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edible

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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SANTA FE · ALBUQUERQUE · TAOS THE STORY OF LOCAL FOOD, SEASON BY SEASON IN NEW MEXICO

MIGRATIONS ISSUE 58 · FALL

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2018


photo: doug merriam

radi sh an dr ye .c o m 5 05 .9 3 0.5 3 25

photo: stephanie cameron

FA RM IN SPI RED CUISIN E


MIGRATIONS: OCTOBER / NOVEMBER DEPARTMENTS 2

GRIST FOR THE MILL By Willy Carleton and Candolin Cook

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CONTRIBUTORS

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LOCAL HEROES

52 EDIBLE NOTABLES Farm to School

54 FACES OF FOOD Common Ground by Zoey Fink Seriously Smoking by Nora Hickey

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AT THE CHEF'S TABLE

78 SOURCE GUIDE / EAT LOCAL GUIDE

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FERMENTI'S PARADOX

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BEHIND THE BOTTLE Cider is Wine

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THE PLATE Seafood in Santa Fe by Michael Dax

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BACK OF HOUSE

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COOKING FRESH

More Than a Meal by Candolin Cook Fusion by Stephanie Cameron

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FORAGED Dock: An Immigration Success Story by Ellen Zachos

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SANTA FE · ALBUQUERQUE · TAOS

70 EDIBLE TRADITION 77 #EDIBLENM

Santa Fe, The Next Generation by Candolin Cook

edible

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

THE STORY OF LOCAL FOOD, SEASON BY SEASON IN NEW MEXICO

Gruet Winery, Radish & Rye, Schwebach Farm, and El Chile Toreado Buen Provecho by Cheyanna Bea

ON THE COVER

84 EDIBLE CRAFT COCKTAIL Farolito by Quinn Stephenson

FEATURES 56 A FARM, A RANCH, A REFUGE

MIGRATIONS ISSUE 58 · FALL

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2018

Bok Choy. Photo by Stephanie Cameron.

Human Spaces for Wild Migrations by Briana Olson

62 BREAKING THE ICE A Conversation with a Local Chef on Recent Immigration Raids By Willy Carleton

66 THE FREEDOM BEHIND THE PHO New Mexico's Vietnamese Legacy by Jason Strykowski

74 A CHILE-LICIOUS EVENT Green Chile Cheeseburger Smackdown WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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GRIST FOR THE MILL PUBLISHERS Bite Size Media, LLC

New Mexico has long been a culinary crossroads. The flows of people, plants, and animals into and out of the region date back many centuries, from Chacoan trade routes to the Camino Real, from the Santa Fe Trail to old Route 66. This dynamic history has enriched the cuisines of our state, which continue to evolve with the influences of new ingredients, new ideas, and new generations. In this issue of edible, we look at the many migrations that shape our food. We examine how Vietnamese immigrants, one of the largest diaspora populations in the United States, have created a thriving restaurant scene in Albuquerque featuring the flavors of Southeast Asia. We speak with refugees from the Democratic Republic of Congo who are connecting with their new land by bringing forth riches in an Albuquerque garden. From a multigenerational barbecue business built on tenets of Southern cuisine to chefs from Costa Rica and Mexico bringing their signature flavors to New Mexico diners, we see how food acts as a bridge between cultures and palates. We also look at how the migrations of animals, such as the greater sandhill crane, connect to the agricultural spaces that we rely on for a strong local food economy. Our wide-angle approach to migrations also takes in a fish jerky start-up in Santa Fe that aims to bring an often overlooked denizen of the sea to the high desert. Finally, we talk to a local chef about the perils that current immigration policies represent for local restaurants and many of the workers that undergird their success. We sometimes equate, or conflate, local food with that which is native to New Mexico. However, celebrating local food and local food producers also means recognizing that many of our favorite dishes are the unique, local synthesis of styles and ingredients from around the world. Throughout these pages, we celebrate the talents, labor, and tenacity of populations relatively recently rooted in New Mexico to reaffirm that our state is more delicious through its diversity.

Stephanie and Walt Cameron

EDITORS Willy Carleton and Candolin Cook

COPY EDITORS Margaret Marti and Briana Olson

DESIGN AND LAYOUT Stephanie Cameron

PHOTO EDITOR Stephanie Cameron

EVENT COORDINATORS Natalie Donnelly and Gina Riccobono

DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER Joshua Hinte

VIDEO PRODUCER Walt Cameron

SALES AND MARKETING Kate Collins, Melinda Esquibel, and Gina Riccobono

CONTACT US Mailing Address: 3301-R Coors Boulevard NW #152 Albuquerque, NM 87120 info@ediblesantafe.com www.ediblesantafe.com Phone: 505-375-1329

SUBSCRIBE ∙ BUY AN AD ∙ LETTERS 505-375-1329

Willy Carleton and Candolin Cook, Editors

WWW.EDIBLENM.COM We welcome your letters. Write to us at the address above, or email us at INFO@EDIBLESANTAFE.COM

Stephanie and Walt Cameron, Publishers

Bite Size Media, LLC publishes edible Santa Fe six times a year. We distribute throughout central and northern New Mexico and nationally by subscription. Subscriptions are $32 annually. Printed at Courier Graphics Corporation Phoenix, Arizona No part of this publication may be used with-

Winner of James Beard Foundation Award 2011 Publication of the Year

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out the written permission of the publisher. © 2018 All rights reserved.


FOOD. FARM. FESTIVAL.

PASSION IN FOOD FOOD. Coffeehouse, farm-to-table restaurant, caterering, market.

FARM. Vegetables, herbs, meat and poultry, fruit, and flowers.

FESTIVAL. Event venue up to 200 guests with our farm as the backdrop.

LOS LUNAS ∙ FACEBOOK.COM/EUROPACAFEANDMARKET


CONTRIBUTORS CHEYANNA BEA Cheyanna Bea was born and raised in central Iowa. She attended Iowa State University and graduated with a bachelor's degree in English. Her work has appeared in several publications and she is currently writing a novel for young adults. Bea moved to New Mexico after being diagnosed with melanoma, and she became a natural therapeutics specialist at the New Mexico School of Natural Therapeutics in 2015. STEPHANIE CAMERON Stephanie Cameron was raised in Albuquerque and earned a degree in fine arts at the University of New Mexico. After photographing, testing, and designing a cookbook in 2011, she and her husband Walt began pursuing Edible Communities and they found edible Santa Fe in their backyard. Today, Cameron is the art director, head photographer, marketing guru, publisher, and owner of edible Santa Fe. WILLY CARLETON Willy Carleton is editor of edible Santa Fe. He recently completed his PhD in history at the University of New Mexico, with a dissertation examining the cultural history of twentieth-century agriculture in the Southwest. He owns and manages Leafwater Farm, a small vegetable farm in Medanales. CANDOLIN COOK Candolin Cook is a history doctoral candidate at the University of New Mexico, an associate editor for the New Mexico Historical Review, and editor of edible Santa Fe. On Saturdays, you can find her selling Vida Verde Farm produce at Albuquerque's Downtown Growers' Market. Follow her farm life on Instagram @vidaverdefarmabq and @candolin

NORA HICKEY Nora Hickey is a writer and teacher living in Albuquerque. Her work has appeared in Narrative, Guernica, DIAGRAM, and other journals. She podcasts with City on the Edge and teaches at the University of New Mexico. BRIANA OLSON Briana Olson teaches English at CNM, copyedits for edible Santa Fe, and is lead editor for The New Farmer’s Almanac, a miscellany of writings and art by farmers, ecologists, and other land-loving types. Her writing has appeared in Salt Hill and Pindeldyboz, among other places. She enjoys long mountain walks, taking risks in the kitchen, and seeking out new and interesting things to eat, from Bangkok to Albuquerque. JASON STRYKOWSKI Jason Strykowski is a freelance writer based in New Mexico.

ELLEN ZACHOS Ellen Zachos is the author of seven books, including The Wildcrafted Cocktail and Backyard Foraging: 65 Familiar Plants You Didn’t Know You Could Eat. She also works with RemyUSA, teaching foraged mixology workshops across the US for The Botanist gin. Zachos shares recipes and tips about foraging at www.backyardforager.com.

MICHAEL J. DAX Michael J. Dax lives in Santa Fe and writes about environment and culture in the American West. He is the author of Grizzly West: A Failed Attempt to Reintroduce Grizzly Bears in the Mountain West (2015). ZOEY FINK Zoey Fink is a native New Mexican with a passion for local food systems and the communities that support them. She is program coordinator for Tres Hermanas Farm and sits on the Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust board, as well as the board of the Agrarian Trust. In her free time, you’ll find her running along acequia banks, pickling produce with her partner Carlos, and working on Cecilia's Organic Harvest in Polvadera. 4

edible Santa Fe | FALL 2018

NOMINATIONS OPEN OCTOBER 15 EDIBLENM.COM


join us! Saturday November 17th and Saturday December 15th

GARRISON PROGRAM HOLIDAY EDITION FORT STANTON HISTORIC SITE Create historic holiday crafts and interact with living historians to discover what life was like at a frontier fort during the holiday season.

Saturday, December 8th • 5–9 pm

LIGHT AMONG THE RUINS JEMEZ HISTORIC SITE Hundreds of farolitos, music, dances, bonfires, and an arts and crafts fair.

Saturday, December 15th • 6–9 pm

LAS NOCHES DE LAS LUMINARIAS FORT SELDEN HISTORIC SITE Lighting of over 800 luminarias, holiday music, a cozy campfire, refreshments, and fun for the whole family.

Sunday, December 16th • 1–4 pm

NACIMIENTO OPEN HOUSE TAYLOR-MESILLA HISTORIC PROPERTY More than 175 nacimientos (nativity scenes) on display in the Taylor family home on the Old Mesilla Plaza. Admission $5.

Monday, December 24th

LUMINARIAS IN LINCOLN LINCOLN HISTORIC SITE Luminarias, Santa arrives on a longhorn steer, and hot chocolate.

Saturday, December 29th • 4:30–7 pm

CHRISTMAS AT THE BOSQUE FORT SUMNER HISTORIC SITE/ BOSQUE REDONDO MEMORIAL Listen to history unfold with December Letters from the Reservation, including supper and refreshments.

NMHistoricSites.org


LOCAL HEROES An edible Local Hero is an exceptional individual or organization working to create innovative, vibrant, and resilient local food systems in New Mexico. Last fall, edible readers nominated and voted for their favorite food artisans, growers, and advocates in nearly two dozen categories—including six new awards. Each issue of edible will contain interviews with several of the winners, spotlighting the important and exciting work they do. It is imperative to the local food movement that we come together as a community to support each other, our local economy, and our environment. Please join us in thanking these local heroes for being at the forefront of that effort.

GRUET Winery AN INTERVIEW WITH LAURENT GRUET, WINEMAKER BEST WINERY Photo by Stephanie Cameron

Laurent Gruet and his nephew Sofian Himeur.

In his youth, Laurent followed his father Gilbert Gruet into winemaking at Gruet et Fils Winery in Bethon, France. He was mentored primarily by his father, with supplemental studies at LycĂŠe Viticole de la Champagne in Avize, France. Following his father to the United States 6

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in pursuit of expansion and affordable vineyards, Laurent and his sister Nathalie moved to New Mexico in 1984. The two (of four) siblings endeavored on the American enterprise, Gruet Winery. The first official wine release from the Albuquerque-based winery was in 1989.


WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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What is your backstory, and what was the moment that brought you to your current work? For me, winemaking is practically genetic. My earliest memories of wine were of being alongside my father in Bethon, France. As a boy, you’d find me cleaning tanks, pumping wines, and helping on the bottling line. At age seven, I was allowed to taste wine. I worked harvests like everyone else and made my first champagne in 1981, a Blanc de Blancs at Gruet et Fils. Between learning from my father, taking some coursework, and learning from our friend Clement Novack at the winery, I feel lucky to have received a practical education, learning by doing. A lot of French vintners were staking their claim in America through the 1970s and early 1980s. My father was intrigued. He considered land in other states, but ultimately saw potential in New Mexico. My sister Nathalie and I stayed in 1984, and my father basically helped us set things up, but the rest was up to my sister and me. He and my mom went right back to France. There was a steep learning curve. While New Mexico soil does work for vinifera grapes, the weather was much more extreme than in France; here we have higher elevation, hotter summers, some winter freezes, and at times, whipping winds. We have learned what works. We persevered, and with some massive orders from New York and California in 1989, we were on the map and never looked back. In 2011, Wine Spectator named our Gruet NV Blanc de Noirs a Top 100 wine of the world, nearly unprecedented for a sparkling wine under twenty dollars. We continue to delight wine drinkers all over the world. I love seeing the surprise on people’s faces when they learn this wine is made in New Mexico, not Champagne. How has winemaking and wine in New Mexico changed since you started Gruet in 1984? There is more growth in the number of wineries and the wine, though mostly still, has taken its taste profiles more toward dry than it did in the late 1980s and 1990s. Through advocacy organizations, such as New Mexico Wine, there is also unity and a commitment to excellence. The organization hosts experts and people to run lab testing or peer-topeer review, if needed. Last year, many wineries with New Mexico Wine held a media tour for national wine writers, who were surprised to see how vibrant the state’s industry has become. How is your approach different than other winemakers in New Mexico? Definitely being a Champagne method winery in this state makes Gruet a standout. Making bubbles is a very different process than making still wine (and we make some still wine, too!), from the processing stages to the bottling line. Much of our winemaking equipment comes from France, and we still send samples of wine back to France for highly detailed lab analyses (we have used Dominique Leboeuf, a long-time friend of my father Gilbert Gruet, who does the lab analysis for top Champagne houses). Another big one: Harvest for us takes place at a totally different time here, much earlier than for still wineries’ grapes. Our growing season is from mid-April to the end of July, and during the day it’s one hundred 8

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degrees on average, but then we’re on about 4300 feet of elevation, so it gets down to thirty or forty degrees at night. This difference between daytime and nighttime temperatures is known as a diurnal shift, and it’s crucial for preserving the acidity in grapes, and results in a bright and lively wine. Big diurnal shifts slow the ripening process, so that grapes don’t have overshot sugar levels. For sparkling wine and Champagne, you don’t want high sugars in the grapes. Do you have a favorite Gruet wine and what meal do you like to pair it with? My favorite sparkling wine to make is the Gruet Grande Reserve, a Blanc de Blancs that is as true to Old World champagne as possible in America: rich, complex, and long-finishing. It is barrel-fermented like the old style, and some of the best Champagne houses still use this method today. The style reminds me of my childhood. On the palate, it has great refreshing zip and pairs beautifully with shellfish (grilled oysters, a shrimp salad, even steamed crab). The wine’s light citrus notes marry well with that “ocean breeze” quality of shellfish. Are there any new techniques or tools you are experimenting with, or would like to in the future? More recently, we have been playing with and making more zero dosage wines under a category called Sauvage. One is one hundred percent chardonnay and the other is a rosé. Sauvage is a mixture of wine and sugar added twice during the Champagne method process: first, to provide food for yeasts and induce fermentation in the bottle to make bubbles; then to top off the wine at a bottling, because it loses some liquid when it’s disgorged. Sugar in dosage doesn’t really make the wine sweet (it’s very difficult to actually taste the sugar when you are drinking the wine), but a zero dosage wine with no sugar makes for a beautifully clean and pure wine, puts the fruit forward, and offers a racy acidity. Is there anything else you would like edible readers to know? Yes! Two things: Gruet has a thriving partnership with the Pueblo of Santa Ana at Tamaya Vineyard to grow wine grapes, in addition to our own vineyard and other area sources. This started in 2014 as a means of economic development for the pueblo, and we grow chardonnay, pinot noir, and, eventually, pinot meunier. We are beginning to get a significant harvest from this thirty-acre vineyard and plan to expand. It’s a win-win that provides jobs and economic diversity for the pueblo, while supplying our winery with much-needed grapes. My right hand at the winery is my nephew and assistant winemaker Sofian Himeur (he is my sister Nathalie’s son). I draw great satisfaction in passing along winemaking knowledge from my late father, his grandfather, to him. Like me, Sofian basically grew up in the winery (only for him, it was this one in Albuquerque!) and for a long time he worked on the sales and marketing side. We were all very close to the late Gilbert, our patriarch, and the family legacy of winemaking has secured a third generation. 8400 Pan American NE, Albuquerque, 505-821-0055, gruetwinery.com


WELCOME faLl flavOrs. Los Poblanos is proud to offer several delectable dining experiences as we head into the warm afternoons and cooler evenings of the harvest season. Experience our Farmer Dinner featuring organic fall produce from the fields of Amyo Farms and Los Poblanos. This is a unique opportunity to hear from the farmers as they introduce ingredients and discuss local farming practices. Or, join us for a late fall meal created by Executive Chef Jonathan Perno and his team who have partnered with the Manzanares of Shepherd’s Lamb and developed a menu centered around the only certified-organic lamb in New Mexico. Tickets and additional information are available at lospoblanos.com/events-calendar. lospoblanos.com


LOCAL HEROES

Radish & Rye AN INTERVIEW WITH CHRIS ROMERO, BEVERAGE DIRECTOR; DRU RUEBUSH, EXECUTIVE CHEF/PARTNER; AND CAMILLE BREMER, MANAGING PARTNER BEST COCKTAIL PROGRAM Photos by Stephanie Cameron

Beverage director at Radish & Rye, Chris Romero.

Radish & Rye beverage director Chris Romero is a Santa Fe native with roots in northern New Mexico. While pursuing his degree at Eastern New Mexico University, he began bar-backing at a local watering hole and has been behind a bar ever since. In recent years, Romero has developed a deep knowledge of and passion for Prohibition-era and craft cocktails. Romero says, “[Radish & Rye owners Camille Bremer and Dru Ruebush] have offered me a platform where I can showcase my abilities and have the tools I need to run a successful bar program. It’s been the most professional and rewarding restaurant experience of my life.”

Bremer: Here at Radish & Rye, our mission is to share our love for food and drink through our “farm-inspired cuisine.” Farm-inspired cuisine is our way of describing quality food and drinks that change with the seasons, with an emphasis on fresh, local ingredients. By using seasonal ingredients grown by local farmers and ranchers, we pride ourselves in supporting local agriculture. We are now part of a national movement that encourages consumers and businesses to minimize food travels as much as possible. Our bar program also echoes our desire to stay as close to home as possible, and nothing is more American than bourbon.

What is your concept for Radish & Rye?

What is a local food issue that is important to you? Why?

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edible Santa Fe | FALL 2018


FR EE EV EN T!

Trade fair

El Camino Real 2 0 18

Sunday, October 21 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Gutierrez-Hubbell House, 6029 Isleta Blvd. SW Experience life along El Camino Real: Weaving demonstrations • Living history re-enactments Educational sessions • Local artisans • Entertainment Children’s activities • Food trucks Horno baking • Blacksmith demonstrations

bernalillo county

Open

Space

El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro

Please visit, www.bernco.gov/ElCaminoRealTradeFair for more information.


LOCAL HEROES

Left: Seasonal shrub smash. Right: Romero mixing up cocktails.

Ruebush: Coming from a family of farmers, it's important to me that we support local agriculture as much as we can. I know how hard farmers work, and I want them to know they're appreciated. Nothing tastes like fresh food. Nothing. When you're able to source food that was in the ground that morning, or grill a pork chop that was butchered days before, the difference in flavor and taste is unmatched by anything else. Can you give us some tips for how to pair bourbon with food? Romero: Pairing bourbon and rye whiskeys depends on the profile of the spirit. For instance, barrel proof bourbons have a richer, bolder profile. More maple, more vanilla, more of what the oak imparts on the distillate, so it would pair well with red meat, ribeye, butcher steak—and especially with dessert. Now if we were going in the way of a low proof rye, the profile is grassy, with hints of honey, and a lighter body, so it plays well with fish, or even a rich red meat like lamb. What is your favorite cocktail at Radish & Rye? Romero: The Ole Gal is my favorite cocktail on our list right now. A riff on a classic, the Old Pal. It is equal parts Lillet Rose, Campari, four dashes of hopped grapefruit bitters, and an ounce and a half of Sazerac Rye. I typically like to find out our guests’ favorite flavor profiles, then pair a cocktail off of what they enjoy, not so much off the food menu. 12

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How is your cocktail program different than others in the state? Romero: Our cocktail program differs from the rest of the state because of our focus on whiskey. No one else is doing rye and bourbon cocktails and a complete American Whiskey back bar. Our focus is a huge draw for guests from all over the world. What do you love most about Southern food and drink? Ruebush: For me, it's the comfort of eating the same dishes that thousands of people have eaten before me. It's the freshness of eating farm food prepared in very simple ways. A lot of people think Southern means fried, and that's a very important aspect, for sure. But more than anything, it's about tradition and simplicity. When it comes to bourbon, I love the sustainability of the industry and the long-standing traditions that have been passed on by multiple generations. It's just so American. Is there anything else you would like to share with edible readers? Bremer: We just celebrated our third birthday at Radish & Rye and we want to thank our amazing team and all of our guests for your continued support! We consider ourselves very lucky to be part of this community and look forward to many years to come. There are some exciting changes for Radish & Rye on the horizon. Stay tuned! 548 Agua Fria, Santa Fe, 505-930-5325, radishandrye.com


Susan’s Fine Wine and Spirits One of the largest selections of wine, craft beer, and spirits in town!

Relax & Refresh at Inn on the Alameda Just 2 blocks from the Historic Plaza Comfortably elegant rooms Lavish buffet breakfast Nightly wine & cheese reception Agoyo Lounge for delicious dining & cocktails nightly 5–10 Private dining for up to 36 people

Learn more about our offerings: www.sfwineandspirits.com

1005 S. St. Francis, Suite 101 | 505-984-1582 Monday - Saturday 10am - 8pm

innonthealameda.com 303 E Alameda at Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe 888.984.2121


LOCAL HEROES

Schwebach Farm AN INTERVIEW WITH DEAN AND IVELLISE SCHWEBACH BEST FARM, GREATER NEW MEXICO Photos by Stephanie Cameron

Dean and Ivellise Schwebach with their six children.

Dean Schwebach grew up on the Schwebach Farm, purchased by his parents Don and Marth Schwebach when he was three. He farmed for his father throughout his youth and, when he turned eighteen, left to attend UNM and became a CPA. Years later, when his father retired, he returned to the farm with his family. He is a sixth-generation farmer. Ivellise Schwebach grew up living in large cities and had no previous experience in farming or gardening. She was an environmental manager before her current job as a homemaker. She says, “I am grateful the Lord moved our family to the farm, and I have learned so much!� The Schwebach family has been farming for six generations. Was there ever a time you wanted to pursue a different career? Why did you ultimately decide to be a farmer? 14

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Dean: I worked on this farm growing up, so I did want to pursue other interests [for a time]. I worked in public accounting and private industry for thirteen years. To stay connected to the farm, I would sell corn for my dad and occasionally perform farming operations when needed. In the years away from the farm, I missed working the land, working with my hands and being outside. When I knew my father was considering retirement, I decided to farm to continue the family farming legacy and to raise my family on this farm. Ivellise: Although I had no prior exposure to farming, I now see why my husband was so drawn to this profession. I am thankful he was willing to bring our family to the farm. Initially, I had reservations about farming, particularly with my lack of knowledge. I was willing to come alongside my husband and join him in this farming adventure.


Seasonal

Sustainable

Organic

Legitimate pizza. Downtown vibe. Artisanal pizzas, fresh salads, and house-made pastas.

New American cuisine with fresh, local, seasonal ingredients, using classic French techniques.

Farina Alto offers fresh, creative fare in a warm setting designed to spark a conversation.

