucy O’Donnell Diagnosis


Contributors Steffi Kammeier BuySR

#003

steffi.kammeier@hotmail.co.uk www.buysr.weebly.com

Nicole Jenkinson Unknown nicole.jenkinson@yahoo.co.uk

Kevin Chalmers Groverake Mine bg16dm@student.sunderland.ac.uk

Vinnie Murphy Extinguished bg33uq@student.sunderland.ac.uk

Aaron Adlington Sanctum A.adlington@yahoo.com


Contributors Natasha Wood Lighting Up the Night

#003

natashawood.wdp@gmail.com

Paddy Blundell Kosovo paddyblundell@googlemail.com www.paddyblundell.com


want to get your work in the next issue of edition? email us at

editionmagazine@hotmail.com www.edition-Magazine.co.uk

Contemporary fine art photography by students at University of Sunderland

Edition #003  

Contemporary fine art photography by students at University of Sunderland

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