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Show your passion for the Festival

We are a registered charity, and every donation helps to sustain us, ensuring that we continue to make the Festival a bold and unique celebration of artistic excellence accessible to the widest possible audience. There are many ways to contribute, from adding a small donation to your ticket order to joining our Friends and Patrons programme from just £60 a year or remembering us in your will. Your support really does make a difference, enabling us to stage a Festival which is the envy of the world.

To explore ways of supporting the Festival go to eif.co.uk/support-us or phone us on +44 (0)131 473 2065

Sweet Mambo Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch Photo Jong Duk Woo Charity No SC004694

Support us

The Festival has been bringing unparalleled performances and the finest artists to audiences from Edinburgh and around the world for 67 years. Presenting a Festival of this scale, ambition and quality as well as our year-round education and outreach programme is costly and with ticket sales covering less than one-third of our annual operating budget, your donations are vital to the Festival’s continued success.


Contents

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Edinburgh International Festival 8 – 31 August 2014 Contents

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02 Welcome to the Festival Festival partners, online and access

57 Virgin Money Fireworks Concert Spectacular Festival finale

04 Festival 2014 Supporters They help make the Festival happen

58 Talks and Discussions Reflecting on the impact of war

06 Opera Trojan horses, principles and pacifism 10 Theatre Compelling history, film noir seductresses, puppets, poets and elephants 22 Dance From the rainbow nation to the Mahabharata 30 Cultural Explorers Wondrous music, reimagined film footage and a live installation

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62 Conversations with Artists Festival artists reveal the ideas behind their work 63 Festival Insights A chance to dance, screenings and creative talks

34 The Opening Concert Oliver Knussen conducts Debussy

64 A Festival for Everyone Tickets for young musicians, our Suggest my Fest app and a call for singers and artistic entrepreneurs

35 Music The finest orchestras, ensembles and soloists

65 Accessing your Festival Make the most of your visit to our venues

46 Greyfriars Atmospheric early evening concerts

66 How to Book

48 The Queen’s Hall Series Lively morning recitals to start your Festival day

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61 War on Film Seminal films telling stories of love, honour and dissent

67 Ticket Discounts and Special Offers 68 Festival City Information for visitors to the Festival and Edinburgh 70 Festival Diary Helping you plan your Festival


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Welcome to the Festival

Photo Seamus McGarvey

Welcome to Festival 2014 ‘It is the destiny of the artist not to serve those who make history, but to serve those who are its victims’ ALBERT CAMUS

Our Festival owes its origins to a belief in the transformational power of culture. Created in 1947 to ‘provide a platform for the flowering of the human spirit’ through the beauty of art as an alternative to forces of destruction and devastation, the Festival creates an opportunity to celebrate the best of humanity between peoples of all nations. Presented almost exactly 100 years since the outbreak of the First World War, Festival 2014 is a compelling exploration of the impact of history, most especially during periods of warfare and unrest, and the immense influence exerted by a powerful few on issues of national identity, the forging of our cultures, and the lives of people throughout the world. Our historical perspective stretches back many millennia to epic battles between the ancient civilisations of Greece and Troy; to depictions of the much-feared figure of the ‘armed man’ in the sacred music of medieval Europe; and at home here in Scotland among the treachery and combat between families in pursuit of the Scottish crown in the 15th century. We explore homages to heroism and the transcendence of tragedy from artists as diverse as Leonard Bernstein, Benjamin Britten, Gabriele D’Annunzio, Franz Josef Haydn, Gabriel García Lorca, Wilfred Owen, Olivier Messiaen, Giovanni Palestrina, Erich Maria Remarque and Virgil.

It is often in the darkest of times that artists can be at their most sublime. Festival 2014 is replete with works that defy the immediate circumstances of their creation; lines of poetry that radiate exquisite beauty beyond muddy trenches; or melodies that make the heart soar above cities under siege; taken together, and experienced with the unique intensity offered by Edinburgh in August, these words and songs, gestures and images, offer the truest glimpses of optimism and transcendence. In a year in which Scotland is proud to host the Commonwealth Games, the Festival also features artists and work from Australia, Canada, New Zealand and especially South Africa, this year celebrating the 20th anniversary of its democracy; all countries which share aspects of our history and traditions. Great art offers a unique space in which to contemplate, or escape, the monumental challenges of humanity. Join us on a potent and poignant journey through inspiring stories of optimism, strength and defiance as we recollect those flashes in time when civilisations have been shaken to their core. Jonathan Mills


Welcome to the Festival

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Festival Merchandise As official broadcast partner, BBC Radio 3 brings the Festival to those who would otherwise miss out. Through live and future broadcasts, and entertaining and insightful coverage, the Edinburgh International Festival can be enjoyed throughout the UK and across the world thanks to this visionary partnership. Full details at bbc.co.uk/radio3

Glasgow 2014 The season of work from South Africa at Festival 2014 is part of the Glasgow 2014 Culture Programme and has been supported by Culture 2014, the City of Edinburgh Council and the Department of Arts and Culture, South Africa. It represents a unique partnership which ensures that Edinburgh’s Festivals are at the heart of the national celebrations around the Commonwealth Games. Culture 2014 is a national programme that showcases dance, theatre, music, visual arts, comedy and much more in the run up to and after the Commonwealth Games. The Culture Programme is a partnership between the Glasgow 2014 Organising Committee, Glasgow Life and Creative Scotland. www.glasgow2014.com/culture

Edinburgh International Culture Summit 2014

Check out the Festival’s exclusive new range of t-shirts, mugs, keyrings and bags, among its other popular ranges of clothing, and buy online now. Scotland’s beautiful bluebell features across this range, making it the perfect souvenir. eif.co.uk/souvenirs

Festival Online – eif.co.uk Hear direct from the artists, experience the music, watch glimpses of some of this year’s performances and read articles from leading journalists at eif.co.uk. Working with our digital media partners Sinfini we also bring you closer to the artists and music through cartoons, films, playlists, guides and competitions both on the Festival site and at sinfinimusic.com A partnership with The Edinburgh Film Company brings the Festival’s YouTube channel to life both before the Festival and during. Visit eif.co.uk/youtube to see the latest interviews, glimpses into rehearsals and to hear from our audiences on opening nights. And we want to hear from you! Join in the conversation on Twitter #EdintFest, like our Facebook page and post your photos and comments for Festival friends to share. New diary, travel and accommodation tools online make it easier for you to plan your visit to the Festival. And signing up to our newsletter will deliver the latest news and offers direct to you.

In August 2012 The Scottish Parliament hosted the first ever Edinburgh Visit eif.co.uk International Culture Summit as part of an innovative partnership between the Edinburgh International Festival, the UK and Scottish Governments and the British Council. The extraordinary cultural energy of Edinburgh in August formed a unique backdrop for a gathering An Accessible Festival for All of Culture Ministers and officials from 33 nations who met artists and thinkers from around the world for a series of debates and Look out for these logos in the brochure for accessible performances. conversations about forging international dialogue through culture. See page 67 for details of discounts and page 65 for venue access information. The second Summit will be hosted at The Scottish Parliament between 10 and 12 August 2014. Plenary sessions will be webcast, with some Audio Described tickets for the Gallery of The Scottish Parliament available to the public. Touch Tour For further details visit www.culturesummit.com British Sign Language Captioned performance Speech-to-Text Reported


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Festival 2014 Supporters

Thank you to all our Festival 2014 supporters The core investment that the Edinburgh International Festival receives from the City of Edinburgh Council and Creative Scotland plays a critical role in ensuring our stability and success. Crucial support from other public sector bodies, charitable funds, the corporate sector, international partners and agencies, trusts and foundations and our individual benefactors, patrons and friends is also vitally important in enabling us to maintain the Festival’s scale and quality. We are grateful to all these organisations and individuals, who make the Festival possible.

Festival Partners Automotive Partner

Document Solutions Partner

Opening Concert Partner

City Dressing Partner

Festival Partner

Grants Official Retail Partner

Hosting & Network Services Partner

University Partner

Project Grants

Hotel Partner

Website Partner

Fireworks Concert Partner

Digital Media Partner

Hotel Partner

Supported through the Scottish Government’s Edinburgh Festivals Expo Fund

Production Sponsors

MAGAZINE

Principal Supporters

Dunard Fund Léan Scully EIF Fund

®

your platform, your future

Edinburgh International Festival Society is registered as a company in Scotland (No SC024766) and as a Scottish Charity (No SC004694) Registered Address: The Hub, Castlehill, Edinburgh EH1 2NE


Festival 2014 Supporters

Principal Donors American Friends of the Edinburgh International Festival The Director’s Circle

Creative New Zealand Toi Aotearoa Culture.pl Department of Arts and Culture, South Africa

Benefactor James and Morag Anderson Geoff and Mary Ball

The Embassy of the Kingdom of The Netherlands, London

Ewan and Christine Brown

The Embassy of the United States of America, London

Joscelyn Fox

The Government of Flanders

Frank Hitchman

Institut français d’Ecosse

Niall and Carol Lothian

The Italian Cultural Institute, Edinburgh

Donald and Louise MacDonald

Italian Embassy in London

David McLellan

The Ministry of Culture, Taiwan

Jean and Roger Miller

The Ministry of Culture of the Russian Federation

Mairi Rankin

Sheraton Grand Hotel & Spa

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation

Keith and Andrea Skeoch

Waldorf Astoria Edinburgh – The Caledonian

Québec Government Office, London

Edinburgh International Festival Benefactors Edinburgh International Festival Endowment Fund Edinburgh International Festival Friends and Patrons

Corporate Friends Bank of Scotland Maclay Murray & Spens LLP Shell U.K. Limited

Corporate Associates A.G. Barr p.l.c. Alba Water ANTA Appetite Direct Cullen Property

Royal Norwegian Consulate General in Edinburgh

Jim and Isobel Stretton Andrew and Becky Swanston John-Paul and Joanna Temperley

Taipei Representative Office in the UK, Edinburgh Office

Jonathan Tidswell

The United States Consulate General, Edinburgh

Mr Hedley G Wright

The Glasshouse, Autograph Collection Hotels

The Bacher Trust The Binks Trust

HEINEKEN

Cruden Foundation Limited

Hotel du Vin & Bistro, Edinburgh

The Peter Diamand Trust

Justerini & Brooks

The Evelyn Drysdale Charitable Trust

Kyloe Restaurant & Grill

Gordon Fraser Charitable Trust

Medicalternative

The Inches Carr Trust

Omni Centre Edinburgh

Eda, Lady Jardine Charitable Trust

Royal Society of Edinburgh

The Morton Charitable Trust

Scottish Beverage Services

The Nancie Massey Charitable Trust

Springbank Distillers Ltd

The Negaunee Foundation The Pirie Rankin Charitable Trust

International Partners and Agencies

Risk Charitable Fund

Australia Council for the Arts

The Russell Trust

Australian High Commission, London

The Stevenston Charitable Trust

British Council

The Sym Charitable Trust

Consulate General of the Republic of Poland in Edinburgh

Michael Shipley and Philip Rudge

Susie Thomson

Dimensions (Scotland) Ltd

Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany, Edinburgh

Gavin and Kate Gemmell

Taipei Representative Office in the UK

Trusts and Foundations

Canadian High Commission to the United Kingdom

Roxane Clayton

The Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo

Benefactors and Patrons Thank you to the following individuals for their support of Festival 2014.

Consulate General of Spain

Legacies

Consulate of the Kingdom of The Netherlands, Edinburgh

Miss Sybil Laurie McKillop

Vincent George Gale MRCVS Christina Clark Young

Claire and Mark Urquhart Zachs-Adam Family

Platinum Reserve J Attias Richard Burns Jo and Alison Elliot Aileen and Stephen Nesbitt

Platinum Supporter Roger and Angela Allen William and Elizabeth Berry Neil and Karin Bowman Katie Bradford Carola Bronte-Stewart Chris Carter and Stuart Donachie The Rt Hon Lord Clarke Lord and Lady Coulsfield Tom and Alison Cunningham Sue and Andy Doig Claire Enders Mr and Mrs Ted W Frison Gillian Gaines Celia F Goodhew Raymond and Anita Green George and Ann Gwilt David and Judith Halkerston Kenneth Harrold

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Shields and Carol Henderson André and Rosalie Hoffmann J Douglas Home Dr Jean Horton Peter Horvath and Barnett Serchuk Sir Brian and Lady Ivory Alan M Johnston Fred and Ann Johnston Paul and Christine Jones Mr and Mrs Roddy Jones Prof Ludmilla Jordanova David and Brenda Lamb Norman and Christine Lessels Alan Macfarlane Chris and Gill Masters Duncan and Una McGhie David Milne and Liz Sharpe Patricia and Alex Neish Nick and Julie Parker Tanya and David Parker Lady Potter Donald and Brenda Rennie Sir Duncan Rice and Lady Rice Mr Andrew and Mrs Carolyn Richmond Ross Roberts Fiona and Ian Russell Charles Smith Robin and Sheila Wight Mark and Ulrike Wilson Ruth Woodburn Neil and Philippa Woodcock Mrs Irené M Young And others who prefer to remain anonymous

Event Supporters National Union of Journalists Scotland and Edinburgh Branches University and College Union Scotland Musicians Union Scotland and Northern Ireland Educational Institute of Scotland Edinburgh Branch and EIS – University Lecturer’s Association Unison – Lothian Health and City of Edinburgh Branches Unite Edinburgh Not For Profit Branch Edinburgh Trades Union Council


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Opera

Les Troyens

Sung in French with English supertitles Enée Sergei Semishkur (28 & 30 August) Cassandre Ekaterina Gubanova (28 & 30 August) Mlada Khudolei (29 August) Didon Ekaterina Semenchuk (28 & 30 August) Anna Markarova (29 August)

HECTOR BERLIOZ LIBRETTO BY HECTOR BERLIOZ AFTER VIRGIL

Chorèbe Alexei Markov (28 & 30 August) Vladislav Sulimsky (29 August)

Mariinsky Opera

Narbal Mikhail Petrenko (28 & 30 August) Yuri Vorobiev (29 August) Valery Gergiev Conductor Yannis Kokkos Director

‘the Mariinsky Orchestra gleamed with typical warmth and radiance’ TIMEOUT, NEW YORK

‘Gergiev’s performance was charged with intensity’

Photos Marie-Noëlle Robert / Théâtre du Châtelet

THE NEW YORK TIMES


Opera Love and war; obedience and loyalty; fate and freedom. Berlioz’s visionary Les Troyens is opera on an epic scale, and deals with some of mankind’s profoundest questions in a work of exceptional power and sensual lyricism.

Thursday 28 – Saturday 30 August 5.00pm Festival Theatre

Valery Gergiev conducts the exceptional performers of his Mariinsky Opera, last heard in the acclaimed production of Strauss’s Die Frau ohne Schatten at Festival 2011, in a spectacular, colourful production by the celebrated Greek-born director Yannis Kokkos.

Tickets* £95 £75 £60 £50 £35 £30 £20 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 5 hours 30 minutes approximately Two intervals include a 45-minute supper break. See page 67 for details on how to pre-book a theatre supper.

From the Trojans’ dutiful acceptance of the famous wooden horse into their beseiged city through to Enée’s flight to Carthage and beyond, the opera presents an awe-inspiring vision of the ancient world, in music both monumental and intimate, glittering and solemn. Les Troyens shows Berlioz at the height of his dramatic powers, in a work whose scale and ambition approach those of Wagner’s Ring cycle.

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eif.co.uk/troyens

Supported by

Production sponsors

Dunard Fund James and Morag Anderson Mariinsky UK tour supported by BP


Image EIF

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Opera


Opera

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Owen Wingrave BENJAMIN BRITTEN LIBRETTO BY MYFANWY PIPER AFTER HENRY JAMES

Aldeburgh Music Sung in English with English supertitles Owen Wingrave Ross Ramgobin Spencer Coyle Jonathan Summers Lechmere Isaiah Bell Miss Wingrave Susan Bullock Mrs Coyle Samantha Crawford Mrs Julian Janis Kelly Kate Catherine Backhouse General Sir Philip Wingrave Richard Berkeley-Steele Ballad singer James Way Mark Wigglesworth Conductor Neil Bartlett Director Simon Daw Set designer Sue Willmington Costume designer Chris Davey Lighting designer Struan Leslie Choreographer Britten-Pears Orchestra

How strongly would you value your principles, even if they brought you into conflict with your family and friends? Would you put yourself in danger to demonstrate what you believe? In 1968, as protests against the Vietnam War dominated the news, Britten responded to a BBC commission for a television opera by returning to a theme that had haunted him since the 1930s – pacifism. Using a libretto by Myfanwy Piper – his collaborator on The Turn of the Screw and Death in Venice – Owen Wingrave sets Henry James’s story of one troubled young man’s fight to escape from his family’s militarism to music of angry intensity and desolate beauty. This new production by the acclaimed director and author Neil Bartlett offers a rare chance to reassess this controversial work. A glorious cast mixes leading professional singers – Susan Bullock, Janis Kelly, Richard Berkeley-Steele and Jonathan Summers – with emerging talent from the BrittenPears Young Artist Programme including Ross Ramgobin and Isaiah Bell. Mark Wigglesworth conducts the Britten-Pears Orchestra in David Matthews’s chamber version of the score. A co-production between the Aldeburgh Festival and the Edinburgh International Festival

‘a masterpiece’ THE GUARDIAN

Neil Bartlett: ‘an artist who can really change the way people feel’ THE OBSERVER

Friday 15 & Sunday 17 August 7.30pm King’s Theatre Tickets* £35 £28 £25 £22.50 £20 £15 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 2 hours 15 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/owenwingrave Sunday 17 August 6.15pm

7.15pm

Supported by

Edinburgh International Festival Friends and Patrons


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Theatre

The James Plays

‘It all comes round, it all comes round again whatever you do’ JAMES III

BY RONA MUNRO

World Premiere National Theatre of Scotland and National Theatre of Great Britain Performed in English Laurie Sansom Director Jon Bausor Designer Cast includes Cameron Barnes, Daniel Cahill, Blythe Duff, Peter Forbes (James I and James II only), Sofie Gråbøl (James III only), Sarah Higgins, Stephanie Hyam, James McArdle (James I only), Rona Morison, Andrew Rothney, Mark Rowley, Jamie Sives (James I and James III only) and Fiona Wood

The James Plays – James I, James II and James III – are a new cycle of history plays by award-winning playwright Rona Munro. This vividly imagined trilogy brings to life three generations of Stewart Kings who ruled Scotland in the tumultuous 15th century. Each play stands alone as a unique vision of a country tussling with its past and future; viewed together they create a complex and compelling narrative on Scottish culture and nationhood full of playful wit and boisterous theatricality. A co-production by the National Theatre of Scotland, the Edinburgh International Festival and the National Theatre of Great Britain

Supported through the Scottish Government’s Edinburgh Festivals Expo Fund


Theatre

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James I: The Key Shall Keep The Lock Featuring James McArdle as James I and Blythe Duff as Isabella

Bold and irreverent storytelling explores the complex character of this colourful Stewart king – a poet, a lover, a law-maker but also the product of a harsh political system.