510 Central Ave SE, Albuquerque 505-243-0130 • farinapizzeria.com

424 Central SE, Albuquerque 505-243-0200 • artichokecafe.com

10721 Montgomery NE, Albuquerque WWW.EDIBLENM.COM 15 505-298-0035 • farinaalto.com


The United States is facing a shortage of farmers as fewer young people are going into agriculture these days. Do your children want to be farmers someday? What advice would you give to them or other young prospective farmers out there? Dean: It is unfortunate there is such a decline in small family farms and in young people going into the agriculture profession. A couple of my children have expressed interest in farming. My oldest, like myself at his age, is pursuing other interests. He has expressed a desire to farm in the future. Farming is a difficult, yet rewarding, way of life. Like anything, it has its risks. If you have the opportunity, perform your due diligence and then do it! What is the biggest challenge facing your business today? Sufficient water supply. Schwebach is a farmers market favorite, especially during sweet corn season. Why do you choose to not use genetically modified sweet corn seed? We do not use genetically modified seed because we do not want to experiment on our family or our customers with genetic food. There is evidence that demonstrates the dangers of genetically modified seeds and the pesticides used alongside those seeds. We believe seed was designed by God to function best naturally. When we go about putting traits into that seed that should not be there, we are likely to cause harm. Our desire is to farm responsibly and provide food that we consider to be safe for our family and our customers. What are your favorite farm tasks? Dean: Cutting beans is my favorite farm task. I head out at dawn on a dewy morning and get on my tractor to cut the beans into windrows. I know I am halfway through harvest when bean harvest time has come.

VOT E

FOR

YOUR MOST LOVED, FARMERS, RESTAURANTS, CHEFS, FOOD ARTISANS, FOOD TRUCKS, FOOD RETAILERS, FOOD ORGANIZATIONS, BEVERAGE ARTISANS, FOOD WRITERS, and LOCAL FOOD HERO

F O R A N edible Santa Fe L O CAL H E RO AWAR D. NOMINATIONS OPEN OCTOBER 15 EDIBLENM.COM

Ivellise: My favorite task is weeding. It is very satisfying to hoe through the garden and see many dying weeds and thriving plants. I get a workout on top of that! What does your perfect day off look like? Dean: Rising early, enjoying the sunrise, reading my Bible, and spending time with my family taking walks around the farm and playing games together. Ivellise: Ditto. Is there anything else you'd like to share with edible readers? We thank the edible community and our customers for supporting our family farm, and for the privilege of growing food for you. We strive each season to improve our farming practices to grow produce in a sustainable and responsible manner. We are also expanding our farming endeavors with farming events that we hope will help you to connect with us! We truly enjoy what we do and hope to continue farming in this community for many more years! 807 Martinez, Moriarty, 505-832-6171, schwebachfarm.com


tastefully

seasoned Private party rooms and offsite catering available

OLD TOWN ALBUQUERQUE 505.766.5100 SEASONSABQ.COM

NORTHEAST HEIGHTS 505.294.WINE(9463) SAVOYABQ.COM

HISTORIC NOB HILL 505.254.ZINC(9462) ZINCABQ.COM

SINCE 1995

SINCE 2007

SINCE 2003


LOCAL HEROES

El Chile Toreado AN INTERVIEW WITH BERENICE MEDINA BEST FOOD TRUCK Photos by Stephanie Cameron

The Medina family from left to right: Lester, Berenice, Celia, and Luis.

El Chile Toreado is a beloved Mexican mobile eatery with a permanent location on Cordova Road in Santa Fe. Family owned and operated, El Chile Toreado is spearheaded by patriarch Luis Medina and matriarch Celia, and our interview is with their daughter and chef Berenice Medina. How did you get to where you are now? What’s the backstory, and what was the moment that brought you to your current work? I feel my family has gotten to where it is now by believing in hard work and good quality food. My father has worked sixteen-hour days for over thirty-five years and has passed down that work ethic to my brother Lester Medina and I. Personally, I have had good food parenting, lol, and I also have a culinary background. I went to Le Cordon Bleu in Hollywood. I experienced that food and style but 18

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always knew I would come back to my roots. Working year after year side-by-side as a family and team, it has strengthened our family and our business. We have created a team (Luis, Celia, Berenice, Lester, Gaby, Uliser, and Sanjuana) that people trust in. We give good food for a good price, and, above all, we strive to give amazing service. We have reached this point in our business by believing in each other and our product. How is El Chile Toreado’s food different from other Mexican food in Santa Fe? Is it influenced by a specific region? Our food stands out because of our traditional but unique flavors. We are from California and I feel like we definitely bring a good twist of Cali to Santa Fe. My father’s recipes are a good representation of what good Mexican food is. His salsas are what stand out the most. I don’t


THE MOST IMPORTANT INGREDIENT IS OUR PEOPLE

DOLINA

CAFE & BAKERY, O P E N F O R B R E A K F A S T & L U N C H 7 D A Y S A W E E K 402 N GUADALUPE ST. SANTA FE, NM dolinasantafe.com

PH 505.982.9394 photos by Anne Staveley


LOCAL HEROES

Tacos from left to right: Pollo en adobo, al pastor, barbacoa, and carne asada.

feel like you can find anything like them here in New Mexico. Our green sauce is what ties all our flavors together. What makes your tacos so delicious? I do feel like our tacos represent us the best. The layers of flavor and texture give for a good experience. The tortilla is a hot, soft delicious foundation stuffed with flavorful meat and topped with amazing selfserve toppings, and finished with some of the spiciest salsa. My dad always says its because we all put our heart and souls into it, but the reality is hard work day after day and never compromising quality. It makes us who we are. What are some challenges involved with operating a food truck/ mobile restaurant that people may not realize? I don’t think people understand the commitment it takes to run a food business, let alone a family business. It takes a lot of grueling hours and finding the way to do it with love. People eat our food knowing they can taste the love in what we do. What was your reaction to learning edible readers had selected you as a Local Hero? 20

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When my brother Lester and I found out our father was chosen, it gave us pride. If anyone deserves to be a Local Hero, it’s him. He is an example of the hard work it takes to keep a business and family together. And that alone is a great contribution for us and our community. My father has shown what true values are and how far they take you. What’s next for your business? We hope to open a [brick-and-mortar] location by next year. It’s our dream to extend our menu and be able to give our people an even better food experience. Having a location will give us the chance to offer more traditional dishes, hopefully accompanied by a nice glass of beer. Mexican food with a good cold beer is always a winner. Is there anything else you would like to share with edible readers? We are honored, and hope to keep giving good food with a smile on our faces. 950 W Cordova Rd, Santa Fe


228 E PALACE AVE, SANTA FE

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AT THE CHEF'S TABLE

Buen Provecho! PURA VIDA FOR YOUR TASTE BUDS By Cheyanna Bea · Photos by Stacey M. Adams

Left: Pork tamale and vegan tamale. Top right: Dessert special, rum cake. Bottom right: Arroz con pollo.

Until recently, the small but growing community of Costa Rican-born Burqueños had to cook for themselves if they wanted to taste the cuisine of their home country. Chef Kattia Rojas and her husband, William, changed that when they opened Buen Provecho, a Costa Rican dining sensation with a variety of Latin American dishes and desserts, from savory and sweet pa’picar to filling san-gui-chez to a healthy selection of pa’los guilas for the little ones. Buen Provecho has a variety of Costa Rican foods that will inspire any appetite. 22

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Originally from Costa Rica, the Rojas family moved to New Jersey hoping to learn English. “I figured, what better way to learn than to submerge myself in the culture,” laughs Rojas. “I always loved to cook and was making tamales all the time for friends and visitors [using] my grandmother’s recipe. What a beautiful thing it is to serve and, in my case, what better way to do it that with my food.” The Rojases moved to Colorado for better work opportunities, and Kattia’s love for cooking grew. She began working as a private chef and soon developed a love for baking. Upon visiting her sister-in-law in


Albuquerque one Christmas, Rojas was shocked that she had a difficult time finding traditional Costa Rican tamales like the ones she had growing up. Tamales vary between Latin countries, and even between regions. In New Mexico, we are used to small tamales in a cornmeal dough with our favorite boneless meat and chile, wrapped in a corn husk. In Costa Rica the tamales are also made in a delicious cornmeal dough, but are larger. They include a favorite boneless meat, as well as carrots, onions, peas, bell peppers, and, sometimes, green olives, wrapped in banana leaves. Chef Rojas’s vegetarian options include mushrooms and jalapeños and capers with black and green olives. “The banana leaves are key,” says Kattia. “It’s a tradition that I didn’t see around here. I saw a need,” says Kattia, “and we decided to move to Albuquerque.” Kattia Rojas continued to work as a private chef and attended Central New Mexico Community College’s culinary program, with a focus in baking. She began selling her goods at the local farmer’s markets and interning with a local food truck. Soon, Chef Rojas found herself thrown into a blossoming catering business which she appropriately named Buen Provecho, a common Spanish saying meaning “enjoy your meal.” Common may be the saying, but not the food at this restaurant. For Rojas, it’s a way of life and an opportunity to serve quality food with exceptional presentation. “When I was first asked to turn Buen Provecho into a restaurant, I was hesitant because of the space usually needed for something like that.” Enter El Vado, a newly renovated motel on Central Avenue featuring shops and a taproom as well as live music and a water feature. The formerly vacant and run-down El Vado motel, built in 1937 as a motor court for the traffic along the old Route 66, now has a chic and inviting atmosphere that blends modern comforts and amenities with historic character and charm. The motel complex also includes several “food pods”—small restaurant spaces where new restaurants can get their start. When the owner of El Vado offered one of those spaces to Rojas, she says she thought, “Oh, I don’t know if I’m ready for that, so I told the owner, maybe in a year? Get in touch with me if someone leaves. Well, just before they opened, someone backed out and they called me! I cried when I saw the location. My grandfather owned a traditional adobe hotel, Hotel Liberia in Liberia, Costa Rica, and I spent most of my days helping him and my grandmother. It was a privilege for them to serve, and when I saw the El Vado space, I knew it was going to be perfect.” Buen Provecho’s food pod is quaint but inviting. When you walk in, the first thing you see is a moist chocolate cake dripping with chocolate sauce. Waiting for the decadent dessert is easier, however, once you smell Chef Rojas’ enticing savory dishes. The casados is a traditional Costa Rican meal that includes options of chicharrÓn, ropa vieja, or carnitas in a bowl or as a platter with several delicious sides, including sweet plantains or picadillo stew. Buen Provecho also has healthy vegetarian and vegan options appealing to every appetite. The Pa’Picar menu is a must-have as well: patacones, yucca fries (don’t forget the sauce!), and maduros, just to name a few.


AT THE CHEF'S TABLE

Top: The newly remodeled El Vado Motel. Bottom: William and Kattia Rojas.

Since opening a stationary location on May 26, Buen Provecho has thrived while serving Costa Rican style tamales, full-flavored aguas frescas, and delicious casados to hungry Burqueños and outof-town visitors. Chef Rojas puts her focus on using quality food and delivering an appetizing presentation for all of her customers, while William, Kattia relates, “is an awesome partner in charge of all the operational things that we need to run Buen Provecho.” There’s 24

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a lot of art and genuine passion that comes out of every dish in this kitchen. For an authentic pura vida experience, stop by El Vado and try for yourself. Buen Provecho! 2500 Central SW at El Vado Motel, Albuquerque 505-550-9668, buenprovechoabq.com


090518 iota lf.pdf

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9/6/18

8:04 AM

The Cellar Tapas Beer & Wine

Join us at The Cellar for an exquisite dinner and exceptional wine presentation. Award-winning Chef James Duke and company are excited to bring you the best Spanish tapas in New Mexico.

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discover the essence of santa fe dining Dining Room· Bar· Tequila Table· Live Entertainment· Private Dining ROSEWOOD INN OF THE ANASAZI 113 Washington Avenue | Santa Fe, NM 87501· (505) 988-3030 rosewoodhotels.com | For reservations, please call (505) 988-3236

A NA SAZ I RESTAURANT BAR & LOUNGE


FERMENTI'S PARADOX

Santa Fe, The Next Generation THE STYLE AND SPIRITS OF LA REINA By Candolin Cook · Photos by Stephanie Cameron

Left: Piña Picante and La Renia cocktails. Right: Jay Carroll, La Reina's proprietor.

