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edible

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA FE ®· ALBUQUERQUE · TAOS

DEMOCRACY

ISSUE 57 · LATE SUMMER · AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

THE STORY OF LOCAL FOOD, SEASON BY SEASON IN NEW MEXICO


photo: doug merriam

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DEMOCRACY: AUGUST / SEPTEMBER DEPARTMENTS 2

GRIST FOR THE MILL By Willy Carleton and Candolin Cook

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CONTRIBUTORS

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LOCAL HEROES

48 FOOD FOR THOUGHT An Update on Fracking in New Mexico by Willy Carleton

76 EDIBLE NOTABLES

88 LAST BITE

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AT THE CHEF'S TABLE

FEATURES

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AT THE CHEF'S TABLE

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Ideal Pairings by Jenn Shapland

BEHIND THE BOTTLE Chefs Talk Wine with Jonathan Perno

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#EDIBLENM

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EDIBLE CRAFT COCKTAIL Tickled Pink Paloma by Quinn Stephenson

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COOKING FRESH

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EDIBLE COMMUNITY

Summer Abundance by Stephanie Cameron Open Fields Preserved by Lisa Brown

edible

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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SANTA FE · ALBUQUERQUE · TAOS

81 SOURCE GUIDE / EAT LOCAL GUIDE

Edgar Beas, Green Tractor Farm, Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta, Paper Dosa Comfort Food, Redefined by Jenn Shapland

ON THE COVER

Rose Hip Cordial by Stephanie Cameron

50 MEAT MATTERS Growing a Market for Our Mountain Ranchers and Farmers by Briana Olson

56 WHAT COULD INDUSTRIAL HEMP MEAN FOR NEW MEXICO AGRICULTURE?

DEMOCRACY

ISSUE 57 · LATE SUMMER · AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

THE STORY OF LOCAL FOOD, SEASON BY SEASON IN NEW MEXICO

Democracy. Ratatouille recipe on page 40. Photo by Stephanie Cameron.

By Michael Dax

62 ELECTING TO EAT WELL A Conversation with Candidates about Food in New Mexico – Interviews and Introductions by Willy Carleton

70 A HARD BILL TO SWALLOW Farm Bill's SNAP Cuts Would Hurt New Mexico by Candolin Cook WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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GRIST FOR THE MILL PUBLISHERS Bite Size Media, LLC

This November, Americans will head to the polls to vote in what many political pundits are calling the most important midterm election in decades. New Mexicans will decide on a new governor, one Senate and three House seats, a State Supreme Court position, and several other state and municipal offices. As a publication dedicated to empowering readers to make a difference in our food system, this edition of edible looks at some of the critical food issues facing our state and at the candidates who will potentially have the power to shape local and national policy for years to come. If there is an underlying argument to every page in this issue, it is that a strong local food system is foundational to a strong democracy, one where we all share a stake in the long-term health of our land and water, in the growth of local businesses, and in our greater community’s ability to eat well. Throughout this issue, we offer a wide-ranging portrait of our state’s political landscape through the lens of food and agriculture. We explore the possibilities of industrial hemp in New Mexico, inquire why most beef raised in New Mexico is exported despite the centrality of cattle ranching to our agricultural economy, and look into the deep cuts to the Supplemental Food Assistance Program in the proposed federal Farm Bill that could destabilize already vulnerable populations and undermine local businesses. We also re-examine fracking in northern New Mexico, and look to the Village of Corrales for a template of how a community can support its local farmers, one acre at a time. Finally, we talk with Michelle Lujan Grisham and Stephanie Garcia Richard, candidates for governor and land commissioner, respectively, as well as Senator Martin Heinrich and US representative candidate Deb Haaland. Through these conversations, we hope readers will better understand these candidates’ positions on issues that directly impact our local food options and our broader landscape. “There’s nothing more political than food,” the late Anthony Bourdain would often say. The pages that follow bolster Bourdain’s point. In New Mexico—one of the hungriest states in the nation—the basic questions of who gets to eat, and what they get to eat, are both political at their core and as salient as ever. When it comes to supporting local food, we often encourage readers to vote with their wallets. This fall, we also hope you make your voices heard at the ballot box.

Stephanie and Walt Cameron

EDITORS Willy Carleton and Candolin Cook

COPY EDITORS Margaret Marti and Briana Olson

DESIGN AND LAYOUT Stephanie Cameron

PHOTO EDITOR Stephanie Cameron

EVENT COORDINATORS Natalie Donnelly and Gina Riccobono

DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER Joshua Hinte

VIDEO PRODUCER Walt Cameron

SALES AND MARKETING Kate Collins, Melinda Esquibel, and Gina Riccobono

CONTACT US Mailing Address: 3301-R Coors Boulevard NW #152 Albuquerque, NM 87120 info@ediblesantafe.com www.ediblesantafe.com Phone: 505-375-1329

SUBSCRIBE ∙ BUY AN AD ∙ LETTERS 505-375-1329 WWW.EDIBLENM.COM We welcome your letters. Write to us at the address above, or email us at INFO@EDIBLESANTAFE.COM Bite Size Media, LLC publishes

Willy Carleton and Candolin Cook, Editors

edible Santa Fe six times a year. We distribute throughout central and northern New Mexico and nationally by subscription. Subscriptions are $32 annually.

Stephanie and Walt Cameron, Publishers

Printed at Courier Graphics Corporation Phoenix, Arizona No part of this publication may be used with-

Winner of James Beard Foundation Award 2011 Publication of the Year

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out the written permission of the publisher. © 2018 All rights reserved.


FiElD To FoRk. AnD NoW BaR. For ten years, Los Poblanos has featured an award-winning wine program and a great selection of local beers for guests experiencing our Rio Grande Valley Cuisine. Now, we are thrilled to introduce the addition of a full spirits license which allows us to curate an exciting new bar experience that pays homage to Los Poblanos’ agricultural and organic farming roots. Sourcing from the surrounding ďŹ elds and other local farms, cocktails at the new restaurant, Campo, feature a wide variety of fresh, organic ingredients and small-batch, barrel-aged spirits as well as house-made components including bitters, lavender simple syrup and amaros. Join us as we cool off with a tantalizing summer beverage at our bar, open every day, 4-9pm. Campo is open for breakfast daily and serves dinner Wednesday-Sunday from 5-9pm. lospoblanos.com

at


CONTRIBUTORS LISA BROWN Lisa Brown is a water rights lawyer turned farmer who lives and works in Corrales. She is the current chair of the Corrales Farmland Preservation and Agricultural Commission.

MICHAEL J. DAX Michael J. Dax lives in Santa Fe and writes about environment and culture in the American West. He is the author of Grizzly West: A Failed Attempt to Reintroduce Grizzly Bears in the Mountain West (2015).

STEPHANIE CAMERON Stephanie Cameron was raised in Albuquerque and earned a degree in fine arts at the University of New Mexico. After photographing, testing, and designing a cookbook in 2011, she and her husband Walt began pursuing Edible Communities and they found edible Santa Fe in their backyard. Today, Cameron is the art director, head photographer, marketing guru, publisher, and owner of edible Santa Fe.

BRIANA OLSON Briana Olson teaches English at CNM, copyedits for edible Santa Fe, and is lead editor for The New Farmer’s Almanac, a miscellany of writings and art by farmers, ecologists, and other land-loving types. Her writing has appeared in Salt Hill and Pindeldyboz, among other places. She enjoys long mountain walks, taking risks in the kitchen, and seeking out new and interesting things to eat, from Bangkok to Albuquerque.

WILLY CARLETON Willy Carleton is editor of edible Santa Fe. He recently completed his PhD in history at the University of New Mexico, with a dissertation examining the cultural history of twentieth-century agriculture in the Southwest. He owns and manages Leafwater Farm, a small vegetable farm in Medanales. CANDOLIN COOK Candolin Cook is a history doctoral candidate at the University of New Mexico, an associate editor for the New Mexico Historical Review, and editor of edible Santa Fe. On Saturdays, you can find her selling Vida Verde Farm produce at Albuquerque's Downtown Growers' Market. Follow her farm life on Instagram @vidaverdefarmabq and @candolin

JENN SHAPLAND Jenn Shapland is a nonfiction writer living in New Mexico. Her work has appeared in Tin House, THE Magazine, Electric Literature, and elsewhere. Shapland teaches creative writing at the Institute of American Indian Arts, and she designs and makes clothing for Agnes in Santa Fe. Her first book, The Autobiography of Carson McCullers, will be published in 2019 by Tin House Books.

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September 8

2PM - 5PM, SANTA FE BREWING CO. 4

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explore the issues iaia museum of contemporary native art

Expanding Horizons: Darren Vigil Gray through February 16, 2019

native treasures collectors sale at the museum of indian arts and culture

A unique sale of Native American art from the homes of top collectors. September 22–23, 2018

museum of international folk art

Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru, through March 8, 2019

Every One, by Cannupa Hanska Luger

“As an indigenous person in this country, I am a political entity, like it or not. And as an artist I’ve had so many opportunities and have so much privilege; at this point in our political climate, I have an obligation to weaponize that privilege.” -Cannupa Hanska Luger

mmiwqt bead project

Using 2”x 2” beads handmade by communities across the country, Luger created a monumental portrait acknowledging missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, queer, and trans people. Each of the 4096 beads represents a real person. Every One is on exhibit at the Museum of International Folk Art August 10 – September 19.

who owns indigenous culture?

What is appropriation? Why does authenticity matter? What role does identity and activism play in the expression of indigenous art forms? Why is the exploration of these topics so fraught? This summer 8 indigenous art institutions and 14 artists share art, perspectives and stories that explore these controversial and global issues.

Learn more at

n m c u ltu re.org /p r o je c t i n dig e n e

ralph t. coe center for the arts

The IMPRINT Exhibition, opens August 14

school of advanced research (sar)

Indian Arts Research Center Collections Tours, Fridays, 2 pm, all year Wednesdays and Fridays, 2 pm, June–September

97th annual santa fe indian market, southwestern association for indian arts

August 18–19, 2018

wheelwright museum of the american indian

Memory Weaving and Peshlakai Vision through October 7, 2018


LOCAL HEROES An edible Local Hero is an exceptional individual or organization working to create innovative, vibrant, and resilient local food systems in New Mexico. Last fall, edible readers nominated and voted for their favorite food artisans, growers, and advocates in nearly two dozen categories—including six new awards. Each issue of edible will contain interviews with several of the winners, spotlighting the important and exciting work they do. It is imperative to the local food movement that we come together as a community to support each other, our local economy, and our environment. Please join us in thanking these local heroes for being at the forefront of that effort.

Edgar Beas ROSEWOOD INN OF THE ANASAZI—ANASAZI RESTAURANT, BAR AND LOUNGE BEST CHEF, SANTA FE Photos by Stacey M. Adams

Executive Chef Edgar Beas leads the talented culinary team at the renowned Anasazi Restaurant, Bar and Lounge at the Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi. Chef Beas is a classically trained chef who graduated from the San Diego Culinary Institute and trained in Spain at the three 6

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Michelin-starred Martin Berasategui Restaurant, where he worked closely with the world-renowned chef himself. He also served as chef de cuisine at Madera, another Michelin-starred restaurant, in Menlo Park, California, before taking the reins at the Anasazi Restaurant.


WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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How did you get to where you are now? What’s the backstory, and what was the moment that brought you to your current work? I have been very lucky to train under highly talented chefs from all over the world. I had the honor of training under Chef Martin Berasategui, world-renowned for his unduplicable culinary technique. I learned how to appreciate ingredients and food in an incomparable environment. I also served as chef de cuisine at Madera in California, another well-regarded restaurant, where we worked with local farm ingredients and used cooking techniques to highlight their natural flavors. I started cooking at a very young age, which helped me understand what the industry has to offer. After working at Madera for several years, I was seeking a new environment to challenge myself culinarily. Santa Fe’s amazing food scene and the Anasazi Restaurant’s long-standing reputation as one of the city’s best restaurants appealed to me, and working there felt like a natural evolution in my career due to my familiarity with haute cuisine and experience working with farm-fresh ingredients. What is a local food issue that is important to you? In accordance with Rosewood Inn’s “sense of place” philosophy and my years of working with local ingredients, I find it important to source locally whenever possible. When I first arrived in Santa Fe, I immediately reached out to farmers in the area to learn about their products and discuss ways we could work together. We’ve developed strong partnerships with local farms and purveyors that continue to this day. In this issue, edible is focusing on local and national food policy. Can you tell us a bit about a problem that is facing our local restaurant industry and what policy initiatives (local, state, federal) you would most like to see enacted, repealed, or protected to address that problem? Living in Santa Fe, a city that proudly champions local sourcing and environmental friendliness, has made me more ecologically conscious than ever. Many people don’t realize how environmentally taxing it is to support a food system. Ingredients are often transported across miles and involve a complex industrial supply chain that has a heavy impact on our planet. Even our diets themselves can harm the environment in irreparable ways. Personally and professionally, I try to 8

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champion sustainable, responsible, and local sourcing whenever possible to reduce my environmental footprint, and I would like to see this reflected in our national food policy as well. Cooking with Kids is also a passion of mine, and I would like to see more involvement from the city and its officials in continuing to educate children on the environment and food. What is a meal you will never get tired of? For a meal at home, I enjoy traditional indigenous Mexican food, and tacos de tripa are my go-to snack. If I go out to dinner, I always go for the tasting menu. In my opinion, it showcases the chef ’s talents and creativity. How does being a Santa Fean inspire your work and passions? Rather than focusing on red and green chiles, which most people associate with Southwestern food, it is my goal to explore different ways to pay homage to Santa Fe’s unique culinary traditions. For example, I like to incorporate native cooking techniques whenever possible, such as smoking with local branches. Upon arriving in Santa Fe, I found it fascinating to learn about the local trees and the types of flavors their branches impart. The ingredients and traditions in Santa Fe are so different and unique from what I’ve previously worked with, and I love the creativity and experimentation they inspire in me. Working closely with a unique community gives me a high level of satisfaction and helps me continue to push my creativity to new levels. Fill in the Blank: When I make guacamole, I always add beer to make it extra delicious. If I had the chance, I would have lunch with Chef Andoni Luis Aduriz at his restaurant, Mugaritz. I'd like to ask him how he approaches his culinary evolution. Most people are surprised to learn that I enjoy going camping and being completely immersed in nature. A food trend I can’t stand is truffle oil. One I like is sourcing locally and wild edibles. 113 Washington, 505-988-3030, www.rosewoodhotels.com/inn-of-the-anasazi-santa-fe


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LOCAL HEROES

Green Tractor Farm BEST FARM, SANTA FE Photos by Stacey M. Adams

Tom and Mary Dixon with Ned Conwell and his son.

Green Tractor is a family farm in La Cienega, which grows certified organic vegetables, flowers, and grapes on three acres. They are committed to water conservation and soil building practices. Rachel Dixon and Ned Conwell run the farm’s day-to-day operations and handle marketing. Tom and Mary Dixon are the landowners and founders of the farm. They lend their expertise where necessary and manage the onsite vineyard and grain production. How did you get to where you are now? Tom and Mary Dixon established Green Tractor Farm in 2000 on the land Tom grew up on in La Cienega, just south of Santa Fe. They became certified organic in 2006. Rachel Dixon grew up on the farm as well, watching Tom and Mary grow alfalfa, corn, beans, and chile throughout her childhood, much as Tom had learned from his parents. Rachel worked on farms in the Bay Area before she and her husband Ned Conwell moved to New Mexico to help take over the heavy lifting at Green Tractor. Ned grew up in suburban San Diego, and after college attended the Farm & Garden program at UC Santa Cruz, where he learned to combine his passions for nature and sustainability through organic farming. Rachel and Ned now have two young chil10

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dren, who are constantly getting in the way, but who are incredibly lucky to be third-generation farmers. What is a local food issue of that is important to you? An overlooked need in our foodshed is the need for small grains such as wheat, rye, and oats to be grown organically (and locally) on a scale that could provide local bakers with a steady supply of flours. The closest large farms now doing this are in our neighbor states. How amazing it would be to see some irrigated sections in eastern New Mexico brought into this effort! And, of course, the availability, management, and future abundance of water is of great importance to all of us because without it our livelihood is impossible. What is a substantial problem facing your business? Access to fresh produce is of utmost importance. Currently, one example that is helping is the Double Up Food Bucks program which subsidizes and increases the buying power of the EBT card system. If this program were a permanent policy, both local farmers and those who have limited access to fresh, local food would benefit. Our hope is that the funding will be established as a guaranteed, continuing budget item.


And, of course, land access is an issue facing farmers everywhere, not only in Santa Fe. Many organizations are doing great work here and all over the country, but we need to keep doing good work to protect land from development. [We] would like to see land [priced low enough to make agriculture feasible] and that can be made available to farmers who are committed to sustainable farming practices. What is a typical day on Green Tractor Farm? We begin the day with coffee, then go over the list of what to harvest for orders and farmers markets; harvest vegetables and flowers; wash vegetables and bunch flowers; drink more coffee; and finish the day with one of the never-ending tasks—weeding, planting, irrigating, etc. Rinse and repeat. Describe your perfect day off. We get days off?! A day off in any sort of water is always rejuvenating. How does your CSA work? We have a local box CSA that has an on-farm pick up because we like to make the food available to our nearest neighbors. We also have a market debit CSA that allows members to shop from our stand at a

discount and we track their account. It’s a great way for people to support the farm while allowing flexibility to get exactly what they want when they want it. A CSA is a great way folks can directly support a farm. By putting money up front in the spring when cash flow is slow, members receive the bounty of the harvest as well as a connection with their farmer. Farming and marketing can be such an unsure business and so much is out of the farmer’s control; it’s a great thing to know that people are committed. What is your favorite vegetable and your favorite way to prepare it? Sweet potatoes! We love to make sweet potato fries because the kids will eat them and we can call it dinner. Is there anything else you’d like to share with edible readers? We are honored and humbled to be voted Best Farm. It is an amazing opportunity to be a part of such a strong community of local food growers, processors, and buyers. www.greentractorfarm.com WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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LOCAL HEROES

Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta BEST EVENT

An Interview with Greg O'Byrne, Executive Director of Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta since 1994; Kate Collins, Board Member, Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta; and Michael Trujillo, President of Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta

Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta Board, photo courtesy of SFWCF.

The Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta is an annual five-day weekend of events featuring the culinary artistry found in Santa Fe’s many excellent restaurants coupled with wines from international wineries. By bringing a hundred international wineries to Santa Fe to partner with seventy-five of Santa Fe’s best restaurants, the five-day fiesta features cooking demos, wine seminars, winery luncheons, and dinners. The weekend culminates with the Grand Tasting at the Santa Fe Opera, where all participating restaurants and wineries serve samples of their best food and wine. What is Santa Fe Wine & Chile’s backstory? O’Byrne: On a bright and slightly cool afternoon in the Santa Fe Railyard on the last Saturday of September 1991, a one-day food and wine event took place. For ten dollars, you could buy a coupon book with ten chits, each one redeemable for either a taste from one of the twenty participating Santa Fe restaurants or a sip from one of twenty California wineries. Forty tasting booths were lined along the perimeter of the L-shaped parking lot behind Sanbusco Center. In the front 12

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corner, a street vendor slowly turned the handle on his chile roaster, blistering a fresh batch of Hatch green, the smoke wafting into the crisp fall air. In a smallish tent on the opposite corner, Mark Miller of Coyote Café in Santa Fe, Rick Bayless from Tompolobampo in Chicago, and Stephen Pyles from Routh Street Cafe in Dallas took turns demonstrating their techniques cooking with chiles. The SFWCF was the 1991 brainchild of Mark Miller, Al Lucero, and Gordon Heiss. While other national food and wine events focus on globetrotting celebrity guest chefs, national magazine advertisers, or Food Network stars (some of whom have never worked in a restaurant), the identity of the Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta, since its inception, has always been about the Santa Fe restaurant community. Collins: In early July 1991, I received a phone call from Gordon Heiss, manager of La Casa Sena, asking for my help on a project he and Mark Miller of Coyote Café had come up with. I was just one year into owning Little Canyon Wines wholesale distribution company and was eager to please two important customers. Gordon laid out


28th AnnuAl

Santa Fe Wine & Chile FieSta

September 23 - 30 2018

GrAnd TAsTinG saturday, september 29th at the santa Fe opera 75 extraordinary santa Fe restaurants & 100 World-Class Wineries

FeATured evenTs Reserve Tasting & Auction Auction luncheon with david ramey rosé All day Guest Chef Walkaround Piper-heidsieck Champagne Brunch Guest Chef luncheons & demos daily Wine seminars nightly Wine dinners sFW&C Film Fiesta Gruet Golf Classic sFW&C Gran Fondo

There’s A Gold rush in sAnTA Fe For The BesT Wines oF The Week AT The sAnTA Fe Wine & Chile FiesTA reserve TAsTinG & AuCTion The top reserve wine from each of the 100 participating wineries is poured with delectable tastes from 10 Santa Fe restaurants. A silent auction of 75 rare wine lots benefits SFW&C education programs. The Gold Pass (limited to only 150 guests) gets you in a half-hour early. Wines so good you will want to start tasting earlier. Gold pass 3:30 pm to 6:30 pm $150 | reserve pass 4:00 pm to 6:30 pm $110 Friday September 28th | the Santa Fe Community Convention Center

FeATurinG TAsTes From These GreAT sAnTA Fe resTAurAnTs Anasazi Andiamo! El Nido Float Bar & Cafe at Meow Wolf Joseph’s Culinary Pub

Maize L’Olivier The Palace Paper Dosa State Capital Kitchen

santafewineandchile.org 505-438-8060


LOCAL HEROES their ideas, asked me to help procure wineries, owners (preferably), and reps to come support and participate. Of course I said yes, and then asked if he was planning this for next year in September. “Oh, no, nine weeks from now.” I told him I would do my best. Luckily I was able to bring seven wineries to our first “Santa Fe Chile & Wine Fiesta.” Yes, that was its first name, switched by the second year. Now in its twenty-eighth year and with ninety wineries, there is great pride, and nostalgia, looking back at how it all began with big idea people and all those who helped to produce it. How does the festival help keep Santa Fe on the map as a worldclass culinary destination? O’Byrne: We simply promote what our unique and amazing culinary community does. Though not a large market for wineries, the highly visible Santa Fe restaurant scene attracts nearly one hundred wineries a year to the event, all of whom want to showcase their wine alongside our restaurants. Relationships between restaurants and wineries are fostered, restaurants become more wine-savvy, events take place year round—it’s a win-win for consumers, wineries, and restaurants alike. Collins: It was Mark Miller’s and Gordon Heiss’s vision to create an event to spotlight the quality and diversity of the culinary scene here in Santa Fe, even then. Both were terrific promoters and marketers, touring around the United States lauding Santa Fe. From the very beginning, SFWCF invited notable chefs to come to Santa Fe and work alongside our local chefs and restaurants to showcase Santa Fe as truly a culinary destination. We have continued to accomplish that every year. Just look at the list of guest chefs we’ve had over these many years. All of them excited to come and do what they do best. What are the biggest challenges coordinating such a large, multiday event? O’Byrne: Permits and ice. Collins: We are a board with a very strong bond that holds us together, with terrific help, in so many ways, including our executive director, Greg [O’Byrne], now celebrating his twenty-fifth year. In addition is Katherine Wright, our ticketing director, and all the contacts and businesses that we’ve worked with. SFWCF is a well-oiled machine with hard-working, dedicated people to help run it right. It is not a competition, and everyone works for the same purpose: To make our guests really glad that they’ve come to Santa Fe. Trujillo: In my opinion, coordination is the key to any event. You have to remember this isn't something that we start in the month of May and say okay we're going to have a big party in September. This event is planned and worked on all year long. We have timelines that are set and we must be able to follow through with that to make sure that the customers are happy. The event pairs seventy-five local restaurants with a hundred international wineries; how do New Mexico wines stack up against wines from across the country and world? O’Byrne: Vivác, Gruet, Don Quixote, Black Mesa, Casa Rondeña, and other New Mexico wineries have been featured every year at the 14

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fiesta, and for good reason. Guests are impressed with the local wines tasted alongside wines from around the world. Collins: We are thrilled to have our New Mexico wineries participate. Gruet is our shining star. It has been our sponsor champagne house with the Gruet family from France here to help us celebrate. The quality of our New Mexico wineries is impressive and quite historic. Our guests so enjoy the opportunity to taste them. Trujillo: I am proud to say New Mexico wines are a big part of Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta. What is your favorite memory from a past event? O’Byrne: So many great experiences, hard to say—Joe Heitz hosting a vertical of his Martha’s Vineyard Cabernet; Paul Draper pouring eight vintages of Ridge Monte Bello; Win Wilson pouring a horizontal of Domaine Dujac and Domaine Romanée Conti; Robert Mondavi silencing a room of a thousand guests when he walked into the Reserve Tasting; Veronique Drouhin as our first Honorary Vintner of the Year; working with Rick Bayless, Stephan Pyles, Mark Miller, John Sedlar, Nancy Oakes, Suzanne Goin—gosh, I don’t know where to begin, really. But if I had to pick one experience it would be hanging with Jean Louis Palladin and smoking Gauloise cigarettes and sipping wine with him after his events. Collins: The first year our Grand Tasting was set up at the Santa Fe Opera. Driving north that Saturday morning, coming over the last hill and seeing the huge bright white tents filling up my view. It was breathtaking and so exciting. You could just feel that we had arrived! Trujillo: As wonderful and nice as this event is, we do not rest on our laurels. The board challenges us to make sure that every year’s event is better than the year before. Which Wine & Chile events are you most excited about this year? O’Byrne: Our Friday Rosé All Day event on the patio with four guest chefs—John Tesar from Dallas, Michael Ginor from Hudson Valley Foie Gras, Matthew Accarrino from SPQR in San Francisco, and Gabriel Rucker from Le Pigeon in Portland—serving tastes with four rosé wine stations showing rosé wines from around the world. Collins: Hands down, all of them! Trujillo: I think one of the things that excites me most this year is the reserve tasting. We have been working to make that a dynamic event and I think we're finally reaching the point where it is one of the best in the country. Is there anything else you’d like to share with edible readers? O’Byrne: It’s not what you drink, but who you drink it with that counts. Collins: Come enjoy Santa Fe’s very best week of hospitality. You won’t be disappointed! Trujillo: The commitment at the board is absolutely incredible. We put an enormous amount of time as board members into this being a great success, and I would like to thank the dedicated board members as well as our fantastic executive director for this team effort.


HIGHLIGHTS FOR THE 2018 SANTA FE WINE & CHILE FIESTA RESERVE WINE TASTING AND AUCTION September 28, 4pm–6:30pm, SF Convention Center, $110 GRAND TASTING September 29, 1pm–4pm, Santa Fe Opera, $175 GUEST CHEF LUNCHEON: Master Sommelier Throwdown! September 26, 11:30am–2pm, Coyote Cafe, $150 Join chefs Allison Jenkins of Arroyo Vino, Eduardo Rodriguez of Coyote Cafe, Rocky Durham of Blue Heron, and Kai Autenreith of Terra Four Seasons while they match wine and food pairing-wits against our sommelier team— Master Sommeliers Jesse Becker, Fred Dame, Tim Gaiser, and Joe Spellman.

Introducing Kristina! Come in and meet our new wine director Kristina Bustamante, CS, CSW. She has returned to Santa Fe after several seasons with the Michelin starred Patina at the Walt Disney Concert Hall, Downtown Los Angeles.

GUEST CHEF LUNCHEON: Dean Fearing of Dean Fearing’s September 28, 12pm–2pm, The Compound, $150 The Father of Modern Southwestern Cuisine, Dean Fearing, joins SFWCF for the first time. Chef Fearing will feature a signature four-course “Bold Flavors with No Borders” menu paired with wines from Tuscany—Mongrana IGT Maremma, Mongrana Chianti Classic, Turpino IGT Syrah, and Querciabella Batar. GUEST CHEF DEMO: John Sedlar of Eloisa September 28, 3pm–4:30pm at SF School of Cooking, $85 Join Chef John Rivera Sedlar for a demonstration of the Latin culinary traditions that are a prominent element of his cuisine at Eloisa, with tastes of Rioja from Bodegas Faustino.

LUNCH • DINNER • BAR

Reservations: 505.982.4353 653 Canyon Road compoundrestaurant.com

WINERY DINNERS Contact the restaurants directly to reserve your seat at each winery dinner.

Susan’s Fine Wine and Spirits

Wednesday, September 26 Arroyo Vino · Broadbent Selections · 505-983-2100 Coyote Café · Orin Swift · 505-983-1615 Joseph’s Culinary Pub · Jose Pastor Selections · 505-982-1272 La Plazuela at La Fonda · Michael David Winery · 505-995-2316 Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi · Martinelli · 505-988-3236 Thursday, September 27 TerraCotta Wine Bistro · Justin Winery · 505-989-1166 Agave Lounge · Stag's Leap Wine Cellars · 505-995-4530 Arable Restaurant · Saint Cosme · 505-303-3816 Arroyo Vino · A Grand Cru Wine Dinner · 505-983-2100 Eloisa · Faustino · 505-982-0883 Joseph’s Culinary Pub · Jordan Winery · 505-982-1272 Luminaria Restaurant · Trinchero Family Estate · 505-984-7915 Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi · Cakebread · 505-988-3236 TerraCotta · Justin Winery · 505-989-1166 The Compound · Ramey Wine Cellar · 505-982-4353 Visit SFWCF's website for the full schedule: www.SantaFeWineandChile.org

It’s Rosé season and we have the largest selection in town! 1005 S. St. Francis, Suite 101 | 505-984-1582 sfwineandspirits.com | Mon - Sat 10am - 8pm WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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LOCAL HEROES

Paper Dosa BEST RESTAURANT, SANTA FE Photos by Stephanie Cameron

Tamil prawn fry dusted with chutney powder; peach and avocado salad with peach cilantro dressing; and housemade lemon soda.

Chef Paulraj (Paul) Karuppasamy received his training in India before starting his cooking career in San Francisco, where he met Nellie Tischler. They lived and worked in San Francisco for eight years before moving back to India and, eventually, settling in Santa Fe. They began Paper Dosa as a pop-up business before setting up shop on West Cordova Road, where they have been for three years. Paper Dosa is a mix of traditional South Indian dishes with California and New Mexico influences. How did you get to where you are now? What’s the backstory, and what was the moment that brought you to your current work? We fell in love in San Francisco at the South Indian restaurant where Nellie worked as a server and Paul as the chef. The restaurant was a huge success right off the bat. We both felt thrilled to be a part of such an inspiring operation. Paulraj was the executive chef, but knew that to grow as a chef he had to have his own restaurant. There was a 16

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major obstacle, however: Paul did not have permanent residency in the US. So we moved to India. This was a difficult time—we both were jobless, had very little money, and were unsure if we would be able to return to the States. Nellie became very ill during that time, and after a year returned home to Santa Fe to be close to her family during her recovery. At that time Nellie found out she was pregnant, so she decided to stay. Finally, five months later, Paul was granted his green card. He returned to San Francisco to his former position and worked there until our son, Thanga, turned two. We thought it best to settle in Santa Fe, and began to build Paper Dosa on a shoestring and a dream. First we catered to a local business where many South Indians were employed. We made sambar, rice, vegetable curry, meat curry, poriyal, and dessert for ten dollars (vegetarian) or twelve dollars (non-vegetarian). We would set up in their break room every Tuesday. Sometimes we would just stand there and watch the queue of people waiting to use the


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LOCAL HEROES

Left: Nellie Tischler and Paulraj Karuppasamy. Right: Farmers market uttapam cooked with chef's selection of seasonal vegetables.

microwave to heat their lunches. That was very humbling, to say the least. We persisted, and for many months did private parties; events; and a few pop-ups at Mu Du Noodles, Sweetwater Harvest, and the Secret Cafe. Mu from Mu Du Noodles allowed us to use her kitchen to prepare food. Zane Fischer (a big influence in our success) invited us to provide food for a meet-up sponsored by Mix, a local organization that helps new entrepreneurs. There we met BJ Pheiffer, who suggested [our] meeting Murphy O’Brian, the owner of Cafe Fina. Murphy is our angel. He changed the course of history for Paper Dosa. He allowed us to use his establishment every Monday evening for almost an entire year. Because of Murphy’s incredible generosity we were able to establish a following and feed the public on a consistent basis. We also won first place in the BizMix Business Plan Competition. We found the perfect location, thanks to Joel Coleman from Fire & Hops. We started out with a ton of free equipment, from freezers to pots and pans to umbrella stands, given to us by Bumble Bee Bob from Bumble Bee’s Baja Grill. The community did everything it could to lift us up and make it possible to have our own brick and mortar. Santa Fe was the absolute right choice to settle in. What is a local food issue that is important to you? Why? We strongly believe in trying to source locally whenever possible. It's more challenging for us because our cuisine is based on a very specific region [that is] unlike New Mexico. That being said, we try to source our meats and vegetables locally. We work with local farmers. The meat is more challenging with, as of now, only a couple of sources to choose from. We would like to see a local slaughterhouse. The other 18

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issue we would like to see addressed in New Mexico is banning Monsanto. As long as we allow them to sell their chemicals and seeds here, the idea of staying local and organic will become more and more of a challenge. How might Paper Dosa’s “fresh South Indian cuisine” be different from the Indian food most Americans are familiar with? Paper Dosa’s concept is “Fresh! Fresh! Fresh!” Everything is made from scratch. Most dishes don’t have wheat or cream, common ingredients in northern Indian food. We provide a lentil and rice, vegetable-focused base menu with South Indian chutneys and dals. South Indian cuisine is primarily vegetarian so there is a lot of emphasis on vegetables. We use a lot of fresh curry leaves, black mustard seeds, and fresh masalas. We also temper our spices. The techniques that we practice are traditional to South India. We do offer a few dishes that are a fusion of southern and northern Indian dishes, such as our Lamb Keema Dosa. Keema is a Turkic word meaning minced meat. In the Paneer and Peas Dosa, the paneer is from the north and we make it fresh and serve it in a dosa—people love it! Dahi Vada is a Punjabi dish that originated in Karnataka, and our Dahi Vada has a traditional South Indian medu vada topped with spiced yogurt and mint and tamarind chutney (both chutneys are from northern India). Is there anything else you’d like to share with edible readers? We also want to thank our wonderful staff. They are a joy to work with. It is because of their hard work that we have been successful. 551 West Cordova, Santa Fe, 505-930-5521, www.paper-dosa.com


AT LA FONDA

A TASTE OF AUTHENTICITY COBB SALAD, WELL DRESSED SINCE 1926

a creative take on classic cuisine 100 E. SAN FRANCISCO STREET, SANTA FE 505.995.2334 | LAFONDASANTAFE.COM OPEN DAILY 7AM-10PM WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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AT THE CHEF'S TABLE

Comfort Food, Redefined ARABLE AND LOYAL HOUND By Jenn Shapland · Photos by Douglas Merriam

Renée Fox and Dave Readyhough at Arable.

Years ago, I regularly gathered with a group of friends at a bar that served truffle tater tots. These were exactly as wrong as you'd expect: tots that obviously came frozen in a bag, drizzled with overly rich, inappropriately expensive oil made from fungus found by pig snouts. But it was our ritual. I recalled these outlandish tots while seated at the bar of Arable, Renée Fox and Dave Readyhough's Eldorado follow-up to their beloved Loyal Hound. At Arable, the green chile cheese tots we ordered arrived not in a basket, not even in a recognizably machine-made cylinder shape. These tots were handmade. And they were so much better than their frozen counterparts. At both of their restaurants, Fox and Readyhough offer comfort food—food that is accessible, hearty, and tinged with nostalgia. But beyond the standard ingredients of comfort food, they've added an indepth conscientiousness about food production. While we talked at a 20

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back table in Loyal Hound late one afternoon, surrounded by regular customers' framed dog portraits, Fox returned again and again to the subject of sourcing. Fox explained, “We're aware of what we're feeding people. . . .The pigs that we buy are pasture-farmed in a healthy environment, they're raised humanely and they're slaughtered humanely.” Relying on La Montañita Co-op to supply their produce, they're aware of what is available from a number of local farmers, buying “local as much as possible, organic as much as possible.” Emphasizing sustainability means not always prioritizing the bottom line. But at Loyal Hound and Arable, Fox and Readyhough aren't looking to make bank, or cater only to a lofty clientele. “The whole idea of a gastropub is to be approachable to anyone, from any socioeconomic background. For some people this is a special occasion restaurant,” Fox tells us. Readyhough chimes in, “And some people


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AT THE CHEF'S TABLE

Grilled Talus Wind Ranch pork tenderloin with pine nut and currant sofrito, served with potatoes and arugula in a sherry chorizo dressing.