Photo Barbara Agnew

James I of Scotland was captured when he was only 13 and became King of Scots in an English prison. Eighteen years later he’s finally delivered back home with a ransom on his head and a new English bride. He’s returning to a poor nation, the royal coffers are empty and his nobles are a pack of wolves ready to tear him apart at the first sign of weakness. James is determined to bring the rule of law to a land riven by warring factions, but that struggle will force him to make terrible choices if he is to save himself, his Queen and the crown.


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Theatre

James II: Day of The Innocents Featuring Andrew Rothney as James II and Mark Rowley as WIlliam Douglas

In the second part of Rona Munro’s thrilling trilogy, innocent games merge with murderous intent in a violent royal playground of shifting realities and paranoia. Crowned King of Scots when only eight years old, James II is the prize in a vicious game between the country’s most powerful families. Seen through a child’s eyes, the Scottish court is a world of monsters with sharp teeth and long knives. Growing up alone, abandoned by his mother and separated from his sisters, James II is little better than a puppet. There is only one relationship he can trust – his growing friendship with another lonely boy, William, the future Earl of Douglas. But the independence and power of young adulthood brings James into an even more threatening world. He has to fight the warring nobles who still want to control him, he has to make brutal choices about the people he loves best, he has to struggle to keep his tenuous grip on the security of the crown and on his sanity… while the nightmares and monsters of his childhood rise up again with new and murderous intent.

James III: The True Mirror Featuring Jamie Sives as James III and Sofie Gråbøl as Queen Margaret

Like James III himself, the final instalment of Rona Munro’s extraordinary trilogy is colourful, brash and unpredictable. It turns its eye on the women of the royal court, both lowly and high-born, who prove to be its beating heart. Irresistible, charismatic, a man of fashion and culture, James III is a man with big dreams… and no budget to realise any of them. But he’s convinced a true king should never allow such minor details to deprive his people of the magnificent European-style court they deserve. Obsessed with grandiose schemes that his nation can ill afford, James is loved and loathed in dangerously unstable proportions. But Scotland’s future will be decided by the woman who loves him best of all, his resourceful and resilient wife, Queen Margaret of Denmark. As the nation thunders dangerously close to regicide and civil war, her true love and clear vision offer the only protection that can save a fragile monarchy and rescue a struggling people. But the cost for Margaret herself may be too high…

James I, James II & James III (all 3 plays in the same day): Sunday 10, Saturday 16, Sunday 17 & Wednesday 20 August 12 noon, 4.00pm & 8.15pm James I (only): Tuesday 12 & Tuesday 19 August 7.30pm James II (only): Wednesday 13 & Thursday 21 August 7.30pm James III (only): Thursday 14, Friday 15 & Friday 22 August 7.30pm Festival Theatre

Tickets* £35 £25 £20 £15 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. Special Offer Buy tickets for all three plays and save 20% (excludes Previews)

Previews James I: Tuesday 5 August 7.30pm James II: Thursday 7 August 7.30pm James III: Saturday 9 August 7.30pm Tickets* £15 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. Parts 1, 2 and 3 each 2 hours 30 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/jamesplays Please note these performances contain strong language and nudity and may not be suitable for children Tuesday 12, Wednesday 13 and Thursday 14 August 7.30pm

7.15pm

6.15pm Saturday 16 August 12 noon, 4.00pm and 8.15pm Sunday 17 August 12 noon, 4.00pm and 8.15pm 11.45am, 3.45pm and 8.00pm

Photo Barbara Agnew


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Photo Roger-Viollet Topfoto

Theatre

The War World Premiere

Chekhov International Theatre Festival / SounDrama Studio Performed in Russian with English supertitles Vladimir Pankov Director Irina Lychagina Libretto Maxim Obrezkov Set and costume designer Nikolai Surkov Lighting designer Artem Kim and Sergei Rodyukov Music directors Sergei Zemlansky and Ekaterina Kislova Choreography

‘Pankov possesses a unique ability to hear literature and the world around him as a universe of sounds’ RUSSKAYA GAZETA

Saturday 9 – Monday 11 August 8.00pm Sunday 10 August 3.00pm King’s Theatre Tickets* £32 £25 £17 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 2 hours approximately eif.co.uk/thewar

Supported by

The Director’s Circle

1913. A group of young people celebrate Christmas in Paris. They share interests, a love for the arts and a deep aversion to common morals. An international circle of poets and artists, they wish to establish new trends in painting and literature, believing that Beauty will save the world. One of the hottest topics of conversation is war. Some think any war is the greatest catastrophe, while others think war is a necessary evil, destroying old ideas and ideals, clearing the way for new ones. When war becomes a painful and terrifying reality less than a year later, they are forced to drastically re-examine their principles and beliefs. Through his innovative ‘sound drama’ technique, where music, movement and rhythm heighten the dramatic action, Russian director Vladimir Pankov’s new production explores the deep psychological and physical impact of war and of how through art we can help provide a vision for the future. A co-production between the Chekhov International Theatre Festival and the Edinburgh International Festival


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Theatre

‘Courageous, confronting, intelligent and magisterially considered theatre.’

Photo Jeff Busby

THE AGE

Ganesh Versus the Third Reich Saturday 9, Monday 11 & Tuesday 12 August 7.30pm Sunday 10 August 2.30pm

Monday 11 August

Royal Lyceum Theatre Edinburgh

Tuesday 12 August

Tickets* £32 £25 £21 £17 £10 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

7.30pm

1 hour 45 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/ganesh

Please note this performance contains strong language and adult themes that might not be suitable for children.

Supported by

The Pirie Rankin Charitable Trust

Performed in English, German and Sanskrit with English supertitles Bruce Gladwin Director, devisor and design Mark Deans, Marcia Ferguson, Nicki Holland, Simon Laherty, Sarah Mainwaring, Scott Price, Kate Sulan, Brian Tilley and David Woods Devisors Cast Mark Deans, Simon Laherty, Scott Price, Brian Tilley and David Woods

Ganesh Versus the Third Reich is poignant, heart-warming, beautiful, disarming, full of vulnerability and sly humour, questioning who has the right to tell a story and who has the right to be heard.

7.30pm

6.15pm

Back to Back Theatre

7.15pm

A young man is inspired to create a play about Ganesh, the Hindu god of overcoming obstacles. In his story, the elephant-headed god travels through Nazi Germany to reclaim the swastika, an ancient Hindu symbol. But as the play unfolds the actors themselves begin to feel the weighty responsibility of storytellers, and the director must find the strength to overcome the difficulties in his own life, and defend his play and his collaborators against an overbearing colleague. Back to Back Theatre creates new forms of contemporary theatre from the perspectives of a unique ensemble of actors, giving voice to social and political issues that speak to everyone.


Theatre

15

‘Eyre’s exquisitely understated performance is a masterclass in how to make something very hard look effortless’ THE GUARDIAN

‘Philosophical, funny… irresistably comic, but moving… It blew me away.’

Image Konstantinos Veletas

THE TIMES ON TOM CAIRNS’S SCENES FROM AN EXECUTION

Minetti BY THOMAS BERNHARD

Performed in English Minetti Peter Eyre Tom Cairns Director and designer

‘A bitter fool’ King Lear The lobby of a grand hotel, New Year’s Eve. A snow storm rages. Minetti, a long-forgotten actor, arrives in great spirits to discuss his comeback as King Lear with a theatre director.

Saturday 16 – Monday 18 August 8.00pm Sunday 17 August 2.30pm

Supported by

Royal Lyceum Theatre Edinburgh Tickets* £32 £25 £21 £17 £10 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 2 hours approximately eif.co.uk/minetti

U.S. Embassy, London

While he waits patiently in the hotel lobby, Minetti's obsessive personality reveals itself in a series of strange encounters with other guests. He rails against outrageous fortune and unfulfilled ambitions, often colliding with crowds of young hotel guests who frequently burst in to celebrate New Year’s Eve. As with King Lear, the storm which rages outside reflects his turbulent emotions until he finally finds peace and resolution. Director Tom Cairns brings Thomas Bernhard’s rarely performed masterpiece to life, in a moving portrait of a once celebrated actor now isolated and forgotten. Starring Peter Eyre as Minetti, the production is a collaboration with two of the world’s great dramatic institutions: the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, London, and The Juilliard School, New York, whose young actors provide an anarchic presence throughout. An Edinburgh International Festival production


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Theatre

FRONT A POLYPHONIC PERFORMANCE BASED ON ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT BY ERICH MARIA REMARQUE, UNDER FIRE BY HENRI BARBUSSE AND CONTEMPORARY SOURCES ADAPTED BY LUK PERCEVAL, CHRISTINA BELLINGEN AND STEVEN HEENE

Thalia Theater Performed in German, French, Flemish and English with English supertitles Luk Perceval Director Annette Kurz Staging Ilse Vandenbussche Costume designer Ferdinand Försch Music Mark van Denesse Lighting designer Philip Bussmann Video Christina Bellingen and Steven Heene Dramaturgy

‘ingenious, subtle and unforgettable’ THE WALL STREET JOURNAL ON THALIA THEATER’S HAMLET

‘visually stunning… conceptually elegant’ FINANCIAL TIMES ON LUK PERCEVAL’S ANDROMACHE

‘Sensational’ THE GUARDIAN ON LUK PERCEVAL’S ANDROMACHE

‘I see that people are forced against each other and in silence, unknowingly, foolishly, obediently, innocently slay. I see that the smartest brains of the world invent weapons and words to make it all even more sophisticated and longer lasting.’ Paul Bäumer, German soldier in the novel All Quiet on the Western Front. Belgium 1914–18. Despite its neutrality, this small country has been, for over four years, the battlefield for foreign powers vying for supremacy in a horrifying conflict seemingly without end. On the Western Front, German, Flemish, French and English lie facing each other in the trenches.


Theatre

Illustration Clifford Harper

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Young men who went to war with a love of life are being traumatised by their experiences of a brutal conflict that will soon be known as the primal catastrophe of the 20th century – the First World War. The Great War. In four languages and from four different perspectives, Flemish director Luk Perceval returns to the Festival for the first time since 2004’s Andromache. An international ensemble combines Remarque’s moving depiction of German soldiers’ extreme mental and physical stress with Flemish contemporary sources to explore the horror from both sides of the trenches. A co-production by Thalia Theater, Hamburg, and NTGent

Friday 22 – Tuesday 26 August 7.00pm Royal Lyceum Theatre Edinburgh Tickets* £32 £25 £21 £17 £10 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 3 hours 30 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/front

Supported by


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Theatre


Theatre

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Helen Lawrence CONCEIVED BY STAN DOUGLAS WRITTEN BY CHRIS HADDOCK STORY BY STAN DOUGLAS AND CHRIS HADDOCK

Canadian Stage Performed in English Stan Douglas Director Sarah Garton Stanley Associate director Rachel Ditor and Matthew Jocelyn Dramaturgy Kevin McAllister Set designer Nancy Bryant Costume designer Rob Sondergaard Lighting designer John Gzowski Sound designer

Vancouver, 1948: wrath, greed, sloth, pride, lust, envy and gluttony all take a turn in a time of fear, paranoia, rage and desperation. The police make pacts with the gangsters who run the whorehouses and gambling joints as Vancouver reinvents itself in the aftermath of the Second World War.

Sunday 24 – Tuesday 26 August 8.00pm Monday 25 August 3.00pm King’s Theatre Tickets* £32 £25 £17 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

A stranger arrives to settle an account of her own, struggling through a fog of psychosis, pills and 1 hours 30 minutes approximately booze to track her target from one end of the city to the other and leaving a trail of murder in her wake. eif.co.uk/helenlawrence Is she victim or perpetrator, seduced or seductress? Tuesday 26 August Has she arrived to flee her past or seek revenge? What she finds is a treacherous, shape-shifting 6.45pm 7.45pm landscape of police and pimps, soldiers and refugees, damaged goods and ghostly lovers – 8.00pm all scrambling to find their feet in the shifting sands. A cinematic stage production from world-renowned visual artist and filmmaker Stan Douglas and acclaimed screenwriter and producer Chris Haddock, Helen Lawrence is inspired by postwar film noir and intertwines theatre, visual art, live-action filming and computer-generated historical backgrounds for a groundbreaking multimedia thriller. A co-production by Canadian Stage, Arts Club Theatre Company, Vancouver, The Banff Centre, Stan Douglas Inc, Festival TransAmériques and Canada’s National Arts Centre Please note this performance contains strong language that may not be suitable for children.

Supported by

Ewan and Christine Brown With additional support from

Canadian High Commission to the United Kingdom


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Theatre

‘stunningly theatrical multimedia piece that drives home the atrocity known as apartheid… By turns chilling and hilarious, brutal and forgiving, the show casts a surreal light on the heart of darkness – and still manages to leave you with hope.’ THE WASHINGTON POST

‘executed with consummate artistry’ LOS ANGELES TIMES

Ubu and the Truth Commission Handspring Puppet Company Performed in English William Kentridge Director Janni Younge Associate Director Jane Taylor Writer Adrian Kohler Puppet designer Wesley France Lighting designer Cast includes Busi Zokufa and Dawid Minnaar


Photos Ruphin Condyzer

Theatre

With its dark and sardonic wit, documentary footage, spectacular animation, poignant puppetry and superb actors, Ubu and the Truth Commission draws on both the historical archive of the hearings of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission and on the dramatic figure of Ubu Roi, a licentious buffoon created by the playwright Alfred Jarry. Ubu and the Truth Commission was the third in a trilogy of plays that brought William Kentridge and Handspring Puppet Company, who later created War Horse, to worldwide acclaim. Revived to mark the 20th anniversary of democracy in South Africa, this metaphorical tale of marital betrayal affords glimpses into the devastating complexities of apartheid. Poignant testimonies that once formed part of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings are given by characters played by Handspring’s puppets. With animation by director William Kentridge, the cast includes actors Busi Zokufa and Dawid Minnaar as Ma and Pa Ubu. A co-production by the Edinburgh International Festival, The Taipei Arts Festival and Taipei Culture Foundation, Festival de Marseille _ danse et arts multiples, Onassis Cultural Centre, Cal Performances Berkeley and BOZAR, Brussels

Thursday 28 – Saturday 30 August 8.00pm Saturday 30 August 2.30pm

Supported by

Royal Lyceum Theatre Edinburgh Tickets* £32 £25 £21 £17 £10 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 1 hour 30 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/ubu Saturday 30 August 1.15pm

2.15pm

2.30pm SOUTH AFRICA – UNITED KINGDOM SEASONS 2014 & 2015

Please note this performance contains graphic images of violence that may not be suitable for children

Inspiring new ways

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Dance

‘A truly unique collaboration’

‘Undulating rhythmic phrases that push and pull… harmonising that is both ethereal and earthy’ WORLD MUSIC, UK, ON LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO

Photo Simon Turtle

FORMER ROYAL BALLET DIRECTOR DAME MONICA MASON


Dance

Inala World Premiere

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Mark Baldwin Choreographer Joseph Shabalala, Ladysmith Black Mambazo and Ella Spira Composers

Sunday 10 – Tuesday 12 August 8.00pm

Ladysmith Black Mambazo Music Includes dancers from Rambert and The Royal Ballet

Tickets* £32 £28 £23 £18 £12 £10 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Produced by Sisters Grimm

Inala – meaning abundance of goodwill – is a muscular and beautiful blend of South African and Western cultures in an exhilarating celebration of the rainbow nation.

The Edinburgh Playhouse

Special Offer Buy for Inala and the Ladysmith Black Mambazo concert and save 20%. 1 hour 35 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/inala

Choreographer Mark Baldwin unites Zulu traditions of song and dance with Western classical ballet, contemporary dance and music in one breathtaking performance. This unique collaboration brings together a stellar company including dancers from The Royal Ballet and Rambert with music performed live by Grammy Award®-winning South African choir Ladysmith Black Mambazo. In over 50 years of joyous and uplifting musicmaking, Ladysmith Black Mambazo’s past successes include working with Paul Simon on his album Graceland, featuring the intricate rhythms and harmonies of its native South African musical traditions. Performed live by the choir and an instrumental ensemble, Inala’s brand new score is a collaboration between classical composer Ella Spira and Ladysmith Black Mambazo.

Supported by

Ladysmith Black Mambazo Saturday 9 August 8.00pm

SOUTH AFRICA – UNITED KINGDOM SEASONS 2014 & 2015

Inspiring new ways

Described by Nelson Mandela as ‘South Africa’s cultural ambassadors’, Ladysmith Black Mambazo has been delivering exuberantly energetic performances around the globe for decades.

The Edinburgh Playhouse

To complement its collaboration on Inala, it gives a special one-off concert that offers the chance to experience one of the world’s finest vocal groups.

Special Offer Buy for Inala and the Ladysmith Black Mambazo concert and save 20%.

Tickets* £30 £25 £20 £15 £12 £10 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Combining traditional Zulu musical styles with gospel 2 hours approximately music, it contrasts powerful, passionate choruses eif.co.uk/ladysmith with soft, soulful sweetness in quieter music, bringing a symphonic richness to its a cappella performances, all delivered with an infectious sense of rhythm and flamboyant dance moves.


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Dance

I AM MAU Lemi Ponifasio Choreography, concept, design and direction

Following his acclaimed performances of Tempest: Without a Body and Birds with Skymirrors during Festival 2010, Lemi Ponifasio returns with another stunning work, exploring the legacy of the First World War and the seismic impact the conflict had around the world. Through an intoxicating mix of extreme physicality, poetic movement, striking imagery and a dynamic interplay of light and darkness, I AM takes inspiration from artist Colin McCahon’s groundbreaking painting Victory over Death 2, exploring identity, conflict and the power of art to transform and elevate us in counterbalance to the horrors wrought by war. New Zealand’s most innovative international contemporary dance and theatre company, led by one of the most distinctive choreographers working today, MAU tackle issues of politics, race, tradition and mythology through a dynamic combination of ideas and influences, performed by a community of dancers drawn from all walks of life. A co-production by Festival d’Avignon, Ruhrtriennale – International Festival of the Arts, the Edinburgh International Festival and Auckland Arts Festival Please note this performance contains nudity

Saturday 16 & Sunday 17 August 8.00pm The Edinburgh Playhouse Tickets* £32 £28 £23 £18 £12 £10 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 1 hour 50 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/iam

Supported by


Dance

THE SCOTSMAN, FESTIVAL 2010

‘physically extraordinary and imaginatively charged’ THE GUARDIAN, FESTIVAL 2010

Photo MAU

‘both Tempest: Without a Body and Birds with Skymirrors touched viewers in a very deep and unexpected way, and I for one will never forget them.’

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Dance

Gnosis

Akram Khan Company Akram Khan Artistic director, choreographer and dancer Fang-Yi Sheu Dancer (Guest artist) Koushik Aithal Vocals Manjunath B Chandramouli Mridanga Kartik Raghunathan Violin Lucy Railton Cello Sanju Sahai Tabla Bernhard Schimpelsberger Percussion

‘Now when (Khan) dances, he doesn’t just tell his own story – he tells all our stories.’ THE ARTS DESK ON DESH, 2011

‘His art speaks tremendously of tremendous things.’ THE FINANCIAL TIMES

Ruth Little Dramaturgy Fabiana Piccioli Lighting and set designer Kimie Nakano and Kei Ito Costume designers


Photo Richard Haughton

Drawing from sources both ancient and modern, Gnosis is inspired in part by the Hindu epic the Mahabharata and the story of Gandhari, the wife of the blind king who blindfolds herself for life to share his journey. As her family becomes embroiled in an internecine war, Gnosis explores notions of inner knowledge and clouded vision, experiencing darkness while being blind to light. One of the world’s most original and exciting dance artists, Akram Khan’s inimitable style combines classical Indian Kathak dance with his contemporary dance roots. Pursuing the idea of the ‘knowledge within’, Gnosis is an exploration of the inner and outer battles of characters, the human and the godly on a pathway of transformation culminating in a shattering conclusion. Khan is accompanied on stage by an ensemble of exceptional musicians from around the world and acclaimed dancer Fang-Yi Sheu from Taiwan. This revival of Gnosis has been commissioned by the Edinburgh International Festival.