From Mabel Dodge Luhan and the Taos Society of Artists to Dennis Hopper and the counterculture movement, there exists a rich history of creative and influential outsiders finding inspiration in, and subsequently transforming, northern New Mexico. For better and for worse, generation after generation, artistic types continue to make pilgrimage to the region to experience the landscape that inspired Georgia O'Keeffe and to search quixotically for the Santa Fe of their imaginations. While baby boomers have dominated the capital for the last half century, millennials are beginning to put their own cultural mark on the city. With the opening of La Reina, a stylish mezcalcentered bar at the newly remodeled El Rey Court hotel, sojourners and locals alike have a watering hole for a new era. La Reina contains its fair share of quintessential Santa Fe elements with its elegant Southwest style and quality libations. Yet, the Cerrillos Road establishment feels literally and figuratively miles apart from the typical Plaza scene—it’s hipper, fresher, younger. Painted inside a nicho in the corner of the bar, La Reina’s motto, “Where Fast 26

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Lives Slow Down,” sets the tone for its often jet-set clientele. On a recent rainy evening, I listened in as a fashionable couple from Austin chatted with their bartender about the most recent influx of young transplants to Santa Fe, and how so many of their friends across the country are making plans to visit the City Different. “It’s more underthe-radar, like Milwaukee, not overrun, like Marfa,” one explained, while sipping mezcal neat. La Reina’s bar menu is largely a showcase for mezcal—currently one of America’s trendiest spirits. Sometimes referred to as tequila’s smokier cousin, mezcal, like tequila, is made from the agave plant. Though tequila is made exclusively from blue agave, mezcal is distilled from more than thirty varietals. Tequila must be produced in Jalisco, Mexico, or in designated neighboring areas, whereas mezcal is produced throughout Mexico, though it originally hails from Oaxaca. Roasting the agave hearts in underground pits before distillation creates mezcal’s distinctive smokey flavor. Once seen as a second-class spirit, mezcal’s popularity has soared in recent years thanks, in part,


to millennials’ thirst for its complex flavors and appreciation of its small-batch production. “We just wanted to feature mezcal because it’s what we love to drink,” says La Reina proprietor Jay Carroll. Jay and his business partner and wife Alison Carroll are recent, part-time, Santa Fe transplants by way of that other boho desert oasis, Joshua Tree. When a Texas-based company purchased the El Rey in 2016, they hired the Carrolls—who are accomplished designers, concept consultants, and owners of the popular olive oil company Wonder Valley—to reinvent the charming, though dated, five-acre, eighty-six room motor court into a boutique hotel destination more in step with the times. Over the course of the project, the Carrolls became partners in the business, and Jay says the renovation became as much restoration as reinvention: “We wanted to strip it down and let the bones sing. We wanted to marry history and [modernity] in this space.” Sitting at a long, rustic wood table in the impeccably decorated parlor between El Rey’s welcome desk and La Reina, Jay flips through a massive coffee table book on the career of Alexander Girard, who he credits as his biggest inspiration in designing the bar and hotel. “Some people have said the space looks very southern California, but many of the elements that are now considered California style actually originated here [in New Mexico] with people like Girard and O’Keeffe,” he explains. “It is so special here. In my opinion, the US has two cities with a truly unique fingerprint: New Orleans and Santa Fe.” To showcase a “sense of place” throughout the property, the Carrolls incorporated many pieces from Native American and local artists—woodworkers, weavers, painters, ceramicists. Especially as a newcomer, Jay tells me he tries to be cognizant of the pitfalls of utilizing Santa Fe style. “Our goal is to be celebratory and appropriate, not appropriative. And I welcome an open dialogue about that and hope that our intention comes through.” The stark white paint had barely dried on the adobe walls before La Reina appeared in Vogue, and local and national “influencers” began to fill their social media feeds with shots of the property’s mid-century furniture, chic black and white patio, and attractive people holding attractive cocktails. (If you didn’t Instagram your visit to El Rey, were you even really there?) Despite the potential for pretension, La Reina is inviting with its casual vibe, ample seating, and warm candlelight from dozens of votives, which freely drip white wax over a centrally-located fireplace mantle. Jay pushes back against my initial impression that La Reina is primarily for the twenty-to-thirty-something scenester set, saying that that is not his intention nor experience: “We want everyone to feel welcome and our clientele has been very diverse.” Jay says part of making the bar accessible is having a “democratic” price point. Unlike many upscale cocktail bars in town, La Reina’s signature drinks range from $9 to $12. Standouts include the La Reina, a slightly sweet and spicy blend of agua de jamaica, Casamigos Reposado, mezcal, and Ancho Reyes; and the SantaFamous—mezcal, pineapple, and a house verdita. My personal

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505.266.6374

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Come Warm Up with Us

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Chic El Rey Court room details.

favorite is the refreshing West Texas creation, Ranch Water—tequila, Topo Chico, and lime, over ice. The bar does, however, stock some more expensive offerings, such as a mezcal de pechuga—made by suspending a raw chicken breast over the still to (allegedly) imbue a savory undertone—that runs $30 a shot. And if agave spirits are not your drink of choice, the bar is well-stocked with an assortment of other liquors, sake, draft beer, and wine. The regulars I spoke with said La Reina is a welcome addition to Midtown and described the Carrolls as friendly, generous, and enthusiastic to be part of the community. To foster that community, every Thursday is Locals Night, where New Mexicans receive ten percent off their tab, and frequently there is a designated “La Reina of the week”—a local woman who is celebrated with a signature cocktail and party in her honor. The hotel’s pool is also open to locals who join the El Rey Swim Club, and there are plans in the works to host community events such as craft fairs, movie nights on the lawn, concerts, and pop-up dinners, along with more permanent food offerings. “Locals have really adopted us as a place to come and congregate and as a meeting ground for both travellers and locals,” says Jay. 28

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The Carrolls believe El Rey can also act as a fresh introduction to the city. “If we’re doing our job right, El Rey and La Reina can be a passport to what I would want to experience as a visitor in Santa Fe,” says Jay. “When I was visiting in my twenties, I knew this was a special place, but it was hard to navigate. So much is geared toward Plaza culture and Canyon Road and an older generation. But there are so many incredible things beyond that. We’d like to facilitate an environment where locals [steer] visitors toward what they like to do. I think those interactions are important for both sides.” With the addition of new art and music spaces like Meow Wolf, an ever expanding and diversifying restaurant scene, and casual hangouts such as La Reina, Santa Fe is indeed becoming less Plaza-centric. “It feels like new things are happening all the time,” says Jay. “People have such a defined idea about what Santa Fe is or should be. I [was worried] the city would be resistant to change, but what I’ve discovered is that many people are optimistic about and welcoming to change, and any place is open to interpretation.” 1862 Cerrillos, Santa Fe, 505-982-1931, elreycourt.com


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Visit us on the Taos Plaza Open for Lunch Tuesday-Sunday. Open for Dinner Everyday. Happy Hour Tuesday-Sunday 2-5 PM. 30 craft beers on tap. 614 Trinity Drive, Los Alamos • 505-662-8877 pajaritobrewpubandgrill.com

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103 East Plaza | Taos, New Mexico


BEHIND THE BOTTLE

Cider is Wine! AN INTERVIEW WITH NEW MEXICO WINE, BLACK MESA WINERY/BITE ME HARD CIDER, AND SANTA FE CIDER WORKS

Photo by Brent Hofacker

New Mexico has a long tradition of growing apples and making cider. From Farmington to Roswell, from Silver City to Cimarron, from Las Cruces to Valverde, apples have represented an important economic mainstay over the past century. In fact, during different decades, opposite corners of the state gained the moniker of the “Land of the Big Red Apple.” Today, several new cideries are building on this applegrowing tradition to meet the growing demand for locally produced, craft cider. We spoke to three of them—New Mexico Wine, Santa Fe Cider Works, and Black Mesa Winery/Bite Me Hard Cider—to learn more about the current state of cider in New Mexico.

the abundance of "free fruit" that one can find along the side streets and creek beds—not just apples, but apricots and cherries.

What makes New Mexico cider unique?

Santa Fe Cider Works: Nationally, cider sales really hit a high point in 2015; after that, regional markets came to the forefront and caused the national, mass-produced cider sales to dip a little. This holds true for New Mexico, as well. More local cider drinkers have chosen to support local cideries, opting to try a unique product instead of always falling back on the commercial, national brands. In New Mexico, we’ve really seen a lot of locals supporting the local market, which speaks volumes about the priorities of our regional communities.

New Mexico Wine: New Mexico apples are grossly underrated for the quality that we grow here. My favorite part of living in New Mexico is

Black Mesa Winery: Apples have been grown here in northern New Mexico for generations. The apples are picked and brought to Black

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BEHIND THE BOTTLE

Photo by Carole Topalian

Mesa Winery, where they are processed and fermented into cider. The cider produced from these trees show a complexity unlike any other. Many say it reminds them of European style cider, which has been made for more than two thousand years. Do you work with orchards in New Mexico, and do you see a local apple-growing sector expanding with the cider industry in New Mexico? New Mexico Wine: There are plenty of rural communities that planted orchards way back when, and they still produce lots of fruit today, especially in northern New Mexico. We hope to see a revival of interest in orchard fruit and apples not for just cider, but also for local beer, wine, and spirits. Santa Fe Cider Works: Each year, we receive more phone calls and emails than we did the year before, offering use of apples from local orchards. Cider provides a unique opportunity for those varieties of apples that aren’t traditionally used for eating or baking. Because the cider industry is able to use bitter/tart apples, we hope this business opportunity will provide incentive for stewardship of more unusual apple trees, creating a diversified orchard, which, ultimately, means all the trees in the orchard are more disease-resistant. The more cider we drink, the more we can help our environment! Black Mesa Winery: We are getting apples from orchards between Española and Taos. Some of the trees are more than sixty years old. We have started working with the growers who have watched large amounts of their apples ripen, fall off the tree, and not be used or sold for years and years. They are very excited about having a new, local market for the large variety of apples they grow. Some would like to grow more apples, but weren’t sure what to plant. When we suggest specific apple cider varieties, they say they are willing to give it a try. Where do you hope to see the New Mexico cider industry in five years, and how will we get there? New Mexico Wine: At New Mexico Wine, we feel that hard cider is an underdeveloped industry right now, but one that could show dramatic growth in the coming years. Wineries make cider, breweries make cider, 32

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and so there is little holding back the industry save increased production, awareness, and eventually distribution. There is great momentum and it supports both farmers and the craft beverage sector. Santa Fe Cider Works: There are approximately eight hundred twenty cideries in America right now, which is double the number from even two years ago. As more New Mexicans continue to enjoy hard cider, we hope to see more local cideries opening. Right now, there are a lot of regional beer festivals that invite a token cidery to their event. In five years, New Mexico will have lots of regional cider festivals, but don’t worry, we’ll be sure to invite a token brewery to our events. Black Mesa Winery: As the cider business continues to expand, especially the part using New Mexico apples, I see family orchards once again being a part of New Mexico’s agriculture economy. As it is tied with the growing wine and beer industries, I see all expanding and New Mexico becoming known and celebrated for its small businesses growing from local products. Is there anything else you would like edible readers to know? Black Mesa Winery: Our signature style is drawn from the New World cider tradition of low tannins and higher acidity. High-elevation fruit (5800-plus feet) provides the perfect juice. We incorporate both modern and traditional methods to produce this artisanal cider, even allowing some native microflora. When utilizing cultured yeasts, we use naturally selected and traditionally bred organic yeasts. New Mexico Wine: We will be hosting The Magnificent Cider Festival at Eaves Movie Ranch on October 20. This old western revival festival is family friendly and will feature seven local cider producers, fresh apples, pumpkins, live music, and the perfect setting for cowboy boots, ten-gallon hats, and pearl button shirts. Tickets $25 at NMwine.com. New Mexico Wine nmwine.com Santa Fe Cider Works 4363 Center Place, Santa Fe, 575-513-7329, santafeciderworks.org Black Mesa Winery/Bite Me Hard Cider 1502 Highway 68, Velarde, 505-852-2820, blackmesawinery.com


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THE PLATE

Seafood in Santa Fe ONE·FOR·NEPTUNE BRINGS FISH JERKY TO THE DESERT By Michael Dax

Nick Mendoza with a fresh catch of rockfish. Photo by George Parish.