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Left: Organic roasted strawberry ice cream sandwich with dark chocolate sauce. Right: Housemade local pork paté, dijon, pickles, and apple chutney.

come three or four times a week. It's like Cheers. It's all about perspective.” That evening, the restaurant was preparing for their popular monthly Supper Club, a seventy-five-dollar four-course dinner that includes wine and revolves around a theme. The idea came from Fox's upbringing in the Midwest, where friends and neighbors would regularly gather together to eat and talk. At Arable, two communal tables offer a similar chance to connect with others, though while the rest of the dining room and patio tables were full, communal seating seemed to be the last choice for diners the night we visited—which may say more about the community the restaurant serves, or the time it takes to build the kind of devoted following Loyal Hound has. We sat at the bar and enjoyed the company of a few regulars, eating tots and sandwiches and an unforgettable butterscotch budino. With Arable, the opportunity to bring something new to a small community inspired a different menu, with the same mindful approach they took at Loyal Hound. “When we went into Eldorado,” says Fox, “we went into all the other restaurants and really thought about what is missing in this community. What does this community need?” When they had octopus on the menu at Arable, locals thanked them for bringing something so unexpected to suburban El Dorado. The name Arable, which refers to land suitable for growing crops, came from Fox and Readyhough's beliefs about the impact of food production on the larger ecosystem. “We specifically will not use anything feedlot,” Fox says. One of my favorite results of this kind of integrity is their kegged wine. I'd never had, or even heard of, wine

from a keg. Fox, who has worked for a wine distributor for ten years, explained that wine you buy at the store might be “a label that was created by a marketing executive from bulk juice that came from who knows where, treated with who knows what pesticide.” Kegged wine is sealed and temperature controlled by the (often organic, solar powered) winemaker, and reduces the carbon footprint by eliminating bottling. It also allows restaurants to sell higher quality glasses of wine at a lower price. Sipping on the Gamay at Arable's bar, my partner and I marveled at the freshness—perhaps it was a placebo effect, but the wine tasted better than any glass I've had recently. “We know what's in everything,” Fox told me, because almost nothing arrives at their kitchens frozen or pre-packaged, which is helpful with food allergies and dietary restrictions. “We have the tiniest freezers of any restaurants in Santa Fe. The ice cream is in there, the frozen chile,” but little else. Comfort food, then, might be about not just what comforts you, but what kind of food you are comfortable eating, what ingredients make you feel good. At Loyal Hound and at Arable, that can mean dirty fries, or fish and chips fried in the polyunsaturated oils they've been researching lately. Or it might mean beet salad with marcona almonds, which is comfort food for some. “Come here for dessert,” Readyhough offers. If that's your go-to, “all our ice cream is homemade, using organic cream.” Loyal Hound, 730 St Michaels, Santa Fe, 505-471-0440, www.loyalhoundpub.com; Arable, 7 Avenida Vista Grande, Santa Fe, 505-303-3816, www.arablesantafe.com WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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AT THE CHEF'S TABLE

Ideal Pairings TERRACOTTA WINE BISTRO By Jenn Shapland · Photos by Douglas Merriam

Left: Catherine O'Brien and Glenda Griswold. Right: Mezze Plate with roasted red pepper hummus; pickled tricolor cauliflower; carrot, feta & raisin salad; quinoa salad; kale pesto; and dolmas.

It's a tale as old as time: two women find themselves dissatisfied with their lives, take a vacation to New Mexico, and wind up moving to Santa Fe. Glenda Griswold and Catherine O'Brien were both working for a large food service company in Washington, D.C. when the Land of Enchantment summoned them. “We told our fathers we had really good jobs with insurance,” O'Brien recalls. “We spent all our life savings, bought a truck, and drove cross country.” With what they had left, they bought a house and started a catering company called Peas 'n Pod. Twenty-three years later, they are still together, still catering, and, though they never planned on it, they're running a popular wine bistro in downtown Santa Fe called TerraCotta. 24

edible Santa Fe | LATE SUMMER 2018

Living in a small, remote city like Santa Fe, it often feels like you are subject to the whims of fate. After dinner one night at Shibumi, O'Brien asked her friend, the chef and owner, if he had a mixer she could buy. He didn't, but he offered to sell her his restaurant. Despite numerous refusals, O'Brien and Griswold finally gave in and bought the place. Out went the white tablecloths, in came the espadrille placemats from France. They started with a list of things they loved and hated about restaurants. Yes to a rotating menu—theirs changes every three months, and is printed on paper instead of “these big-ass menus” some restaurants hand out so “you can't even see the person across the way.” Yes to seasonal ingredients, like shishito peppers. Griswold describes TerraCotta as a “green-chile-red-chile-free zone.”


Open for Lunch Tuesday-Sunday. Open for Dinner Everyday. Happy Hour Tuesday-Sunday 2-5 PM. 30 craft beers on tap. 614 Trinity Drive, Los Alamos • 505-662-8877 pajaritobrewpubandgrill.com

E V E R Y D AY W E ’ R E B R U S S E L I N ’ OPEN DAILY • BRUNCH • LUNCH • DINNER • CATERING 4410 Wyoming Blvd NE, Albuquerque • 505-299-6973 TheAcreRestaurant.com


AT THE CHEF'S TABLE

Left: Planked salmon crusted with whole grain mustard and brown sugar. Right: French onion burger.

“Not that we don't love it,” she assures me, “but there's so much of that here.” Instead, their menus focus on more Mediterranean fare: grilled artichokes, gazpacho, and an assortment of bruschetta. Both Peas 'n Pod and TerraCotta are inspired by Griswold and O'Brien's world travels. “We love Thailand, we love Vietnam, Europe. A lot of [catering] clients are carte blanche with us when planning the menu. If I say 'Let's do an East Asian menu,' they're all about it.” Their love of exploring is also what led them to amass a huge wine menu— over six hundred bottles from all over the globe. Griswold has organized the wine list by price: the $20s, the $30s, and on up. That way, if you come in wanting a simple bottle of wine with dinner, it's easy to find. And if one night you want to splurge, you can flip to the back. Glasses of wine are six dollars until 6pm (though in New Mexico you can't sell wine at more than a fifty percent discount, so this only applies to glasses that start eleven dollars and under). Their collection of rosé, especially popular during this heatwave, is the largest in Santa Fe. Because the restaurant came with a wine cellar, they're able to store a vast selection. 26

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O'Brien and Griswold prize their local community. They stay open on Thanksgiving and Christmas, offering a buffet for anyone who isn't in the mood to cook. TerraCotta is also very dog friendly, so much so that customers will often reserve the portal for themselves and their canine companions. “We love Santa Fe. It was the best thing we ever did, moving here,” Griswold told me. Their partnership glows through their conversation, as they finish each other's sentences, and enthusiastically interrupt each other. Reflecting on their working relationship, O'Brien says, “We've known each other twenty-six years, lived together twenty-three, we're best friends, and we have a good support system. We get along pretty well, we love each other very, very much, we like the same things.” It's obvious that they've built a lasting, sustainable partnership around food. 304 Johnson St, Santa Fe, 505-989-1166, www.terracottawinebistro.com


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BEHIND THE BOTTLE

Chefs talk wine CAMPO AT LOS POBLANOS AND VIVÁC WINERY Recipe by Jonathan Perno, Executive Chef · Photos by Stephanie Cameron

Chef Carrie Eagle.

Left: Executive Chef Jonathan Perno. Right: Zucchini, Tomato, and Cream Salad with Vivác's 2017 Grüner Veltliner.

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This is edible’s third installment of “Chefs Talk Wine,” where we ask a chef to pick a favorite local wine and create a recipe that celebrates that wine. We are committed to telling the stories of New Mexican wine, which plays a vital part in our local agriculture and the goodfood movement.

getting people to drink New Mexican wine is hard because it doesn’t

Chef Jonathan Perno grew up in New Mexico, trained at the California Culinary Academy, and spent time at Postrio, Splendido, and Alain Rondelli in San Francisco; at Sweet Basil in Vail; at Splendido at The Château in Beaver Creek; and at the Metropolitan in Salt Lake City. His résumé also includes the requisite European culinary tour, including a stage at La Tante Claire in London. In addition, he spent a year learning raised-bed farming at an organic farm in Berkeley, California.

Dry rosés with tannin and big cabs and old-world wines.

Perno fits in perfectly at Los Poblanos. He's done everything from harvesting honey from the farm’s bees for his house-made chocolates to collaborating on the creation of Campo, the farm's exceptional new restaurant. He is a strong advocate of the farm-to-table philosophy and the slow food movement. While he’s absolutely content to let the fresh ingredients take all the credit, Perno has already impressed the most critical of foodies with his unique perspective on food. Tell us about your philosophy when pairing wine with food at Los Poblanos. I try to make food to meet everyone’s tastes in wine. You don’t know if a customer is going to like whites or reds, so I work to make it universal without compromising the integrity of the product. If you like a wine, it’s a good wine. It doesn’t have to be expensive. Wine should be natural, approachable, and not intimidating. How do you navigate the connection of flavors between food and wine? Instinct. I lean on that more than anything, because I’m not really wine savvy. Sometimes I taste the food before the wine and sometimes the wine before food, then go back and forth between whichever is leading the charge. What’s your process around creating dishes to pair with a wine? Dylan Storment, beverage director at Los Poblanos, develops the wine around the menu I have created. I am creating the food based on where we are with the season and availability of ingredients, and I trust that he is doing the same with the wine. If we are both doing that consciously and with intention, there is a natural togetherness.

have the marketing power of states like California, Oregon, and Washington. Which are your favorite styles of wine?

Tell us about the wine you are pairing with your recipe. We selected the 2017 Grüner Veltliner “1725 Estate Vineyard” from Vivác Winery. Grüner Veltliner is an Austrian grape that makes a light white wine. It is fresh, vibrant, and citrus-forward with a little bit of pepper and green apple undertones, and pairs nicely with the zucchini, tomatoes, and cream in the salad. Is there anything else you would like edible readers to know? Support local producers and build up New Mexico.

ZUCCHINI, TOMATO, AND CREAM SALAD 4 ounces cherry tomatoes, halved 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Juice of one lemon, halved Handful of parsley leaves Handful of oregano leaves 1/2 cup heavy cream 1 tablespoon champagne vinegar 6 ounces green zucchini, cut into 1/4 inch rounds 2 pickled hot peppers, sliced 1 white of leek, cut thin and fried Microgreens, for garnish Salt and pepper to taste Marinate halved cherry tomatoes in a small mixing bowl; add salt, pepper, olive oil, parsley, oregano, and half of the lemon juice. Mix and let marinate for up to a half hour. Next, to make the cream dressing in another small mixing bowl, add cream and a pinch of salt. Whip the cream until it starts to become a bit more viscous, then add vinegar and remainder of the lemon juice. Keep whisking until cream mixture starts to thicken (don’t over-whisk the dressing; it will become too thick). Set aside in refrigerator until ready to build the salad. To build, add the zucchini to a mixing bowl and season with salt and pepper to taste. Mix, add dressing, and combine. On a plate

In your experience, is it hard to convince New Mexicans to drink New Mexico wine?

or bowl, add marinated tomatoes; then place zucchini on top;

Wine in New Mexico is underappreciated. It hasn’t been recognized as a force and everything in New Mexico is under the radar. I think

4803 Rio Grande NW, Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, 505-344-9297, www.lospoblanos.com

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and finish with hot peppers, microgreens, and fried leeks.


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#EDIBLENM ediblesantafe TAG us or use #edibleNM and your pics could be featured here. We always pick a favorite and send them a gift certificate to one of our favorite local joints.

WINNER

madeinmarrow #happycanadaday from us! This week, we tackle a love it or hate it #dish. Go read about our trepidations in our new post! #edibleNM

healthy.happenings pie am loving new mexico. . .pie also love this squash pie from @farmhouse_taos #ediblenm @ediblesantafe

champagneandcookies I just wrote this recipe for Sour Cherry & Anise Empanaditas! Something from my youth growing up in Albuquerque, New Mexico and a favourite dessert from my childhood. . .#edibleNM

driftandportersantafe Our Mermaid Cake. . .Gluten free and vegan lemon coconut cake layered with vanilla buttercream, lemon almond mascarpone and mashed blueberry syrup. . .#edibleNM

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CRAFT COCKTAIL

TICKLED PINK PALOMA By Quinn Stephenson

1 1/2 ounces Roca Patrón Silver 3 ounces pink grapefruit juice, freshly squeezed 1/2 ounce fresh lime juice 1/2 ounce soda water 1/2 ounce cardamom-infused simple syrup Agave syrup Pop rock candy, for garnish To make cardamom-infused simple syrup: Grind 1/3 cup green cardamom pods in a spice grinder and place in a pan. Add 1 cup simple syrup (one part water one part sugar) to the pods and heat to a boil. Remove from heat and let cool. Filter infusion through a fine strainer and pour into a squeeze bottle. To rim the glass: Apply a thin layer of agave syrup to the outer rim of a highball glass, then dip rim in strawberry pop rock candy. To make the drink: Rim a highball glass with pop rock candy and fill with ice, then layer all remaining ingredients and stir gently.

Photo by Lois Ellen Frank.

Photo by Lois Ellen Frank.

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COOKING FRESH

Summer Abundance A VEGETARIAN DINNER PARTY By Stephanie Cameron

Purple Basil Lemonade

Cucumber, Lime, and Basil Sorbet

The Menu Purple Basil Lemonade Roasted Eggplant Jam and Oven-Dried Tomatoes Sweet Corn Hush Puppies with Lime-Cilantro Aioli Cucumber, Lime, and Basil Sorbet Ratatouille Tart with Tomato-Onion Jam Los Poblanos’ Zucchini Salad (page 30) Corn and Lavender Paletas

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There is no better time to do a vegetarian dinner party than during the abundance of summer. This menu is a refreshing alternative to the roast and two sides. Vegetables bring flavor and textural choices to the table and celebrate the seasonal colors found at the farmers market. Serve this menu as a series of courses, allowing each dish to shine and be savored. Many of the steps to prepare these dishes can be done ahead of time, making the day of the party easy.

PURPLE BASIL LEMONADE Serves 4. Make ahead. 4 cups water 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice 1/2 cup loosely packed fresh purple basil leaves 6 tablespoons sugar 4 cups ice 4 purple basil sprigs Combine water and lemon juice in a large bowl. Place basil and sugar in a mortar; pound with pestle until a paste forms. Add sugar mixture to juice mixture; stir until sugar dissolves. Strain mixture through a sieve over a bowl; discard solids. Place 1 cup ice in each of the 4 glasses. Pour about 1 cup lemonade into each glass; garnish each serving with 1 basil sprig. Spice it up with a red chile and sugar rim.

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CUCUMBER, LIME, AND BASIL SORBET AMUSE-BOUCHE

1 pint. Make ahead. 6 basil leaves 1/4 cup lime juice 1/2 teaspoon lime zest 2 cucumbers, peeled and quartered 1/2 cup sugar 1 cup water Boil 1/2 cup water with sugar until sugar has dissolved. Set aside in a medium-sized bowl. In a blender, combine cucumber with basil, lime juice and zest, and 1/2 cup water to make a fine puree. Add to cooled sugar mixture and stir. Place in freezer to cool until semi-frozen, about 40 minutes. Pour back into blender and blend until ice crystals are very fine. Return to bowl, cover, and freeze. For a finer sorbet, repeat the blending one more time after freezing an additional 40 minutes. Then freeze fully until ready to use. This is meant to be a palate refresher. Serve only a small amount on a small plate or tasting spoon.

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115 Harvard SE, Albuquerque · 505-219-2001 · saltandboard.com WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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ROASTED EGGPLANT JAM AND SUN-DRIED TOMATOES ROASTED EGGPLANT JAM Recipe by Amy Robb (edible Northeast Florida) 1 pint. Make ahead. 1 medium eggplant, diced into 1/2-inch cubes 1/2 large red onion, minced 1/4 cup olive oil 1/4 cup tomato paste 5 cloves garlic, finely minced or pressed 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup loose parsley, chopped 2 heaping tablespoons capers 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar 1 loaf of rustic bread Preheat oven to 450°F and line a baking pan with aluminum foil. Combine eggplant, red onion, and garlic in a bowl. Toss with olive oil and tomato paste until vegetables are well-coated. Spread evenly on baking pan and roast for 25 minutes. Remove baking pan from oven, and return the roasted eggplant mixture to the mixing bowl. Add chopped parsley, red wine vinegar, capers, and salt. Blend well with a wooden spoon, breaking up softened eggplant. Final jam should be thick, but easily spreadable.

SUN-DRIED TOMATOES Make ahead. 1 1/2 pounds Roma tomatoes, cored and cut in half lengthwise 1 teaspoon kosher salt Oven-Dried For oven-dried tomatoes, cut tomatoes in half and sprinkle cut sides with kosher salt. Place tomato halves, cut sides down, on paper towels. Let stand 1 hour. Preheat oven to 300°F. Arrange tomato halves, cut sides up, in a single layer on a baking sheet. Bake for 3 1/2 to 4 hours or until edges of tomatoes curl (the tomatoes will feel dry to the touch). Remove from oven and cool. These will keep for a week, covered, in the refrigerator, or for up to a month in the freezer. Sun-Dried For sun-dried tomatoes, simply slice tomatoes in half, place on a raised screen, lightly sprinkle with salt, and place in the hot sun until dry. Depending on your weather conditions, this could take anywhere from four days to two weeks. You'll want to cover them with cheesecloth, raised so it does not touch the tomatoes, to keep out any critters and provide proper ventilation. You will also need to bring them in during the night, lest the evening dew undoes your drying process. Serve eggplant jam smeared on rustic bread and topped with oven-dried tomato.

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4:03 PM

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SWEET CORN HUSH PUPPIES WITH LIME-CILANTRO AIOLI Makes 12 hush puppies. 2 ears of corn 1 cup cornmeal 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon granulated sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder 3/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon cayenne 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons buttermilk 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted 1 teaspoon hot sauce 2 tablespoons chopped scallions Vegetable oil for frying Slice off corn kernels. Stir cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and cayenne in a medium bowl. Add buttermilk, melted butter, hot sauce, corn, and scallions, and then stir until just combined. Pour 2 inches of oil into a heavy-duty pot. Heat over medium high heat until temperature reaches 375°F. Working in batches, gently roll dough into 1 1/2 inch sized balls and carefully lower into hot oil using a slotted spoon. Take care not to crowd pot. Fry until golden brown and cooked through, turning with wooden spoon for even browning, 2–3 minutes. Serve warm hush puppies plain or with aioli dipping sauce, below. LIME-CILANTRO AIOLI Make ahead. 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro 1/2 cup mayonnaise Zest of 1 lime 4 teaspoons lime juice Whisk together all ingredients in a small bowl. Store in refrigerator overnight. Serve with hush puppies.

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RATATOUILLE TART WITH TOMATO-ONION JAM 6–8 servings TOMATO-ONION JAM 1 pint. Make ahead. 2 teaspoons olive oil 2 cups red onions, sliced Lyonnaise-style (thinly from end to end) 1/4 cup shallot, finely diced 2 pounds Roma or other meaty tomatoes 1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice 1/2 cup honey 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon smoked paprika Heat a small saucepan over medium-high heat and add the oil, onions, shallots, and a heavy pinch of salt; toss to coat with oil. Reduce heat to low and allow onions and shallots to soften, then caramelize for about 15 minutes, stirring often. Chop tomatoes coarsely. Combine all ingredients in a large saucepan and bring to a boil, uncovered. The pan should be no more than half full, because jam tends to bubble up so much that it might overflow. Cook about 30–40 minutes, stirring often, until reduced and thickened. The jam takes on a translucent quality when it is getting close to done. To test, put a drop on a chilled plate—if it holds together, it's done; if it leaks liquid at the edges, it needs a little more time. TART CRUST Make ahead. 1 1/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted and coarsely chopped 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons ice water Preheat oven to 450°F. Combine flour, pine nuts, salt, baking powder, and pepper in a food processor; pulse 3 times or until combined. Combine oil and 3 tablespoons ice water in a small bowl. With processor on, slowly add oil mixture through food chute, and process until dough is crumbly. Sprinkle dough into a 9-inch glass or ceramic pie plate coated with cooking spray. Press dough into an even layer in bottom and sides of dish. Bake for 10 minutes. Remove from oven. Make a day ahead, if desired. Cover and store in refrigerator.