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Photo Philip Van Ootegem

Dance

Tuesday 19 – Thursday 21 August 8.00pm

The appearance of Fang-Yi Sheu supported by

King’s Theatre

The Ministry of Culture, Taiwan

Tickets* £32 £25 £17 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 1 hour 35 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/gnosis Thursday 21 August 7.45pm


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Dance

Sweet Mambo Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch Pina Bausch Director and choreographer Peter Pabst Set designer Marion Cito Costume designer Matthias Burkert and Andreas Eisenschneider Musical collaboration Marion Cito, Thusnelda Mercy and Robert Sturm Collaboration Lutz Förster Artistic director Dirk Hesse Managing director

The relationships between women and men – seduction, happiness and misery, physical and mental fragility – are explored in the inimitable style of the great Pina Bausch. In each life-affirming scene dancers tell stories, flirt, fight, decry, seduce and abandon each other. Revelling in life’s inherent humour, Pina Bausch’s unique concept of dance theatre creates beautiful, ambiguous imagery that mixes glamour and movement with a raft of recurring props – from water and fruit to chairs and dirt – creating ever-changing visual collages that balance on a knife-edge between reality and surrealism. One of her final works, ‘Sweet Mambo’ is an exciting combination of solos and ensemble dances, gentle gestures and sumptuous costumes as dreams, sorrows and anecdotes unfold.

‘The remarkable and much missed Pina Bausch leaves a glorious legacy in her exuberant work’ INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY, FESTIVAL 2010

‘She made you thrilled to be human’ THE GUARDIAN


Dance

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Saturday 23 – Monday 25 August 7.30pm The Edinburgh Playhouse Tickets* £32 £28 £23 £18 £12 £10 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 2 hours 30 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/sweetmambo Monday 25 August

Photo Oliver Look

7.15pm


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Cultural Explorers

‘simply sensational: the audience was nearly blown over by Partch’s music.’

Photo Wonge Bergmann

DIE ZEIT

Delusion of the Fury A Ritual of Dream and Delusion BY HARRY PARTCH DIRECTED BY HEINER GOEBBELS

Ensemble musikFabrik Klaus Grünberg Scenography and lighting designer Florence von Gerkan Costumes Paul Jeukendrup Sound designer Matthias Mohr Dramaturgy Florian Bilbao Choreography

Harry Partch is one of the most original artists and musicians of the 20th century. The American composer not only invented his own tonal system, but also designed and built instruments of idiosyncratic beauty to play his music. These fantastical instruments, recreated specially, provide the set for this theatrical production. Legendary composer and director Heiner Goebbels returns to the Festival for the first time in six years, while the superb musicians of the Ensemble musikFabrik bring the score to vibrant life. Delusion of the Fury is a large-scale music-theatre work inspired by Japanese Noh theatre works and Ethiopian myth, integratrating lighting, movement and song in a sound world full of lightness and humour.

Friday 29 & Saturday 30 August 8.00pm King’s Theatre Tickets* £35 £28 £20 £15 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 1 hour 15 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/delusionofthefury

Produced by Ruhrtriennale – International Festival of the Arts in coproduction with the Ensemble musikFabrik, the Holland Festival and Lincoln Center Festival, New York.


Cultural Explorers

Beyond Zero: 1914 –1918 ‘The adventurous Americans have constantly pushed forward the musical boundaries’

Kronos Quartet Aleksandra Vrebalov Composer Bill Morrison Filmmaker

A response in music and film to the conflict that launched a century of war, and a celebration of the power of art to keep us sane and offer us comfort. Beyond Zero: 1914–1918 brings together three of the world’s most pioneering artists: the Kronos Quartet, known for decades for their trailblazing performances and collaborations; acclaimed Serbian composer Aleksandra Vrebalov; and filmmaker Bill Morrison, respected for his work with rare and even partially destroyed archive images. They come together for a journey through the turmoil of the First World War that combines music and film, matching a web of sounds and music from before, during and after the war with specially created film that draws on rare First World War footage from the Library of Congress, some of which has never been seen before. Beforehand, in Prelude to the Black Hole, Kronos travels back in time to 1914 to explore some of the music it would have played had it existed then, by iconic Western composers, world musicians and blues artists.

Monday 18 August 8.00pm Festival Theatre Tickets* £35 £25 £20 £15 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. Special offer Book for both the Kronos Quartet’s Beyond Zero: 1914–1918 and Usher Hall concert on 19 August and get a 20% discount 1 hour 10 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/beyondzero

Supported by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, with additional funding by The MAP Fund, which is supported by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. It was commissioned for Kronos by Cal Performances; National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial and Harriman-Jewell Series, Kansas City, Missouri; and Hopkins Center, Dartmouth College.

THE GUARDIAN

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Cultural Explorers

Photo Ilgın Erarslan Yanmaz

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Patria World Premiere ‘one of the world’s foremost exponents of traditional Spanish guitar’

Paco Peña Flamenco Company Poet, artist, playwright and musician, Federico García Lorca became a symbolic figure for the Republican army and supporters during the Spanish Civil War when his life was brutally cut short at the very start of the conflict. In Patria, world-renowned flamenco guitarist Paco Peña brings a very personal new work to the Festival, exploring through music and song the emotional, physical and cultural impact of the war on his country’s history, inspired by the life and music of one of its most famous casualties.

THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

A consummate musician, Lorca made an important contribution to the Andalusian folk repertoire, while his poetry has been an inspiration to artists involved in the expression of flamenco for many years.

Wednesday 27 & Thursday 28 August 8.00pm The Edinburgh Playhouse

Through traditional Spanish folk music and songs, many written and performed by Lorca during his lifetime, alongside a collection of simple songs of the time used as rallying cries for combatants and supporters on either side of the conflict, Peña vividly contrasts a colourful cultural heritage with the stark brutality of the war.

Tickets* £30 £25 £20 £15 £12 £10 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

In doing so, Patria reflects the extreme polarity of ideas and ideologies that prevailed during Spain’s most turbulent and destructive period.

2 hours approximately eif.co.uk/patria


Cultural Explorers

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Exhibit B THIRD WORLD BUNFIGHT Brett Bailey Creator

Exhibit B lies somewhere between performance and exhibition. 13 tableau vivant installations featuring black performers look at the themes of racism, ‘othering’ and the colonial history of Europe in Africa. This deeply moving work, researched and created by South African artist Brett Bailey, gazes into the hidden Curiosity Cabinets of European racism. It focuses on the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when Europe’s powers scrambled for Africa’s rich resources, and the continent’s scientists formulated the pseudo-scientific racial theories that continue to warp perceptions, with horrific consequences. Drawing on the ‘human zoos’ and ethnographic displays so popular during this period, this site-specific exhibit places Africans and African asylum-seekers in display cases, unpacking the histories, and turning the gaze back on Europeans.

‘terrible and magnificent… should run for several months so that all government ministers and scholars can attend.’ LE SOIR Supported by

9,10, 12, 13, 15, 19, 20, 22 and 25 August: Performances from 2.00pm – 5.50pm; 16, 17, 23 and 24 August: Performances from 10.30am – 5.50pm Playfair Library Hall Tickets* £14 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

SOUTH AFRICA – UNITED KINGDOM SEASONS 2014 & 2015

A walk through performance lasting 25 minutes approximately. Tickets available at 20 minute intervals. eif.co.uk/exhibitb

Photo Sofie Knijff


The Opening Concert

Image Alte Pinakothek, Munich, Interfoto / The Bridgeman Art Library

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The Opening Concert

Royal Scottish National Orchestra Oliver Knussen Conductor Kirill Gerstein Piano Claire Booth Soprano Edinburgh Festival Chorus Christopher Bell Chorus Master Schoenberg Five Orchestral Pieces Op 16 (original version) Scriabin Prometheus – The Poem of Fire Debussy Le Martyre de Saint Sébastien

The 2014 Festival opens with a concert of three opulent masterpieces. They are performed by the Royal Scottish National Orchestra under composer and conductor Oliver Knussen, one of the most respected figures in British music, famed for his brilliant insights into 20th-century repertoire.

Friday 8 August 7.30pm Usher Hall Tickets* £46 £39 £32 £26 £20 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 2 hours 30 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/opening

Sponsored by

Schoenberg’s explosive Five Orchestral Pieces are in many ways as revolutionary as Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring, exploring troubled inner worlds in music of exquisite, kaleidoscopic colours. Awardwinning Russian-born pianist Kirill Gerstein is the soloist in Scriabin’s mystical Prometheus, which depicts nothing less than mankind’s quest for enlightenment in music of tremendous power. After the interval, Debussy seems to prophesy the fallen of the Great War in his oratorio Le Martyre de Saint Sébastien, a collaboration with Italian war veteran Gabriele D’Annunzio, which evokes a world of pitiful self-sacrifice, exotic spiritualism and repressed desire.


Music

Image iStock

Photo Neda Navaee

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Holst’s The Planets

Scottish Chamber Orchestra

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra

Robin Ticciati Conductor

Donald Runnicles Conductor

Lars Vogt Piano

Michaela Kaune Soprano

Brahms Tragic Overture Schumann Symphony No 3 ‘Rhenish’ Webern Langsamer Satz Beethoven Piano Concerto No 5 in E flat ‘Emperor’

Edinburgh Festival Chorus Christopher Bell Chorus Master Britten Sinfonia da Requiem Berg Seven Early Songs Holst The Planets Colin Matthews Pluto

The BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra returns under its formidable Chief Conductor Donald Runnicles for one of the grandest orchestral showpieces in the repertoire: Holst’s The Planets. From its gripping depiction of war in Mars to the serene beauty of Venus, it is a piece of immense profundity and unforgettable melody – and it is followed by composer Colin Matthews’s dazzling Pluto, written in 2000 to complement Holst’s existing suite. Beforehand, Runnicles and the BBC SSO perform Britten’s moving Sinfonia da Requiem, a deeply felt pacifist work that prefigures his famous War Requiem (performed by the Philharmonia Orchestra on Thursday 14 August) by more than two decades. Berg’s opulent Seven Early Songs show the influence of Richard Strauss, Wagner and even Debussy, and are performed by German soprano Michaela Kaune.

Such are the heroic power and the beautiful, eloquent melodies of the ‘Emperor’ Concerto that it is hard to believe Beethoven wrote it in a Vienna under attack from Napoleon’s invading armies. The strength and thoughtfulness of renowned German pianist Lars Vogt are an ideal match for this monumental concerto’s virtuosic demands. The Scottish Chamber Orchestra, famed for its refined performances under Principal Conductor Robin Ticciati, explores the glories of the Rhine in Schumann’s Third Symphony, a work of songful beauty and spiritual wonder at the natural world. To begin the concert, Brahms’s Tragic Overture shows the composer at his most turbulent and emotional, and Webern’s Langsamer Satz is a richly Romantic vision of nature and desire. ‘sublime’ The Daily Telegraph ‘a fantastic performance of the Third Symphony, the Rhenish… one of the finest, most exquisite performances by the orchestra in its 40-year history’ The Herald

‘What a night. What a performance... What an orchestra. And what a genius conductor.’ The Herald Saturday 9 August 8.00pm

Sunday 10 August 7.30pm

Supported by

Usher Hall

Usher Hall

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Donald and Louise MacDonald

2 hours 15 minutes approximately

2 hours approximately

eif.co.uk/theplanets

eif.co.uk/sco

Supported by


Photo Josef Polleross

Music

Photo Josep Molina

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The Sixteen Harry Christophers Conductor Music by Josquin, Poulenc, Sheppard and Taverner

Hespèrion XXI Le Concert des Nations La Capella Reial de Catalunya Jordi Savall Director and Viola da gamba

War and conflict from the Renaissance to the present day are the compelling subjects of vocal ensemble The Sixteen’s boldly eclectic programme under founding director Harry Christophers. The choir performs two sections from Josquin Desprez’s Missa L’homme armé, one of several choral masterpieces based around a medieval song warning of the menace of a fearsome armed man, as well as the Sanctus from John Taverner’s Missa ‘O Michael’, with its entrancing web of voices. It interweaves these Renaissance masterpieces with striking yet sensuous choral music by Francis Poulenc: the four moving Motets pour un temps de pénitence, and the searing power of the cantata Figure humaine, written in Nazi-occupied France and set to texts smuggled secretly to the composer from the poet Paul Éluard. ‘Beautifully balanced and blended’ The Scotsman, Festival 2013

Nedyalko Nedyalkov Kaval Yurdal Tokcan Oud Hakan Güngör Qanun Dimitri Psonis Santur War and peace in Baroque Europe: From the Thirty Years War to the Peace of Utrecht

Jordi Savall is one of the world’s true musical pioneers. His searching historical curiosity has shed new light on the changing role music has played in society through the ages. He brings together his three exceptional instrumental and choral ensembles with special guest soloists for a spectacular performance tracing the music of war and peace during one of Europe’s most turbulent centuries. With music both stirring and soothing by composers including Lully, Cavalli, Blow and Handel, as well as traditional music from the Middle East and Eastern Europe, Savall reveals how music has been used to provoke men to fight, and also to console and commemorate in times of peace. ‘Savall’s interpretations are so elegant, sensuous and surprising’ The Times

Monday 11 August 8.00pm

Tuesday 12 August 7.30pm

Supported by

Usher Hall

Usher Hall

David McLellan

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £34 £26 £20 £16 £10 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

2 hours 30 minutes approximately

eif.co.uk/thesixteen

eif.co.uk/hesperion

Supported by


Photo Josep Molina

Paul Lewis Piano

Britten’s War Requiem

Beethoven Piano Sonata in E Op 109 Piano Sonata in C sharp minor Op 27 No 2 ‘Moonlight’ Piano Sonata in E flat Op 27 No 1 Piano Sonata in C minor Op 111

Philharmonia Orchestra

One of the very finest British pianists, Paul Lewis has drawn huge critical acclaim internationally for his Beethoven piano sonata cycles. Praised for his intellectual rigour and his imaginative lyricism, he brings a strong physicality as well as luminous poetic insights to Beethoven’s tempestuous music. His all-Beethoven Festival recital contrasts sonatas both early and late. The melodic and harmonic beauty of the virtuosic Op 111 seems to look forward to Chopin, while the nocturnal evocations of the earlier ‘Moonlight’ Sonata justly make it one of Beethoven’s bestknown works. The sparkling brilliance of the short Op 27 No 1 serves as a prelude to the transcendental drama of Op 111. Its stormy first movement gives way to sublime melody in its second, one of the composer’s most serene creations. ‘breathtaking’ The New York Times ‘Lewis played with power and tenderness, grandeur and intimacy’ The Phoenix

Sir Andrew Davis Conductor Albina Shagimuratova Soprano Toby Spence Tenor Matthias Goerne Baritone Edinburgh Festival Chorus NYCoS National Boys Choir Christopher Bell Chorus Master Britten War Requiem

A cry of fury at the futility of war, and an intensely moving tribute to the dead. Benjamin Britten summed up his deeply held pacifist beliefs in his powerful War Requiem, which contrasts texts from the Latin Requiem Mass with searing visions of the First World War in poetry by Wilfred Owen. It is a deeply humane masterpiece with a timely message of compassion and reconciliation, from the shattering fanfares of the ‘Dies irae’ to the exquisite concluding plea for peace. Widely admired for his incisive accounts of British music and his expertise in choral works, Sir Andrew Davis directs the outstanding Philharmonia Orchestra, and gathers a stellar line-up of international vocalists, as well as the combined forces of the Edinburgh Festival Chorus and the boys of the NYCoS National Boys Choir. ‘gloriously characterful playing.’ The Scotsman, Festival 2012

Wednesday 13 August 8.00pm

Thursday 14 August 8.00pm

Supported by

Usher Hall

Usher Hall

Joscelyn Fox

Tickets* £34 £26 £20 £16 £10 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

1 hour 30 minutes approximately

eif.co.uk/paullewis

eif.co.uk/brittenwarrequiem

Sponsored by

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Ruins of Coventry Cathedral after German bombings, 1940 Photo Tallandier RA/Lebrecht

Music


Photo Michiel Hendryckx

Music

Photo Wolfgang Stahr

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Ute Lemper Bach’s Mass in B minor Scottish Chamber Orchestra Collegium Vocale Gent Choir and Orchestra

Lawrence Foster Conductor

Philippe Herreweghe Conductor

Ute Lemper Vocalist Includes music by Weill, Eisler and Stravinsky

The charismatic German chanteuse Ute Lemper, celebrated for her spellbinding performances of Kurt Weill and Marlene Dietrich, joins the Scottish Chamber Orchestra to explore the sensuous decadence and simmering passions of Weimar Republic Germany.

Dorothee Mields Soprano Hana Blazikova Soprano Damien Guillon Countertenor Thomas Hobbs Tenor Peter Kooij Bass Bach Mass in B minor

She sings seductive songs by Weill – including the famous Surabaya Johnny and Mack the Knife – as well as anti-Nazi numbers by Hanns Eisler and Bertolt Brecht. 50 years on from Marlene Dietrich’s own appearance at the Festival, Lemper finishes with songs made famous by the German star in the 1930s.

Widely considered to be JS Bach’s crowning achievement, the Mass in B minor is a monumental hymn of praise that transcends its religious origins, in music that is by turns exuberant, intense, serene and dramatic. With its sublime arias and stirring choruses, it is a moving expression of love and peace.

Under Lawrence Foster, the orchestra also performs the Suite from Weill’s biting Threepenny Opera, and the catchy rhythms of Stravinsky’s tuneful Scènes de ballet.

It is performed by the choir and orchestra of Collegium Vocale Gent, under their founding director Philippe Herreweghe, widely acclaimed for their interpretation of the music of JS Bach. Famed for their lucid yet enormously expressive performances that combine power and subtlety, they are joined by an international gathering of exceptional soloists, all regular Collegium Vocale Gent collaborators.