The first time I met Nick Mendoza, he was standing behind the kitchen counter at a mutual friend’s house party. Three large aluminum bags sat in front of him, and as I wandered in his direction, he eagerly offered me a taste of fish jerky. “When you say ‘fish jerky’ most people wrinkle their nose,” Mendoza admitted to me later. “But they’re interested enough to taste it and that surprise of the flavor is enough.” I fit his characterization perfectly, and after a couple samples of the three flavors—honey lemon ginger, Cajun, and Norse smoke—I was hooked. Mendoza and his company, OneForNeptune, had just returned from the Fancy Food Show in New York City, where Massimo Bottura, owner and operator of one of the world’s top ranked 34

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restaurants, chose OFN’s fish jerky as a top pick among thousands of entries. Mendoza, who began making fish jerky last year in home experiments in Santa Fe, was overwhelmed. The company had just finished their first round of fundraising and already had an agreement from SnackNation to include their product in the delivery service’s healthy mail-order snack boxes. OneForNeptune is still in its beginning stages, slowly expanding to more retail outlets while also selling the jerky through its website. But beyond being just a tasty snack, the company is contributing to a shift in the seafood industry—bringing transparency to and eliminating waste from one of the most inefficient sectors of our food industry.


THE PLATE

Photo by Theresa Mendoza

Photo by Nick Mendoza

Photo by Kevin Allen Brown

Nick Mendoza experimenting with various fish species and recipe blends in his Santa Fe kitchen.

Mendoza grew up splitting time between San Diego, California, and his grandparents’ ranch in the Gila region of southwest New Mexico, where he worked during the summers—a “surf-and-turf upbringing,” as he describes it. Early on, he developed an affinity for the ocean, and he initially chose a career in marine fisheries science, working as a researcher in sustainable aquaculture in Monterey, California. But after a few years, he didn’t feel as if he were making a meaningful difference, and on a whim, he quit his job and returned to the Gila. At first, he tried to establish connections in the farm-to-table market, hoping to sell his family’s grassfed beef directly to restaurants in Santa Fe, but he quickly turned to the idea of beef jerky, itself a trendy product, especially for locally raised beef. While mending fences on the ranch one day, it occurred to Mendoza to bring together his ideas for jerky with his passion for sustainable aquaculture. He already owned a commercial dehydrator, and had recently moved to Santa Fe, where he eventually made his first batch of fish jerky in May 2017. “It was completely inedible,” laughs Mendoza. But employing his scientific background, Mendoza continued his experimentation, changing small aspects of the recipe with each batch and meticulously recording the results. Giving a nod to the Vikings who relied on dried fish for their long journeys, Mendoza’s first flavor was Norse Smoke, seasoned with sea salt and juniper berries left over from the production of Wheeler’s gin from Santa Fe Spirits. By October, he was ready to share it beyond his circle of family and friends, and brought it to a food festival in Palo Alto, California, where his hundreds of samples were gone within an hour. Since the beginning, Mendoza opted to use rockfish and other common white fishes, due to their leanness and comparably low oil content, which makes them good for drying. Also, according to Mendoza, “They are a blank canvas, of sorts, and take really well to the flavor profiles that we have created.”

But beyond its utility, Mendoza chose these fish as a way of combating inefficiencies in the notoriously opaque and wasteful seafood industry. While a healthy market for rockfish once existed, the fish declined in the 1980s and 1990s. Although the fish’s population has rebounded, markets and tastes have moved on. “There’s a huge supply and demand issue with the rockfish we source,” says Mendoza. “Fishermen are catching a lot more than the market wants.” And as a result, more and more rockfish have become by-catch and are often either castoff (thrown back into the ocean) or turned into pet food or fertilizer. In addition to opting for species that might otherwise be discarded, Mendoza hopes to further transparency within the industry, which according to one study in Canada sees more than fifty percent of fish mislabeled. On top of that, the Food and Drug Administration inspects less than two percent of fish entering the United States, and seafood is often traded at sea, making it difficult to know where it was caught and who caught it. To advance this kind of transparency, every package of OneForNeptune will include a QR code that will allow consumers to connect to the “Find my Fish” app that provides details such as information about the fishery, the name(s) of the fishermen, the coordinates where it was caught, and the type of fish. As a marine scientist, Mendoza sailed several voyages conducting research aboard a brigantine-style tall ship. These sailors continue to honor and recognize superstitions and traditions developed over hundreds of years, one of which requires a ritual toast to the Roman god of the sea, Neptune. On the eve of a journey’s end, the captain gathers the crew and pours the first drink of the night into the sea as an offering and cheers to safe passage. OneForNeptune is seeking to honor the spirit of this ceremony, and as it grows will continue to inspire a healthy, sustainable relationship to the ocean. oneforneptune.com WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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BACK OF THE HOUSE

More Than A Meal SAZÓN IS A TRUE FINE DINING EXPERIENCE By Candolin Cook · Photos by Stephanie Cameron I wasn’t really in the mood for soup on a hot August evening at Sazón, but my server Diego Martinez kept pushing the chef ’s signature dish, Sopa de Amor. “It is so special, not like anything you’ve had before,” he assured with the finesse of a true salesman. The menu offered no description and Diego had been intentionally vague, so when my starter arrived looking more like dessert I was intrigued. A heap of white amaretto foam sprinkled with cocoa powder and cinnamon sat atop a spring green base of poblano cream, concealing a lump of blue crab underneath. Diego instructed me not to stir the soup and to make sure I got every component in each spoonful. With my first bite, the interplay of diverse flavors, textures, and temperatures both delighted and confused my palate. Catching my perplexed expression, Diego walked over and asked expectantly if I liked it. “I think it might be the best soup I’ve ever had,” I replied sincerely. Sazón is the culinary culmination of Chef Fernando Olea’s nearly thirty years in Santa Fe’s restaurant scene. Olea is a striking figure—tall, mustachioed, confident. On the afternoon we meet, he is wearing a banana yellow button-up shirt tucked into well-worn Levi’s, a tan cowboy hat, and a couple dozen bracelets and necklaces. I compliment his cowboy boots. “Crocodile skin,” he tells me, “but I’ve got all kinds—ostrich, snake, shark.” He exudes warmth and sincerity, and, according to Olea's business partner at Sazón, Lawrence Becerra, is too humble. “I’d eat Fernando’s food in the back of a bus,” says Becerra, “but one of the most rewarding things about opening Sazón with Fernando is seeing him finally get the recognition he deserves.” Born and raised in Mexico City, Olea immigrated to the United States in 1983. Though Olea’s first career was in business administration, eating what Americans called Mexican food inspired him to become a chef so that he could bring the “true” flavors of Mexico to the United States. “Tex-Mex cuisine has been sold to Americans as Mexican cuisine. Many people think Mexican food is beans, rice, yellow cheese, and iceberg lettuce, but that isn’t the Mexican food I know,” Olea says. “When Mexicans started making food for American palates, we lost the essence of something; so I started rescuing recipes from my family. My food is not made for the American palate. It’s the food I enjoy, and I hope they do too.”

Fernando Olea in Sazón's bar area.

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Olea’s brand of Mexican cuisine draws inspiration from the best of Mexico’s fine dining and street food scenes as well as his aunt and mother’s most cherished recipes. At Sazón, these influences manifest in everything from Muscovy duck enmoladas to Oaxacan-style


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OCTOBER 31 - NOVEMBER 2, ALBUQUERQUE, NM

A collaborative conference to examine the critical connections between soil, people, and planet.

REGENERATE NURTURE DIVERSITY, BUILD RESILIENCE REGENERATE2018.COM

Sisters of the Soil An evening with

Nicole Masters Integrity Soils

A conversation about the connections between agriculture, conservation, soil health, and gut health.

Christine Su

PastureMap

Betsy Ross

Sustainable Growth Texas

Thurs, Nov 1, 7pm | Hotel Albuquerque | $10 | Tickets and info at quiviracoalition.org/sisters WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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BACK OF THE HOUSE

Left: Halibut with mole verde. Right: Dulce Sinfonía.

chapulines (grasshoppers) tacos. Olea’s moles are unarguably the stars of Sazón, but it wasn’t always that way. “Mole was hard at first because [most] Americans had only experienced [the sauce] at [subpar] Mexican restaurants, so they thought they didn’t like it,” says Olea. “How do you change somebody’s mind? The only way is to make them taste it.” Thus, every table receives a complimentary tasting flight of that evening’s moles—three savory, three sweet—and a handful of delicate tortillas to sample each. After deciding on a favorite, guests may pair it with one of that evening’s protein specials (on my visit: lamb, pork, halibut, duck, beef tenderloin)—or defer to the chef’s recommendation. Olea’s complex mole negro and spicy Coloradito rival the best I’ve had in Oaxaca, and his New Mexico mole made from white chocolate and local ingredients— apricots, Socorro pecans, piñon, red chile—is truly unique. But mole wasn’t the only hard sell Olea experienced in bringing fine Mexican cuisine to Santa Fe. Though US diners have become more familiar with upscale Mexican food in recent years—thanks in part to international recognition for Mexican chefs such as Pujol’s Enrique Olvera—when Olea started out in the nineties, he had trouble getting people in the door. “I’d have hotel concierges tell me that when they recommended my [previous] restaurant, people would say, ‘Oh we don’t want Mexican food tonight, we want a nice dinner.’ I got to the point that I thought maybe I’m bringing the wrong food to the States because people didn’t even want to try it.” Despite such misperceptions, Olea garnered a loyal and enthusiastic following among Santa Fe foodies, including Lawrence Becerra and his wife Suzanna. Becerra was born in New York City to European parents and has lived all over the world, including twenty-six years in London. He has dined in many of the globe’s top restaurants and is particular about what constitutes an exceptional dining experience. “When I decided to go into business with Fernando [in 2015] it was for selfish reasons. I was tired of restaurants with mediocre food, poor service, and bad wine. So I thought I’d make my own,” he says. 38

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Both Becerra and Olea agreed that for Sazón to work, its food, drink, atmosphere, and service had to be superior and harmonious. In three years of business, the restaurant has achieved numerous awards and accolades for its cuisine; an exceptionally curated wine, mezcal, and tequila menu; and a romantic ambiance, bolstered by a fine art collection from Mexican artists. The last essential, good service, as many local restaurateurs will tell you, is the hardest to come by in New Mexico. “In Mexico City every fine dining establishment has impeccable service,” says Olea, “I don’t find that that’s [a given] in the United States. To be a server is a noble profession that takes a lot of dedication and time, but here waiting tables is largely seen as a job in transition.” Becerra adds, “It’s expensive to eat good food. You want everything to be perfect. This whole notion that the service can be laid back because this is a laid back town is bullshit. People come here from all over the world, and when they come to Sazón, we don’t just want them to have a meal, we want them to have an experience.” At Sazón servers receive rigorous training to provide that experience. “The cream has risen to the top and we are very pleased with our team now,” says Becerra. Adds Olea, “I want people who really love the industry they are in, it’s just that.” I tell Olea that at the conclusion of my meal the other night, my excellent server Diego tempted me with another mysterious signature dish, the Dulce Sinfonía, but I’d had no room for dessert. Olea looks slightly hurt and more than a little sorry for me. “You will try it now,” he orders. Once again I am instructed to get every component in one bite—but Olea requests that I don’t describe the flavors here, so that readers may experience the dish “organically, without expectations.” Olea is delighted that I love the dessert and that I can’t guess its ingredients. “Sweet Symphony is magic. I think it was a gift to me,” he says, gesturing upward. That may be, but Olea’s cooking is a gift to Santa Fe. 221 Shelby, Santa Fe, 505-983-8604, sazonsantafe.com


Upcoming Special Dinners & Events Please join us for these very special events. Please RSVP by emailing reserve@farmandtablenm.com

A Taste of Mexico: Amor y Sabor

Five-Course Wine Dinner with Guest Chef Dr. Amelia Malagamba & Ehecatl Aztec Dancers

October 22 | 6:00pm | $85

Steak Flight Tasting

Six-Course Chefs Collaborative Dinner

November 5 | 6:00pm | $95

Gratitude Dinner

Four-Course Wine-Paired Dinner

November 19 | 6:00pm | $75

Vegan Dinner

Five-Course Wine Dinner

December 3 | 6:00pm | $70

NYC | NYE

New York City inspired New Year’s Eve Dinner

December 31 | open reservation times | $95

8917 4th St NW

Albuquerque, NM 87114

Santa Fe

321 San Francisco

986-8700

505.503.7124 Farmandtablenm.com

Dinner: Tues-Sat open at 5pm Brunch: sat-sun 9am-2pm

See our website for a full list of events and special dinners.