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RATATOUILLE TART 1/2 to 3/4 cup Tomato-Onion Jam; see above Tart crust; see above 3 Roma tomatoes, sliced 1/4-inch thick 1 Japanese eggplant, sliced 1/4-inch thick on a mandoline 1 yellow squash, sliced 1/4-inch thick on a mandoline 1 zucchini, sliced 1/4-inch thick on a mandoline 1 to 2 roasted red peppers, julienned 2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil Kosher salt Black pepper, freshly cracked 3 teaspoons chopped fresh oregano, divided 1/2 cup crumbled goat cheese Preheat the oven to 400°F. Spread the Tomato-Onion Jam evenly over the prepared tart crust. Layer the tomatoes, eggplant, yellow squash, and zucchini in overlapping rows, or as desired. Sprinkle the roasted red peppers around the tart. Drizzle the assembled tart with a little olive oil, making sure to brush a little on the edges; then season with salt and pepper, and top with half of the fresh oregano. Bake for 25 minutes uncovered, then cover with foil and cook for 20 minutes longer. Remove from the oven and immediately sprinkle with the goat cheese and remaining oregano before serving.


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CORN AND LAVENDER PALETAS 10 paletas. Make ahead. 4 ears of sweet corn 2 cups coconut milk, full fat 6 tablespoons sugar 1 tablespoon culinary lavender 1 teaspoon vanilla 1/8 teaspoon salt Preheat oven to 400°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Slice off corn kernels and spread on baking sheet. Roast till soft and starting to brown, around 20 minutes. Let cool completely. Pour the milk, sugar, lavender, vanilla, and salt into a sauce pan. Heat and stir until sugar is completely dissolved—do not boil. Remove from heat and let steep for 30 minutes, covered. Strain out lavender. Pour into a blender and add corn. Puree till smooth; strain and discard corn pulp. Pour mixture into popsicle molds and freeze.

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Pig + Fig Cafe breakfast + lunch + dinner mon - sat 6am - 8pm | sun 8am - 4pm 11 Sherwood Blvd, White Rock, NM 87547 | (505) 672-2742 www.pigandfigcafe.com | pigandfigcafe@gmail.com

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Join us for the 2nd Annual Summer Wine Festival at Taos Ski Valley. This elegant affair features wine tasting, gourmet dinners, stargazing, yoga, chocolate pairing seminars and much more. Come experience the renaissance that is taking place at Taos Ski Valley. PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS

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EDIBLE COMMUNITY

Open Fields Preserved CORRALES VOTERS PASS BOND TO SUPPORT FARMLAND PRESERVATION By Lisa Brown · Photos by Stephanie Cameron

Aaron and Elan Silverblatt-Buser of Silver Leaf Farms prepping conservation easement for first planting.

Voters in the Village of Corrales spoke with an unqualified voice earlier this year when they overwhelmingly supported a ballot measure to preserve farmland in their village. The measure allows for $2.5 million in general obligation bonds to procure easements for agricultural and wildlife conservation use. Though residential development has taken place here at breakneck speed, we’ve always grown our own food in this part of the Rio Grande Valley—from pre-contact Pueblos to our recent ancestors to our new farmers. This measure helps meet one of our small farmers’ greatest challenges: access to land. Its passage demonstrates how a small community can support the local food movement. Although open spaces in the village are now interspersed with custom homes, Corrales is uniquely situated to preserve its remaining open fields. Newcomers recognize that they benefit from the farms 44

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next door, which increase property values and provide a community environment illuminated by open space, so they’ve bought into farmland preservation and protecting a way of life. Passage of the farmland preservation bond continues a program begun in 2004, which was used to permanently preserve almost forty acres of farmland in Corrales. The funds from the first bond were exhausted last year, leading to the measure for a new bond. Since developers covet prime agricultural land, farmers are often priced out of the market. By preserving some of Corrales’ remaining farmland and making it available to local farmers, the village is helping to secure its own local food supply. Older Corraleños still recall that it was local farms which kept the community from going hungry during the Great Depression. However, by the late twentieth century, Corrales’ agricultural heritage was losing ground. Bonnie Gonzales and her husband Al bought land in


Top: Field Manager Anita Adalja and Conor Gilliland stringing cucumber vines. Bottom: Butter lettuce and tomatoes in production.

Corrales in 1988, built their adobe house by hand, and moved in in 1990. They’d found a place where they could grow food for their new family. But, she recalls, “It didn’t take long for concern to set in—concern I saw reflected in the eyes of people of this village who’d been here much longer than I had. The farm stands were declining amid the growing housing industry, and there was spotty support for a centralized marketing facility.” Corrales’ matriarch farmer, the late Evelyn Losack, conceived of the first Corrales farmers market around 1986. With the proliferation of chain grocery stores, delivery trucks stopped coming to Corrales to buy the produce to take to Albuquerque in the seventies, and Losack was tired of driving into town to sell her apples and chile. Local grower Russell Trujillo was among the first to sell his onions in front of the Mercado de Maya, across from the elementary school.

Russell was later instrumental to the formation of the current growers market, connecting the Gonzaleses to New Mexico Department of Agriculture grant programs and the state farmers market association to develop marketing resources. By the late nineties, the couple had quit their corporate jobs and moved full-time into agriculture. Their biggest concern was marketing, and so they worked to get the definition of a growers market into the village land-use code, thus creating a self-supporting and reliable location and structure. The Corrales Growers’ Market has expanded continuously since that time, adding new growers every week. One factor that makes this possible is Corrales’ farmland preservation program, rooted in the creation of conservation easements. “Because farmland easements create a usable (more than one acre) block of land, they can support larger farming operations, and we gain all the WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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EDIBLE COMMUNITY

Conservation easement in production in Corrales.

benefits: local food production, open space, habitat, view sheds, and a community environment that showcases the land to draw target customers to Corrales,” says Gonzales. “They come to the market for the freshest food, the healthiest food, and the most delicious food because that is the food they want to feed the people they love,” she says. The Corrales Farmland Preservation and Agricultural Commission began as a committee formed primarily to assist the village’s administration with the process of creating conservation easements on farmland. In 2004, the village received a $1.5 million grant from the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service and passed the initial general obligation bonds in matching funds to purchase development rights from landowners who wished to preserve their land. The land remains theirs, though the easement is held in perpetuity by a land trust that works with the village. The land may be sold, but the easement passes to the next owner. The Juan Gonzales Bas Heritage Farm, five and a half acres in the heart of Corrales, earned a conservation easement purchased during the first round of bond sales in 2004. It is the only preserved property that is owned by the Village of Corrales so far. The village aspires to create a flagship farm there, using sustainable agricultural practices and providing educational opportunities for the community through a public-private partnership. The Commission’s duties expanded to include management recommendations for the village-owned farm, as well as to encourage and sustain local farmers generally, by promoting access to a local market and, as its mission statement says, supporting “traditional agricultural economic development.” Aaron and Elan Silverblatt-Buser grew up in Corrales. They now own Silver Leaf Farms, a USDA certified organic vegetable farm that 46

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pays its expanding number of employees a livable wage. They are first generation farmers, part of the movement to maintain our core values. They currently farm two parcels of land preserved by Corrales’ farmland preservation program, comprising around six acres, and have the potential to do more. “Access to farmland in semi-urban or peri-urban centers is one of the largest problems facing young and beginning farmers. No exception here. There are lots of half-acre and one-acre plots of land left in Corrales; however, in order to appropriately scale our operation, we need to have access to contiguous land. We always thought we would have to move out of Corrales to find larger plots of land,” says Elan. Conservation easements are an effective tool for landowners to keep their properties in permanent conservation while providing access to land for local farmers. “In places like Corrales, the idea of a farmer purchasing land is laughable because of the intense pressure to develop,” says Elan. “Land in conservation is in conservation forever. This means that we are only stewards in the longer trajectory of the land. Being on land that has a conservation easement allows us to think about the longer-term health of the soil and the surrounding ecosystem.” That ecosystem is fragile. Climate change is shifting the way water flows. Moving agriculture forward here will require close observation, attention to consequences, and adjusting how crops are grown to find the right balance. But preserving farmland is the necessary first step to sustaining our farmers and creating new ones. www.corralesgrowersmarket.com; www.eatsilverleaf.com; corrales.nm.org/committees-and-commissions


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FOOD FOR THOUGHT

A Threat to Our Water is a Threat to Our Food AN UPDATE ON FRACKING IN NEW MEXICO By Willy Carleton · Photos by Stephanie Cameron

Left to right: Fracking pad and methane tower in the Greater Chaco area.

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Over the past nine months, since edible’s last article about fracking in northern New Mexico and its potential impacts on our food, New Mexico has surpassed Alaska and Oklahoma to become the third largest oil and gas–producing state in the nation. Although much of the increased production has occurred in southeast New Mexico, new industrialized fracking technology in the form of horizontal drilling and multi-stage fracturing threatens large amounts of precious water resources statewide. Even as an intense drought has dried up northern stretches of the Rio Grande in our state, frack wells in northern New Mexico continue to use, on average, 1.3 million gallons of freshwater per well. While ninety-one percent of available land in northwest New Mexico is already leased for oil and gas, companies have now expressed interest in fracking more than 55,000 acres of additional land in the region, and have expressed the intent to develop previously un-fracked regions of northern New Mexico, including the Rio Puerco watershed and upper stretches of the Pecos watershed. For all those in New Mexico concerned with the harmful environmental and health impacts of fracking, these are critical times indeed. There have been, in recent months, several causes for cautious hope in the fight to protect New Mexico’s long-term environmental and cultural resources against the short-term interests of oil and gas industries. In March of this year, Secretary of Department of the Interior Ryan Zinke deferred an oil and gas lease sale which threatened 4,434 acres of additional land around Chaco Canyon, pending a more thorough “cultural assessment.” In mid-June, a US district court judge decided that the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) had not adequately evaluated the environmental risks when it issued oil and gas leases in the Santa Fe National Forest along the Nacimiento uplift near the towns of Cuba, Regina, and Gallina. Also in June, Senators Heinrich and Udall cosponsored the Chaco Cultural Heritage

Area Protection Act, which would prohibit federal minerals from being fracked within a ten-mile buffer around Chaco Culture National Historical Park. The Greater Chaco Coalition and Navajo chapters in the impacted development areas of Chaco oppose this legislation on the grounds that the buffer zone is arbitrary and inadequately small, that it doesn’t address the impacts of fracking that have already occurred in the region, and that it doesn’t offer community health protections. Despite the recent swell in community involvement, the fight over fracking in our state is far from over, and a long-term transition toward renewable energy remains imperative. “While the short-term fracking boom has catapulted New Mexico to top ranking in national oil production,” Rebecca Sobel of WildEarth Guardians in Santa Fe recently explained, “the supposed wealth has yet to trickle down and we continue to rank at the bottom of national education, poverty, and work standards. The bust is inevitable as our state’s heritage, history, and communities continue to pay the price for fracking.” Sobel concluded that “we need to be asking ourselves what we want our communities to look like and how we are supporting the transition away from boom and bust economies to more sustainable economies.” Peggy Baker, of Rio Arriba Concerned Citizens (RACC), offered a similar assessment. She noted that, given how important oil and gas have been to local economies in parts of Rio Arriba county and elsewhere in northern New Mexico, “we’ve realized that the only real alternative is to move more toward sustainable energy.” The RACC has begun to work with Northern New Mexico College and local solar businesses, and Baker encourages people in rural communities affected by fracking to “go to the board meetings of your local energy cooperative and ask members about what is getting in the way of transitioning to renewable energy and how we can change that.”


Meat Matters GROWING A MARKET FOR OUR MOUNTAIN RANCHERS AND FARMERS By Briana Olson

“B

Angus on the range of Angus Cimarron Ranch in northern New Mexico. Photo by Stephanie Cameron.

More and more, consumers care whether animals are raised healthfully, humanely, and sustainably, and the growing demand for grassfed beef is further evidence of that. But what, faced with misleading brands and confusing labels, is the right thing to do? How can you, as an eater and @TravelNewMexico citizen, support local markets for sustainably raised meat? 50

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“T

here is no market,” Mike Callicrate tells me. “The market died; it's gone. The government didn't support competition in the marketplace.” A longtime rancher and family farm advocate, Callicrate is explaining why he believes we need to bring back year-round, publicly owned markets. He cites Philadelphia's Reading Terminal Market as a model for a market that enables ranchers and farmers to reach consumers year-round without having to step away from what they do best: ranching and farming. “In my vision, there would be full meat-processing, a hundred carcasses hanging, a full meat counter with people buying that fresh meat right there, knowing where the meat comes from.” A couple weeks earlier, driving the highways of northern New Mexico, I tuned into the Angus and Herefords grazing the pastures along the roadside. It was late spring, and soft black calves bobbled between their mothers' legs. Raising cattle for beef is second to dairy in leading agricultural production in the state, a fact easier to believe, driving through ranch land, than another statistic I'd recently come across: between ninety-one and ninety-nine percent of cows raised for beef in New Mexico are exported. I wanted to find out why, and I wanted to know where the beef on local supermarket shelves is coming from instead. As it turns out, the first question, complex as it is, can be answered far more easily than the second. “Cedar River Farms,” offers a clerk at one meat counter, “up in Greeley, Colorado.” Not long after talking to Callicrate, I stop in at a store in Albuquerque that bills its products as natural to ask if they have any locally raised beef (not that they know of ) and if they can tell me where they source their tri-tips and sirloins and rib eyes. It does not take much sleuthing to learn that Cedar River Farms is not a farm at all; it's a brand owned by JBS, the largest meat processing company in the world. The company's US division is headquartered in Greeley, where JBS runs a beef packing plant that processes about five thousand animals each day. (Until recently, JBS also owned Five Rivers Cattle, a conglomeration of eleven feedlots in six states, including four Colorado feedlots with a combined capacity of 338,000 head. They sold Five Rivers after agreeing to a $3.2 billion fine for involvement in a bribery scandal in Brazil, their global headquarters.) This means that it's probably impossible to identify the origins of any steak, much less any package of ground beef, bearing the Cedar River Farms trademark. It also means that claims on the Cedar River Farms website—that the brand represents meat from cows born in the United States and raised without hormones—are difficult to evaluate. Several attempts to call the number listed under “contact us” yielded no response. This is the kind of high-tech, concentrated, efficiency-driven operation that dominates industrial meat production. Four beef-packing companies—Cargill, Tyson, JBS, and National Beef Packing Co—control eighty-five percent of the US market. “There's so much challenge in trying to access the consumer,” Callicrate says. “The big meatpackers and food companies are a big part of the problem in their ability to predatory price smaller companies out of business.”

Over the past thirty years, small, family-owned feedlots and meatpacking plants have shuttered, one after another, leaving small-scale producers with limited options and long drives to reach slaughter and processing facilities that can grant the USDA mark of inspection, required for all retail sales of beef and pork, whether to local restaurants or international suppliers. The surviving small-scale processors are typically booked six months out, and there are so few USDA inspected facilities in New Mexico that many ranchers and farmers who want to sell locally must first drive their animals to Arizona or Colorado. Others opt to sell their animals at auction, where they disappear into the industrial cycle. “From a purely economic standpoint,” says Susann Mikkelson, director of the Southwest Grassfed Livestock Alliance (SWGLA), “the state is losing out.” Calves often leave at nine months old, explains Mikkelson, and “once they leave, they come back as a retail product—if it is our product. We don't know if it ever comes back.” SWGLA is working to change this, in part by connecting producers with retailers and consumers. Through their website, consumers can find and buy directly from producers. Buying whole animals, or “cowpooling” with friends and family, allows customers to have beef (and pork) custom-processed, in a facility approved for meat for personal consumption. Mikkelson says even custom processors can be hard to access during hunting season, when they can make easier money processing wild game (which, unlike beef, does not need to age before being cut). Echoing every rancher I've spoken to, she cites the shortage of USDA inspected processors as a major barrier to getting more locally raised meat into the retail market. Why the shortage? For one, to write a simple sentence describing the USDA system for inspections is impossible. In theory, the rules are the same for a Tyson plant that slaughters a million chickens a day as for a family-owned processor that harvests twelve cattle on Tuesday and twenty pigs on Wednesday. Even if inspections are executed fairly (and there's a widespread perception among small-scale producers that they are not) this puts smaller processors at a disadvantage. If their approach to harvesting animals doesn't match the increasingly mechanized, high-capacity production model, implementing what the USDA's Food Safety Inspection Service calls a HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point) plan is labor-intensive, which is probably one reason, Mikkelson says, that so many New Mexico plants choose to operate as custom. “In a big plant,” explains Michael Fisher, a trained veterinarian who worked for USDA's Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) for thirty years, “the inspectors are pretty busy. In a little bitty place where there's probably about two hours of work for eight hours, instructors get bored, so they're looking for something to inspect. It looks like they're being inspected to death. And sometimes they probably are.” Fisher also cites the cost and logistics of staffing rural, low-capacity plants with USDA inspectors, who must be onsite to evaluate the health of live animals and the plant's HACCP compliance. “When you've got to do all this surveillance, with limited resources,” Fisher says, well, “if there are less of them, better for you. If there's a reason, any reason to shut it down—there's a temptation to take it.” And for a small business with WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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Beef aging in the brick and mortar cut-and-wrap at the TCEDC. Photo courtesy of TCEDC.

limited financial and legal resources, where even a brief suspension can be catastrophic, it might not seem worth the risk. If there's an antithesis to the JBS plant in Greeley, it's the mobile matanza, run by the nonprofit Taos County Economic Development Corporation (TCEDC) from 2007 to 2014. When I sit down with Pati Martinson, the TCEDC's director, and ask why the mobile matanza went out of service, she doesn't blame FSIS or the USDA; but she does mention lapses in USDA funding and the cost of having a staff person manage the required HACCP plan. The Taos group launched the mobile slaughter unit, or mobile matanza, to extend their mission of supporting the traditional foodways and preserving the land-based lifestyles of the peoples of northern New Mexico. “The honor of feeding people is still in our DNA,” says Martinson, adding that the TCEDC was founded in response to a 1980s crackdown on the region's historic, informal food trade. One of the nonprofit's core projects is incubating small businesses, and the afternoon I'm there, we meet bakers prepping to make a batch of scones for the next day's farmers market. In the office, two young employees discuss what beans to plant in the community garden. The mobile matanza, a huge trailer with a custom-designed space for harvesting animals from bison and yak to pigs and cattle, is pulled up alongside 52

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the brick-and-mortar cut-and-wrap where, when the unit was in operation, beef carcasses would hang to age until the butcher broke them down according to a rancher's or customer's specifications. “I'm a firm believer that you can't abuse your animals,” says David Griego of D&R Ranch, who made regular use of the mobile matanza, not just because it was cheaper and more convenient, but because he considered it more humane. Travel is stressful for animals. By coming directly to ranches or nearby staging areas, the mobile matanza provided an alternative for family farms and ranches—people who love their animals, resist the use of feedlots and antibiotics, and have a tradition of harvesting their own animals and providing meat to others. Now, Griego says, “so many people in the area [around Mora] don't have a way to slaughter their animals.” The mobile matanza, essentially a microprocessor, might not have a dramatic impact on the percentage of New Mexico–raised beef sold within the state; but its reboot could help more New Mexicans access healthier, sustainably raised meat. “At this point,” says Daniel Unruh of Red Barn Ranch, “we need to develop more markets.” Unruh sells his grassfed beef at small Las Vegas venues, like Semilla Natural Foods, and is a member of the Sweetgrass Co-op, which sells to the one store where someone in-


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Taos County Economic Development Corporation's Mobile Matanza unit. Photo by Briana Olson.

volved in distribution was willing (and able) to talk to me about both the sourcing and slaughter of animals: La Montañita Co-op. “Their procurement man,” Unruh says, “has a really strict regimen as far as qualifying those cattle.” George Whitten, president of the Sweetgrass Co-op and owner of Blue Range Ranch (based in the San Luis Valley, which Whitten jokes is “the only part of New Mexico that's in Colorado”), speaks so warmly of the relationship they've developed with La Montañita that I feel like we're talking about a different industry than the corrupt, predatory one Callicrate describes. But La Montañita, though growing, is a relatively small supplier, and both Whitten and Unruh agree that the shortage of processing facilities is linked to the challenge of reaching consumers. That brings us back to labeling, which many shoppers rely on when buying meat. On any given day, looking over the supermarket cuts on display, you're likely to see lamb chops tagged “New Zealand” alongside unmarked filet mignons, skirt steaks, tenderloins, and sausages. The steaks and sausages are not usually labeled by country, not because none of the beef or pork is imported, but because in 2015, Congress repealed country-of-origin labeling for beef and pork. So long as they're processed in a USDA-inspected plant—which imports have to be—beef and pork can be labeled products of the USA. About seventy-five percent of grassfed beef sold in this country is imported from countries in the Southern hemisphere such as Argentina and Uruguay. So a product that consumers perceive as a sustainable choice, one tied to local producers and healthier practices for both humans and animals, in many cases actually has a significant travel footprint, and, because it's cheaper, is contributing to the plummet in what a US rancher can earn for grassfed or pasture raised cattle. “Consumers want to do the right thing,” says SWGLA's Mikkelson, and statistics suggest she's correct. More and more, consumers care whether animals are raised healthfully, humanely, and sustainably, and the growing demand for grassfed beef is further evidence of 54

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that. But what, faced with misleading brands and confusing labels, is the right thing to do? How can you, as an eater and citizen, support local markets for sustainably raised meat?