‘Ute Lemper shines’ The Sydney Morning Herald ‘Lemper grabs her audience by the throat’ The Guardian

‘the choral sound was beautifully focused, the instrumental playing exceptionally clean.’ The Independent ‘Herreweghe coaxed out playing and singing that was consistently eloquent.’ The Guardian

Friday 15 August 7.30pm

Saturday 16 August 7.30pm

Supported by

Usher Hall

Usher Hall

Dunard Fund

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

With additional support from

2 hours 30 minutes approximately

2 hours 15 minutes approximately

eif.co.uk/utelemper

eif.co.uk/bachmass

Sponsored by

The Government of Flanders


Shostakovich’s Leningrad Symphony

London Philharmonic Orchestra

I, CULTURE Orchestra

Vladimir Jurowski Conductor

Kirill Karabits Conductor

Patricia Kopatchinskaja Violin

Panufnik Sinfonia elegiaca Shostakovich Symphony No 7 ‘Leningrad’

Magnus Lindberg Chorale Bartók Violin Concerto No 2 Beethoven Symphony No 3 ‘Eroica’

Founded in 2011 by Poland’s Adam Mickiewicz Institute, the I, CULTURE Orchestra brings together exceptional young musicians from the former Soviet and Eastern Bloc states of Poland, Ukraine, Georgia, Belarus, Moldova, Armenia and Azerbaijan. Under the charismatic young Ukrainian conductor Kirill Karabits, the orchestra performs two immensely powerful symphonies that cry out against the brutality of war. Shostakovich wrote his impassioned ‘Leningrad’ Symphony during the gruelling 900-day Nazi siege of the city, and its thrillingly dramatic music for a spectacularly huge orchestra has come to symbolise the triumph of the human spirit in times of conflict. The lyrical Sinfonia elegiaca by Polish-born composer Andrzej Panufnik is a poignant expression of consolation for all victims of war. ‘There’s no doubting the orchestra’s amazing verve and enthusiasm’ The Arts Desk Karabits: ‘an energising presence’ The Daily Telegraph

Sunday 17 August 7.30pm

Colour, heroism and boundless power come together in the London Philharmonic Orchestra’s compelling Festival concert under its Principal Conductor, the charismatic Vladimir Jurowski. Beethoven famously tore the original dedication to Napoleon from his Third Symphony, furious that he had proclaimed himself Emperor of France and fearful of the conflict that he could bring to Europe. The ‘Eroica’ remains a revolutionary work, whose rich melodies and heroic ambitions swept away all previous ideas of what a symphony could be. Making her Festival debut, the astonishing young Moldovan violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja performs Bartók’s brilliant Second Violin Concerto, her remarkably vivid playing an ideal match for the piece’s earthy Hungarian folk influences. The concert begins with the radiant hues of Magnus Lindberg’s Bach-inspired Chorale. Vladimir Jurowski: ‘His music-making tends to crackle with fresh ideas and intellectual engagement’ The Boston Globe

Monday 18 August 8.00pm

Supported by

Usher Hall

Usher Hall

Dunard Fund

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

2 hours approximately eif.co.uk/leningrad

Supported by

Léan Scully EIF Fund James and Morag Anderson

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Photo Sheila Rock

Photo Sasha Gusov

Music

2 hours 15 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/lpo


Photo Michiel Hendryckx

Music

Photo Jay Blakesberg

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Kronos Quartet Philip Glass String Quartet No 6 Clint Mansell Music from The Fountain and Requiem for a Dream

Celebrating its 40th anniversary, the Kronos Quartet has commissioned and performed more than 800 new works, as well as collaborated with a rich collection of global musicians. To complement its film project Beyond Zero: 1914–1918 (on Monday 18 August, see page 31), it gives a special recital focusing on its collaborations with two artists whose work spans both classical and popular culture. Philip Glass has collaborated with the Kronos players since the 1980s. His String Quartet No 6, written for and premiered by Kronos last year, is a hugely powerful work, dark and brooding in places. Clint Mansell is the former lead singer of alternative rock band Pop Will Eat Itself, and as a composer has scored several films by the acclaimed director Darren Aronofsky. Kronos performs Mansell’s music from Aronofsky’s The Fountain and the cult classic Requiem for a Dream. ‘exhilarating’ The Guardian ‘The Kronos Quartet doesn’t just give a performance, it puts on a show’ The Herald, Festval 2010

Tuesday 19 August 8.00pm

Supported by

Collegium Vocale Gent Scottish Chamber Orchestra Philippe Herreweghe Conductor Sophie Bevan Soprano Sarah Connolly Mezzo soprano Benjamin Hulett Tenor Matthew Rose Bass Haydn Mass in D minor ‘Nelson Mass’ Bruckner Ave Maria Christus factus Os justi Stravinsky Symphony of Psalms

Renowned worldwide for his invigorating interpretations that cast fresh light on classical masterpieces, conductor Philippe Herreweghe brings the exceptional singers of his Collegium Vocale Gent to join the Scottish Chamber Orchestra in a concert of choral masterworks. Haydn’s ‘Nelson’ Mass, originally named ‘Mass in Troubled Times’, was written as Napoleon’s invading armies were threatening Vienna, and gained its second nickname following Nelson’s stunning victory over Bonaparte in the Battle of the Nile. Considered one of the composer’s profoundest creations, it moves from darkness to a jubilant finale. Herreweghe gathers a quartet of remarkable British singers for the piece’s virtuosic vocal solos. Afterwards, Herreweghe directs three warm, reverential choral motets by Bruckner, and Stravinsky’s hugely powerful Symphony of Psalms, which combines spiritual solemnity with sparkling wit.

Usher Hall Tickets* £34 £26 £20 £16 £10 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. Special offer Book for both the Kronos Quartet’s Beyond Zero: 1914–1918 and this Usher Hall concert and get a 20% discount

Wednesday 20 August 7.30pm

Supported by

Usher Hall

The Stevenston Charitable Trust

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

1 hour 50 minutes approximately

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

eif.co.uk/kronos

eif.co.uk/collegium-sco

With additional support from

The Government of Flanders


41

Photo Alexander Vasiljev

Music

Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Bernstein’s Kaddish Symphony

Sir Andrew Davis Conductor

Royal Scottish National Orchestra

Erin Wall Soprano Truls Mørk Cello

John Axelrod Conductor Vadim Gluzman Violin Rebecca Evans Soprano Samuel Pisar Narrator

Strauss Don Juan Four Last Songs Schumann Cello Concerto Grainger The Warriors

Edinburgh Festival Chorus NYCoS National Girls Choir Christopher Bell Chorus Master

One of Australia’s finest ensembles, the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra has been praised for the intense drama of its colourful performances. Chief Conductor Sir Andrew Davis is joined by two world-renowned soloists in a programme of bright contrasts.

Barber Violin Concerto Bernstein Symphony No 3 ‘Kaddish’

Strauss’s exuberant Don Juan is a vivid musical portrait of the inveterate womaniser that bursts onto the stage in an explosion of virile melodies. By contrast, Canadian soprano Erin Wall, admired for the pristine beauty of her singing, is the soloist in Strauss’s final work, the intensely moving Four Last Songs.

Anguished and celebratory, furious and consoling, Bernstein’s epic Kaddish Symphony is an inspired evocation of the Jewish prayer for the dead. It is also a celebration for the living. Dedicated to the memory of John F Kennedy, it is a hugely powerful and profoundly spiritual symphony about mortality and faith.

Schumann’s poetic, playful Cello Concerto is the canvas for the lyrical talents of exceptional Norwegian cellist Truls Mørk. The concert reaches a resounding climax with the thrillingly flamboyant and colourful The Warriors by the orchestra’s compatriot, Percy Grainger.

At the composer’s request, Samuel Pisar, a survivor of both Auschwitz and Dachau concentration camps, wrote a deeply personal narration to accompany Berstein’s music. He delivers his testimony with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, celebrated soprano Rebecca Evans, the Edinburgh Festival Chorus and NYCoS National Girls Choir, under the baton of Bernstein protégé John Axelrod.

‘dazzling’ The Australian

By way of contrast, the exceptional Ukrainian-born violinist Vadim Gluzman is the soloist in Samuel Barber’s lush, lyrical and immensely virtuosic Violin Concerto.

Thursday 21 August 8.00pm

Supported by

Sunday 24 August 7.30pm

Supported by

Usher Hall

Harold Mitchell Esq, AC

Usher Hall

The Bacher Trust

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 2 hours approximately eif.co.uk/mso

With additional support from

His Grace, The Duke of Buccleuch and Queensbury KBE

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 1 hour 30 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/kaddish


42

Music

Czech Philharmonic Conducted by Jiří Bělohlávek

01

02

Nicola Benedetti Violin

Bernarda Fink Mezzo soprano

Janáček Overture – From the House of the Dead Korngold Violin Concerto Martinů Symphony No 4

Smetana From My Life (orch Szell) Dvořák Biblical Songs Janáček Sinfonietta

With an illustrious history of performing the rich repertoire of its homeland and a distinctive sound, the Czech Philharmonic brings two concerts of sumptuous music to Festival 2014.

The world-renowned mezzo soprano Bernarda Fink, celebrated for her exquisite voice and her powerful performances sings the moving Biblical Songs by Dvořák, contemplative essays in peace and touching sincerity.

Scottish violinist Nicola Benedetti is the soloist in the extraordinarily lush, romantic Violin Concerto by Erich Korngold, written in Hollywood after the composer fled Nazi-occupied Austria. Before it comes the striking overture to Janáček’s final opera From the House of the Dead.

Before them, the orchestra performs George Szell’s colourful orchestral arrangement of Smetana’s First String Quartet, in which the composer looks back with searing honesty on his life’s achievements.

The concert concludes with the radiant Fourth Symphony by Martinů, which is full of glorious tunes and sparkles with optimism. ‘unbounded lyricism… that only this orchestra can bring’ The Guardian

The orchestra’s Festival residency concludes with Janáček’s spectacular Sinfonietta. Dedicated to the Czechoslovakian armed forces, the piece celebrates mankind’s courage in music of enormous power and lyricism – with a huge orchestra that includes a gleaming gathering of 25 brass players.

Friday 22 August 8.00pm

Supported by

Saturday 23 August 8.00pm

Supported by

Usher Hall

Geoff and Mary Ball

Usher Hall

Jim and Isobel Stretton

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

1 hour 30 minutes approximately

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

eif.co.uk/czech1

eif.co.uk/czech2

Photo Václav Jirásek

‘the orchestra glowed in vivid hues, with golden strings… radiant horns and deliciously acidic woodwind.’ The Scotsman


Photo Nadia F Romanini

András Schiff Piano Beethoven Piano Sonata in E minor Op 90 Piano Sonata in A Op 101 Bartók Piano Sonata Janáček Sonata 1.X.1905 ‘From the street’ Schubert Piano Sonata in G D894

One of the world’s most respected pianists, balancing emotional intensity with poetic subtlety, András Schiff has been a lifelong champion of central European music. His Festival recital contrasts Classical elegance with the thrilling energy of 20th-century masterpieces from Hungary and Moravia. Schiff performs two gloriously melodic Beethoven sonatas, of emotional complexity yet radiant brevity. The exciting rhythms and gripping power of Bartók’s folk-inspired Piano Sonata couldn’t come as a greater contrast. Janáček’s emotionally charged Sonata 1.X.1905 is a hugely dramatic, personal piece written in the white heat of emotion following the killing of a street protester in Brno. The luminous serenity of Schubert’s G major Sonata D894, considered one of the composer’s most perfect creations affords the platform to illustrate Schiff’s deserved reputation as one of the composer’s finest interpreters. ‘András Schiff is the Master’ Los Angeles Times

43

Scene from opera William Tell by Gioacchino Rossini 1792–1868 Italian, engraving 19th century Image The Art Archive / Museum der Stadt Wien / Collection Dagli Orti

Music

William Tell GIOACHINO ROSSINI Teatro Regio Torino Concert performance sung in Italian Guglielmo Tell Fabio Maria Capitanucci Arnoldo Melchtal John Osborn Matilde Elena Mosuc Gualtiero Mirco Palazzi Melchtal Giacomo Prestia Jemmy Erika Grimaldi Edwige Anna Maria Chiuri Gesler Luca Tittoto Fisherman Mikeldi Atxalandabaso Rodolfo Luca Casalin Gianandrea Noseda Conductor

A passionate tale of forbidden love, and a story of a bitter struggle against tyranny: William Tell is the summation of Rossini’s operatic expertise in a powerful work of great energy, drama and beauty. From its bracing overture, the opera tells of the eponymous medieval Swiss patriot and his fight against Austrian oppression in music of great passion and lyricism. Its most famous scene, in which the renowned archer is forced to shoot an apple off his son’s head, is just one of the opera’s many colourful highlights. The dynamic Italian conductor Gianandrea Noseda, respected worldwide for his opera interpretations and Music Director of the Teatro Regio in Turin, directs the chorus and orchestra and a cast of exceptional international soloists.

Monday 25 August 8.00pm

Tuesday 26 August 6.30pm

Supported by

Usher Hall

Usher Hall

Tickets* £34 £26 £20 £16 £10 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

The Italian Cultural Institute, Edinburgh

2 hours 5 minutes approximately

4 hours approximately

eif.co.uk/andrasschiff

eif.co.uk/williamtell


44

Music

Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Conducted by Mariss Jansons

01

02

Jean-Yves Thibaudet Piano

Leonidas Kavakos Violin

Shostakovich Symphony No 1 Ravel Piano Concerto in G Ravel Daphnis et Chloé Suite No 2

Brahms Variations on a Theme by Haydn Wolfgang Rihm Lichtes Spiel Strauss Ein Heldenleben

Last year’s Festival performance of Mahler’s mighty Ninth Symphony by Amsterdam’s Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra showed beyond doubt why it is hailed as one of the world’s truly great ensembles. The orchestra returns for a residency under the magnificent direction of its Chief Conductor, Mariss Jansons.

The climax of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra’s second Festival concert is Richard Strauss’s grand symphonic poem ‘A Hero’s Life’, whose leaping melodies and kaleidoscopic orchestral colours depict the fearless protagonist (perhaps Strauss himself) battling his critics and celebrating his love for his wife. It’s impossible not to be swept up in the gloriously vivid storytelling and sheer spectacle of Strauss’s evocative music.

French pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet is a master of sparkling technique and poetic lyricism, both qualities an ideal match for Ravel’s heartfelt Piano Concerto in G, with its infectious jazz rhythms and bittersweet slow movement.

The commanding Greek-born violinist Leonidas Kavakos, warmly remembered for his concerto and recital performances at the 2012 Festival, is the soloist in the lyrical Lichtes Spiel by German composer Wolfgang Rihm, a seductive, highly expressive work of languid harmonies and transparent textures.

The orchestra brings its concert to an opulent conclusion with the hedonistic glory of Ravel’s sumptuous ballet score Daphnis et Chloé.

To begin the concert, Mariss Jansons conducts the endlessly inventive melodies of Brahms’s magnificent Variations on a Theme by Haydn.

‘Jansons and the Concertgebouw seem to be the consummate match’ The Australian

‘Believe the hype: great orchestra without equal’ The Australian

Wednesday 27 August 8.00pm

Thursday 28 August 8.00pm

Supported by

Usher Hall

Usher Hall

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

The Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, London

1 hour 45 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/concertgebouw1

Sponsored by

Supported by

The Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, London

‘Kavakos possesses a sound of unrivaled beauty’ The New York Times

1 hour 50 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/concertgebouw2

Photo Vanne Dokter

Shostakovich wrote his First Symphony when he was just a student. It is a precociously assured piece, lively, witty and full of biting satire.


Music

Photo Tommy Ga-Ken Wan

Photo Hans van der Woerd

Mahler’s Symphony No 6 Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

Ilan Volkov Conductor

Mahler Symphony No 6

Hibla Gerzmava Soprano Claudia Huckle Contralto Simon O’Neill Tenor Andrew Staples Tenor Jan Martiník Bass

Mahler’s Sixth Symphony, sometimes called the ‘Tragic’, is a work of enormous power and pathos whose grimly militaristic opening march and shattering final hammer-blows seem to prophesy the mechanised conflict of the First World War. Yet amidst its cataclysmic turmoil, the Symphony is shot through with poignant lyricism, expressing profound love and serene visions of a rural idyll, with church chimes and cowbells wistfully evoking an arcadian way of life that Mahler perceived to be vanishing. Young French-Canadian conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin was widely acclaimed for his electrifying performances with the Chamber Orchestra of Europe at Festival 2013, combining blistering energy with a flair for sumptuous sound. He returns to conduct the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, of which he is Music Director, in one of Mahler’s most personal utterances. ‘Nézet-Séguin, the greatest generator of energy on the international podium’ Financial Times

45

Thomas Trotter Organ Edinburgh Festival Chorus Christopher Bell Chorus Master Jonathan Mills Sandakan Threnody Janáček Glagolitic Mass

The Festival’s concert series at the Usher Hall concludes in epic style, with a blazing confrontation between darkness and light given by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra under Prinicipal Guest Conductor Ilan Volkov. Edinburgh International Festival Director and composer Sir Jonathan Mills’s oratorio Sandakan Threnody honours the 2,500 British and Australian prisoners of war who lost their lives in the death marches in North Borneo during the Second World War. By contrast, Janáček’s Glagolitic Mass is a joyous affirmation of life. A cast of renowned international singers, the full force of the Edinburgh Festival Chorus and acclaimed organist Thomas Trotter bring the Festival to a spectacular, jubilant close.

Friday 29 August 8.00pm

Supported by

Saturday 30 August 8.00pm

Usher Hall

The Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, London

Usher Hall

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 1 hour 30 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/mahler6

The appearance of Yannick Nézet-Séguin supported by

Québec Government Office, London

Tickets* £44 £36 £27 £25 £18 £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Supported by

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

Performance of Sandakan Threnody supported by

eif.co.uk/bbcsso

Roxane Clayton


46

Greyfriars Greyfriars Kirk Tickets* £20 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 1 hour approximately

Photo Giuseppe Masci / iStock

eif.co.uk/greyfriars

Greyfriars Greyfriars Series is supported by

The Binks Trust

Quartet for the End of Time

Collegium Vocale Gent

Jörg Widmann Clarinet Antje Weithaas Violin Alban Gerhardt Cello Steven Osborne Piano

Philippe Herreweghe Conductor

Messiaen Quartet for the End of Time

The Festival’s Greyfriars concert series opens with one of the landmark compositions of the 20th century. Olivier Messiaen wrote his immensely powerful Quartet for the End of Time while a prisoner of war in Stalag VIII-A in Silesia, and it was premiered in the camp in 1941 to an audience of 400 fellow prisoners and Nazi guards. Despite its apocalyptic themes, drawn from the Book of Revelation, it is a glittering work of sublime, transcendent beauty, and it is performed by an ensemble of exceptional international soloists.

Lassus Lagrime di San Pietro

The astonishing Lebanese-born church singer, nun and musicologist Sister Marie Keyrouz has single-handedly brought the rich traditions of Oriental Christian chant to a world audience through her virtuosic, hypnotic singing that uses the voice as an instrument of ecstasy and celebration. Following an intensely spiritual and widely acclaimed performance at Festival 2008, she returns with her small choir of singers, L’Ensemble De La Paix, for an exploration of the canticles of the Eastern Christian Church. Wednesday 13 August 5.45pm eif.co.uk/keyrouz

A beautifully focused sound and a fine vocal blend are among the many exceptional qualities that define Philippe Herreweghe’s Collegium Vocale Gent as one of the world’s most accomplished vocal ensembles, especially as interpreters of early music. Exploiting the warm, resonant acoustics of Greyfriars Kirk, they perform The Tears of Saint Peter by Renaissance composer Roland de Lassus, a cycle of 20 exquisite sacred madrigals that powerfully express grief, regret and forgiveness in music of moving simplicity and consoling contemplation. Tuesday 12 August 5.45pm

Monday 11 August 5.45pm

Sister Marie Keyrouz L’Ensemble De La Paix

eif.co.uk/collegiumvocale

eif.co.uk/endoftime

The Hilliard Ensemble Werner Heider Six Songs for Peace Dufay Missa ‘L’homme armé’

For 40 years, renowned vocal quartet The Hilliard Ensemble has championed early choral music, performing it with precision and spiritual insight. In one of its final performances before it bids farewell to the world’s concert stages, it combines ancient and modern in the Renaissance richness of Dufay’s Missa ‘L’homme armé’ and the moving Six Songs for Peace by contemporary German composer Werner Heider.