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Edible Mag - 7.5” x 4.75”


COOKING FRESH

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Fusion

PLAYING WITH INGREDIENTS AND ELEMENTS OF COOKING By Stephanie Cameron In this edition of Cooking Fresh, we are embracing seasonal produce from the East and the West and celebrating the migration of cuisines, recipes, and ingredients to New Mexico. Our farmers markets have long been abundant with New Mexico’s traditional ingredients, such as chiles, corn, beans, and squash. Now many farmers have added Asian vegetables to their repertoire, allowing cooks to play with the ingredients they use in traditional Latin and Asian dishes, fusing these cuisines. In the fall, we start to see bok choy, daikon radish, mizuna, tatsoi, shishito peppers, Japanese eggplants, and Thai chiles showing up in the markets. Talk to your farmers about how they are preparing these newer market finds.

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SAUTÉED TATSOI WITH PORK BELLY Serves 2 - Adapted from Food Blogga Tatsoi, an Asian brassica with a mild mustardy flavor, stands up to sautéing and pairs nicely with crispy pork belly. 2 tablespoons tamari soy sauce 1/4 teaspoon rice vinegar 2 teaspoons brown sugar 2 teaspoons pure lime juice 2 teaspoons ginger, minced 1/4 teaspoon ground red chile 1 pound uncured pork belly, cubed 1 tablespoon sesame oil, divided 2 small bunches of tatsoi 1–2 teaspoons hulled sesame seeds, toasted In a small bowl, whisk together soy sauce, vinegar, sugar, lime juice, ginger, and chile. In a large skillet over medium high heat, add 2 teaspoons sesame oil. Add pork belly; salt to taste; and cook until golden brown. Remove from skillet and set aside. Add remaining sesame oil and tatsoi to skillet; once wilted, add sauce. Reduce heat to medium-low, and cook until sauce slightly thickens. Divide greens on plates. Top with pork belly. Drizzle with remaining sauce from pan, and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Serve immediately. WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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LAOTIAN CHICKEN ENCHILADAS

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Serves 4 - Adapted from Genius Kitchen

Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add canola oil.

Laotian chile, peanuts, and coconut milk put an Asian twist on the usual enchilada recipe. We used Kinna’s Kitchen products, which can be sourced at Talin Market, Keller’s Meat Market, Whole Foods, La Montañita Co-op, and Albuquerque's Downtown Growers Market, or ordered online at kinnas.net.

Add onions, cabbage, daikon radish, garlic, and 1/4 teaspoon salt, stirring to mix. Let cook until vegetables are soft, about 6–8 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add chicken, green onions, peanuts, cilantro, remaining salt, and pepper, tossing to coat, and let cook for 1–2 minutes. Add 3/4 cup coconut milk and 1/3 cup tamarind chile sauce, mixing thor-

8 flour tortillas 2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cooked and shredded 1 tablespoon canola oil 1/2 sweet onion, chopped 1/3 cup daikon radish, shredded 1/2 cup cabbage, shredded 4 garlic cloves, minced 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper 4 scallions, green ends sliced (save whites for another recipe) 1/3 cup peanuts, crushed, plus more for garnish 1/4 cup fresh cilantro, chopped, plus more for garnish 2 1/2 cups organic coconut milk 1/3 cup plus 1/2 cup Kinna’s Tamarind Chile Sauce 1 tablespoon Kinna’s Laos Chile Paste 42

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oughly to combine. Turn off heat. Spray a 9×13-inch baking dish with nonstick spray. Whisk together remaining coconut milk, tamarind chile sauce, and Laos chile paste. Pour about 1/2 cup or so on the bottom of the dish. Place a few spoonfuls of the chicken mixture on each tortilla, roll up tightly and place in the dish. Cover with remaining coconut milk and chile sauce mix. Use a spoon and cover every inch of the tortillas completely with the sauce. Bake for 20 minutes. Garnish with additional peanuts and cilantro. As you plate the enchiladas, spoon sauce from the bottom of the dish over the top of the tortillas.


Meat Matters An in-depth look on how we source, eat, think, and talk about meat.

November 4 - 5, 2018 in Albuquerque Presented by New Mexico chapter of Chefs Collaborative and Edible Santa Fe

Hands-on Workshops November 4 -5

Steak Flight Tasting Dinner November 5, 6pm at Farm & Table

Two days of butchery workshops, field trips, and demonstrations to help educate and inspire fellow professionals.

Carnivores unite for a unique tasting experience! This incredible dinner will feature five identical tasting courses, representing five different beef producers: Susieville Cattle Company, Ranney Ranch, San Juan Ranch, and Alameda Farms. Local wine will be paired with the tasting for a true taste of New Mexico terrain and terroir.

Taught by Adam Danforth, a James Beard award-winning author of two books about slaughtering and butchering livestock; Camas Davis, executive director of the Good Meat Project; and Derek Wagner, co-chair of Chefs Collaborative and chef/owner of Nick’s on Broadway.

Proceeds will benefit Chefs Collaborative education programs and the Southwest Grassfed Livestock Alliance. RSVP by emailing reserve@farmandtablenm.com.

Audubon Conservation Ranching Program

ediblenm.com/meatmatters


CHINESE BEEF ROLLS (NIU ROU JIAN BING) Serves 4 - Adapted from Goodies à Valanté Red chiles and pinto beans find their way into this northern Chinese street food that is assembled like a burrito. Note: Make the bean paste and beef filling a day ahead. The beef gets better the longer it sits and soaks up all the flavors. Sweet pinto bean paste 1 cup dried pinto beans 4 cups water, divided, or as needed 3/4 cups sugar Beef filling 3 pounds beef shank 2 whole black cardamom pods 3 scallions, ends removed, cut in half 1 teaspoon Sichuan peppercorn 4 cloves garlic 2 star anise pods 1 thumb ginger, sliced 3 dried hot red chiles, stems and seeds removed 1 cinnamon stick 1/3 cup rice wine 3 tablespoons dark soy sauce 1/2 cup light soy sauce 1 tablespoon salt 3/4 tablespoon rock sugar Hot water Pancakes 2 cups all-purpose flour 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons warm water 2 tablespoons vegetable shortening 4 scallions, cut in thin slices 1/2 teaspoon salt Roll Sweet pinto bean paste 1 bunch cilantro, chopped 1 bok choy, thinly sliced Favorite hot sauce Prepared beef filling For the bean paste, place beans in a saucepan and cover with 2 cups water. Bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Drain and discard water. Place drained beans in a clean saucepan and cover with 2–3 cups water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low, cover the saucepan, and simmer for 2 hours, adding more water as needed, until beans are soft and can be crushed between your fingers. Drain beans and discard water. Stir beans and sugar together in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Cook about 10 minutes, stirring constantly, until sugar melts and beans form a loose, shiny paste. Immediately transfer the paste to a container to cool. Preheat oven to 350°F. Heat a large, oven-safe pot with oil. Add garlic, scallions, dried chiles, star anise, cardamom, 44

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peppercorn, cinnamon, rock sugar, and ginger. Cook until fragrant, about 2 - 3 minutes. Add rice wine, dark and light soy sauce, beef shank, salt, and add just enough hot water to cover the beef shank. Bring to a boil, cover, and transfer to the oven to cook for 1 1/2 hours. Remove and let meat rest for 5 minutes. Stir liquid through a fat seperator. Slice meat thinly and place in bowl with remaining liquid and refrigerate overnight. For the pancake, mix flour and water in a bowl until it comes together, then knead the dough until smooth. Cover in plastic wrap and let rest for 30 minutes. Roll out to a 1/4 inch thick rectangular shape, spread a thin layer of vegetable shortening on top, and sprinkle with salt and scallions. Roll up the dough and pull as tightly as possible from the longest side, until it forms a sausage. Divide into four pieces; seal each end. Roll each piece into a pinwheel and let rest for 5 minutes. Flatten the pinwheel by hand and roll out into a disk, as thin as possible. The dough may stick a little but it should be workable. Use a bit of oil, not flour, to prevent sticking, if necessary. Heat a large pan with oil on medium high heat and cook the pancakes until golden on each side. About 1 minute per side. To serve, spread 1/2 tablespoon bean paste on a pancake, top with warm beef slices, bok choy, cilantro, and hot sauce, and roll up. Repeat with remaining pancakes.


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KOREAN BBQ INSIDE-OUT TAMALES Serves 4 Combined with the fragrant, spicy flavors of Korean barbeque, the corn and pork in this dish shine. We sourced our pork from Polk’s Folly Farm, who sells at the Downtown Growers’ Market in Albuquerque, and several vendors at the farmers markets offer pork now. Korean Barbecued Short Ribs - Adapted from Kitchn 2 pounds pork short ribs 1/2 cup soy sauce 2 1/2 tablespoons sesame oil 2 tablespoons brown sugar 4 green onions, trimmed and chopped roughly 5 cloves of garlic, minced 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger root 1/2 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds 1/4 teaspoon red chile 1 Asian or Bosc pear, peeled and cored Combine soy sauce, sesame oil, brown sugar, green onions, garlic, ginger, sesame seeds, and red chile in a bowl. Slice pear into 1/4-inch thick chips. Place ribs in a large, sturdy re-sealable plastic bag. Scatter pear around ribs, then pour in marinade. Turn ribs to ensure they are evenly coated. Refrigerate for at least 3 hours, and up to 24 hours. Turn ribs at least once during the marination. Prepare the grill. A charcoal grill is preferable, but gas will do fine.

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Drain excess marinade off ribs and reserve. Cook ribs on the grill, turning often with metal tongs. Depending on the thickness of the meat and the heat of the grill, this may take as little as 5 minutes, or as long as 15 minutes. Tend the grill carefully. Toward the end of the cooking process, pour remaining marinade over ribs, cook another minute to caramelize, then pull off to check for doneness. Mizuna Salad - Adapted from Healthy Seasonal Recipes 5 cups mizuna, cut into large bite-sized pieces, washed and spun dry 1/4 cup chopped chives 2 tablespoons salted peanuts, crushed 2 tablespoons unrefined peanut oil 1 1/2 tablespoons white vinegar 1 1/2 teaspoons soy sauce or tamari 1/2 teaspoon sugar Freshly ground pepper, to taste Pinch salt Combine mizuna, chives, and peanuts in a large salad bowl. Combine peanut oil, vinegar, soy sauce, sugar, pepper, and salt in a jar; cover and shake to combine. Pour over the greens and toss to coat. Masa and Plating Follow any traditional recipe for tamales, but assemble using only the dough (no filling). Steam tamales just before plating the dish. Once steamed, unwrap and place corn husk on the plate. Position tamale on top with short ribs and mizuna salad. Spoon your favorite chile sauce over the tamale.


Dinner for Two NOT JUST FOR PARTIES OF 2

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FORAGED

Dock: An Immigration Success Story By Ellen Zachos

Dock going to seed. Photos by Ellen Zachos.