1 2

Buy meat directly from ranchers and farmers. If you can't afford farmers market prices, pool with friends and family to buy in bulk.

Support stores, markets, and restaurants that source their meat from local ranchers and farmers. When you walk into a restaurant or a supermarket, ask for locally raised meat.

3 4

Research brands before you buy. Don't take brand names or claims that meat is “all-natural” at face value.

Invest or volunteer with organizations, like SWGLA and the TCEDC, that are working to expand local markets and/or can help you stay informed about upcoming legislation. Southwest Grassfed Alliance www.grassfedlivestock.org Taos County Economic Development Corporation www.tcedc.org

5

Call your US representatives and senators and ask them to enhance antitrust enforcement and support real competition in food and agriculture. Tell them you support country-of-origin labeling for pork and beef.

Senator Tom Udall: 202-224-6621 Senator Martin Heinrich: 505-242-0210 Representative Michelle Lujan Grisham (First District): 202-225-6316 Representative Steve Pearce (Second District): 202-225-2365 Representative Ben Luján (Third District): 202-225-6190


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What Could Industrial Hemp Mean for New Mexico Agriculture? By Michael J. Dax · Photos by Stephanie Cameron

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O

ver the past decade, a dramatic shift in the debate over our relationship with marijuana (cannabis) has largely revolved around the plant’s recreational and medicinal uses. To date, twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia now allow medicinal marijuana in some form, and nine states (plus D.C.) have legalized the use of recreational marijuana. While the issue of marijuana decriminalization and legalization has received significant attention across the country, the legalization of hemp—a term used for non-psychoactive varieties of cannabis—has until very recently garnered far less notice from policy makers, media, and activists. Nevertheless, in September, a district court decision overturned one of Governor Susana Martinez’s vetoes from the 2017 legislative session to make New Mexico the thirty-fifth state to lift the ban on industrial hemp production. With New Mexico’s supreme court upholding that decision in April, the onus is now on the state’s Department of Agriculture to develop the rules and regulations that will govern the fledgling industry. In the meantime, hemp advocates are chomping at the bit to see the first fields seeded as they look to neighboring states and current growers for an idea of what industrial hemp production could mean for the Land of Enchantment. Despite the stigmas that continue to cloud opinions of hemp, civilizations from China to Egypt to England have cultivated the plant for thousands of years. Hemp rope had its origins in Russia more than 2,500 years ago and was used by the British Navy starting in the 1500s on the rigging of their ships. Hemp fibers were also employed to produce the cloth for the ships’ sails, and across the world, hemp was commonly used as a paper product. The United States has its own history of growing hemp. It was an early cash crop in the South starting in the late eighteenth century, and in addition to being used for paper and textiles, early Americans figured out how to burn hemp seed oil for fuel. Hemp seed oil was also used for a variety of medicinal uses including for pain relief, muscle spasms, and sleeping aids. In response to sensationalized fears surrounding marijuana use, however, Congress criminalized the plant in 1937. But during World War II, practical concerns trumped those cultural fears, and the federal government launched a “Hemp for Victory” campaign. With other textiles in short supply, the government recognized the need for additional raw materials to produce items such as clothes, rope, and parachutes, encouraging farmers to grow

“I

hemp to contribute to the war effort. Despite these practical uses and the long-standing tradition of growing hemp, following the war, the government only tightened its prohibition on all strains of cannabis, perpetuating the notion that there is little difference between marijuana and hemp. Despite attempts to conflate the two varieties of cannabis, they have fundamental differences. Both contain cannabinoids, compounds that exist naturally in cannabis plants. But while marijuana contains high amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)—the psychoactive component that produces a “high”—hemp contains little THC. THC levels in recreational marijuana typically range from fifteen to twenty-five percent, while hemp cannot legally contain more than three-tenths percent THC. Hemp can be bred to promote different qualities, such as longer fibers used in textiles, higher concentrations of seeds for nutritional supplements, or higher levels of another cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), which has medicinal benefits but does not produce any psychoactive effects. More than thirty countries, including Canada, China, Russia, and Australia, permit hemp cultivation. For its part, in the 2014 Farm Bill, Congress eased the ban by allowing individual states to authorize industrial hemp programs regulated by their respective agriculture department or research university. Despite this reform, a legal gray area still exists because the federal government continues to classify hemp as a controlled substance. Much about the long-term prospects of hemp as a legal industry remains uncertain, but that has not prevented farmers from taking advantage of this new opportunity, and unsurprisingly, New Mexico’s northern neighbor Colorado is at the forefront of this burgeoning movement. Veronica Carpio founded Grow Hemp Colorado in 2014, following the Colorado legislature’s passage of an industrial hemp bill. Among other responsibilities, the organization advocates for good hemp policies, educates the public, and helps farmers network and find markets for their product. According to Carpio, the most difficult part for farmers is finding the seed. Because hemp cannot contain more than three-tenths percent THC at dry weight, there is a fine line for growers, with a great deal of risk if a crop goes “hot” and is above that threshold. A quick Google search will reveal many options for buying hemp seeds, but as Carpio suggests, “Question everything. Good genetics don’t come cheap.” Carpio has test results demonstrating the long-term stability of the seeds she

In addition to practical limitations, the hemp industry still faces many cultural biases. In Colorado, Veronica Carpio says that law enforcement has continued to be an issue. “It’s been illegal for so long that it doesn’t really matter how much THC there is,” she says. “It’s important for law enforcement to get educated. They think everything is a drug.” WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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@TravelNewMexico

Team at Wumaniti Earth Native Sanctuary (upper left, clockwise): Stephen Jacobs, Elliott Enos, Gemma Ra’Sta, and Tiana Suazo.

sells and recommends that anyone buying seed also request to see test results demonstrating consistently low levels of THC. Growers also have the option of buying seed that has been officially certified, which carries a much greater degree of assurance that it will produce a legal crop. However, until last year, every strain of certified seed originated outside of the United States, making growers dependent on foreign competitors. In late 2017, Colorado’s Department of Agriculture certified a strain of hemp seed from New West Genetics, a Fort Collins based company. This could be a boon for the industry, especially in states like Washington and California, which allow farmers to grow only certified seed. New Mexico’s Department of Agriculture is still in the process of developing its rules and regulations, so it is yet to be determined if it will allow non-certified seed. If so, will it honor Colorado’s certification process or require that seed to be separately certified in New Mexico? Michael Chappelear, who founded the New Mexico Hemp Association in 2014 to help advocate for its legalization, worries that transporting seed across state lines could raise the ire of the federal government and suggests that it could be safer for farmers to import their seed from Europe, where most certified seed originates. “It’s almost as if they’ve put it on each and every state to reinvent the wheel,” says Chappelear of the legal limbo created by the federal government. 58

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For the past four years, Kristin DiFerdinando, better known as Gemma Ra’Star, has been growing hemp under a religious exemption through Wumaniti Earth Native Sanctuary. Starting in 2015, she has contracted with landowners in Taos Pueblo, Arroyo Seco, Arroyo Hondo, and Questa, and she typically waters, via acequia, two times a week. “We grow the best hemp,” Ra’Star says of northern New Mexico. “The higher the elevation the better.” Hemp tolerates both cold and heat well, so New Mexico’s high desert climate with warm days and cool nights can be well suited for hemp production. Chappelear also stresses the importance of going organic. Hemp will absorb whatever is in the soil, so for a crop destined for food or nutritional products, the soil must be free of any harmful chemicals. On the flip side, however, Ra’Star heralds hemp’s ability to clean up soil and thinks it could be potentially useful in agricultural fields contaminated from a legacy of mining chemicals, pesticide use, or fuel spills. According to Ra’Star, for hemp used in textiles or products like hempcrete, the trace amounts of contaminants will not be harmful. Although New Mexico is well-suited for growing hemp, when it comes to harvesting and processing, the industry has a lot of room to grow. Carpio acknowledges that certain hemp products, like biofuel, have not yet taken off because the processing facilities do not exist. For this same reason, Wumaniti Earth Native Sanctuary has


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Left: Hemp seedling. Right: Ra’Star in Wumaniti greenhouse.

downsized from thirteen to four acres this year because of its limited capacity to harvest. In addition to practical limitations, the hemp industry still faces many cultural biases. In Colorado, Carpio says that law enforcement has continued to be an issue. “It’s been illegal for so long that it doesn’t really matter how much THC there is,” she says. “It’s important for law enforcement to get educated. They think everything is a drug.” However, according to Ra’Star, Wumaniti has had plenty of interactions with law enforcement, but has never had a problem. This, she attributes to the fact that they have always been transparent and welcoming with the communities where they farm. To help normalize the idea of hemp cultivation, Wumaniti also offers tours of their farms and invites community members to help harvest at the end of the year. This idea of involving the community is central to the way Wumaniti runs the business side of its operation. It’s not just about growing hemp, but about empowering local farmers and using hemp to boost the local economy by finding innovative ways to put the plant to work. At its two retail stores in Taos and Santa Fe, Wumaniti sells sixty-one products, the majority of which are made with hemp grown in New Mexico. These include clothing, teas, balms, oils, protein bars, and dog treats. Ra’Star and her co-founder, Elliott Enos, of Taos and Tesuque Pueblos, have also been experimenting with hempcrete as a building material and will be opening a hempcrete store adjacent to their current location in the Santa Fe Mall. Some of their members are already building with the flame-retardant material, and the store will display hempcrete domes to help introduce people to the concept. Because Wumaniti operates as a religious organization, New Mexico’s legalizing hemp production will not directly affect it, but Ra’Star and Enos are excited at the prospect of more people growing. Wu60

edible Santa Fe | LATE SUMMER 2018

maniti currently has seventeen part-time employees, but more hemp being grown could mean additional sources of raw material to help them expand their production. “I want to see an economic turnaround in the state,” says Enos. “It’s going to be a great tool for New Mexico to utilize and run with it.” Hemp cultivation in New Mexico holds significant potential, but much about the fledgling industry has yet to be determined. New Mexico’s Department of Agriculture is in the process of writing rules for licensure, inspection, record keeping, fees, and law enforcement. According to a spokeswoman for the department, it hopes to present its draft regulations to the Board of Regents sometime this fall. If all goes according to plan, it is possible that farmers could be growing hemp by 2019. Meanwhile, there appears to be significant movement at the federal level. At the end of June, with support from majority leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), whose home state has embraced industrial hemp for the past four years, the Senate passed a version of the 2018 Farm Bill that included a provision to fully legalize the production of hemp and sales of CBD. “It’s time we took this step,” said McConnell at a recent meeting of the Senate Agriculture Committee. A similar provision was not included in the House Farm Bill, so the two bills will be reconciled through a conference committee later this year, but this progress is an indication of the cultural shift underway, and growers like Ra’Star have reason to be enthusiastic. “The more hemp we grow, the better,” she says. “Everyone can make products from it and everyone can thrive from it.” www.wumaniti.com, www.growhempcolorado.com, www.newmexicohempassociation.org


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Electing to Eat Well A CONVERSATION WITH CANDIDATES ABOUT FOOD IN NEW MEXICO Interviews and Introductions by Willy Carleton

Gubernatorial candidate Michelle Lujan Grisham bunching carrots at a farm in New Mexico. Photo courtesy of Michelle Lujan Grisham campaign.

“B

Because of issues surrounding storage, distribution, and pretty draconian requirements that are well-intentioned but onerous, we don't really incentivize locally grown, highquality food. You can change those policies at the state level by creating incentives. We have to invest in food storage infrastructure, which makes a big difference in keeping the supply chain moving. — Michelle Lujan Grisham 62

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With the November elections on the near horizon, edible reached out to candidates in several races to ask how they would shape the foodscape of our state. We begin with a conversation with Michelle Lujan Grisham, a Representative in the US House and the Democratic candidate for governor. Lujan Grisham sat down with me at Verde in Santa Fe. Her Republican opponent in the New Mexico gubernatorial race, Representative Steve Pearce, did not respond to edible’s requests for an interview. edible: How would you, as governor, prioritize New Mexicans’ access to sustainable and locally grown food? MLG: I’d make sure that we get fresh produce and fresh foods that are locally grown into schools and other public programs, such as subsidized child-care and senior programs. Because of issues surrounding storage, distribution, and pretty draconian requirements that are wellintentioned but onerous, we don't really incentivize locally grown, high-quality food. You can change those policies at the state level by creating incentives. We have to invest in food storage infrastructure, which makes a big difference in keeping the supply chain moving. Another way is to look at food assistance. There’s a Double Up Food Bucks program embedded in the most recent authorization of the funding of the Farm Bill so you get double the amount of money. So basically, [normally under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)] it’s a buck fifty per amount of meal, which is awful. The Double Up Food Bucks program means that I’ll give you three dollars, roughly, if you buy fresh fruits and vegetables. And where we like you to do that is at participating grocery stores and at farmers markets, because we want [SNAP recipients] to have a relationship with the people growing that food. It changes their eating habits, it changes their awareness, and it puts money into the hands of local farmers in a much more direct fashion. Money from the USDA can make a real difference in expanding a farmer’s produce and agricultural footprint, giving that farmer the resources to invest in either buying or leasing land. So there are a variety of programs tied to SNAP both directly and indirectly, and if the federal government continues to be draconian about moving away from [food assistance], those are places where states will have to make it up until we get Congress not to lose its mind. edible: What do you see as the biggest threat to New Mexican agriculture right now? MLG: There are a bunch, but water is among the most difficult and challenging, and also access to land. It's too expensive, so we can't grow in the way that we would like to. Now, I am not a Pollyanna about water here, but I'm not nearly as pessimistic as most folks on the campaign trail. However, I’m concerned about this lawsuit with Texas and other state stakeholders, where Texas claims that we owe them probably a billion dollars in water. We, in my opinion, made a huge mistake engaging in a litigious manner. I would argue that we don't have seasoned water lawyers on this case from the AG's office; that the state engineer is not a seasoned, well-regarded water expert; that the interstate stream commis-

sion of folks on all of these water foundations all work in a vacuum and don't work very well together—that was all by design by this governor—and they don't have the capacity to do water management, water technology innovation, and water conservation, and we must immediately do all of those. I want to do a fifty-year water plan. Water is not a one to twoyear planning process, and that means what we need, in terms of water technologies, is really knowing what the quality of our water is and where it is, because we really don't have state-of-the-art reviews. We’ve been mapping better, but we really need to make sure that we know that we can meet our agricultural needs for a hundred years. Drought is the new norm, so we better figure that out—and I think we can. I think we can grow the same kind of quality products with less water and do it in a much more effective way. Finally, as one of my economics segments I want to promote value-added agriculture, which includes looking at incentives for water innovations and technologies, and I want to support a center of excellence toward that goal. I've identified the land grant university [as that center], because that's where we've made those investments already. Let’s make sure that those investments are working. edible: Speaking of water, where do you stand on fracking in New Mexico? MLG: It’s a contentious issue, and the truth is that an all-out ban on fracking is the easiest way to deal with that, but it is not a practical way. I don't even think that if you wanted that that you could win it if somebody were litigating it. And we’re the third largest oil and gas producer. So, with regard to fracking, we want no more methane plumes, we want to do methane mitigation, and we need to talk about the water that we're using in oil and gas. It’s a completely unfair investment when we don't have enough food security and we have all these food deserts, but we’re using water we don't readily have in [the oil and gas] industry. We want to make sure that fracking industries are held accountable for water problems, including water pollution, and we need to be much tougher on those environmental standards. And the best way out of fracking is renewable energy. I want to move immediately into renewable energy. It's a reasonable investment in that infrastructure and you have to stay the course, like long-term water planning. You get your transmission lines in, you take advantage of those tax credits, you join all the regional transmission authorities, and you invest in the infrastructure with these businesses that want to do wind and solar energy. As governor, I’ve got to give businesses investing in wind and solar energy the tools that they need to make sure that that's an expanding business. edible: In our last issue of edible, we looked at some of the challenges and dangers women food workers and farmworkers face. How would you support equity in the workplace? MLG: In every vehicle and measure possible. If we want to stamp out discrimination, we need to lead by example and make that clear. If you want a government contract, you want our investments, we will hold you accountable. Discrimination is very real, both based on gender and on racial and ethnic backgrounds. So, minority ranchers and farmers WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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Photos courtesy of Michelle Lujan Grisham campaign.

have engaged in huge lawsuits, and now there are settlements out of the USDA with black farmers and Native American farmers. Hispanic farmers have won their settlement, but we've been very slow to make those awards and to sufficiently identify that we're meeting the needs of all those farmers that were discriminated against. Those ranchers couldn’t get grazing permits, they didn't get USDA investments, they wouldn't let them participate in any of the educational efforts—they were just blocked out. So those lawsuits tell you that those are real issues. And they are exacerbated by gender. It’s largely a male-dominated field, and it's the same thing that you see everywhere. So lead by example: if you want a government contract, I want to see what your policies are, I want to see how many women-owned farms and ranches and food associations or cooperatives or grocery stores or whatever part of that distribution effort you're in. I want to see how that's working.

products, and get them from farm to table, whether it's locally or it's being exported out. And look what we're doing with craft beers. We have to think about a way to tell our story of success. We are winning lots of awards. People weren't paying attention, so we want to make them pay attention…. And the state has a role. That has to be a part of our economic design. edible: How do you feel about the possibility of growing hemp in New Mexico? MLG: I love it. Please write a really thorough, thoughtful, positive article in your magazine that shows what we’re missing by not fully engaging in hemp production in this state. edible: So, needless to say, if you’re governor, hemp production will happen?