Supported by

The Government of Flanders

Thursday 14 August 5.45pm eif.co.uk/hilliard


Greyfriars

Wu Man, Sanubar Tursun and Friends

Polish Radio Choir

Ricercar Consort

Music by Górecki and Penderecki

Philippe Pierlot Bass viol and director

Musical Encounters on Central Asian frontiers

Two revered virtuosos in Asian traditions come together for a recital exploring cultural links that go back more than 2,000 years. Wu Man is one of the world’s foremost players of the pipa, a four-stringed Chinese lute, and has been widely praised for her highly colourful performances. Sanubar Tursun is a symbol of Uyghur traditions, matching athletic, highly ornamented vocals with delicate playing on the dutar, a Central Asian long-necked lute. They are joined by other Uyghur musicians for a recital of solos, duets and trios. Friday 15 August 5.45pm eif.co.uk/wuman

Music by Scheidt, Schütz and Schein Prized for the rich sound and vibrancy of its quietly ecstatic performances, the Polish Radio Choir, Krakow, has enjoyed close relationships with its country’s eminent composers. It brings a programme of powerfully expressive religious works by Górecki and Penderecki to the Festival, contrasting the luminous simplicity of Górecki’s moving Totus Tuus and two Marian Songs with the more opulent harmonies of Penderecki’s Missa brevis and the Agnus Dei from his Polish Requiem.

eif.co.uk/polishradio

Music by Dowland, Gesualdo, Brian Ferneyhough and Hilda Paredes

Contemporary music specialists the Arditti Quartet has made numerous acclaimed Festival appearances in recent years, and the players return with music both radiantly ancient and bracingly modern. Countertenor Jake Arditti sings moving Renaissance masterpieces by Dowland and Gesualdo in new arrangements for quartet by Mexican composer Hilda Paredes. They are followed by the exquisite beauty of Brian Ferneyhough’s Dum transisset I-IV, modelled on viol music by Christopher Tye, and by Paredes’s own atmospheric Canciones lunáticas for countertenor and quartet. Saturday 16 August 5.45pm eif.co.uk/arditti

Supported by

Susie Thomson

Wednesday 20 August 5.45pm eif.co.uk/ricercar

Supported by

Concerto Italiano

Aga Khan Foundation

Jake Arditti Countertenor

The Belgian-based Ricercar Consort makes a welcome return to the Festival under director Philippe Pierlot following two thrilling performances of English music in Festival 2012. It performs imposing choral and instrumental music from the early German Baroque by Scheidt, Schütz and Schein, composers who struggled to continue their creative work during the Thirty Years War, contrasting moving funeral odes with evocative dance music.

Monday 18 August 5.45pm

Supported by

Arditti Quartet

47

The Tallis Scholars Peter Phillips Director Music by Palestrina, Mouton, Josquin, Gombert and Lassus

Praised for the exceptional purity and brilliance of its singing, The Tallis Scholars under founding director Peter Phillips perform an emotive programme contrasting the splendours of Renaissance choral music from Italy, France and the Netherlands. Beginning with the rich opulence of movements from Palestrina’s five-voice Missa L’homme armé, based around a medieval song that warns of the coming of a fearsome armed figure, it includes funeral odes by Mouton, Josquin and Gombert, before closing with the resplendent choral glories of Gombert’s uplifting Regina caeli.

Rinaldo Alessandrini Harpsichord and director Anna Simboli Soprano Gianluca Ferrarini Tenor Luca Dordolo Tenor Music by Monteverdi, Marini, Uccellini, Merula and Castello

One of Italy’s finest Baroque ensembles, Concerto Italiano is cherished for its vivid, urgent yet subtle performances that display a rare expressive flexibility. Under director Rinaldo Alessandrini, the group brings a rich programme of exquisite Italian music to the Festival, contrasting instrumental pieces by Marini, Uccellini, Merula and Castello with dazzling madrigals by Monteverdi, including the highly moving Lettera amorosa and the hugely emotional miniature opera Il Combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda, in which a Christian knight unknowingly defeats his beloved in battle. Thursday 21 August 5.45pm

Tuesday 19 August 5.45pm eif.co.uk/tallisscholars

eif.co.uk/concertoitaliano


The Queen’s Hall Series

Supported by Edinburgh International Festival Benefactors

Hebrides Ensemble Graham F. Valentine Narrator Schoenberg Verklärte Nacht (arr Steuermann) Stravinsky The Soldier’s Tale

The 2014 Queen’s Hall Series opens with the power and panache of a masterpiece of music theatre, performed by one of Scotland’s foremost chamber groups, the Hebrides Ensemble. Stravinsky combined text and music to witty and vivid effect in his Faustian The Soldier’s Tale, in which a naive army recruit attempts to make amends for selling his soul while playing the fiddle. Actor Graham F. Valentine, acclaimed for his starring role in Meine faire Dame at the 2012 Festival, narrates the infectiously entertaining work. The Hebrides players perform Schoenberg’s highly Romantic, emotionally charged Verklärte Nacht in a sparkling version for piano trio by Austrian composer and pupil of Schoenberg, Edward Steuermann. ‘undoubtedly Scotland’s most adventurous chamber ensemble’ The Scotsman, Festival 2013 ‘a life-affirming experience’ Bachtrack

Photo Simon Fowler

Photo Sussie Ahlburg

48

Nicola Benedetti Violin Anna-Liisa Bezrodny Violin Benjamin Gilmore Viola Leonard Elschenbroich Cello Alexei Grynyuk Piano Brahms Piano Quartet in G minor Op 25 Shostakovich Piano Quintet

Acclaimed violinist Nicola Benedetti is held in wide admiration as one of Britain’s finest young musicians. She gathers an ensemble of her regular collaborators – each performer a respected soloist in their own right – for a special Festival recital contrasting two masterpieces of the chamber repertoire. Brahms’s G minor Piano Quartet bustles with infectious melody, and concludes with a famously fiery gypsy rondo finale. Shostakovich’s powerful Piano Quintet was written in the Soviet Union during the Second World War, and its accessible but distinctive music ranges from poignant introspection to biting satire. ‘it was thrilling to hear and watch Nicola Benedetti’ The Times This concert will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 3.

Saturday 9 August 11.00am

Supported by

Monday 11 August 11.00am

The Queen’s Hall

The Peter Diamand Trust

The Queen’s Hall

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

eif.co.uk/hebrides

eif.co.uk/benedetti


Ian Bostridge Tenor Julius Drake Piano

Alban Gerhardt Cello Steven Osborne Piano

Songs by Mahler, Weill and Britten

Britten Cello Suite No 1 Tippett Piano Sonata No 4 Beethoven Cello Sonata in C Op 102 No 1 Britten Cello Sonata

Celebrated for the remarkable passion, drama and directness of his elegant performances, British tenor Ian Bostridge is widely admired as one of the world’s most perceptive and accomplished musicians. Joined by the eminent pianist Julius Drake, musical partner of choice for a host of world-renowned singers, he brings a wide-ranging recital to The Queen’s Hall, whose warm intimacy provides the ideal setting to appreciate the duo’s consummate craft. Together they explore songs of lost innocence and unrequited love by Mahler, from the countryside idylls of early Lieder to the achingly poignant Songs of a Wayfarer. Kurt Weill and Benjamin Britten’s heartfelt responses to conflict are revealed by Weill’s pleas for peace in his Four Walt Whitman Songs, and moving depictions of the young during wartime in Britten’s Who Are These Children.

Two of today’s most accomplished musicians, German cellist Alban Gerhardt and Scottish pianist Steven Osborne, come together for a powerful recital of solo and duo works contrasting radiant lyricism with dramatic intensity. The first half features solo music by two composers renowned for their pacifist beliefs. Gerhardt’s bold, fresh playing is an ideal match for the vivid sound worlds of Britten’s First Cello Suite. Osborne, whose poetic playing has made him an admired Tippett interpreter, performs that composer’s remarkably expressive Fourth Piano Sonata. The two performers join forces after the interval for two visionary cello sonatas: Beethoven’s intimate C major sonata and Britten’s compelling masterpiece.

Ian Bostridge: ‘he is outstanding in every way’ Financial Times This concert will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 3.

49

Photo Ben Ealovega

Photo Sim Canetty-Clarke

Photo Marco Borggreve

Photo Simon Fowler

The Queen’s Hall Series

‘Steven Osborne is one of the unsung heroes of British pianism’ The Independent Alban Gerhardt: ‘his cello playing is bold, technically resourceful and rhythmically incisive.’ The New York Times This concert will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 3.

Tuesday 12 August 11.00am

Wednesday 13 August 11.00am

The Queen’s Hall

The Queen’s Hall

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

2 hour 15 minutes approximately

eif.co.uk/bostridge-drake

eif.co.uk/gerhardt-osborne


Supported by Edinburgh International Festival Benefactors

Photo Robert Workman

The Queen’s Hall Series

Photo Molina Visual

50

Artemis Quartet

Piotr Anderszewski Piano

Mozart String Quartet in G K387 Bartók String Quartet No 3 Schubert String Quartet in D minor D810 ‘Death and the Maiden’

Bach Overture in the French Style BWV 831 Schumann Novelette Op 21 No 8 Szymanowski Metopes Schubert Piano Sonata in C minor D958

The players of the Berlin-based Artemis Quartet have been acclaimed for the technical brilliance and intensity of its high-energy performances – qualities needed in abundance for this virtuosic and diverse recital.

Polish pianist Piotr Anderszewski is widely admired for the freshness and sublime poetry of his performances.

Schubert’s masterful ‘Death and the Maiden’ Quartet forms the thrilling conclusion to the Artemis’s programme. It is a deeply emotional work that matches melancholy with glowing lyricism. Before the interval, it performs Mozart’s sparkling G major Quartet K387, the first of a set written in tribute to Haydn, and Bartók’s brief but punchy Third Quartet.

His Festival recital concludes with the profound emotions and serene melodies of Schubert’s C minor Sonata D958, one of the composer’s final works. Anderszewski also evokes the heady harmonies and exotic colours of the scintillating Metopes by his compatriot Szymanowski, inspired by Homer’s Odyssey.

‘Blistering performance’ The Financial Times

Beforehand, Anderszewski contrasts the passionate virtuosity of Schumann with the sparkling elegance of Bach.

This concert will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 3.

‘extraordinary’ The Sunday Times

Thursday 14 August 11.00am

Friday 15 August 11.00am

Supported by

The Queen’s Hall

The Queen’s Hall

Frank Hitchman

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

With additional support from

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

2 hours approximately

eif.co.uk/artemis

eif.co.uk/anderszewski

Consulate General of the Republic of Poland in Edinburgh


Trio Verlaine

51

Photo Harald Hoffmann

Photo Myshael Schlyecher

The Queen’s Hall Series

Anna Prohaska Soprano Eric Schneider Piano

Lorna McGhee Flute David Harding Viola Heidi Krutzen Harp Ravel Le tombeau de Couperin (arr Morlock) R Murray Schafer Trio for flute, viola and harp Bax Elegiac Trio Takemitsu And then I knew ’twas Wind Debussy Sonata for flute, viola and harp

Songs by Beethoven, Braunfels, Eisler, Wolf, Rachmaninov, Ives, Quilter, Schubert, Liszt, Poulenc, Fauré, Stravinsky and others

Young German-born soprano Anna Prohaska has been hailed as one of the most exciting voices of her generation, praised for her kaleidoscopic vocal colours as well as for the warmth and power of her impeccably elegant singing.

With its exquisite sounds and subtle, pastel colours, Debussy’s highly evocative Sonata for flute, viola and harp established this unusual trio of instruments as a thrillingly expressive chamber grouping in 1915. That piece provides the passionate climax to the recital by US/ Canadian Trio Verlaine, whose members are all established soloists and orchestral players in their own right.

Her evocative recital with pianist Eric Schneider brings together soldiers’ songs from across the classical repertoire, celebrating heroism as well as providing moving testimony to the pity and tragedy of conflict – from Beethoven’s glorious Die Trommel gerühret to Fauré’s bittersweet C’est la paix, by way of folk songs and even an Orkney lament.

Beforehand, it performs English composer Arnold Bax’s deeply lyrical Elegiac Trio, as well as the richly melodic, Mahler-inspired Trio by leading Canadian musician R Murray Schafer. Takemitsu’s And then I knew ’twas Wind combines meditative calm with tender, exotic harmonies, and the concert opens with a sparkling trio arrangement of Ravel’s poignant Le tombeau de Couperin.

Anna Prohaska: ‘totally captivating’ The Daily Telegraph ‘Eric Schneider’s piano playing radiated lunar beauty’ The Times

‘[a] beautifully balanced sound’ The Seattle Times

Saturday 16 August 11.00am

Supported by

Monday 18 August 11.00am

Supported by

The Queen’s Hall

Mr Hedley G Wright

The Queen’s Hall

John-Paul and Joanna Temperley

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

eif.co.uk/trioverlaine

eif.co.uk/prohaska-schneider


Supported by Edinburgh International Festival Benefactors

Michael Houstoun Piano Vaughan Williams Suite for solo piano Ravel Le tombeau de Couperin Lilburn Chaconne Rachmaninov Piano Sonata No 2 (original version)

Photo Uwe Arens

Photo Russell Duncan

The Queen’s Hall Series

Photo Sal Criscillo

52

Simon Keenlyside Baritone Malcolm Martineau Piano Songs and chansons by Ireland, Somervell, Vaughan Williams, Butterworth, Eisler, Gurney, Finzi, Schumann and Wolf

Concert pianist Michael Houstoun is one of New Zealand’s finest musicians, praised around the globe for his vivid, fiery playing and for the clarity of his incisive interpretations. His Festival recital contrasts glowing music by two Commonwealth composers with glittering keyboard masterpieces that show off the power and poetry of the piano.

Poignant English songs of regret and lost innocence contrast boldly with richly Romantic German Lieder in this Festival recital by internationally renowned British baritone Simon Keenlyside. He is joined by Edinburgh pianist Malcolm Martineau, celebrated for his distinguished collaborations with a wide range of international singers.

Houstoun begins his concert with the warm-hearted lyricism of Vaughan Williams’s evocative, folk-inspired Suite, and continues with Le tombeau de Couperin, Ravel’s light-hearted yet reflective look back to the glories of French Baroque music in six exquisitely poignant memorials to friends killed in the First World War.

Keenlyside and Martineau bring together songs from Butterworth’s A Shropshire Lad , a touching evocation of a vanishing pastoral England, and Vaughan Williams’s Songs of Travel, which explore the innermost thoughts and longings for home of soldiers on the front line.

Houstoun continues with the colourful, nature-inspired Chaconne by Douglas Lilburn, one of New Zealand’s most prominent 20th-century composers. He concludes his recital with the lush Romanticism and dramatic virtuosity of Rachmaninov’s Second Piano Sonata. ‘draws magnificence from his Steinway’ The New Zealand Herald This concert will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 3.

The rich melodies of Schumann’s gripping mini-drama Ballade des Harfners are a fine contrast to the touching pastoral evocations of Wolf’s Fussreise and Blumengruss. ‘Simon Keenlyside has no peers and few equals among English baritones’ The Sunday Telegraph Malcolm Martineau: ‘the incomparable accompanist’ The New York Times This concert will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 3.

Tuesday 19 August 11.00am The Queen’s Hall Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 1 hour 45 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/houstoun

Sponsored by

Wednesday 20 August 11.00am ®

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With additional support from

Creative New Zealand Toi Aotearoa

Supported by

The Queen’s Hall Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 1 hour 45 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/keenlyside-martineau

MAGAZINE


53

Photo Keith Saunders

Photo François Darmigny

The Queen’s Hall Series

Renaud Capuçon Violin Takács Quartet Hanna Weinmeister Violin/Viola 01 Janáček String Quartet No 2 ‘Intimate Letters’ Edgar Moreau Cello Smetana String Quartet No 1 ‘From My Life’ Beethoven String Quartet in E minor Op 59 No 2 Jérôme Ducros Piano Korngold Violin Sonata Mahler Piano Quartet Movement Webern Two Pieces for Cello and Piano Korngold Suite for Piano Left Hand, Two Violins and Cello

02 Janáček String Quartet No 1 ‘The Kreutzer Sonata’ Barber Adagio from String Quartet Beethoven String Quartet in A minor Op 132

Quite simply one of today’s outstanding musicians, French violinist Renaud Capuçon has been widely praised for his sizzling virtuosity, precision and refined playing. He is joined by exceptional chamber music colleagues in a recital celebrating the lush richness and glorious melody of music written in the years before the First World War.

The Takács Quartet is respected worldwide for its lucid, dramatic performances and technical brilliance. The quartet’s two Festival concerts contrast glittering Czech masterpieces with powerfully moving works by Beethoven.

Korngold, Mahler and Webern were – astonishingly – only in their teens when they wrote this concert’s opulent opening works. Each piece’s sublime melodies reveal an astonishing maturity. Capuçon and colleagues end their recital with Korngold’s highly virtuosic Suite, a compelling piece charting a journey from darkness to light, written in 1928 for the virtuoso pianist Paul Wittgenstein who lost an arm in the Great War. Renaud Capuçon: ‘exquisite tonal refinement and grace’ Chicago Tribune

The centrepiece of the ensemble’s opening concert is Smetana’s ‘From My Life’, a deeply Romantic, intimately autobiographical work. Janáček’s passionate ‘Intimate Letters’ was inspired by unrequited love, and the Takács players end their first concert with the mystery and contemplation of Beethoven’s second ‘Razumovsky’ quartet. The Quartet’s second recital culminates in Beethoven’s String Quartet Op 132, regarded as one of the most rapturous creations in all music. Before the interval, the Takács players perform Janáček’s hugely evocative ‘Kreutzer Sonata’ Quartet, as well as Barber’s moving Adagio, strongly associated with Oliver Stone’s film Platoon and famously played at the funeral of President Kennedy. The Friday 22 August concert will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 3.

Supported by

This concert will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 3.

Thursday 21 August 11.00am

01 Friday 22 August 11.00am

02 Saturday 23 August 11.00am

The Queen’s Hall

The Queen’s Hall

The Queen’s Hall

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

eif.co.uk/capucon

eif.co.uk/takacs01

eif.co.uk/takacs02

Donald and Louise MacDonald


The Queen’s Hall Series

Supported by Edinburgh International Festival Benefactors

Anne Sofie von Otter Mezzo soprano Daniel Hope Violin Bengt Forsberg Piano Bebe Risenfors Accordion, double bass, guitar Songs and instrumental music from Terezín. Music by Kálmán, Ullmann, Schulhoff, Haas, Berman, Roman and Bach

Terezín, or Theresienstadt, was the concentration camp north of Prague where the Jewish cultural elite – composers, musicians, painters, writers, scholars of every kind – were interned during the Nazi reign of terror. Encouraged to continue their creative activities as a Nazi propaganda tool, they nevertheless produced fascinating, deeply moving and often uplifting work that affirms the triumph of human dignity over almost unimaginable suffering. World-renowned Swedish mezzo soprano Anne Sofie von Otter has assembled a collection of songs and instrumental music produced or played in Terezín – from colourful cabaret songs by Martin Roman to tender lullabies by Ilse Weber, by way of Lieder by Pavel Haas and Viktor Ullmann – which she performs with an ensemble of exceptional international colleagues. ‘among the world’s great mezzo-sopranos.’ The Daily Telegraph This concert will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 3.