What makes a plant invasive? Most people describe an invasive plant as a non-native with an aggressive growth habit, which negatively affects native species, but I don’t like this definition. I don’t care where a plant came from, especially if it’s useful and tasty. And when a useful, tasty plant has an aggressive growth habit, I recommend eating it to keep it under control. Several species of dock are common weeds. Native to Europe and Western Asia, dock is a highly successful transplant, and now grows on all seven continents. Foragers appreciate dock for its tart, lemony flavor, its abundance, and the fact that it’s free. In northern New Mexico, Rumex crispus is the most common dock species, commonly known as curly dock (for its wavy leaf margins) or yellow dock (for the color of its root). Dock is a perennial plant, found in open fields and drainages. Its greens are among the first wild edibles to emerge in spring. New growth will emerge from the base of old stalks, so look for last year's tall, dried flower stalks to locate tender, young plants. Pick the youngest (perhaps even unfurled) leaves at the center of each clump. They will be intensely mucilaginous, so be prepared for sticky fingers. From early to mid-spring, young dock leaves are tasty raw or cooked. The mucilage in the leaf stems can be overwhelming, so if 48

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you want to eat dock raw, remove the stem and use only the leaf blade in salads. By early summer, dock greens become tough and fibrous. However, when cool temperatures return in fall, dock puts out a second round of tender leaves. Bonus! Like many greens, dock reduces in volume when cooked, to about twenty to twenty-five per cent of its original volume. The application of heat dulls the color of the leaves and also changes dock's texture from crisp to creamy. Dock greens are excellent in stir-fries, soups, stews, and egg dishes. The sour flavor of dock comes from oxalic acid, which may cause kidney stones when consumed in large quantities. Lest you be alarmed, the same compound is found in spinach. If your doctor has advised you not to eat spinach, or if you are prone to kidney stones, don't eat dock. If you are generally healthy and don't gorge yourself on pounds of dock every day for a month, you should be fine. In summer, small white flowers are held on tall branching stalks, and those flowers are followed by multitudes of vibrant, reddish brown seeds. It's easy to collect enough for several cups of flour in a very short time. Strip the seeds from their stems by running your hand along the stem from bottom to top, catching the seeds. Use the entire seed head (no need for winnowing) and enjoy the extra fiber. Pick out any leaves and bugs that may have come along for the


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FORAGED

Photo by Ellen Zachos.

ride, and if your seeds aren't one hundred percent dry, give them a few hours in the dehydrator, or let them dry in the sun between two screens. The screens are important as the seeds are very lightweight and may easily blow away. Once the seed is dry, you can grind it and use it as flour as is, but a quick and easy, extra step will make your flour more flavorful. Preheat your oven to 350°F and spread the dock seeds on cookie sheets in a thin layer. Bake the seeds for five minutes, then pull them out of the oven and let them cool. You'll immediately smell the difference. The scent is rich and dark with hints of caramel. Store your roasted dock seeds in a tightly-covered glass jar until you’re ready to use them. To make flour, pour the roasted seeds into the dry grains canister of a Vitamix or a coffee bean grinder and pulverize until the seeds are as fine as flour. Because roasted dock seed flour is gluten-free, it doesn't bind as well as traditional flours. To hold your baked goods together, use dock seed flour in combination with traditional flours (half and half ) in breads, muffins, brownies, and crackers. The next time you hear someone call dock an invasive weed, or disparage it for not being a native plant, you’ll know that person has never eaten dock greens or baked with dock seed flour. Once you’ve done those things, you won’t curse it as a non-native invader; you’ll celebrate this versatile immigrant.

DOCK SEED CRACKER RECIPE 1/2 cup dock flour 1/2 cup whole wheat flour 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons cold butter 2 teaspoons ground wild garlic (or garlic powder) 2 teaspoons ground bee balm (or oregano) 2 teaspoons wild mustard seeds (or black pepper) 1/4 cup water Ground sumac (optional) Preheat oven to 400°F and lightly flour both a baking sheet and a rolling surface. Add the ingredients to the bowl of food processor and pulse to combine. Add approximately 1/4 cup of water, a tablespoon at a time, while the food processor runs steadily. Stop when the dough sticks together, but is not wet. You may not need all the water. Move the dough to floured rolling surface and roll the dough to about 1/8 inch. Lightly sprinkle the top of the dough with salt (and a little ground sumac, if you have it), then cut the dough into individual crackers and use a spatula to transfer the crackers to baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes, then allow the crackers to cool before serving. These will keep for several days in a tightly sealed plastic container. This recipe can be made without the cheese and with your favorite blend of spices.

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W INE B IS T R O

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EDIBLE NOTABLES

Rooted in Community NEW MEXICO CELEBRATES FARM TO SCHOOL MONTH By Pam Roy

Photo courtesy of Monkey Business Images.

October is National Farm to School Month. This month recognizes a wide variety of schools and programs across the state that are creating avenues for local farmers to supply school cafeterias and meals programs with fresh fruits and vegetables, while educating students on where their food comes from, how it is prepared, and its connection to health and well-being. New Mexico’s Farm to School program began eighteen years ago with the help of the nonprofit organization Farm to Table 52

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and through the efforts of the NM Food & Agriculture Policy Council, NM School Nutrition Association, and many other key partners. Because of these efforts, the New Mexico Public Education Department (NMPED) announced an investment in the program through the New Mexico Grown Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Grant. This grant benefits children and farmers across the state by providing schools with resources to buy fresh locally grown produce from New Mexico farms. A total of

fifty-six New Mexico school districts will receive funds to increase and evolve farm to school programs; twenty-five districts will be implementing for the first time. Last spring, NMPED’s Student Success and Wellness Bureau also created a New Mexico Farm to School and Nutrition permanent position to support farm to school and cafeteria programs across New Mexico. Core partners are now working to develop a statewide network. These partners include the New Mexico School Nutrition


Association, the New Mexico Department of Health’s Healthy Kids Healthy Communities Program, the Department of Agriculture, the Community Engagement Center at the University of New Mexico, FoodCorps, the New Mexico Food & Agriculture Policy Council, Farm to Table, NM Cooperative Extension Service, the National Farm to School Network, and the USDA. All are working together to enhance NMPED’s commitment to the program, ensuring its stability and growth. Farm to Table would like to thank the many farmers, school food services direc-

tors, students, teachers, organizations, agencies, and policymakers who have nurtured the Farm to School program as it has evolved. They also invite the public to Food & Farms Day and School Nutrition Day at the Legislature on January 24, 2019. This is a wonderful event that takes place in the Rotunda at the Roundhouse and gives people a chance to come together to celebrate, learn, and engage around all of this work. Please feel free to contact Farm to Table at 505-660-8403 or Pam Roy at pam@farmtotablenm.org.

Farm to School Tour with Anthony Wagner, co-owner of Wagner Farms in Corrales. Bottom: 2017 NM Food and Farms Day, NM State Legislature. Photos courtesy of Farm to Table.


FACES OF FOOD

Common Ground CONVERSATION AND COMMUNITY AT TRES HERMANAS FARM By Zoey Fink · Photos by Stephanie Cameron

On the farm with Zoey Fink, Max Bervig, and members of Tres Hermanas Farm. (Names have been omitted by request.)

I mop sweat from my brow and take a seat on the cooler nestled under our shade structure at Tres Hermanas Farm in Albuquerque, an agricultural program hosted by Lutheran Family Services (LFS) refugee resettlement agency. Adama* sits to my right and Eda* sits across from us. Both women are refugees originally from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), resettled in Albuquerque through LFS. Adama fled the DRC in early 2010, seeking asylum in Malawi and applying for refugee status through the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). Eight years, 54

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dozens of interviews, background checks, and medical appointments later, Adama and her family were approved for refugee status and assigned to the LFS Albuquerque office to embark on the resettlement process. We’ve spent the last three hours hoeing and harvesting in the collective plots at Tres Hermanas Farm, bringing some order to the sea of weeds that has risen among the eggplants, tomatoes, okra, squash, flowers, beans, and bitter tomatoes that are just beginning to set fruit. We have a bin of freshly harvested leeks between us, and we’re me-

thodically trimming the roots and leaves and putting them in a clean basket for tomorrow's farmers market. Eda, a fellow refugee, has volunteered to interpret Swahili and English for us. Eda fled to Sudan after being blinded during a violent attack in her hometown in the DRC. Before the attack, Eda attended agricultural school and was teaching herself English. Though she was robbed of her ability to see, Eda works tirelessly to master English and exudes positivity when asked about the future. Her faith is steadfast and she is an important member of the team at Tres Hermanas.


I ask Adama how she felt when she got off the plane at the Sunport, what her thoughts were the first time she and I met. “I was very scared to come to America, but when I got off the plane I was happy. Zoey and Antoine [a LFS staff member] met me and my family at the airport and we were all smiling even though we were tired. Many days I miss my home, but we were not safe there.” I don’t know the details of Adama’s struggles in the DRC, and I’ve never asked. Like Eda, many of the refugees with whom I work have gone through unthinkable trauma—watching friends and loved ones lose their lives, having homes burned to the ground, countless stories of rape and abuse, the pain of leaving children and family members behind—and yet they persevere, seeking safety and stability in a country far from home. As we sit cleaning leeks, Adama tells me: “I miss being able to communicate with everyone, with the people around me. It is hard for me because I don’t speak English. But here [in America] we have so many opportunities; my children have a chance to be educated.” While providing space for participants to grow produce for home consumption is the main goal of Tres Hermanas Farms, we also sell surplus produce at farmers markets to help participants earn extra income and practice their English. Adama has set up at both the Los Ranchos and Downtown Growers’ markets this year. “Farming has helped me meet many people and helped me with the language,” Adama explains. “The markets are frightening for me, having to speak English with strangers, I make many mistakes and there are many words that I don’t know, but everyone has met me with kindness.” Tres Hermanas Farm provides a space that is familiar for many refugees from agrarian backgrounds. Though the landscape is different, many aspects of growing food and tending to fields are universal, at least at small-scale farms. Participants tend to seek out seeds sourced from their home countries; our field is alive with nyanya shuma (African bitter tomato), goosa (a cooking green from Chad), and lingalinga (amaranth). Others might buy seeds from

local sources, borrow from the seed library at the Rio Grande Community Farm, or seek guidance from me as we flip through seed catalogues together. Adama and I discuss the crops that she longs for from Africa that will not grow in New Mexico’s climate. She describes a small type of banana that she used to cook nearly every day in Malawi and the DRC. When I ask if she has discovered any new foods in Albuquerque that she enjoys, she says, “I can find yams here that I love to eat that I did not have access to living in a camp in Malawi. At the farm I can grow lingalinga and nyanya shuma and tomatoes that I cook. Grocery stores are full of fresh things all year. I love grapes. These are new to me. My kids love Taki Chips!” The sun is getting high and the basket of cleaned leeks is overflowing. We put them in the cooler to store alongside bags of eggplants that we will take to the Downtown Growers’ Market tomorrow. I ask Adama what her goals are for her future here. “For myself, I am quickly getting old. I am telling my children that they need to go to school and get an education. For myself, my children are my future. I am hoping that I can get a job and also continue working with the farm. My daughter is working and my two other children are going to school. They are learning English quickly and even learning to read. I never had an education and I tell my children that education is the most important thing that they can do for their futures. I just want to say thank you to all of Albuquerque for receiving [refugees] who are not the same color and not the same culture as the US. We are thanking you people because you have welcomed us, taken care of us, and have been friendly to us.”

JOIN US FOR THE

ANCIENT WAY FALL FESTIVAL OCTOBER 6, 12 - 5 PM Live music, food, vendors, and harvest displays!

*Names have been changed Join Tres Hermanas Farm for their 2018 fundraiser, the Annual Maize Maze, October 20, 21, 27, and 28 from 11am to 6pm at Los Poblanos Open Space. For more information, visit riograndefarm.org or call program coordinator Zoey Fink at 505-835-5527.