The second thing that you can do is make sure that you get into the educational system early and you recruit girls. It’s exactly what we've done in robotics, engineering, how you got to STEM and STEAM. Historically, it is not only that we weren’t graduating enough young people, but we were terrible at making sure the girls were part of that design. We need to require that [our] education system has absolute gender equality. That will change the dynamic in the future.

MLG: It’s done. First of all, I’ve got a proactive policy about cannabis in general. But, as your readers know, its rope, not dope, and it can be used for so many things—they're even building houses with it. So far, there aren’t too many things it can’t be used for—maybe NASA still has to figure out a way that they want to use it in space? But, no, it’s amazing. And we don’t know enough about it because we haven't grown enough. We’ve really been myopic.

edible: Is there anything that you would do in particular to support the growth of local food industries and value-added producers, such as restaurants and breweries?

I brought medical cannabis to the state—I tried to do it in the Johnson administration but didn't succeed until Richardson—and as the debate has unfolded about recreational cannabis, I have no doubt that we can meet the challenges it represents. And there are challenges—surrounding intoxication, prevention, underage use, edibles, worker environments, and public safety—but we are smart enough to figure it out, I have no doubt. And then we have the ability and opportunity to learn from the mistakes—and there have been some doozies, including in Colorado—from all the other states. Perfect! This may be one of those things where not jumping in too early provides the opportunity to learn. So I'm interested in an industry that's both productive for us economically, productive for the state in research capacities, and productive in the way that we model education. So I'm all in. I want the legislature to put them together and I don't want them to drag their feet. Do it together, do it up front.

MLG: We need to brand who we are in terms of our food. You know, historically, we used to help both small farmers and food producers market their products so that they would get both in-state availability and out-of-state marketing for their products. New Mexico does a really poor job of that. The state could do a much better job. We have to help with that marketing, help with that branding. We have to make sure that we're talking to those purchasers. I talked about how I want local food in school and senior programs. Well, if you embed that in your own purchasing activities, it creates a really unique market for getting it purchased everywhere else. So, we will want to work with federal grants and we will work with local farmers and ranchers to figure out how we want to brand and market those 64

edible Santa Fe | LATE SUMMER 2018


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State Representative and land commissioner candidate Stephanie Garcia Richard. Photo courtesy of Stephanie Garcia Richard campaign.

Although the gubernatorial and congressional races more often get the headlines, the under-recognized New Mexico land commissioner race has potentially significant and farreaching ramifications for the local food economy and the state’s greater environment. I met with Democratic member of the New Mexico House of Representatives and candidate for land commissioner Stephanie Garcia Richard at her Santa Fe office in late June. Her opponents, Patrick Lyons and Michael Lucero, did not respond to edible’s requests for interviews. edible: In terms of sustainable agriculture, regenerative ranching, and the development of a thriving local food economy, what's at stake in the upcoming land commissioner race? SGR: Good land management is essential to good food, and I see two specific ways this race can impact local food systems. Number one, the office has a lot of leverage in terms of the land that it leases to ranchers and other developers for different types of land use. I think that we need to look to the office to provide leadership around both encouraging and incentivizing sustainable water use and rotation of crops and cattle on state trust land, looking to the future and the long-term sustainability of those lands. Number two, the land office oversees and manages nine million acres of land, so it that’s a large area. It’s not all contiguous, it's broken up by section, but there's a lot [and] there's an opportunity to partner with agencies and groups like the Natural Resources Conservation Service, the US Forest Service, or the sustainable rangeland program at New Mexico State University 66

edible Santa Fe | LATE SUMMER 2018

(called Jornada), all to do broad-scale landscape management. That all plays into what's at stake with the health of the land, and the water most importantly. edible: How could you incentivize more sustainable practices? SGR: We could do it through the lease agreements. For example, we could give you a refund or a reduction in cost from your lease if you agree to particular conservation practices. We can also reinstate millions in renewable energy projects abandoned these last four years and ensure we use state land parcels to establish renewable energy transmission lines and become the leader in sustainable food and energy practices. edible: You mentioned water. How would you protect New Mexico's water resources? SGR: So there are a number of ways that our land office plays a role in our state’s water. Of course, all water rights and all of that kind of jurisdiction is with the Office of the State Engineer. But for the water rights tied to state trust land, not allowing any more large-scale use of fresh water in our most fragile aquifers, like the Ogallala, is a perfect example. There's a lot that the office can determine just through lease agreements: There is determining whether or not new proposed leases are even going to be approved [based on] if they are going to use large amounts of our fresh water; there is incentivizing recycling of water and using produced water; there is co-locating any activities that require water next to produced and recycled water facilities. So that's one whole area of advocacy where the office has a direct impact on water use by approving or disapproving leases.


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But then there are other things: incentivization, and I have already talked about that, but also just prioritizing watershed health. We can create “wet water” by eliminating invasive species, by sustainable long-term landscape practices that draw water down and capture it in the soil. They call it creating wet water. The third thing that the land office can do is really advocate around the protection of our water rights in any water law changes that are proposed. Fighting out-of-basin transfers will be important. There’s a lot being proposed right now; you may have heard of the proposed transfer of a number of acre feet out of the San Agustin Plains for municipal use, rather than for agricultural use. That threatens ecosystems, that threatens local food supply and local food economies. And then it’s about ensuring that we are protecting the water that people have used for agriculture for hundreds and even thousands of years. edible: What is your stance on fracking? How, as the land commissioner, would you affect fracking in New Mexico?

how a land commissioner uses the large voice of the office to advocate for protection of public lands. I’d also like to mention that, when this office was first created, it was created with a lot of autonomy and not a lot of oversight. So there's no check and balance, really, on the office. The governor has the check and balance of the legislature and vice-versa, but not so with the land office. So you cannot do anything that I talked about without bringing some transparency and accountability to decision-making into the office, and that's always something I try to remember to emphasize. That’s something I want to champion and something I want to change formally through legislative work. Right now, land deals are made behind closed doors, in the dark, and there are very minimal public notice requirements. So, more accountability and transparency, and really bringing the office to light, all has to happen before any of the solutions that I mentioned really take hold because we're trying to create a culture in the office that will continue with whoever is land commissioner.

SGR: I think that the land office really is the pivotal point in the direction fracking goes in this state. So now, as we're facing the climate realities that pose serious health concerns, environmental concerns, even economic concerns, the land office really needs to begin by banning fracking in fragile aquifers; by really pushing the industry to not use fresh water; and then by providing a just transition away from the heavy reliance on extractive industries to a more sustainable, renewable energy generation model. edible: What is your stance on the US-Mexico border wall, and how could the land commissioner affect the building of a wall? SGR: I think the border wall is un-American. I think that it divides families and cultures. It is an insane waste of resources. But we have leverage on the building of the border wall because we have twentytwo miles of state trust land in the bootheel that the office has complete purview over. Eminent domain would have to be called upon that land, or the commissioner taken to court, or National Guard troops would have to be stationed there, but the bottom line remains that the twenty-two miles of state land that we have on the southern part of our border are at the complete preview of this office. Not the governor, not the legislature. So I believe that gives this office leverage, using its high profile and its bully pulpit to really stand up and push back and speak out against the building of that wall. edible: And you’ll use that leverage? SGR: Absolutely. edible: What are the biggest threats to New Mexico's public lands and how would you address them? SGR: The biggest threat is always water. . . . The second biggest threat, truly, is the grab from the Feds. We see the shrinking of some of our protected monuments nationwide, and that could happen here to New Mexico. So I believe that, where we have state trust land bordering monuments within national monument borders, [we need] to stand up and resist those threats to protected lands. I think a strong land commissioner can provide a real model for land use nationwide, and certainly in the West, for how a land commissioner cares for our state land, for how a land commissioner stands up to land grabs, for 68

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Deb Haaland, Democratic candidate for US House of Representatives, First District . Photo courtesy of Deb Haaland campaign.

In addition to requesting interviews from each of the gubernatorial and land commissioner candidates, edible reached out to several candidates in our congressional races with simply one question: If elected, how will you prioritize increasing New Mexicans’ access to sustainable, locally grown food? Deb Haaland (Democratic candidate for US House of Representatives, First District): If elected to Congress, I will fight for our local farmers and prioritize access to sustainable, locally grown food at every turn. My father's parents were farmers who immigrated to the US, and as an enrolled member of the Pueblo of Laguna, I know that we would all be better served by getting back to the land and locally grown food, and turning away from our reliance on large factory farms. In Congress, I will play an active role in the [Federal] Farm Bill that is likely to be an ongoing conversation into 2019. We need a Farm Bill that supports a healthy, sustainable, humane, and beneficial fair food system for everyone—no longer should it foster pesticide-intensive agriculture and prop up factory farms. The current Farm Bill places almost all subsidies directly or indirectly into meat, dairy, and high-fructose corn syrup, at the expense of the less than one percent that goes to fruits and vegetables. No longer can the Farm Bill be a handout to the mega factory farms. The Farm Bill should provide for substantial investments into the development of plant-based and clean meat technology, which will


not only require less land and resources, but also decrease the risk of global public health threats. As a single mom, I struggled to get access to healthy food for my daughter while on food stamps. We need to ensure [that] New Mexicans of all income levels, including people on SNAP, have access to the fruits and vegetables they need to stay healthy and strong. That means innovative solutions like ensuring people can use SNAP at farmers markets, and simple solutions like ensuring local fruit and vegetable farmers aren't losing out on subsidies that factory sugar farmers get.

Martin Heinrich, Incumbent Democratic candidate for US Senate. Photo courtesy of Martin Heinrich campaign.

Martin Heinrich (Incumbent Democratic candidate for US Senate): Like parents across New Mexico, knowing what’s in the food I buy for my family—and where it comes from—is important to me. Increasing access to sustainable, locally grown food creates a safer, healthier, and less environmentally impactful food supply, while supporting New Mexico farmers and growers. That’s why I was proud to successfully boost funding for initiatives like increasing access to locally produced foods for low-income families and promoting SNAP benefit use at farmers markets, and why I have fought to provide fresh, locally grown food to those who receive WIC benefits. That’s also why I continue to fight for clear and accurate labeling of food products, including GMOs—so we can all make more informed decisions about the foods we are feeding our families. Increasing access to sustainable, locally grown food doesn’t just benefit our families, it also boosts New Mexico’s dynamic agriculture economy. That’s why I’ve supported legislation to increase federal funds for specialty crops like green chile, to strengthen the crop insurance program, to provide relief to our producers who are struggling from drought conditions, and create grants to help ensure the next generation of farmers can succeed. New Mexicans can count on me to do all I can to continue to champion efforts that support our families’ health and well-being. Note: edible reached out to congressional candidates of both major parties with this question, no other candidates replied in time for print.

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AN EDIBLE OPINION

A Hard Bill to Swallow FARM BILL'S SNAP CUTS WOULD HURT NEW MEXICO By Candolin Cook

“T

Exchanging a WIC check at the Española Farmers Market. Photo courtesy of the New Mexico Farmers' Marketing Association.

The Farm Bill is one of the country’s most important and expensive pieces of legislation, yet many of us don’t have a clear understanding of what it does. The bill essentially has three main goals: to aid farmers in order to protect our food supply and economy; to protect the environment; and to feed the hungry. 70

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I

n certain ways, Socorro County can be considered New Mexico’s heartland. It is in the center of the state, about fifty miles south of Albuquerque hugging I-25 and the Rio Grande. Like the majority of New Mexico, its communities are rural, with plenty of country charm exhibited at local events—rodeos, farmers markets, 4-H auctions. Well over one million acres of farmland are set aside for cattle, alfalfa, chile, wheat, corn, and other crops that feed bellies across the country. With such a strong agricultural identity, Socorro County residents should be paying close attention to ongoing ag policy debates in Congress over the new Farm Bill, which is set to replace the current bill when it expires in September. However, agricultural policy isn’t all they should be concerned about. Despite being surrounded by food production, twenty-two percent of Socorro’s population faces food insecurity and relies on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)—a program that has been paid for by the Farm Bill, but is now in jeopardy. The Farm Bill is one of the country’s most important and expensive pieces of legislation, yet many of us don’t have a clear understanding of what it does. The bill essentially has three main goals: to aid farmers in order to protect our food supply and economy; to protect the environment; and to feed the hungry. The nutrition component dwarfs the others, with eighty percent of the Farm Bill’s $430 billion five-year budget going toward SNAP and other nutrition programs. The Farm Bill originated during the Great Depression and Dust Bowl with the Agricultural Adjustment Act, which helped stabilize crop prices and feed the poor. Over the years the Farm Bill has changed in size and scope: the Food Stamp Program was folded into the Farm Bill in 1977; Congress began including conservation measures in the 1980s; and in the 1990s and 2000s provisions for a greater focus on tribal and other underserved communities led to funding for land grant colleges, technical assistance, and outreach to help ensure the sustainability of the farms and the people who work the land. Every five years the Farm Bill expires and must be updated, debated, and passed through Congress. Both the Senate and House must draft and pass their own versions of the bill, then work together to reconcile the two before sending it to the president for signature. Historically, the bill has been a relatively bipartisan effort, with Republicans and Democrats compromising on issues such as farm subsidies, crop insurance, natural resource conservation, rural development, trade, energy, labor safety, and nutrition programs. This year, as with the last Farm Bill in 2014, partisan debate over SNAP spending has made the bill more divisive. On June 21, the House narrowly passed its Republican-led version of the 2018 Farm Bill, 213–211. All House Democrats and twenty Republicans voted against the bill, and New Mexico Congressman and gubernatorial candidate Steve Pearce (R-NM) voted in favor. If enacted, the House bill would cut SNAP spending by an estimated $20 billion over the next decade, largely by limiting eligibility through stricter work requirements. Some one to two million people would be forced out of the program. About $8 billion of those savings would go toward work training programs and administrative costs. While House Republicans and President Trump claim the restrictions

will lead to greater self-sufficiency, opponents point to research that suggests these short-term training programs have proven ineffective in helping the unemployed find work, and believe long-term solutions to unemployment are more likely to be found through training in high-demand sectors and access to affordable education, child care, and transportation. Under the existing 2014 Farm Bill, able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDs) between the ages of eighteen and forty-nine are already required to work part time or participate in a work-training program to receive food stamps, and must agree to accept a job if offered. Otherwise they will lose benefits after three months. The 2018 House bill will raise the maximum age to fifty-nine, with exceptions for pregnant women, caretakers of children under six, or persons with disabilities. (Critics argue the definition of those considered disabled is too narrow, often not including individuals with some mental illnesses, such as veterans suffering from undiagnosed PTSD.) New stipulations will punish anyone who fails to comply with the work requirements by dropping their coverage for one year for the first infraction, and three years for each subsequent violation. The House proposals would also drastically cut school free-lunch programs and remove waivers that currently allow states facing high unemployment rates to avoid federal penalties for noncompliance. New Mexico has the second-highest unemployment rate in the nation, doubling and tripling the national average in some rural counties. Our state is the third-highest food stamp user per capita. Forty-two million Americans use SNAP to buy groceries, including about 450,000 New Mexicans. Despite persistent misperceptions depicting food stamp users as “moochers” and “welfare queens,” the vast majority locally and nationally are elderly, disabled, or are children (forty percent of our state’s young children recieve SNAP). Despite the rhetoric one often hears, only seven percent of beneficiaries fall into the ABAWD category. About half of SNAP users come from working families. Maria Griego of the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty (NMCLP) explains: “For hundreds of thousands of New Mexicans, work does not itself guarantee steady or sufficient income to provide for families. SNAP helps one in seven workers in New Mexico [who] turn to SNAP to supplement low and fluctuating pay and to help their families get by during spells of unemployment.” The average SNAP family in New Mexico uses the assistance for only fourteen months. Critics of the House Farm Bill say rigid twenty-hour-a-week work requirements are unrealistic for states like New Mexico where fulltime and living-wage jobs are difficult to come by. They say by removing the waivers and the state’s power to implement its own work and work-training criteria, many deserving individuals will go hungry. Griego says that “these types of requirements are particularly untenable for Native American nations who have their own governments that know best how to tackle food insecurity and workforce development in their own communities.” Under this plan, an estimated 120,000 New Mexicans could face termination of SNAP, and tens of thousands would see reduced benefits. According to gubernatorial candidate and Representative Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-NM), the WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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Photo courtesy of the New Mexico Farmers' Marketing Association.

new House stipulations and red tape (such as providing a monthly utility bill) would “further destabilize an already disjointed SNAP system in New Mexico.” The Congresswoman adds, “[These] draconian cuts to SNAP create an unfunded mandate [and would] waste $7.6 billion on creating an untested and unchecked workforce bureaucracy at the state level.” After the initial failure of the House Farm Bill in May, Representative Pearce said, “In New Mexico, too many are trapped in poverty, and we owe it to them to help provide a pathway to success and prosperity. The job training and work requirements added would have helped New Mexicans learn the skills needed to succeed and to lift themselves out of poverty.” After the subsequent passage of the House bill, Krysten Aguilar, Director of Operations and Policy Advocacy of La Semilla Food Center in Anthony, countered, “It is offensive when Pearce assumes that New Mexicans are not already trying to find work and enter job training programs. These [new] programs are not yet in place, and when Pearce brags that 116,800 New Mexicans would qualify for them, what that really means is that 116,800 might lose their benefits if New Mexico is not prepared to accept [them] into job training programs within a few months. Until that infrastructure is in place, it is irresponsible—and arguably cruel—to make people depend on them in order to eat. . . . If the Representative honestly wanted to create a ‘pathway to success and prosperity,’ he would increase access to food, not reduce it, and he would introduce a Healthy Food Financing Initiative for New Mexico.” She adds that Pearce’s support of the “devastating” bill shows that he is “deeply detached from the lives of his constituents.” 72

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Indeed, proposed cuts to SNAP funding would hit rural New Mexicans especially hard. In Representative Pearce’s District 2— which encompasses the largely rural southern half of the state including Socorro County—at least 162,393 New Mexicans participate in SNAP, according to the NMCLP. Certain aspects intrinsic to rural areas make it especially hard to comply with work and training mandates. Rural areas have been slower to recover from the 2008 recession and have experienced significant population loss in the last decade, prompting a decline in manufacturing, construction, and service jobs. Work-training programs are also less present in rural areas, requiring residents to travel great distances to participating offices. That travel may prove impossible for some because reliable public transit is nearly nonexistent in isolated areas. For Native American SNAP participants living on tribal lands, this may require moving away from family to more urban areas, something Native American food sovereignty lobbyists have likened to Relocation Policy. (Over seventy-five thousand SNAP participants in New Mexico are Native American.) Searching for employment is also greatly hindered by limited internet access. And for rural farm workers, the seasonal nature of agricultural work puts them at greater risk of violating short grace periods. SNAP dollars are also critical to the survival of rural grocery stores, which service populations experiencing higher rates of poverty. In Socorro, for example, there are only two supermarkets, Walmart and the locally-owned John Brooks SuperMart. Dan Smiel, operations manager for John Brooks in Socorro, says that SNAP dollars account for ten to fifteen percent of monthly sales, and they are “very important to all [John Brooks] stores.” He says without SNAP dollars the Socorro location would likely have to let go of five or six of their


Break for a beer at the place where the brakemen used to break between brakings. . – I’m thirsty

OUR DOWNTOWN TASTING ROOM IS NOW OPEN. Located in a historic old brakeman’s quarters at

510 GALISTEO ST, DOWNTOWN SANTA FE.


Photo by Carole Topalian.