Photo Tommy Ga-Ken Wan

Photo Ewa-Marie Rundquist

54

Scottish Ensemble Commonwealth Strings Elgar Introduction and Allegro Peter Sculthorpe Sonata for Strings No 3 Vaughan Williams Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis Gareth Farr Relict Furies for mezzo soprano and double string orchestra (EIF commission, World Premiere) Tippett Concerto for Double String Orchestra

A vibrant celebration of the richness and diversity of music-making across the Commonwealth. The Scottish Ensemble brings together 14 of Scotland’s foremost string players in a tightly knit ensemble, famed for its luminous, ardent performances. It is joined by Commonwealth Strings, a group of exceptional young string players selected from across the Commonwealth for this Festival performance, in a concert contrasting glorious English classics and rich Antipodean evocations. Elgar’s noble yet virtuosic Introduction and Allegro is joined by Vaughan Williams’s mystical ‘Tallis Fantasia’, interspersed with the vivid nature evocations of Australian composer Peter Sculthorpe’s joyful Third Sonata for Strings and a new Festival commission from leading New Zealand composer Gareth Farr. The concert ends with the jazzy rhythms of Tippett’s thrilling Concerto for Double String Orchestra. Scottish Ensemble: ‘exquisite’ The Scotsman In association with the Royal Over-Seas League This concert will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 3.

Monday 25 August 11.00am

Tuesday 26 August 11.00am

Supported by

The Queen’s Hall

The Queen’s Hall

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Creative New Zealand Toi Aotearoa

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

eif.co.uk/vonotter

eif.co.uk/scottishensemble


Stéphane Degout Baritone Simon Lepper Piano Songs and Lieder by Schubert, Loewe, Schumann, Liszt, Weill, Wolf and Fauré

Gripping, grotesque miniature operas sit alongside touching Gallic evocations in this powerful recital by French baritone Stéphane Degout, an internationally celebrated singer respected for the dramatic intensity of both his vivid operatic performances and his sophisticated concert recitals. Joined by British pianist Simon Lepper, Degout performs the chilling gothic fantasy of Romantic ballads including Schubert’s unsettling Der Zwerg and Loewe’s macabre Edward, based on a gruesome Scottish legend. They then perform Liszt’s exuberant Tre sonetti del Petrarca and convey the high emotions of Fauré’s poignant L’horizon chimérique. Stéphane Degout: ‘beautiful voice… magisterial’ The Wall Street Journal Simon Lepper: ‘one of the most gifted and enterprising [accompanists] of his generation’ Opera Magazine

55

Photo Marco Borggreve

Photo Jacqui McSweeney

Photo Julien Benhamou

The Queen’s Hall Series

Pavel Haas Quartet Schulhoff String Quartet No 1 Shostakovich String Quartet No 10 Brahms String Quartet in A minor Op 51 No 2

Founded in 2002, the Pavel Haas Quartet is considered one of the world’s most exciting chamber ensembles, combining the lush, full-blooded sound of the Bohemian quartet tradition with a searing dramatic intensity. Named after a Czech composer whose life was cut short in Auschwitz, the quartet begins its Festival recital with the jaunty, folk-influenced First Quartet by Erwin Schulhoff, another composer who lost his life in a Nazi concentration camp. Shostakovich’s Tenth Quartet depicts the triumph of the human spirit over adversity in vivid music of intense emotional richness, and the Pavel Haas players conclude their concert with the endlessly flowing melodies of Brahms’s graceful A minor Quartet Op 51 No 2. ‘in a class of their own’ The Strad ‘a force to be reckoned with’ The Herald This concert will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 3.

This concert will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 3.

Wednesday 27 August 11.00am

Thursday 28 August 11.00am

In memory of

The Queen’s Hall

The Queen’s Hall

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Vincent George Gale MRCVS

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

eif.co.uk/degout-lepper

eif.co.uk/pavelhaas


Supported by Edinburgh International Festival Benefactors

Photo Dario Acosta

Photo Klaus Rudolph

The Queen’s Hall Series

Photo Franz Hamm

56

Frank Peter Zimmermann Violin Daniil Trifonov Piano Christian Zacharias Piano Stravinsky Serenade in A Beethoven Violin Sonata in D Op 12 No 1 Violin Sonata in E flat Op 12 No 3 Violin Sonata in A Op 12 No 2 Violin Sonata in F Op 24 ‘Spring’

A recital celebrating the rich lyricism of Beethoven’s violin sonatas from the internationally sought-after violinist Frank Peter Zimmermann and his recital partner, the perceptive pianist Christian Zacharias. Zimmermann has been widely praised for his exuberant, playful accounts of Beethoven sonatas that mix authoritative strength with breathtaking intimacy, and Zacharias is celebrated for the poetry and precision of his touching interpretations. They begin their recital with Beethoven’s first three sonatas, combining high spirits with singing melodies. To conclude, they play Beethoven’s sublime ‘Spring’ Sonata, which holds one of the most memorable melodies in all music. Frank Peter Zimmermann: ‘playing of real distinctiveness and vitality’ Boston Globe

Ravel ‘Noctuelles’, ‘Oiseaux tristes’, ‘Une barque sur l’océan’ and ‘Alborada del gracioso’ from Miroirs Liszt 12 Transcendental Studies

Famed for his pyrotechnic playing, and for his effortless poetic pianism, multi-award-winning young Russian virtuoso Daniil Trifonov brings The Queen’s Hall 2014 concerts to a thrilling conclusion, having gripped Festival audiences for the past two years with his expressive intensity and bold insights. He returns with a recital combining breaktaking virtuosity with sublime poetry. Birdsong, marine evocations and Spanish fireworks all feature in Ravel’s exquisite piano suite Miroirs, while Liszt’s Transcendental Studies push a performer’s technical abilities to their limits in richly Romantic music, full of tempestuous brilliance and emotional intensity. Trifonov opens his recital with the neo-Classical elegance of Stravinsky’s festive Serenade in A. ‘A remarkable pianist with a fearless and magnetic stage presence’ The Scotsman, Festival 2013 ‘Technique, musicianship: Daniil Trifonov has it all’ The Seattle Times

Christian Zacharias: ‘a performer who is suited for the world stage’ The New Yorker This concert will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 3.

Friday 29 August 11.00am

Supported by

Saturday 30 August 11.00am

Supported by

The Queen’s Hall

Niall and Carol Lothian

The Queen’s Hall

Claire and Mark Urquhart

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

Tickets* £30 £27 £22 £19 £11 £8.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details.

The Inches Carr Trust

1 hour 45 minutes approximately

2 hours 15 minutes approximately

eif.co.uk/zimmermann-zacharias

eif.co.uk/trifonov


57

Photo Rob McDougall

Virgin Money Fireworks Concert

Virgin Money Fireworks Concert

Scottish Chamber Orchestra Garry Walker Conductor Wagner Ride of the Valkyries Beethoven Egmont Overture Mendelssohn War March of the Priests from Athalie Debussy Marche Écossaise Tchaikovsky 1812 Overture

The Virgin Money Fireworks Concert brings Edinburgh’s summer festival season to a spectacular conclusion, celebrating courage, heroism and struggles for freedom through stirring, uplifting music and a breathtaking fireworks display specially choreographed by international fireworks artists Pyrovision. Alongside the majesty of Wagner’s ‘Ride of the Valkyries’ from Die Walküre and Debussy’s rousing March Écossaise, the concert takes in the stormy passions of Beethoven’s Egmont Overture and the memorable ‘War March of the Priests’ from Mendelssohn’s Athalie. Sunday 31 August 9.00pm Tickets* Ross Theatre (seated) £28.50 Princes Street Gardens (standing) £12.50, priority entry £17.50 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 45 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/virginmoneyfireworks

Sponsored by

Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture, written to celebrate Russia’s deliverance from Napoleon’s invading armies, brings the evening to an electrifying conclusion, accompanied by a glittering display of pyrotechnics from the Edinburgh Castle ramparts. Visit eif.co.uk/virginmoneyfireworks for up-to-the-minute news, features and advice on how to make the best of your evening at the Virgin Money Fireworks Concert. Please note that there are special ticket sales arrangements for this event. See page 66 for further details.


58

Talks and Discussions

Culture and Conflict

Festival 2014 engages with international academics and commentators to consider the First World War as a starting point to exploring the impact of war in general into the 21st century.

The War that Ended Peace

The Culture of Violence in the Twentieth Century

Professor Margaret MacMillan argues that in 1914, after a sustained period of peace, Europe walked into a catastrophic conflict that killed millions, bled its economies dry, shook empires and undermined the continent’s dominance of the world. Presented in association with the Embassy of the Republic of Serbia.

Were the atrocities committed in the First World War exceptional, untypical events, or did they represent a broader ‘culture of violence’ and a descent into the total warfare of the 20th century? Alan Kramer, Professor of European History at Trinity College Dublin discusses. Chaired by Dr Alison Elliot.

Saturday 9 August 2.30pm

Sunday 10 August 5.00pm

First World War: Re-thinking the Centenary

Quartet for the End of Time

Professor John Horne explores ways to think about the war and how to commemorate it that go beyond the national state. He argues that we need to overcome national limitations to see the war for what it was – a global conflict that gave birth to the violent century that followed. Chaired by Professor Donald Bloxham, University of Edinburgh.

Professor Peter Hill talks about Messiaen’s masterpiece, written in a prisoner-of-war camp in Germany and first performed on 15 January 1941. Monday 11 August 12 noon

Saturday 9 August 5.00pm

Culture and Conflict High Command in War Sir Hew Strachan argues that much of the British debate about the First World War has been unfairly focused on command, and particularly that of Douglas Haig. He aims to expand the accepted polarities of view – the generals as able men struggling to cope, or callous butchers – in order to give an accurate account of command. Chaired by historian Trevor Royle.

Author and academic Randall Stevenson, Professor of TwentiethCentury Literature at the University of Edinburgh, leads a discussion on the cultural impact of war and how it influenced the course of poetry, theatre and fiction from the 19th to the 20th centuries. With Robyn Marsack, Director of the Scottish Poetry Library, and theatre academic Octavian Saiu. Monday 11 August 5.00pm

Sunday 10 August 2.30pm

The War Requiem Sir Adam Roberts, international relations expert, and tenor Ian Bostridge join Matthew Studdert-Kennedy for a discussion on Britten’s celebrated 1962 choral work, performed by the Philarmonia Orchestra at Festival 2014, and its controversial political context. Tuesday 12 August 2.30pm

Objecting to War Initially entering the language in response to the First World War, ‘pacifism’ as a term was applied to viewpoints that ranged from conscientious objection to war weariness and defeatism. Martin Ceadel, Professor of Politics at the University of Oxford, explores the subject. Chaired by Sir Adam Roberts. Tuesday 12 August 5.00pm


Talks and Discussions

The First World War and Australia’s Rise to Nationhood

59

From Red Clydeside to Radical Scotland

Professor The Honourable Marie Bashir, Governor of New South Wales, considers the social and political environment of Australia in the years immediately prior to the First World War. Chaired by Dr Robin Prior.

Dr William Kenefick argues that there was a ‘real Red Clyde’ and it was the war resisters of the Independent Labour Party (ILP) who were largely responsible for its making. He also explores other leading centres of anti-war activity such as Aberdeen and Dundee. Chaired by Jeane Freeman.

Wednesday 13 August 2.30pm

Monday 18 August 5.00pm

Gallipoli: The End of the Myth

Women and the Killing Fields: Femininity and War

Author and academic Dr Robin Prior argues that although the motives for the Gallipoli campaign were admirable, it was a flawed operation from the beginning. Chaired by Robyn Marsack. Wednesday 13 August 5.00pm

A traditional view of men as active warriors and women as nothing more than bystanders is a myth. But what roles did women play in and near to the killing fields of the 20th century? Professor Joanna Bourke explores the question in this talk chaired by historian Dr Heather Jones. Tuesday 19 August 2.30pm

Contemporary Military Operations – Risks and Responsibilities General The Lord Richards of Herstmonceux, who exercised high command on major operations around the world before becoming the UK’s Strategic Military Commander and Principal Military Adviser to the Prime Minister, will examine military operations. Chaired by Sir Hew Strachan.

The White War: Life and Death on the Italian Front The Western Front dominates our memories of the First World War, yet in this definitive talk on the Italian North East Front, historian and author Mark Thompson explores with Professor Joseph Farrell the futility of this warfare. Presented in association with the Italian Cultural Institute.

Thursday 14 August 2.30pm Tuesday 19 August 5.00pm

The Road to 11 November David Stevenson, Professor of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science, will analyse the combination of military, diplomatic, economic and political factors that led Germany to appeal for a ceasefire in 1918 and the Allies to grant one. Chaired by Professor Donald Bloxham.

War, Atrocities and the Truth What has war wrought in our time, and what new truths have we been forced to confront? Artist Brett Bailey and Dr Tarak Barkawi are joined by Emmanuel Jal, South Sudanese musician and former war child, to discuss how war destroys truths and lives. Chaired by broadcaster Bidisha.

Thursday 14 August 5.00pm Wednesday 20 August 2.30pm

Owen Wingrave: Ghosts of Tradition Neil Bartlett, Director of Aldeburgh Music’s Owen Wingrave, and Dr Heather Jones, specialist in First World War studies, discuss the role of the conscientious objector and the tradition of soldiering in both world wars, in the company of Joanna Bourke, Professor of History at Birkbeck, University of London. Monday 18 August 2.30pm

Beacon of Light: The new Edinburgh International Festival and the arts in post-war Society Dr Angela Bartie talks with Lloyd Anderson, Director of the British Council Scotland, about the origins and development of the Edinburgh International Festival and its role in promoting international dialogue and improving cultural relations after the Second World War. Thursday 21 August 2.30pm


60

Talks and Discussions

How War Reporting has Changed: A Century On The BBC’s Chief International correspondent, Lyse Doucet, and BBC Middle East correspondent Orla Guerin reflect on how war reporting has changed since the First World War. Chaired by Professor Siân Reynolds. Supported by Trade Unions in Scotland – NUJ, UCU, MU, EIS and EIS-ULA, UNISON, Unite and Edinburgh TUC Friday 22 August 2.30pm

Killing Civilians Leading humanitarian studies scholar Dr Hugo Slim and international relations expert Jennifer Welsh discuss the issue of civilian suffering in recent conflicts, in the company of Judith Robertson, former Head of Oxfam Scotland.

University of Edinburgh Lex Pacificatoria: Using Law to End Wars This lecture by Professor Christine Bell looks at the rise of negotiated settlements as a tool for ending contemporary wars and the legal, political and moral controversies that those settlements cause. It draws on her work arguing that a new ‘lex pacificatoria’ or law of the peacemakers has developed as a way of managing these controversies. Chaired by Professor Dorothy Miell, Vice Principal and Head of the College of Humanities and Social Science. Thursday 28 August 2.30pm

Tuesday 26 August 2.30pm

Scotland in the Soft Power Era The Peace to End Peace Sir Adam Roberts looks at the lessons that were learned, and not learned, from ‘the War to End War’, resulting in the disastrous 1919 Treaty of Versailles, ‘the Peace to End Peace’. Chaired by Professor Christine Bell. Wednesday 27 August 2.30pm

A Century on the Edge: From Cold War to Hot World, 1945–2045 In the years starting with the nuclear age in 1945, human society has come to terms with an unprecedented ability to destroy itself and massively damage the global environment. Have Cold War nuclear lessons really been learnt and can we learn to live within our worldwide limits? A talk by Paul Rogers, Professor of Peace Studies, University of Bradford. Chaired by Dr Andrea Birdsall. Wednesday 27 August 5.00pm

The Hub Tickets* £6 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. Special Offer Book for 5 or more events and save 50% 1 hour approximately eif.co.uk/cultureandconflict

A discussion hosted by the Centre for Cultural Relations at the University of Edinburgh, led by Director Charlie Jeffery, on the complex relationship between conflict and culture. With Professor Chris Breward, Vice Principal Creative Industries and Performing Arts, Professor Antonella Sorace, Professor of Developmental Linguistics, and Professor John Holden, cultural relations expert. Thursday 28 August 5.00pm

The Hub Tickets* £6 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 1 hour 15 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/university


War on Film

61

Image The Producers, courtesy Rialto Pictures

War on Film

Talk: Permanent Post-War Cinema? Film theoreticians and historians generally hold the view that the end of the Second World War marked a turning point in cinema. All over the world, production techniques, cinema audiences and the styles and themes of storytelling saw drastic changes from 1945 to 1955. This talk by Edinburgh International Film Festival Artistic Director Chris Fujiwara asks if it is possible to speak of a permanent postwar cinema? Sunday 24 August 12 noon

Ran Dir. Akira Kurosawa 1985 / 160 mins / 15 Based on Shakespeare’s King Lear, Ran tells the story of Hidetora Ichimonji, an aging Sengoku-era warlord who decides to abdicate his throne in favour of his three sons Taro, Jiro and Saburo. Saturday 23 August 2.30pm

Come and See

The Producers

Dir. Elem Klimov 1985 / 142 mins / 15

Dir. Mel Brooks 1968 / 88 mins / PG

Come and See is a psychological thriller set during the Nazi occupation of the Belorussian SSR. A young boy finds an air rifle and joins the Soviet Army and is thrust into the atrocities of war.

Mel Brooks’ brilliant and hilarious cult classic musical set in the late 1960s tells the story of an accountant and producer who set out to make a Broadway flop that despite their best efforts turns out to be a huge success.

Sunday 24 August 5.00pm Monday 25 August 3.30pm

The Burmese Harp Dir. Kon Ichikawa 1956 / 116 mins / 12A The Burmese Harp is set within the final days of the Second World War and tells the story of Private Mizushima, the harp player of Captain Inouye’s group of soldiers who fight and sing to raise morale. Saturday 23 August 5.30pm

Joyeux Noël Dir. Christian Carion 2005 / 116 mins / 12A Joyeux Noël is a French film that retells the true story of the impromptu Christmas truce declared by French, Scottish and German troops in the trenches of the First World War. Sunday 24 August 2.30pm

The Tin Drum Dir. Volker Schlöndorff 1979 / 142 mins / 15 The Tin Drum is a film adaptation of Günter Grass’s surreal black comedy novel set in Danzig during the Second World War. Protagonist Oskar Matzerath is given a tin drum on his third birthday and decides he does not want to grow up in the senseless world he sees around him.