Photo courtesy of the New Mexico Farmers' Marketing Association.

thirty-five to forty employees. According to the Rural Grocery Store Initiative out of Kansas State University, rural and small town grocers are already disappearing at an alarming rate. This increases shoppers’ travel times and expenditures, limits the amount of fresh foods consumed, and jeopardizes job opportunities. Last year, over $650 million in SNAP benefits was spent at New Mexico food retailers. But SNAP dollars don’t just result in increased food sales, they also allow families to spend more income on nonfood items and services, providing a much-needed economic boon to struggling communities. Studies have repeatedly shown that this type of “trickle-up” economics is critical in times of economic downturn, as poor households spend their money quickly, injecting it back into the community, as opposed to tax-break dollars given to wealthier Americans who are more likely to put it into savings. People often remark that the name Farm Bill is a misnomer because so much of the funding doesn’t directly go to farms. However, nutrition program dollars are good for farmers, too. One example in New Mexico is the SNAP incentive program, Double Up Food Bucks, which is funded through the Farm Bill, as well as the state and other partners. This program, first implemented in 2015, allows individuals to double their SNAP dollars when they spend them on locally grown fruits and vegetables at farmers markets. In surveys conducted by the New Mexico Farmers Market Association (NMFMA), seventy-three percent of local farmers say they have seen an increase in produce sales because of the program and seventy-eight percent of shoppers say they are buying and eating more fruits and vegetables. According to Sarah Lucero of the NMFMA, “SNAP cuts would have a huge economic impact on New Mexico. Every SNAP dollar spent generates $1.70 in economic activity . . . and Double Up Food Bucks doubles any amount of SNAP dollars spent at participating locations on New Mexico grown fruits and 74

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veggies—which helps farmers grow their small businesses and keep that extra $1.70 in the local economy.” In addition to forty participating farmers markets, in 2017, nine grocery stores, nine farm stands, and several mobile markets and CSAs also accepted Double Up Bucks. This includes MOGRO, a mobile grocery service that brings fresh produce boxes to food insecure areas such as Socorro. In addition to “struggling families trying to make ends meet,” Aguilar says Representative Pearce’s support of the House bill “shows a complete disregard for the wellbeing of farmers in his district.” Although the House plan has many Americans worried, on June 28 the Senate passed its own version of the 2018 Farm Bill, 86-11, which leaves the 2014 Farm Bill SNAP requirements intact. Though few find their bill perfect, the Senate’s self-proclaimed “bipartisan bill” has received praise from national and New Mexico food security advocates, including the Native Farm Bill Coalition and the NMCLP. Maria Griego says, “The final version of the Senate Farm Bill strengthens SNAP and protects millions of Americans’ access to healthy food.” All of this has set the stage for a showdown between the House and Senate in the coming weeks. By the time this issue goes to print, the two bills may be reconciled—or it is possible congressional debates will carry on past the September 30 deadline, leaving plenty of time for edible readers to contact their local representatives. Griego says, “Instead of trying to cut SNAP, lawmakers should focus on bipartisan legislation that grows income and employment opportunities for all New Mexicans through policies that actually work. We urge Steve Pearce and other lawmakers to stop supporting such damaging legislation and, instead, to strengthen SNAP and ensure families across New Mexico can meet their basic needs.” www.nmpovertylaw.org, www.lasemillafoodcenter.org, www.farmersmarketsnm.org


Art, Culture, History and Beyond

Join The Circles Explorers, the Museum of New Mexico Foundation’s newest membership level, tailor-made for those with an adventurous spirit. We’re pioneering a new way to engage in the art, culture and history of our four state museums in Santa Fe and seven historic sites statewide.

Become a Circles Explorer today! For more information call Cara O’Brien, Director of The Circles, at 505.982.6366, ext. 118, email cara@museumfoundation.org or visit museumfoundation.org/explorers


EDIBLE NOTABLES DOC MARTIN'S NAMED ONE OF THE BEST WINE RESTAURANTS

Executive Chef Bill Hartig says, “I'm excited Wine Enthusiast heard about what we're doing. Taos is definitely off the beaten path, but I'm really proud of the food we're bringing to northern New Mexico. Our cellar is amazing. Our som makes unique pairings nightly. It's a really thoughtful process.” Call 575-758-1977 to make your reservation today! www.taosinn.com

SANTA FE MARGARITA TRAIL GOES MOBILE

“We are kind of a high-desert wine oasis. It's not a mirage, it's an amazingly curated international wine collection and we're really proud of it. Our sommelier, Peggy De'Scoville, has an amazing palette,” says Grace Lawrie, Doc Martin's marketing director. In her interview with Wine Enthusiast, De'Scoville says, “People don’t want to be separated from the food and wine they are consuming anymore. Guests have a desire to know not only how the dishes are prepared in the restaurant, but where the food is grown, where the grapes are grown, and the faces behind the product. In wine specifically, more and more consumers are turning away from factory-finished, homogeneous products. There is a growing interest in autochthonous varietals, indigenous yeast, and biodynamic farming practices. . . . Guests are more informed about the wine world than ever, and are looking for more than a familiar name or region.” 76

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Since inception in May 2016, more than 7,500 Santa Fe Margarita Trail passports have been sold, over 2,600 prizes awarded, and seventy-five margarita lovers have completed the entire trail, enjoying all thirty-one margaritas offered. www.SantaFe.org/Margarita_Trail

THE CITY DIFFERENT GETS READY TO RAISE THE ROOF WITH FIRST EVER SANTA FE MUSIC WEEK

In Wine Enthusiast’s “America's 100 Best Wine Restaurants 2018,” the impressive cast of restaurants includes Doc Martin’s of Taos. A staple of the Taos community and part of The Historic Taos Inn, some guests are surprised to learn about their world-class wine cellar. Doc's, as it's known locally, boasts an extensive wine list with more than four hundred labels, hailing from around the world with vintages as far back as 1989. Doc’s has been a winner of Wine Spectator's “Best Of ” category for over thirty consecutive years.

To redeem awards, participants must visit the Plaza Visitors Center at 66 E. San Francisco Street. Any of the three Santa Fe Visitor Centers can assist with questions about the new app or transfer existing stamps from a paper passport to the new app.

The Santa Fe Margarita Trail passport is now available as a mobile app, with all the benefits of the original printed passport converted into an interactive mobile experience. The app includes an interactive map, which provides directions to all locations on the trail. Like the original paper passport, the app provides descriptions of each location on the Margarita Trail, the recipe for each margarita, and a one-dollar discount on each margarita. The app also tracks the margarita enthusiast’s collection of virtual stamps and sends notifications on progress toward earning rewards, including the Margarita Trail t-shirt, a signed copy of The Great Margarita Book, and a margarita bartender kit.

Jazz, pop, mariachi, opera, country, classical, folk, Latin rock, and more will be drifting through the air during the first ever Santa Fe Music Week, August 24 through September 3. Attendees will experience live music from national headlining artists as well as local favorites in venues such as the Santa Fe Opera, The Lensic Performing Arts Center, the Santa Fe Plaza bandstand, the Santa Fe Railyard, and various restaurants and bars.

Two new award levels have been created for program participants who earn ten and fifteen stamps. Both grant membership to the exclusive “Margarita Society,” which allows access to events, seminars, and tastings. Once full membership is achieved, users receive Margarita Society benefits.

“Music is an important aspect of Santa Fe’s amazing cultural tradition and makes a real contribution to the quality of life in our community,” said Mayor Alan Webber. “I think a week-long music celebration for locals and visitors to enjoy is long overdue.”


EDIBLE NOTABLES Santa Fe Music Week will include appearances by Grammy-winning band, The Mavericks, and singer-songwriter Robert Earl Keen with Special Friends, both at the Santa Fe Opera; Tobias Rene at Fort Marcy Ballpark; and Bob Schneider, Austin’s sixtime Musician of the Year, at the Santa Fe Railyard Concert series. The week includes free mariachi performances weekday afternoons on the Plaza, and groups including Jimmy Gilmer & The Fireballs and Nosotros will take the stage on the Plaza nightly. Additional Music Week highlights include The Platinum Music Awards and a special music performance by the Aspen/ Santa Fe Ballet, both at The Lensic.

Mountains. Taos Ski Valley’s Summer Wine Festival-goers can look forward to a dine-around dinner, grand tasting, champagne brunch, chocolate tasting, mushroom hunting, hiking, fly-fishing, yoga, hot air balloon rides, live music, and some of best wine and food northern New Mexico has to offer.

Enjoy a Taste of History

“Santa Fe Music Week is the perfect showcase to experience Santa Fe’s yearlong foot thumping and hip swaying music scene, with ten days that show off the outstanding musicians and fabulous live music venues in our city,” said Randy Randall, TOURISM Santa Fe executive director. See full list of performers, dates, and ticket pricing information for Santa Fe Music Week at www.santafe.org/Santa_Fe_ Music_Week.

SECOND ANNUAL TAOS SUMMER WINE FESTIVAL

“Taos Ski Valley wants to show attendees what makes Taos special, which is our mountain activities, talented musicians, inspired and pace-making artists, locally sourced and hand-crafted food, and the amazing wines are just the icing on the cake,” says Cecilia Cuff, director of food and beverage at Taos Ski Valley. Lodging packages are available at The Blake, The Edelweiss, and The Snakedance. Stay and enjoy a relaxing three-day weekend. www.skitaos.com/event/summerwine18

Autumn at El Rancho de las Golondrinas Living History Museum spans the exotic to the local. September 15–16 Santa Fe Renaissance Fair Enjoy incredible performances and music, jousting knights, sword fights, Clan Tynker, arts and crafts vendors, and delicious food. October 6–7 Harvest Festival Celebrate the New Mexican Harvest and take part in traditional food preparation. String chiles into ristras, learn how to run the mill and make a tortilla, press apples into cider, and stomp grapes for wine.

Mark your calendar for the second annual Summer Wine Festival at Taos Ski Valley, August 17–19. partially funded by the city of santa fe arts commission and the 1% lodgers’ tax, county of santa fe lodgers’ tax, new mexico arts, and the santa fe new mexican

Late summer is the perfect time to escape to the crisp air of the Sangre de Cristo All photos courtesy of subjects.


SUMMER SPECIAL CABIN AND DINNER FOR TWO, $125

COME VISIT THE BEAUTIFUL EL MORRO VALLEY!

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edible Marketplace

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CHILE FESTIVAL

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Source Guide CATERERS

Talin Market

Organic and health-conscious Southeast Asian Fusion. Personal chef service for Northern New Mexico. Can accommodate dietary preferences. hellochefnathsf@gmail.com, chefnath.com

LODGING

Nath’s Inspired Khmer Cuisine

FOOD ARTISANS / RETAILER Barrio Brinery

88 Louisiana SE, Albuquerque, 505-268-0206, talinmarket.com

Enjoy Santa Fe’s most unique resort, with relaxing ambiance and luxurious amenities. 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, Santa Fe, 505-455-5555, buffalothunderresort.com

Casa Gallina

Cheesemongers of Santa Fe

1 mile east of El Morro National Monument in Ramah, 505-783-4612, elmorro-nm.com

Eldora Chocolate

Eldora crafts chocolate using natural, organic, and fair trade ingredients. 8114 Edith NE, Albuquerque, 505-433-4076, eldorachocolate.com

Heidi's Raspberry Farm

Sumptuous, organic raspberry jams available throughout New Mexico and online! 600 Andrews, Corrales, 505-898-1784, heidisraspberryfarm.com

La Montañita Coop

La Montañita Co-op is New Mexico's largest community-owned natural and organic food market. Locations in Albuquerque, Gallup, and Santa Fe, lamontanita.coop

PopFizz

Pop Fizz is a Mexican-style paleteria with an American soda fountain twist. Catering available, book online at pop-fizz.net

Santa Fe Olive Oil & Balsamic Company

Balsamic Company offers the finest quality extra virgin olive oils, balsamic vinegar, gourmet salts, and delicious specialty foods. 116 Don Gaspar, Santa Fe, 505-992-1601; 109 Carlisle SE Albuquerque, 505-266-6043; 103 East Plaza Taos, 575-758-4136; santafeoliveoil.com

Savory Spice Shop

Spice specialist with a variety of blends as well as extracts, sauces, and specialty foods. 225 Galisteo, Santa Fe, 505-819-5659, savoryspiceshop.com/santafe

Skarsgard Farms

Delivering fresh, local, and organically grown produce and natural groceries to doorsteps across New Mexico. 505-681-4060, skarsgardfarms.com

Santa Fe Inn & Eco-Retreat

Buffalo Thunder, Hilton Santa Fe

Bringing fine fermented foods to Santa Fe. We make our products by handcrafting small batches of flavorful goodness using only the finest ingredients.1413-B W Alameda, Santa Fe, 505-699-9812, barriobrinery.com Specializing in artisan cheese, charcuterie, and specialty foods from farm and field. 130 E Marcy, Santa Fe, 505-798-7878, cheesemongersofsantafe.com

Rancho Gallina

Discover the art of a slow vacation. 613 Callejon, Taos, 575-758-2306, casagallina.net

El Morro RV Park and Cabin Rental Inn of the Anasazi

Featuring 58 rooms which reflect a sophisticated modern aesthetic celebrating the hotel’s southwestern spirit. 113 Washington, Santa Fe, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels. com/en/inn-of-the-anasazi-santa-fe

Inn on the Alameda

Relax and refresh–-just two blocks from the historic Santa Fe plaza. 303 E Alameda, Santa Fe, 888-984-2121, innonthealameda.com

Best Kept Secret on the Turquoise Trail

Los Poblanos Historic Inn & Organic Farm

4803 Rio Grande NW, Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, 505-344-9297, lospoblanos.com

Rancho Gallina

Located 20 minutes south of town off the Turquoise Trail Scenic Byway, Rancho Gallina is the greenest place to stay in Santa Fe. 31 Bonanza Creek, 505-438-1871, ranchogallina.com

Sarabande B & B

Comfort, elegance, and simplicity exist in harmony to provide you a relaxing home away from home in Albuquerque. 5637 Rio Grande NW, Albuquerque, 505-348-5593, sarabandebnb.com

Local. Organic. Authentic. Retreats · Celebrations Bed & Breakfast

The Historic Taos Inn

125 Paseo Del Pueblo Norte, Taos, 575-758-2233, taosinn.com

NURSERIES & SERVICES deerBrooke

Irrigation and backflow prevention specialists. Repairs, installations, and consulting. 505-319-5730, NMLawnsprinklerexperts.com

Grow Y'Own

Year-round cedar raised beds with hoops and covers. 505-466-0393, raisedbed.biz

ranchogallina.com 505-438-1871 WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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Osuna Nursery

A family-owned and operated nursery, gardening center, and landscaping company. 501 Osuna NE, Albuquerque, 505345-6644, osunanursery.com

ORGANIZATIONS, EVENTS, & EDUCATION Bernalillo County Cooperative Extension Service

Food Preservation Classes, June–August. Get details and register at bernalilloextension.nmsu.edu

Bosque Chile Festival

Join in the celebration of the chile harvest on Saturday, August 18, 2018, at the National Hispanic Cultural Center. 1701 Fourth Street SW, Albuquerque, 505-468-1418, bernco.gov/bosquechilefestival

El Rancho De las Golondrinas

Living Spanish village includes a hacienda, village store, schoolhouse, and more. 334 Los Pinos, Santa Fe, 505-471-2261, golondrinas.org

New Mexico Wine

New Mexico Wine promotes local grape growing and winemaking industries. winecountrynm.com

Santa Fe Wine & Chile

Refer to website for event details and locations. September 23–30, Santa Fe, 505-438-8060, santafewineandchile.org

Taos Ski Valley

715 Camino Lejo, Santa Fe, NM, 505-471-9103 santafebotanicalgarden.org

Sparky’s

We are an automotive shop specializing in Subaru maintenance and repair. 3216 Los Arboles NE, Albuquerque, 505-750-3740, sparkysabq.com

2nd Annual Summer Wine Festival at Taos Ski Valley, August 17–19! Wine tastings, food, hiking, live music, and more will fill your weekend in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains! skitaos.com

RETAILERS

OTHER SERVICES

4022 Rio Grande NW, Albuquerque, 505-344-1253, sarabandehome.com

Garcia Auto Group

8449 Lomas NE, Albuquerque, garciacars.com

Keller Williams Realty, Bunny Terry

Next Best Thing to Being There 1315 Mountain NW, Albuquerque, beingthereabq.com

Sarabande Home

The Golden Eye Jewelry

115 Don Gaspar, Santa Fe, 505-984-0040, goldeneyesantafe.com

A different kind of realtor in the city different. 505-504-1101, ilovesantafehomes.com

WINE STORES

Kure

218 Camino La Tierra, Santa Fe, 505-983-2100, arroyovino.com

New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs

505-827-6364, newmexicoculture.org

We pride ourselves on providing a unique, friendly, and welcoming environment. 220 North Guadalupe Street, 505-930-5339, kureforlife.com

New Mexico Museum Foundation

Los Alamos National Bank

116 Lincoln, Santa Fe, 505-982-6366 ext.100, museumfoundation.org

Santa Fe Botanical Gardens

Los Alamos, Santa Fe, Albuquerque, lanb.com

Arroyo Vino Parcht  

103 East Plaza, Taos, 575-758-1994, parcht.com

Susan's Fine Wine and Spirits  

Offering the selection you desire, and the service you deserve. 1005 S St. Francis, Santa Fe, 505-984-1582, sfwineandspirits.com

Eat & Drink Local Guide ALBUQUERQUE Ajiaco Colombian Bistro

Ajiaco’s varied Colombian cuisine is influenced by the diverse flora and fauna found around Colombia. 3216 Silver SE, 505-2662305, ajiacobistro.com

Artichoke Café

Fresh, local, seasonal ingredients, classic French techniques, extensive wine list, private dining, catering, and great atmosphere. 424 Central SE, 505-243-0200, artichokecafe.com

Campo at Los Poblanos Historic Inn & Organic Farm

Rio Grande Valley cuisine rooted in seasonal organic ingredients from our own farm. 4803 Rio Grande NW, 505-344-9297, lospoblanos.com

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edible Santa Fe | LATE SUMMER 2018

Cutbow Coffee

Roastery, tasting room, coffee bar. The culmination of more than 25 years experience by one of the nation's most accomplished artisan coffee roasters, Paul Gallegos. 1208 Rio Grande, 505-355-5563, cutbowcoffee.com

Farina

Starting with the finest organic flour, our pizza crusts are made by hand and topped with the freshest ingredients, including artisan cured meats. 510 Central SE, 505243-0130, farinapizzeria.com

Farina Alto

Farina Alto offers fresh, creative fare. Gather over a glass of wine, a good story, and a phenomenal plate of food. 10721 Montgomery NE, 505-298-0035, farinaalto.com

Farm & Table

A wonderful dining experience! Enjoy delectable seasonal dishes created from scratch, sourced from local farmers and our beautiful on-site farm. 8917 Fourth Street NW, 505-503-7124, farmandtablenm.com

Five Star Burger

Fresh beef, free of hormones and antibiotics. A wide selection of sandwiches, entrées, salads, a kids menu, beer, and wine. Happy hour 4–6pm every day. 1710 Central SW; 5901 Wyoming NE, 505-821-1909, www.5starburgers.com

Flying Star

Fine cuisine in a coffee shop scene. Six locations in Albuquerque, flyingstarcafe.com


EATGRASSBURGER.COM

Grassburger

The feel-good, award-winning burger— 100% grassfed beef, vegan, or poultry! 11225 Montgomery, 505-200-0571, eatgrassburger.com

Humble Coffee

Extraordinary coffee. Friendly service. A thoughtfully designed, relaxed space. A craft coffee shop specializing in singleorigin espresso and brews. 505 Central SE and 4200 Lomas, humblecoffeeco.com

Il Vicino

Serving authentic wood oven pizza. Multiple locations in Albuquerque and Santa Fe, ilvicino.com

Kosmos Restaurant

Great food, great beer, great vibe! 1715 Fifth Street NW, factoryon5.com

Level 5 - Rooftop Restaurant & Lounge

Located on the top floor of Hotel Chaco— experience a refined, chic, and contemporary atmosphere. 2000 Bellamah NW, 505-246-9989, hotelchaco.com

Salt and Board

Salt and Board, a charcuterie-based cork and tap room in the heart of the Brick Light District. We specialize in cured meat and cheese boards, gourmet toasts, pressed sandwiches, and salads. 115 Harvard SE, 505-219-2001, saltandboard.com

Savoy Bar & Grill

California wine country in the Northeast Heights. Farm-to-table dining and a casual patio. 10601 Montgomery NE, 505-294-9463, savoyabq.com

Seasons Rotisserie & Grill

Oak-fired grill, local and seasonal ingredients, and the best patio dining in Old Town. 2031 Mountain NW, 505-766-5100, seasonsabq.com

Still Spirits

Still Spirits is a distillery and cocktail bar in downtown Albuquerque. 120 Marble Ave NW, 505-750-3138, facebook.com/stillspiritsabq

The Acre

The Acre is a farm-to-table restaurant offering fresh, local, seasonal, organic vegetarian food that will delight even the most

devoted carnivores. 4410 Wyoming NE, Albuquerque, 505-366-3878, theacrerestaurant.com

The Cellar

Featuring a large variety of Spanish style authentic tapas and a large selection of local beers, wines, and sangria. 1025 Lomas NW, Albuquerque, 505-242-3117, thecellartapas.com

The Grove Cafe & Market

The Grove features a bustling café experience serving breakfast, brunch, and lunch. 600 Central SE, 505-248-9800, thegrovecafemarket.com

The Shop Breakfast & Lunch

Come in for breakfast or lunch, creative American classics with Latin and creole influences, made from local and organic ingredients. 2933 Monte Vista NE, 505-433-2795, theshopbreakfastandlunch.com

505 Central Ave NW | 4200 Lomas Blvd NE

Albuquerque • @humblecoffee

Trifecta Coffee Company

We roast coffee and brew it in unique ways utilizing some of the best methods available. All of our baked goods, sweet and savory, are made in house. 413 Montano NE, 505-803-7579, trifectacoffeecompany.com

Zacatecas

Zacatecas, a real taquería, features recipes handed down from generation to generation with flavors that are true to the history and culture of Mexico. 3423 Central NE, 505-255-8226, zacatecastacos.com

Zinc Restaurant & Wine Bar

A three-level bistro featuring contemporary cuisine and late night bar bites. 3009 Central NE, 505-254-9462, zincabq.com

SANTA FE

Anasazi Restaurant & Bar

Contemporary American Cuisine inspired by locally sourced seasonal ingredients. 113 Washington, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels.com/en/inn-of-the-anasazi-santa-fe

Arable

Inspired by the bounty of New Mexico, and the small community of Eldorado, Arable was born. 7 Avenida Vista Grande, Santa Fe, 505-303-3816, arablesantafe.com

colombian bistro

now open

tuesday-saturday 11am-8pm

3216 Silver SE, Albuquerque 505-266-2305, www.ajiacobistro.com Ajiaco’s varied Colombian cuisine is influenced by a diverse flora and fauna found around Colombia. Cultural traditions of different Colombian ethnic groups play a role in our choice of ingredients. WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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Arroyo Vino

Arroyo Vino, voted a top 100 restaurant in America by OpenTable reviewers, serves progressive American fare inspired by our on-premise garden and local purveyors. 218 Camino La Tierra, 505-983-2100, arroyovino.com

Coyote Cafe & Rooftop Cantina

Elegant eatery featuring local cuisine with Southwestern flair, cocktails, and a rooftop bar. 132 W Water, 505-983-1615, coyotecafe.com

Dinner for Two

Elegant bistro known for tableside preparations, plus a menu of locally sourced fare, and global wines. 106 N Guadalupe, 505-820-2075, dinnerfortwonm.com

Dolina

We serve modern American brunch with Eastern European influences. Open 7 days a week. 402 N Guadalupe, 505-982-9394, dolinasantafe.com

Eloisa

Creative, elevated takes on traditional New Mexican fare plus tasting menus and craft cocktails. 228 E Palace, 505-982-0883, eloisasantafe.com

Joseph's Culinary Pub

Chef Wrede has a unique and uncompromising vision on traditional and contemporary cuisine, both regional and international. 428 Agua Fria, 505-982-1272, josephsofsantafe.com

La Plazuela at La Fonda on the Plaza

Authentic New Mexican cuisine, award-winning wine list, and impeccable service. 100 E San Francisco, 505-995-2334, lafondasantafe. com/la-plazuela

Loyal Hound

Locally sourced modern comfort food paired with craft beer, cider, and wine. 730 St. Michaels, 505-471-0440, loyalhoundpub.com

Milad Persian Bistro

Milad Bistro brings authentic middle eastern cuisine to the American Southwest. Traditional Persian dishes are counterbalanced by modern interpretations. 802 Canyon Road, 505-303-3581, miladbistro.com

Ohori's Coffee Roasters

The original source for locally roasted coffee beans, gifts, and gathering. 505 Cerrillos and 1098 St. Francis, 505-982-9692, 507 Old Santa Fe Trail, ohoriscoffee.com

Opuntia Tea, food, and botanical curiosities in Santa Fe's Baca Railyard. 922 Shoofly, opuntia.cafe

Paper Dosa Paper Dosa brings fresh, authentic homestyle South Indian dishes to your table. These bright and exciting flavors will leave you wanting more. 551 W Cordova, 505-930-5521, paper-dosa.com

Radish & Rye Farm-inspired cuisine: simple yet innovative food and drinks sourced locally whenever possible. We work closely with local farmers

and ranchers to build our menu. 548 Agua Fria, 505-930-5325, radishandrye.com

Red Sage Red Sage at Buffalo Thunder is perfect for your next romantic night out. Fare rotates seasonally. Enjoy the extensive wine list. 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 505-819-2056, buffalothunderresort.com

Santa Fe Brewing

The beer made with the spirit of the Southwest! Multiple locations in Santa Fe and Albuquerque, santafebrewing.com

Second Street Brewery

Over sixty handcrafted beers, food, music, and events. Three locations in Santa Fe. secondstreetbrewery.com

Summer on the patio! New menu items August 2018, featuring vegetarian friendly & lighter fare

Second St Brewery - Rufina Taproom, 2920 Rufina St, Santa Fe

Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen

Discover Sweetwater Dinner—Tuesday through Saturday. 1512 Pacheco, 505-795-7383, sweetwatersf.com

TerraCotta A smart, casual restaurant located in a charming one-hundred-year-old adobe. Seasonally changing, globally inspired cuisine and an extensive, value-priced wine list. 304 Johnson, 505-989-1166, terracottawinebistro.com

The Compound Restaurant Chef Mark Kiffin preserves a landmark tradition of elegant food and service at his Canyon Road institution. 653 Canyon Road, 505-982-4353, compoundrestaurant.com

TAOS Doc Martin’s 30+ year Wine Spectator Award Winner. Patio dining, fresh local foods, and live entertainment. 125 Paseo Del Pueblo Norte, 575-758-1977, taosinn.com

Five Star Burger

Fresh beef, free of hormones and antibiotics. A wide selection of sandwiches, entrées, salads, a kids menu, beer, and wine. Happy hour 4–6pm every day. 1032 Paseo Del Pueblo Sur, 5starburgers.com

Parcht /pärCHt/= the physical condition resulting from the need to drink wine, eat good food, and shop…in Taos. 103 E Plaza, 575-758-1994, parcht.com

Taos Diner I & II Home to New Mexican and American homemade, homegrown, and organic breakfast, lunch, and dinners. Gluten-free choices. Beer and wine. 908 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, 575-758-2374; 216 B Paseo del Pueblo Sur, 575-751-1989, taosdinner.com

The Gorge: Bar and Grill

Our menu is straightforward, yet eclectic, and chock-full of favorites made from scratch using as many fresh and local ingredients as possible. 103 E Plaza, 575-758-8866, thegorgebarandgrill.com

South Indian cuisine WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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edible

edible BLUE RIDGE

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No. 27 Spring 2013

Austin

®

Celebrating Central Texas food culture, season by season

Number 31 Summer 2016

summer pickles

The

WELLNESS W

plus:

Issue

edible

so goooood!

foraging in the Valley

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ISSUE 6 | Spring 2018

Celebrating the food culture of Central Virginia

Barboursville’s wondrous garden

easy, seasonal recipes

edible Columbus

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PRICELESS

Complimentary

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Celebrating local, fresh foods in Dallas, Fort Worth and North Texas—Season by Season

No. 23 Fall 2014

®

TELLING THE STORY OF HOW THE LOWCOUNTRY EATS & DRINKS

CAPITAL DISTRICT

Issue No. 15

Celebrating Local Foods, Season by Season

Fall 2013

Eat. Drink. Read. Think.

Petal Pusher

Fall Comfort Food

Raise the Roof

Southern Born and Bred

Support Local Community, Food & Drink

OBERLIN • GRANARIES OF MEMORY • INTEGRATION ACRES • STONEFIELD NATURALS SCHMALTZ • THE APPLE • WILLOW BASKETS • OHIO’S HISTORIC BARNS

Cheers, Honey!

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The FruiTs OF The Fall harvesT

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edible GREEN MOUNTAINS

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NO.1 SPRING 2018

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No. 12 2015

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green mountains celebrating vermont’s local food culture through the seasons

N O. 37 • S P R I N G 2018

HUDSON VA L L E Y

Celebrating the Bounty of the Hudson Valley

denver • boulder • ft.collins EAT. DRINK. THINK. LOCAL.

The Liquid Assets Issue

THE LIQUID ASSETS ISSUE

THE

lamb

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ISSUE

ISSUE

WINTER 2015

NEVERSINK SPIRITS • SYLVIA WOODSTOCK FISHING THE ESOPUS • CUKES & SQUASH • LOCAL GINGER

No. 12

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Issue 34

MARIN & Summer 2017 WINE COUNTRY

Celebrating the harvest of Marin, Napa and Sonoma counties, season by season

EDIBLE FLOW ERS • OYSTERS • FA R MERS M A R K ETS

Local Scoop Shops Sonoma County’s Brand Power Wild Huckleberries No. 1 | SPRING 2018

Cowgirl Creamery Sells

No. 1 | SPRING 2018

EDIBLE FLOWERS • OYSTERS • FARMERS MARKETS

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Explore a world of local food through the magazines and websites of Edible Communities. We’ll introduce you to the chefs, farmers, brewers, home cooks and others who inspire and sustain local flavors across the US and Canada. Learn more at ediblecommunities.com

Issue #33 | Summer 2017

Celebrating the Local Food Community of Fairfield, Litchfield, and New Haven Counties

MARKET DAY AT BARBERRY HILL FARM • YUMI ECO SOLUTIONS SUMMER RECIPES • HOW CONNECTICUT RAISED THE MODERN CHICKEN

N O. 18 S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 017

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FALL 2014

A LOCAVORE THANKSGIVING HOTEL DINING: AN INSIDER’S GUIDE

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THE WEIRD AND WONDERFUL ISSUE faux cheese ∙ food on the fringe ∙ the odd bits NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION • KINGSTON • PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY • EASTERN ONTARIO

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CELEBRATING THE ABUNDANCE OF LOCAL FOOD IN AMERICA’S FARM-TO-FORK CAPITAL

Celebrating the Bounty of Rhode Island, Season by Season

CHEF MATT MASERA

Good food. Good drink. Good read. • No. 42 • July-August 2017

THE WORLD’S NEWEST VEGETABLE

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ISSUE 47 MARCH / APRIL 2017

695880 - Cover Toronto

LUCKY DOG RANCH

State Bird 695880 - Cover Toronto

COOKS CSA Cooking with Chef Felmley Farmer Sandra Broussard Cooks Fresh Fisherman Dan Major and Local Box Crab Young Baker Gets Creative with Cupcakes Exploring Imperial Beach

FRESH START MARCH / APRIL 2017

ISSUE 21 • SPRING 2014

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

5

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The Art of Small Farming Tending Henry The Perfect Salad

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N O. 39 JA N UA RY/ F E B R UA RY 2 018

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24 HARVEST 2014

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N O. 2 S P R I N G 2018

WESTCHESTER

Stay up to the minute on all things Edible.

Everything Delicious, from the Hudson to the Sound

E A T. D R I N K . R E A D . T H I N K . ISSUE THIRTY TWO • AUTUMN 2013

HOMEMADE STOCK • GARLIC • HOT COCKTAILS • SEEDS

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But our dumpling policy, apparent in the variety of dough-bundled treats found in the GTA, is a slam dunk!

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edible Santa Fe | LATE SUMMER 2018

the drinks issue Member of Edible Communities

urban rabbit apple detectives spirits of the wild

GREATER TORONTO • THE GOLDEN HORSESHOE • NIAGARA • PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY • SOUTHWESTERN ONTARIO edibletoronto.com

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No. 24, Harvest 2014 A MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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GREATER NEW MEXICO Ancient Way Cafe

A unique outpost offering great meals from scratch and fresh baked goods. Located 1 mile east of El Morro National Monument in Ramah, 505-783-4612, elmorro-nm.com

Black Bird Saloon

Indulge yourself in the grub, Wild West style, perhaps a juicy and flavorful El Chivato Burger or a Black Jack Ketchum. Offerings here are genuine, simple, and good. 28 Main Street, Los Cerrillos, 505-438-1821, blackbirdsaloon.com

Blades’ Bistro

Chef and owner Kevin Bladergroen brings together fine and fresh ingredients, artistic vision, and European flair in every dish. Sunday brunch, fabulous cocktails, and an awardwinning wine list. 221 Highway 165, Placitas, 505-771-0695, bladesbistro.com

Greenhouse Bistro

Good food always puts you in a good mood!

Fresh, seasonal ingredients provide the basis for a meal that promotes healthy living. 5 Thomas, Los Lunas, 505-866-1936, greenhousebistro.com

Pajarito Brewpub & Grill

Open for lunch Tuesday–Sunday. Open for dinner every day. Happy hour Tuesday– Sunday 2–5pm. 30 craft beers on tap. 614 Trinity, Los Alamos, 505-662-8877, pajaritobrewpubandgrill.com

Pig + Fig

Whether you're strictly vegan or strictly meat and potatoes, our goal is to create comfort food for everyone using high quality, ethically sourced, seasonal ingredients. 11 Sherwood Blvd, White Rock, 505-672-2742, pigandfigcafe.com

PRICELESS

GREEN BAY, FOX VALLEY & LAKESHORE

more than one edible

Rhubarb! A SURE SIGN OF SPRING

www.EDIBLENUTMEG.com

late summer/early fall 2012

45

GREEN BAY'S EVER-CHANGING GARDEN IF KIDS MAKE IT, THEY'LL EAT IT!

SPRING 2017 Issue No. 16

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artisans, recipes & ideas from 80+ regions

2 for $45 / 3 for $60

ISSUE 47 MARCH / APRIL 2017

easy, seasonal recipes

LUCKY DOG RANCH

Winter 2012-13 · Celebrating Local Food, Farms, and Community in the Nutmeg State · Number 24

Barboursville’s wondrous garden

THE WORLD’S NEWEST VEGETABLE

sogoooood!

CELEBRATING THE ABUNDANCE OF LOCAL FOOD IN AMERICA’S FARM-TO-FORK CAPITAL

CHEF MATT MASERA

edible Nutmeg® Member of Edible Communities

Celebrating the food culture of Central Virginia

edible sacramento™

read plus:

Chef and owner Kevin Bladergroen brings together fine and fresh ingredients, artistic vision, and European flair in every dish. Sunday brunch, fabulous cocktails, and an award-winning wine list.

Famous for its signature dishes of spicy guacamole, hand-rolled tamales, blue corn enchiladas, carne adovada, and chile rellenos. 300 Santa Fe County Road 98, Chimayo, 505-351-4444, ranchodechimayo.com

FREE

foraging in the Valley

221 Highway 165, Placitas 505-771-0695, www.bladesbistro.com

Rancho de Chimayó

edible BLUE RIDGE Number 31 Summer 2016

Creative Casual Cuisine

FRESH START MARCH / APRIL 2017

Genuine Food & Drink Enchanting, Dusty... Wild West Style 28 MAIN STREET LOS CERRILLOS 505.438.1821 Thursday - Sunday blackbirdsaloon.com

TAOS DINER I & II

908 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, 575-758-2374 216 B Paseo del Pueblo Sur, 575-751-1989 www.taosdinner.com

edible sacramento™

ediblesubscriptions.com CELEBRATING THE ABUNDANCE OF LOCAL FOOD IN AMERICA’S FARM-TO-FORK CAPITAL

CHEF MATT MASERA

Home to New Mexican and American homemade, homegrown, and organic breakfast, lunch, and dinners. Gluten-free choices. Beer and wine.

THE WORLD’S NEWEST VEGETABLE

WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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LAST BITE

SANDIA Y PEPINO MARGARITA Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi Anasazi Restaurant, Bar and Lounge The Sandia y Pepino Margarita is one of the many cocktails you will find along the Santa Fe Margarita Trail. This margarita is a perfect complement to a hot summer’s day. 1 1/2 ounces El Jimador Tequila Silver 1/4 ounces Cointreau 3/4 ounces fresh watermelon juice 1/4 ounces fresh cucumber juice Tajin lime salt blend Sliced cucumber for garnish Line the rim of the glass with the Tajin lime salt blend. Combine ingredients and shake with ice. Strain and pour over ice. Garnish with a cucumber slice.

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edible Santa Fe | LATE SUMMER 2018


Enjoy tastes as unique as the city that serves them on the Margarita Trail

Taste your way along the Margarita Trail, featuring more than 30 specialty-crafted margaritas. Get the paper Passport or download the new App to ďŹ nd the latest restaurants that have joined the trail. Bottoms-up! Learn more at santafe.org/margaritatrail


✷ THE DESTINATION FOR THE BEST IN FOOD & WINE W E E K LY W I N E S E M I N A R S WINE DINNERS & MORE

ARROYOVINO.COM 505.983.2100 6 Y E A R S I N S A N TA F E

Late Summer 2018: Democracy  

Throughout this issue, we offer a wide-ranging portrait of our state’s political landscape through the lens of food and agriculture. We expl...

Late Summer 2018: Democracy  

Throughout this issue, we offer a wide-ranging portrait of our state’s political landscape through the lens of food and agriculture. We expl...