Hunger Dir. Steve McQueen 2008 / 96 mins / 15 British artist Steve McQueen’s film debut Hunger is a historical drama that follows life in the Maze Prison, Northern Ireland, with the events surrounding Bobby Sands’ 1981 IRA hunger strike. Monday 25 August 5.30pm

Sunday 24 August 7.45pm

Darfur Night and Fog Dir. Alain Resnais 1955 / 32 mins / 15 Filmmaker Alain Resnais recorded the abandoned grounds of Auschwitz ten years after the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps. The documentary shows the footage from the camps overlaid with voiceovers of the prisoners’ experiences. Monday 25 August 2.30pm

Dir. Uwe Boll 2009 / 98 mins / 15 Darfur tells the story of a group of Western journalists in Sudan who visit a small village to gather footage and interviews in the hope of reporting on the violence they have seen. Monday 25 August 7.30pm

The Hub Tickets* £6 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. eif.co.uk/films

Presented in association with

Filmhouse


62

Conversations with Artists

Photo Karin Kohlberg

Photo Michael Courtney

Conversations with Artists

Hebrides Ensemble

The James Plays

Stan Douglas

Members of the renowned Scottish ensemble, including co-founder and artistic director William Conway, talk to Oliver Condy about Stravinsky’s The Solider’s Tale, which they perform during their Queen’s Hall concert on 9 August.

The creative team behind National Theatre of Scotland’s The James Plays discuss their ambitious new project with Jackie McGlone.

Canadian artist Stan Douglas talks with Fruitmarket Gallery Director Fiona Bradley about his film and contribution to Canadian Stage’s production of Helen Lawrence.

Sunday 10 August 12 noon

The Tallis Scholars

Inala

Peter Phillips, founder of peerless vocal ensemble The Tallis Scholars, talks to Richard Morrison of The Times about performing at the Festival.

Members of the creative team behind Inala discuss their hybrid dance and music production, in the company of Dame Monica Mason.

Monday 18 August 12 noon

Tuesday 12 August 12 noon

Takács Quartet

Ute Lemper

Recognised as one of the world’s great music ensembles, the Takács Quartet talks to music critic Richard Morrison about its unique artistic vision.

Iconic German cabaret star Ute Lemper talks to Jamie MacDougall about her life and work.

Friday 22 August 5.00pm

Gordon Fraser Charitable Trust The Hub

Monday 25 August 12 noon

Wednesday 20 August 12 noon

Supported by

Samuel Pisar UNESCO Honorary Ambassador and Special Envoy for Holocaust Education Samuel Pisar talks to broadcaster Reverend Richard Coles about his highly personal narration which accompanies Bernstein’s Kaddish Symphony. Tuesday 26 August 5.00pm

William Kentridge The South African artist discusses his role in the creation of Ubu and the Truth Commission with Fruitmarket Gallery Director Fiona Bradley.

Thursday 14 August 12 noon Friday 29 August 12 noon

Tickets* £6 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 45 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/conversations


Festival Insights

Escaping War

63

Festival Insights THE DEMOCRATIC SET: Back to Back Theatre and Lung Ha’s Theatre Company

Photo Associated Newspapers/REX

Australia’s Back to Back Theatre and Edinburgh-based Lung Ha’s Theatre Company have worked together on THE DEMOCRATIC SET residency, a rapid series of short live performances and screen-based video portraits created in collaboration with local actors. Responding to the needs of the local performers, the film explores an alternative view of the world through some very personal portraits. In this discussion and screening event, the two companies talk about the project and the finished film. Director Bruce Gladwin also answers questions about his ground-breaking production Ganesh Versus the Third Reich, which will be shown during Festival 2014. Monday 11 August 2.30pm eif.co.uk/democraticset

Bitter Music: Harry Partch’s diary with David Moss Bal Moderne A dance film event with archival footage and live music inspired by the songs and dances of wartime Europe. This immersive dance experience invites the audience to dress up in period clothes, joining singers, ensemble musicians and participatory dance specialists Bal Moderne to experience wartime era dance culture. Bal Moderne’s choreographies are specially designed for people with no experience of dance and each has a different theme… so come along, dress up and experience the joy and escapism of dancing during turbulent times!

Friday 15 August, Saturday 16 August & Sunday 17 August 2.30pm The Hub Tickets* £12 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 2 hours approximately eif.co.uk/balmoderne

Bitter Music is the rediscovered diary of Harry Partch’s seven-month travels as a tramp and day labourer. Accompanying the staging of his last great opera, Delusion of the Fury, during Festival 2014 this chronicle offers insights into the beginnings of the uncompromising artist that he became. American percussionist and vocal virtuoso David Moss presents part of this musical text in a lecture performance. Friday 29 August 2.30pm eif.co.uk/bittermusic

Edinburgh International Festival Young People’s Lecture: Emmanuel Jal The Edinburgh International Festival is delighted to offer young people the opportunity to meet and listen to international political activist and South Sudanese rapper Emmanuel Jal. Born into the life of a child soldier, Jal survived unbelievable struggles to emerge as a recording artist, achieving worldwide acclaim for his unique style of hip hop. Thursday 21 August 4.30pm eif.co.uk/emmanueljal

The Hub Tickets* £6 *Fees apply. See page 66 for details. 1 hour 20 minutes approximately eif.co.uk/insights


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Exhibition | A Festival for Everyone

Exhibition

Primordial: SuperNaturalBayiMinyjirral

Danie Mellor Acclaimed contemporary Australian artist Danie Mellor devises an intriguing exhibition that navigates between his own highly evocative works on paper developed from selected objects in the World Cultures Collection of National Museums Scotland, and his own indigenous and European heritage. The historical and colonial obsessions of Mellor’s work respond to an array of wonders from the worlds of science, technology and nature, suggesting ways of appreciating the complex intertwined narratives of Scotland and Australia. Presented by National Museums Scotland and the Edinburgh International Festival. With the support of Michael Reid, Sydney, Australia.

1 August – 23 November 10.00am – 5.00pm daily National Museum of Scotland Free eif.co.uk/daniemellor

A Festival for Everyone Edinburgh Festival Chorus

Suggest My Fest Facebook app

Are you an enthusiastic and talented singer? Would you like the opportunity to perform some of the most exhilarating choral repertoire with internationally celebrated conductors, orchestras and soloists? If so, we invite you to audition to become a member of the Edinburgh Festival Chorus. Find out more at eif.co.uk/chorus or email chorus@eif.co.uk

Discover your perfect Festival line-up with our Suggest my Fest Facebook app! If you want to know which of the events at this year’s Festival are for you, then fear not: with this app we do the work, offering recommendations tailor-made to suit your taste. Whether it’s epic and thrilling, intimate or contemplative you’re after, Suggest my Fest will be your perfect Festival guide.

‘I have not one critical syllable to utter about the Edinburgh Festival Chorus’s singing.’ The Herald

Visit eif.co.uk/suggestmyfest from Saturday 29 March.

International Festival Encounters: Developing Artistic Entrepreneurship A series of encounters with key figures in the arts on the theme of Artistic Entrepreneurship, this intensive five-day programme looks to attract ambitious producers, programmers and performers working at early postgraduate level and above or who are already engaged in a career in the arts. Participants will immerse themselves in three days of events across the range of Festivals in Edinburgh, followed by a two-day conference, with presentations by leading figures from across the performing arts, including Edinburgh International Festival Director Jonathan Mills and Director Designate Fergus Linehan. Participants will present examples of their work, with opportunities for feedback and to network with key players in the international arts sector. Applications must be received by Wednesday 30 April. For more details on how to apply visit rcs.ac.uk/summer A partnership between the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, the University of Edinburgh and the Edinburgh International Festival

Young Musician’s Passport Calling all young Edinburgh and Lothians musicians. Experience the magic of a live concert, performed by some of the world’s greatest international musicians this summer… for FREE! From the fabulous Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra conducted by the incomparable Mariss Jansons to sonic trailblazers the Kronos Quartet, if you’re at school in Edinburgh or the Lothians, study music, play an instrument or perform in an ensemble, you can choose from a feast of up to 40 Festival 2014 concerts. Sign-up is absolutely free and each passport member can get 1 free ticket and up to 2 halfprice tickets per concert. Find out more and sign up today at eif.co.uk/ympassport In association with City of Edinburgh Council


Venue Access and Information

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Venue Access and Information A full Venues Guide, with information about access, parking, buses to venues and accessible performances is available at eif.co.uk/access where it can be viewed online or as a Word document. The Festival brochure and the Venues Guide are available in audio and Braille formats. Simply call +44 (0)131 473 2089 or go to eif.co.uk/access for digitally accessible versions. Please note: if you require the use of the loop or Sennheiser systems please check when booking. There are some areas where the signal is not available. Hub Tickets staff will ensure that you are seated in the correct area. Artlink offers an escort service to help people with disability to enjoy the arts. For more information contact them directly at artlinkedinburgh.co.uk or +44 (0)131 229 3555. Assistance animals are welcome. The Queen’s Hall 85–89 Clerk Street EH8 9JG – Ramped access – Wheelchair spaces on ground floor – Induction loop in stalls – Sennheiser infrared system with receivers available from the cloakroom – Accessible toilet on ground floor – Café/bar on ground floor serving tea, coffee, drinks and snacks – Gallery only accessible by stairs – Single yellow line parking on side streets National Museum of Scotland Chambers Street EH1 1JF – – – –

Level access Lifts to all floors Adapted toilets Parking at NCP at Quartermile, 1 Lauriston Place, EH3 9AU

Festival Theatre 13–29 Nicolson Street EH8 9FT

The Edinburgh Playhouse 18–22 Greenside Place EH1 3AA

Usher Hall Lothian Road EH1 2EA

– Ramped access at front and level access at side entrance – Wheelchair spaces in stalls on floor 1 – Lift to all levels with accessible toilet on floors 1 and 2 – Sennheiser infrared system with receivers available from the cloakroom on the mezzanine level – Café/bar on ground floor with lift access to other bars – Single yellow lines and Pay and Display spaces on side streets. NCP at Quartermile, 1 Lauriston Place, EH3 9AU

– Ramped access to circle level on the ground floor – Wheelchair spaces on circle level – Sennheiser infrared system. Headsets available from staff – Accessible toilet on circle level – Bar and refreshment kiosk on ground level and in the stalls and mezzanine levels – Steep stairs only to balcony and stalls levels – Pay and Display parking on Picardy Place and Union Place. NCP at Greenside Row, EH1 3AN and at the St James Centre, Leith Walk EH1 3SS

– Level access from Grindlay Street – Lift to all levels – Wheelchair spaces and accessible toilets in stalls and grand circle – Lift to grand circle and upper circle bar – Disabled badge spaces on Grindlay Street and Cambridge Street. NCP on Castle Terrace, EH1 2EW

Greyfriars Kirk, Greyfriars Place EH1 2QQ – Level access to the Kirk – Wheelchair spaces in the Kirk and all seating on ground floor – Accessible toilet on ground floor – Parking at NCP at Quartermile, 1 Lauriston Place, EH3 9AU King’s Theatre 2 Leven Street EH3 9LQ – Level access to the Box Office with level access through to the foyer – Wheelchair spaces in the stalls – Platform lift to the stalls – Accessible toilet in the box office area and another in the stalls level – Sennheiser infrared system with receivers available from main foyer – Bars only accessible by stairs. Please ask staff for refreshments before the performance to have them brought to you – Single yellow line parking on side streets and in car park in Riego Street, Tollcross

Royal Lyceum Theatre Edinburgh, 30 Grindlay Street EH3 9AX – Lift to all levels – Wheelchair spaces in stalls and six seats in stalls with moveable arms for seat transfer – Induction loop and hearing enhancement system available from the shop – Accessible toilet on ground floor – Bars accessible by the lift – One wheelchair available to borrow – Limited number of disabled badge spaces on Grindlay Street and Cambridge Street. NCP at Castle Terrace, EH1 2EW Playfair Library Hall, Old College, South Bridge, University of Edinburgh EH8 9YL – Ramped access at South Bridge entrance – Lift to all levels via mail room door, on left just inside South Bridge entrance – Steep ramp and stone steps to front entrance – Unisex accessible toilet on first floor near box office and meeting point – Parking at NCP at Quartermile, 1 Lauriston Place, EH3 9AU

The Hub 348–350 Castlehill EH1 2NE – Level, ramped or lift access to all public areas – Wheelchair spaces in Main Hall – Induction loop in Hub Tickets and Main Hall – Accessible toilet on ground floor, others accessible by lift – Bar and café on ground floor – Lift to all upper levels with voice announcement and Braille buttons – Parking at NCP on Castle Terrace, EH1 2EW Ross Theatre, Princes Street Gardens EH2 2HG – Level access to the Gardens and Ross Theatre through the King’s Stables Road entrance – Wheelchair spaces available in the Ross Theatre and Princes Street Gardens. Please tell Hub Tickets if you would like to use either of these areas when you book your tickets – Accessible toilets in the Gardens and behind the Ross Theatre – Please note that the Gardens become very crowded, which, combined with the noisy fireworks, may make this area unsuitable for assistance animals – For up to date parking and travel information please visit eif.co.uk/virginmoneyfireworks in the weeks before the concert


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How to Book

Booking information How to book

Access information and discounts

Online eif.co.uk Telephone 0131 473 2000 Overseas +44 (0)131 473 2000 In Person Hub Tickets, The Hub, Castlehill, Edinburgh EH1 2NE

If you are a wheelchair user, have mobility difficulties or have visual or hearing impairments you can buy seats/spaces in the area of the venue most appropriate to your needs for the lowest (unrestricted view) ticket prices for that performance. Your companion’s ticket will be free.

Wednesday 19 March Priority booking opens for Festival Friends and Patrons at 10.00am online, by post and fax.

Our goal is to make the Festival accessible to as many people as possible. Look out for the Touch Tours, Captioned, Audio Described, and Speech-to-text Reported icons in this brochure as well as supertitled performances. For even more information go to eif.co.uk/venues or request a printed Venues Guide.

Saturday 29 March Public booking opens at 10.00am online, in person, by telephone and post.

Ticket collection Tickets can be collected from Hub Tickets, posted out to your address, printed at home or picked up at the venue on the day of the performance. Simply select your preferred option when you make your booking.

Transaction and postage fees If you choose to receive your tickets in the post, you will be charged an additional 80p for postage. A transaction fee of £1 will be added to all bookings.

Hub Tickets Opening Hours Saturday 29 March – Saturday 12 July: Monday to Saturday 10.00am to 5.00pm Monday 14 July – Sunday 27 July: Monday to Sunday 10.00am to 6.00pm Monday 28 July – Saturday 30 August: Monday to Saturday 9.00am to 7.30pm, Sunday 10.00am to 7.30pm Sunday 31 August: 1.00pm – 8.00pm

For more information or to claim an access discount please call the Access line +44 (0)131 473 2089 or email access@eif.co.uk. To enable us to determine your requirements and assist you fully we are unable to offer this service online. This brochure is available, with a Venues Guide, in audio and Braille formats. Simply call +44 (0)131 473 2089 or go to eif.co.uk/access for digitally accessible versions.

Virgin Money Fireworks Concert Due to the popularity of the concert you can take advantage of a limited number of special Priority Entry tickets for the Gardens. For only an extra £5 you gain access to the Gardens a full half hour before the gates open. As ever, ticket holders for the Ross Theatre don’t need to rush to secure their spot and so can take their seats once the gates are open. – Princes Street Gardens (standing) tickets are £12.50, and £17.50 with Priority Entry. – Ross Theatre (seated) tickets £28.50 standard entry. – All tickets are on sale from the time booking opens and are limited to ten per booking. Last chance to buy: a limited number of Gardens tickets will be released for sale from 10.00am on Saturday 23 August. Tickets can be booked online, by phone or in person. Please note, tickets must be collected from Hub Tickets no later than 8.00pm on Sunday 31 August. Visit eif.co.uk/virginmoneyfireworks for all information.

Buy your tickets at our venues From Monday 31 March you can buy tickets at The Edinburgh Playhouse, Festival Theatre, King’s Theatre, The Queen’s Hall, Royal Lyceum Theatre Edinburgh and the Usher Hall.

Programme Vouchers now available, £3 Buy your Festival event programme vouchers now to get the most from your evening at the theatre or concert, plus you’ll never need to search for change again! All printed programmes are priced at either £3 or £3.50. When buying tickets in person or by phone, remember to add a programme voucher for each show and if buying online remember to add the required number of programme vouchers to your basket.


Ticket Discounts and Special Offers

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Ticket Discounts and Special Offers Young People, Students and Young Scot cardholders – Half Price Now! Young people can buy any ticket at 50% off on selected performances when booking opens on Saturday 29 March. Under 18s, students in full-time education and Young Scot cardholders.

Half Price from Wednesday 30 July

Special Offers Culture and Conflict Talks Buy for 5 or more events and save 50%. See pages 58–60 for details. The James Plays Buy for all three plays and save 20%. Offer excludes Preview performances. See pages 10–12 for details.

50% off all tickets for selected performances for senior citizens, unemployed people, Equity and MU card holders.

Inala and Ladysmith Black Mambazo Book for both Inala and the Ladysmith Black Mambazo concert and receive a 20% discount. See pages 22–23 for details.

Are you 26 or under? Tickets for only £8 on the day

Kronos Quartet Book for both the Kronos Quartet’s Beyond Zero: 1914–1918 at the Festival Theatre and its Usher Hall concert on 19 August and get a 20% discount. See pages 31 and 40 for details.

Pay only £8 on the day for selected performances, for everyone 26 years old and under. Proof of age is required and you have to buy them in person from Hub Tickets or at the venue.

Group Bookings We are delighted to offer great benefits for bookings of 10 or more tickets. – 10% discount on all full price Festival tickets for selected performances – The opportunity to make flexible ticket reservations – Dedicated Group Sales Staff to assist you

Festival Theatre Les Troyens supper offer Make the most of your evening at the Mariinsky performances of Les Troyens at the Festival Theatre this summer, with a special interval picnic supper. Enjoy a Simple, Seafood or Deli picnic supper from as little as £8.50! Suppers must be pre-booked up to two days before the performance. Simply add them to your basket when booking your tickets by phone, online or in person. All ticket offers must be booked in the same transaction, and all offers and discounts are subject to availability.

Photo Stuart Armitt

Please call +44 (0)131 473 2089 or email groupbookings@eif.co.uk


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Festival City

Festival City Getting around… The following Lothian Bus services will take you to Festival venues lothianbuses.com The Edinburgh Playhouse 1, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 19, 22, 25, 26, 34, 44, 45, 49

Photo Shutterstock

Festival Theatre, Playfair Library Hall, National Museum of Scotland 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 14, 29, 30, 31, 33, 37, 47, 49

Edinburgh’s Summer Festivals 2014 Edinburgh International Film Festival 18–29 June +44 (0)131 228 4051 edfilmfest.org.uk Edinburgh International Jazz and Blues Festival 18–27 July +44 (0)131 467 5200 edinburghjazzfestival.com Edinburgh Art Festival 31 July – 31 August +44 (0)131 226 6558 edinburghartfestival.com

Edinburgh International Book Festival 9–25 August +44 (0)131 718 5666 edbookfest.co.uk Edinburgh Mela 29–31 August +44 (0)131 661 7100 edinburgh-mela.co.uk edinburghfestivals.co.uk The online one-stop shop for Edinburgh’s 12 major festivals. The place to go to find news, listings and the festivals’ iPhone app.

Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo 1–23 August Official Edinburgh +44 (0)131 225 1188 Festivals Map edintattoo.co.uk Pick up a copy of the official festivals map, available at Edinburgh Festival Fringe most venues around town 1–25 August during the festivals. Admin: +44 (0)131 226 0026 Box office: +44 (0)131 226 0000 (June to September only) edfringe.com

Visiting the city… VisitScotland For all your accommodation and tourism information needs. +44 (0)845 22 55 121 info@visitscotland.com visitscotland.com Festival Beds Accommodation in private homes in the city and surrounding area. +44 (0)131 225 1101 admin@festivalbeds.co.uk festivalbeds.co.uk Traveline travelinescotland.com National Rail Enquiries nationalrail.co.uk

The Hub, Greyfriars Kirk 23, 27, 41, 42, 67 (stop on George IV Bridge, 5 minutes’ walk from The Hub or Greyfriars Kirk) King’s Theatre 10, 11, 15, 15A, 16, 23, 24, 27, 36, 45 The Queen’s Hall 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 14, 29, 30, 31, 33, 35, 37, 45, 47, 49 Royal Lyceum Theatre Edinburgh 1, 10, 11, 15, 15A, 16, 24, 34, 36, 47 Usher Hall 1, 10, 11, 15, 15A, 16, 24, 34, 36, 47


Festival City

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Festival Venues Partner Hotels on map

2

3

PL

Book Festival

Tattoo Office ILE

AL M ROY

Ross Theatre Festival Fringe Box Office

The Hub Edinburgh’s Festival Centre

National Museum of Scotland

Usher Hall Royal Lyceum Theatre

Greyfriars Kirk

MORRISON ST

GATE

COW

Playfair Library Hall Festival Theatre, Edinburgh

OW

RR

TTE

Hotel du Vin & Bistro, Edinburgh (D4) 11 Bristo Place Edinburgh EH1 1EZ +44 (0)131 247 4900 hotelduvin.com/ hotels/edinburgh

The Edinburgh Playhouse

Tourist Information Centre

The Glasshouse, an Autograph Collection Hotel (E1) 2 Greenside Place Edinburgh EH1 3AA +44 (0)131 525 8200 theglasshousehotel.co.uk

PO

4

Waldorf Astoria Edinburgh – The Caledonian (A3) Princes Street Edinburgh EH1 2AB +44 (0)131 222 8888 thecaledonian. waldorfastoria.com

GR EE NS ID E

1

Macdonald Holyrood Hotel (E3) 81 Holyrood Road Edinburgh EH8 8AU +44 (0)131 550 4500 macdonaldhotels. co.uk/holyrood

The Queen’s Hall

King’s Theatre, Edinburgh

Look out for exclusive offers from our Festival partners at eif.co.uk/partneroffers The Hub Edinburgh’s Festival Centre, Royal Mile

C3

Festival Theatre Nicolson Street

D4

The Queen’s Hall Clerk Street

E5

The Edinburgh Playhouse Greenside Place E1 Royal Lyceum Theatre Edinburgh Grindlay Street

B3

Other Festivals

Usher Hall Grindlay Street

B3

Ross Theatre Princes Street Gardens

B3

King’s Theatre Leven Street

B5

Playfair Library Hall Old College, South Bridge D3 Greyfriars Kirk Greyfriars Place

D4

National Museum of Scotland Chambers Street

D3

International Book Festival Charlotte Square A2 Jazz and Blues Festival Box Office The Hub

C3

Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo Office Market Street D2 Festival Fringe Box Office Royal Mile D3 Tourist Information Centre Princes Street D2


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Festival Diary

Venue

5 – 7 August

Fri 8 August

The Queen’s Hall

Sat 9 August

Sun 10 August

11.00am Hebrides Ensemble (p48)

Clerk Street R WS T WC C

The Hub

2.30pm Culture and Conflict: The War that Ended Peace (p58)

Castlehill L LF WS T WC C

5.00pm Culture and Conflict: First World War: Re-thinking the Centenary (p58)

12 noon Conversations: Hebrides Ensemble (p62) 2.30pm Culture and Conflict: High Command in War (p58) 5.00pm Culture and Conflict: The Culture of Violence in the Twentieth Century (p58)

Greyfriars Kirk

King’s Theatre Leven Street LF L WS H WC

Nicolson Street L R LF WS H WC C

Tue 12 August 11.00am Ian Bostridge, Julius Drake (p49)

12 noon Culture and Conflict: Quartet for the End of Time (p58)

12 noon Conversations: Inala (p62)

2.30pm Festival Insights: THE DEMOCRATIC SET (p63) 5.00pm Culture and Conflict: Culture and Conflict (p58)

5.45pm Quartet for the End of Time (p46)

Greyfriars Place L WS WC

Festival Theatre

Mon 11 August 11.00am Nicola Benedetti Anna-Liisa Bezrodny Benjamin Gilmore Leonard Elschenbroich Alexei Grynyuk (p48)

Tue 5 August 7.30pm Preview: James I: The Key Shall Keep The Lock (p10) Thu 7 August 7.30pm Preview: James II: Day of The Innocents (p12)

8.00pm The War (p13) Chekov International Theatre Festival / SounDrama Studio

3.00pm 8.00pm The War (p13) Chekov International Theatre Festival / SounDrama Studio

7.30pm Preview: James III: The True Mirror (p12) National Theatre of Scotland and National Theatre of Great Britain

12 noon James I: The Key Shall Keep The Lock (p10)

2.30pm Culture and Conflict: The War Requiem (p58) 5.00pm Culture and Conflict: Objecting to War (p58)

5.45pm Collegium Vocale Gent (p46) Philippe Herreweghe conductor

8.00pm The War (p13) Chekov International Theatre Festival / SounDrama Studio

7.30pm James I: The Key Shall Keep The Lock (p10) National Theatre of Scotland and National Theatre of Great Britain

4.00pm James II: Day of The Innocents (p12) 8.15pm James III: The True Mirror (p12)

National Theatre of Scotland and National Theatre of Great Britain

National Theatre of Scotland and National Theatre of Great Britain

The Edinburgh Playhouse Greenside Place L WS H WC C

Royal Lyceum Theatre Edinburgh

8.00pm Ladysmith Black Mumbazo (p23)

8.00pm Inala (p22)

8.00pm Inala (p22)

8.00pm Inala (p22)

7.30pm Ganesh Versus the Third Reich (p14) Back to Back Theatre

2.30pm Ganesh Versus the Third Reich (p14) Back to Back Theatre

7.30pm Ganesh Versus the Third Reich (p14) Back to Back Theatre

7.30pm Ganesh Versus the Third Reich (p14) Back to Back Theatre

Every 20 minutes from 2.00pm until 5.50pm Exhibit B (p33) THIRD WORLD BUNFIGHT

Every 20 minutes from 2.00pm until 5.50pm Exhibit B (p33) THIRD WORLD BUNFIGHT

8.00pm Holst’s The Planets (p35) BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra Donald Runnicles conductor

7.30pm Scottish Chamber Orchestra (p35) Robin Ticciati conductor

Grindlay Street LF WS T WC C

Playfair Library Hall South Bridge R LF WC

Usher Hall Lothian Road L LF WS WC C

7.30pm The Opening Concert (p34) Royal Scottish National Orchestra Oliver Knussen conductor

Access Facilities Key: L Level access R Ramped access LF Lift SL Stair lift WS Wheelchair spaces in auditorium T Induction loop H Infrared system WC Accessible toilets C Accessible catering/bar

Every 20 minutes from 2.00pm until 5.50pm Exhibit B (p33) THIRD WORLD BUNFIGHT

8.00pm The Sixteen (p36) Harry Christophers conductor

7.30pm Hespèrion XXI, Le Concert des Nations, La Capella Reial de Catalunya (p36) Jordi Savall director


Festival Diary Wed 13 August

Thu 14 August

Fri 15 August

Sat 16 August

11.00am Alban Gerhardt, Steven Osborne (p49)

11.00am Artemis Quartet (p50)

11.00am Piotr Anderszewski (p50)

11.00am Trio Verlaine (p51)

2.30pm Culture and Conflict: The First World War and Australia’s Rise to Nationhood (p59)

12 noon Conversations: Ute Lemper (p62)

2.30pm Escaping War (p63) Bal Moderne

2.30pm Escaping War (p63) Bal Moderne

5.00pm Culture and Conflict: Gallipoli: The End of the Myth (p59)

5.45pm Sister Marie Keyrouz, L’Ensemble De La Paix (p46)

5.45pm The Hilliard Ensemble (p46)

8.00pm Britten’s War Requiem (p37) Philharmonia Orchestra Sir Andrew Davis conductor

Events Key:

Dance

Theatre

Opera

Tue 19 August 11.00am Michael Houstoun (p52)

12 noon Conversations: The James Plays (p62)

2.30pm Culture and Conflict: Women and the Killing Fields: Femininity and War (p59)

5.00pm Culture and Conflict: From Red Clydeside to Radical Scotland (p59)

5.45pm Wu Man, Sanubar Tursun and Friends (p47)

7.30pm James III: The True Mirror (p12) National Theatre of Scotland and National Theatre of Great Britain

Mon 18 August 11.00am Anna Prohaska, Eric Schneider (p51)

2.30pm Culture and Conflict: Owen Wingrave: Ghosts of Tradition (p59)

5.00pm Culture and Conflict: The Road to 11 November (p59)

Every 20 minutes from 2.00pm until 5.50pm Exhibit B (p33) THIRD WORLD BUNFIGHT

8.00pm Paul Lewis (p37)

2.30pm Escaping War (p63) Bal Moderne

2.30pm Culture and Conflict: Contemporary Military Operations – Risks and Responsibilities (p59)

5.45pm Arditti Quartet (p47)

7.30pm James III: The True Mirror (p12) National Theatre of Scotland and National Theatre of Great Britain

5.45pm Polish Radio Choir (p47)

7.30pm Owen Wingrave (p8) Aldeburgh Music

7.30pm Owen Wingrave (p8) Aldeburgh Music

7.30pm James II: Day of The Innocents (p12) National Theatre of Scotland and National Theatre of Great Britain

Sun 17 August

12 noon James I: The Key Shall Keep The Lock (p10)

12 noon James I: The Key Shall Keep The Lock (p10)

4.00pm James II: Day of The Innocents (p12)

4.00pm James II: Day of The Innocents (p12)

8.15pm James III: The True Mirror (p12)

8.15pm James III: The True Mirror (p12)

National Theatre of Scotland and National Theatre of Great Britain

National Theatre of Scotland and National Theatre of Great Britain

8.00pm I AM (p24) MAU

8.00pm I AM (p24) MAU

8.00pm Minetti (p15)

2.30pm 8.00pm Minetti (p15)

Every 20 minutes from 2.00pm until 5.50pm Exhibit B (p33) THIRD WORLD BUNFIGHT

Every 20 minutes from 10.30am until 5.50pm Exhibit B (p33) THIRD WORLD BUNFIGHT

Every 20 minutes from 10.30am until 5.50pm Exhibit B (p33) THIRD WORLD BUNFIGHT

7.30pm Ute Lemper, Scottish Chamber Orchestra (p38) Lawrence Foster conductor

7.30pm Bach’s Mass in B minor (p38) Collegium Vocale Gent Choir and Orchestra Philippe Herreweghe conductor

7.30pm Shostakovich’s Leningrad Symphony (p39) I, CULTURE Orchestra Kirill Karabits conductor

Music

Cultural Explorers

Discussions

5.00pm Culture and Conflict: The White War: Life and Death on the Italian Front (p59)

5.45pm The Tallis Scholars (p47) Peter Philips director

8.00pm Gnosis (p26) Akram Khan Company

8.00pm Beyond Zero: 1914–1918 (p31) Kronos Quartet

7.30pm James I: The Key Shall Keep The Lock (p10) National Theatre of Scotland and National Theatre of Great Britain

8.00pm Minetti (p15)

Every 20 minutes from 2.00pm until 5.50pm Exhibit B (p33) THIRD WORLD BUNFIGHT

8.00pm London Philharmonic Orchestra (p39) Vladimir Jurowski conductor

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8.00pm Kronos Quartet (p40)


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Festival Diary

Venue

Wed 20 August

Thu 21 August

Fri 22 August

Sat 23 August

The Queen’s Hall

11.00am Simon Keenlyside, Malcolm Martineau (p52)

11.00am Renaud Capuçon Hanna Weinmeister Edgar Moreau Jérôme Ducros (p53)

11.00am Takács Quartet (p53)

11.00am Takács Quartet (p53)

12 noon Conversations: The Tallis Scholars (p62)

2.30pm Culture and Conflict: Beacon of Light: The new Edinburgh International Festival and the arts in post-war Society (p59)

2.30pm Culture and Conflict: How War Reporting Has Changed: A Century On (p60)

War on Film (p61):

War on Film (p61):

2.30pm Ran

12 noon Talk: Permanent Post-War Cinema?

Clerk Street R WS T WC C

The Hub Castlehill L LF WS T WC C

Greyfriars Kirk Greyfriars Place L WS WC

King’s Theatre Leven Street LF L WS H WC

Festival Theatre Nicolson Street L R LF WS H WC C

2.30pm Culture and Conflict: War, Atrocities and the Truth (p59)

4.30pm Edinburgh International Festival Young People’s Lecture: Emmanuel Jal (p63)

5.45pm Ricercar Consort (p47) Philippe Pierlot director

5.45pm Concerto Italiano (p47) Rinaldo Alessandrini director

8.00pm Gnosis (p26) Akram Khan Company

8.00pm Gnosis (p26) Akram Khan Company

12 noon James I: The Key Shall Keep The Lock (p10)

7.30pm James II: Day of The Innocents (p12) National Theatre of Scotland and National Theatre of Great Britain

4.00pm James II: Day of The Innocents (p12)

5.00pm Conversations: Takács Quartet (p62)

5.30pm The Burmese Harp

Sun 24 August

Mon 25 August 11.00am Anne Sofie von Otter Daniel Hope Bengt Forsberg Bebe Risenfors (p54)

12 noon Conversations: Stan Douglas (p62) War on Film (p61):

2.30pm Joyeux Noël

2.30pm Night and Fog

5.00pm Come and See

3.30pm The Producers

7.45pm The Tin Drum

5.30pm Hunger 7.30pm Darfur

8.00pm Helen Lawrence (p18) Canadian Stage

3.00pm 8.00pm Helen Lawrence (p18) Canadian Stage

7.30pm Sweet Mambo (p28) Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch

7.30pm Sweet Mambo (p28) Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch

7.30pm Sweet Mambo (p28) Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch

7.00pm FRONT (p16) Thalia Theater

7.00pm FRONT (p16) Thalia Theater

7.00pm FRONT (p16) Thalia Theater

7.00pm FRONT (p16) Thalia Theater

Every 20 minutes from 2.00pm until 5.50pm Exhibit B (p33) THIRD WORLD BUNFIGHT

Every 20 minutes from 10.30am until 5.50pm Exhibit B (p33) THIRD WORLD BUNFIGHT

Every 20 minutes from 10.30am until 5.50pm Exhibit B (p33) THIRD WORLD BUNFIGHT

Every 20 minutes from 2.00pm until 5.50pm Exhibit B (p33) THIRD WORLD BUNFIGHT

8.00pm Czech Philharmonic 01 (p42) Jiří Bělohlávek conductor

8.00pm Czech Philharmonic 02 (p42) Jiří Bělohlávek conductor

7.30pm Bernstein’s Kaddish Symphony (p41) Royal Scottish National Orchestra John Axelrod conductor

8.00pm András Schiff (p43)

7.30pm James III: The True Mirror (p12) National Theatre of Scotland and National Theatre of Great Britain

8.15pm James III: The True Mirror (p12) National Theatre of Scotland and National Theatre of Great Britain

The Edinburgh Playhouse Greenside Place L WS H WC C

Royal Lyceum Theatre Edinburgh Grindlay Street LF WS T WC C

Playfair Library Hall South Bridge R LF WC

Usher Hall Lothian Road L LF WS WC C

Every 20 minutes from 2.00pm until 5.50pm Exhibit B (p33) THIRD WORLD BUNFIGHT

7.30pm Collegium Vocale Gent, Scottish Chamber Orchestra (p40) Philippe Herreweghe conductor

8.00pm Melbourne Symphony Orchestra (p41) Sir Andrew Davis conductor

Access Facilities Key: L Level access R Ramped access LF Lift SL Stair lift WS Wheelchair spaces in auditorium T Induction loop H Infrared system WC Accessible toilets C Accessible catering/bar


Festival Diary Tue 26 August

Wed 27 August

Thu 28 August

Fri 29 August

Sat 30 August

11.00am Scottish Ensemble, Commonwealth Strings (p54)

11.00am Stéphane Degout, Simon Lepper (p55)

11.00am Pavel Haas Quartet (p55)

11.00am Frank Peter Zimmermann, Christian Zacharias (p56)

11.00am Daniil Trifonov (p56)

2.30pm Culture and Conflict: Killing Civilians (p60) 5.00pm Conversations: Samuel Pisar (p61)

2.30pm Culture and Conflict: The Peace to End Peace (p60) 5.00pm Culture and Conflict: A Century on the Edge: From Cold War to Hot World, 1945 – 2045 (p60)

2.30pm Lex Pacificatoria: Using Law to End Wars (p60)

12 noon Conversations: William Kentridge (p62)

5.00pm Scotland in the Soft Power Era (p60)

2.30pm Festival Insights: Bitter Music: Harry Partch’s diary with David Moss (p63)

73

Other events Virgin Money Fireworks Concert Scottish Chamber Orchestra (p57) Garry Walker conductor Princes Street Gardens L WS WC Sunday 31 August 9.00pm

Primordial: SuperNaturalBayiMinyjirral Danie Mellor (p64) National Museum of Scotland, Chambers Street L LF WC T Friday 1 August – Sunday 23 November Open daily 10.00am – 5.00pm

8.00pm Delusion of the Fury (p30) Ensemble musikFabrik

8.00pm Delusion of the Fury (p30) Ensemble musikFabrik

5.00pm Les Troyens (p6) Mariinsky Opera

5.00pm Les Troyens (p6) Mariinsky Opera

8.00pm Ubu and the Truth Commission (p20) Handspring Puppet Company

8.00pm Ubu and the Truth Commission (p20) Handspring Puppet Company

2.30pm 8.00pm Ubu and the Truth Commission (p20) Handspring Puppet Company

8.00pm Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra 02 (p44) Mariss Jansons conductor

8.00pm Mahler’s Symphony No 6 (p45) Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra Yannick Nézet-Séguin conductor

8.00pm BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra (p45) Ilan Volkov conductor

8.00pm Helen Lawrence (p18) Canadian Stage

5.00pm Les Troyens (p6) Mariinsky Opera

8.00pm Patria (p32) Paco Peña Flamenco Company

7.00pm FRONT (p16) Thalia Theater

6.30pm William Tell (p43) Teatro Regio Torino Gianandrea Noseda conductor

Events Key:

Dance

8.00pm Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra 01 (p44) Mariss Jansons conductor

Theatre

Opera

8.00pm Patria (p32) Paco Peña Flamenco Company

Music

Cultural Explorers

Discussions


Please Recycle The single most important thing you can do with this brochure when you have finished with it, is recycle it.

Profile for Edinburgh International Festival

Edinburgh International Festival brochure 2014  

Discover the 2014 programme of the best music, opera, dance and theatre. 8-31 August 2014 For more videos, audio, articles and ticket booki...

Edinburgh International Festival brochure 2014  

Discover the 2014 programme of the best music, opera, dance and theatre. 8-31 August 2014 For more videos, audio, articles and ticket booki...

Profile for edintfest