LOCATED 1 MILE EAST OF THE EL MORRO NATIONAL MONUMENT


A Farm, A Ranch, A Refuge HUMAN SPACES FOR WILD MIGRATIONS By Briana Olson

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Doug Aitken, migration (empire), still, 2008. © Doug Aitken, courtesy 303 Gallery, New York; Victoria Miro Gallery, London; Galerie Presenhuber, Zurich; Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

This striving for balance—mimicking vanished wetlands while protecting the economic viability of neighboring farms—is the norm, not the exception, when it comes to wildlife conservation. 56

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@TravelNewMexico


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he sandhill crane is not featured in artist Doug Aitken's migration. Nor are sandpipers, snow geese, ibis, or any of the other hundreds of bird species whose migratory path aligns with the long, narrow river that is New Mexico's lifeline. But the video installation—a haunting sequence of wild animals set in a series of budget hotel rooms—arrived at SITE Santa Fe last October, just as sandhill cranes were traveling to winter along the Rio Grande. And while the billboard-sized image of a horse pacing in front of a TV or a deer ransacking a minibar or an owl shredding a down pillow in a nondescript motel room in a nondescript industrial area is meant, clearly, to invite reflection on the strange contemporary forms of human migration, and the way human sprawl erodes animal habitat, I left the gallery thinking of wilder, more welcoming stopover sites: protected places like Bosque del Apache, wildlife refuges and open spaces that are something like extended stay hotels (breakfast included) for tens of thousands of cranes and other wintering waterfowl. Months later, with winter and the cranes and Aitken's installation come and gone, I head south to Socorro County to explore the intersecting foodsheds of the wild and the domesticated. I'm en route to tour two private properties that have been put in conservation along the river, but first, I take a detour and circle through the 1,700-acre Bernardo Waterfowl Management Area, part of the Ladd Gordon Waterfowl Complex. It's a quiet June afternoon, and the only bird I sight with certainty is killdeer, running along the roadside. Yet in the croplands—green cornfields shining against unbroken blue sky— I see the promise of winter visitors, boisterous flocks of the majestic cranes whose flight paths defy the gridwork we have made of the earth, whose presence in North America predates Homo sapiens by at least 2.4 million years, and yet who have come to rely on forage (and habitat) cultivated and managed by humans. Far from picky, the sandhill crane is an opportunist and omnivore, and will eat eggs, invertebrates, snails, lizards, rodents, and even small birds, but it leans vegetarian, and favors roots and seeds. It uses its long beak to dig for tubers and chufa nuts, and to graze on the stubble of harvested sorghum and corn. Sated, it likes to loaf in fields of alfalfa—a green it will also eat. It is named for the Sandhills of Nebraska, near the Platte River, where the lesser sandhill crane, known to migrate from as far as Siberia, lays over in spring. The Rocky Mountain population of greater sandhills breeds in Montana's Bitterroots or the northern reaches of the Rockies, returning summer after summer, with the same partner, to the same nest site, and winters almost exclusively along the middle Rio Grande. "It's important to remember," says riparian ecologist Gina Dello Russo, that Bosque del Apache is "just a remnant and created snapshot of what used to happen all up and down the river." Dello Russo was resident ecologist at the famed wildlife refuge for seventeen years, and is now a board member of Save Our Bosque Task Force. Historically, she says, the Rio Grande sculpted a patchwork of habitats, with flooded areas and cattail marshes where sandhill cranes fed. In spring, shallow waters would promote invertebrate bloom, attracting migratory shorebirds.

The river was last allowed to flood naturally in the 1940s, and as much as ninety-three percent of the region's native wetlands have been lost since 1918. Dello Russo tells me that in the 1970s, the crane population at the refuge dropped to as low as seventeen. That was when wildlife managers decided to raise crops for cranes and other waterfowl—a practice that also limits damage to farmlands. This striving for balance—mimicking vanished wetlands while protecting the economic viability of neighboring farms—is the norm, not the exception, when it comes to wildlife conservation. The word "environmentalist" might not conjure the picture of a woman driving a tractor or a cowboy driving cattle or a figure in camouflage, crouched in the predawn light, but farmers, ranchers, and hunters have contributed land and labor to form and manage protected spaces throughout the West. Also, hunting stamps and tags are an important source of revenue for state conservation efforts. "There's a misconception that farmers aren't stewards of the land," says Cecilia Rosacker, executive director of the Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust (RGALT). The organization has worked with landowners along the river's middle corridor to place conservation easements restricting development on twenty-three riverside properties, including the 350-acre La Joya farm that she's invited me to visit. "Caring for the land," she says, for a farmer, "is a matter of business." Also, she adds, living close to the land, witnessing the "primal call of nature" that is the day's first birdsong, the day's first light, is part of why farmers—herself included—do what they do. Hank Taliaferro, the La Joya farm's owner and birder-in-chief, is running late, so Rosacker and I climb in the truck with Victor R. Saiz, the farm's manager, who peppers his observations on the crops—teff, some sorghum, and fescue, all being raised for horse feed—with stories of his own family's migrations. He shows us a trough they've cleared of invasive salt cedar (a fire hazard and threat to the soil), where, with funding from Partners for Wildlife, they're working to construct a natural corridor. Neither Rosacker nor Saiz can help me identify the small birds fluttering alongside the river, but Taliaferro later tells me some two hundred and thirty avian species live or stop over on the property. At one point, Taliaferro mentions that all the elk now in New Mexico descend from Rocky Mountain elk transplanted from Yellowstone. The Gila subspecies was hunted to extinction in the early twentieth century. Taliaferro himself is a hunter. Hunting was his introduction to wildlife, and hunting is how he's introduced his sons to the wild. When I ask how he marries his identity as a hunter with his identity as a conservationist, he runs through a list—hunting for meat, not trophies; hunting common species, like mallards, and knowing how to tell one from another; how hunting dollars contribute to conservation—before reaching what feels like his real answer. "I think it's what makes us human," he says, "what keeps it real." He also draws a straight line from his boyhood hunting to his purchase of this farm. Saiz keeps joking that farmers don't need to gamble—farming is gambling, the saying goes—and when I ask Taliaferro WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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Greater sandhill cranes and snow geese at Bosque del Apache. Photo by Stephanie Cameron.

about the gamble of purchasing not just a farm but one with a conservation easement, he calls it a dream, outlining concrete goals—clearing more salt cedar, planting more cottonwoods, hosting pheasant release hunting, raising vegetables, breaking even—and concludes that their progress, after six years, despite a few failures, is good. Then he mentions Annapolis, his hometown. Maryland’s eastern shore, he says, has gone from farms to a concrete jungle. "This," he gestures at the land that surrounds the farmhouse, "is to counter that." An hour later, standing with Rosacker and Chuck Muncy on a lookout point on Muncy's 500-acre ranch—also placed in conservation through partnership with RGALT—I have a breathtaking view of the river curving north, bordered with a vibrant green cottonwood gallery. Muncy points at houses scattered on the horizon, and tells me none of that was there when he was growing up. As we pile back into his truck and drop down toward the riverbank, Muncy talks about his late father, a fit, hardworking man who bought this land in 1974, and recalls how together they dug the wells and put in two windmills. Near the river, he points out some shrubs whose berries, he thinks, songbirds eat. "Wolfberry," Rosacker says. Sandhill cranes, I learn later, also eat their fruit, and somewhere on this stretch of river, there's a roost, a shallow site where wintering cranes come for the night, but Muncy admits he hasn't seen it. He also admits to having had reservations about the easement at first, but says he warmed to it once he realized this was what he wanted to do, and where he wanted to be for the rest of his life. 58

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Thunderclouds loom above the ranch's uplands as we head out, and the conversation turns to weather, the hope of rains both for Muncy's rangelands and Rosacker's farm, then circles back to a subject Rosacker and I discussed earlier: the SunZia Southwest Transmission project. Near the Escondida bridge, she points at open sky above the river that, if the project's permits are approved, will be crossed with two 500-kilovolt transmission lines, carrying electricity from eastern New Mexico to Arizona. The proposed river crossing lies between Bosque del Apache, the Ladd Gordon complex, and the Sevilleta refuge—square in the middle of the Central Flyway. Naturally, Rosacker is concerned about bird deaths and environmental impacts of the lines, but she's also worried about the viewshed. By the time I'm back on I-25, it's dark, and the rain has started. When I approach Albuquerque, my mind turns to Valle de Oro, a site that operated as Price's dairy through the 1980s, now the first urban wildlife refuge in the Southwest. It's easy to see a parallel between the surrounding neighborhood and the industrial locations of the motels where animals are caged in Aitken's video; Mountainview contains thirty-two of Albuquerque's thirty-six EPA-regulated industrial sites, and South Broadway is lined with salvage yards, old RVs and cars waiting to be picked of their usable parts. But this isn't some strange fictional landscape where deer have been reduced to scavenging motel minibars; it's a neighborhood whose community came together when these 570 acres went up for sale, determined to preserve the open space, for themselves and for wildlife.


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Left: Wheat paste murals by activist-artist Chip Thomas, inspired by a crane dance performed at Valle de Oro, photo by Briana Olson. Right: Sandhill crane, photo by Stephanie Cameron.

In June, when I visited Valle de Oro, deputy refuge director Katie McVey had stayed late the night before, using flood irrigation to fill the refuge's first playa, and as we skirted the broad, shallow pool, stooping to admire a pair of iridescent tiger beetles, she chatted excitedly about the woodhouse and spadefoot toads that had come out to enjoy the midnight water. A playa is a type of intermittent wetlands, and McVey explained how when it goes dry, toads crawl deep into the playa's cracks, seeking moisture. Their presence, she said, is one marker of a healthy ecosystem. So is milkweed, a native plant (and food for butterflies and other pollinators) that McVey excitedly pointed out. Before my visit, I'd asked about birds at the refuge, hoping to catch the tail-end of spring migrations. By drawing my attention to other species, McVey means to emphasize the intricacy of an ecosystem. In the end, it's not all about the cranes. At Valle de Oro, in fact, the transition from alfalfa and fescue to wetlands and upland habitat, once completed, will mean fewer wintering cranes, who will instead be drawn to Candelaria Farms—a plan also meant to divert larger birds from the nearby airport and air force base. Clearing non-native species, building wetlands, and planting native willows and cottonwoods will support a variety of year-round and migratory wildlife, including western kingbirds, sandpipers, and American pipits (check ebird.org for recent sightings). A saltgrass meadow swale, sustainable alternative to concrete drainage, will run diagonally through the ref60

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uge. On September 29, their inaugural Build Your Refuge day, staff and volunteers will work on Valle de Oro's first public trail. The goal, McVey says, is "habitat diversity, species diversity, for a diverse audience." It's the first refuge she knows of to have an environmental justice strategic plan, and in keeping with the US Fish and Wildlife Service's goals for the new urban wildlife refuge program, Valle de Oro aims to engage people who haven't been exposed to the wild, and who might be more comfortable indoors than out. McVey is particularly proud of the involvement of school groups and the Rocky Mountain Youth Corps. "Instead of a pipeline," she says, "we say we're building a job acequia." Already, one military veteran who volunteered at the refuge has landed a position at Sevilleta. McVey envisions Valle de Oro as a "gateway to other spaces, to other opportunities for recreation," goals to be achieved by connecting the refuge with existing paths in the bosque, but, most of all, as "a gateway to a deeper connection with nature." The sandhill crane is called an umbrella species—one that is so widely loved that many rallied to protect it last century, when its numbers dwindled—because its protection has resulted in protections for other, lesser known species. In more than one indigenous tradition, the crane is a peacemaker. rgalt.org, fws.gov/refuge/valle_de_oro


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Breaking the Ice A CONVERSATION WITH A LOCAL CHEF ON RECENT IMMIGRATION RAIDS By Willy Carleton

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At first, I was pretty terrified as the leader of the kitchen. I was afraid to lose people who we had had for years, that we had invested time and money and created a relationship with, that those people were going to be separated from their families, or have to leave us.” 62

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rising tide of raids by Immigration and Customs @TravelNewMexico Enforcement (ICE) agents has swept over the nation. The country witnessed a thirty percent increase in ICE deportations in 2017 compared to the previous year, and recent media reports suggest that 2018 will continue the trend. In New Mexico, many local businesses have been affected. Between February 26 and March 2, sixty-three businesses in New Mexico were audited by ICE and, according to several local chefs, more audits have since followed.

A N N U A L R I O G R A N D E A G R I C U LT U R A L L A N D T R U S T F U N D R A I S E R

To learn more about how these raids have affected local restaurants, I recently sat down with a chef in a popular and longstanding establishment here in New Mexico. When I entered the crowded eatery, a man in a white chef jacket walked across the restaurant swiftly, extending a hand with a broad smile and introduced himself. “Mind if we talk somewhere more private?� he asked as he extended his arm toward the front door.

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“Of course not,� I said. “Lead the way.�

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As we strolled into a nearby and much emptier restaurant, he asked if I had spoken with any other chefs on this topic.

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“No, it’s been difficult. It seems many people, understandably, are afraid to talk about it.�

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“Well, I’m afraid!� he said with a nervous laugh. His disarming smile bespoke nothing of his fear.

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I asked him, again, whether he was comfortable doing this interview. He affirmed that he was and that it was important to him. He asked me, though, not to include his name or that of his restaurant. What follows is our brief conversation.

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Shortly before we parted ways, a few minutes after I had turned off the recorder, he off-handedly remarked that he had never voted and had never considered himself political. “Well,� I said, “having this conversation seems political.�

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He responded with a laugh and said, “I guess this is the most political thing I’ve ever done.� He paused, and with a more serious note, added, “But it’s just so important.�

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Edible: Has your restaurant been included in any of the recent ICE raids?

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Local Chef: We haven’t been included, but we’ve heard about other restaurants being raided. We haven’t been raided yet. Edible: How have those raids affected the atmosphere of your restaurant? Local Chef: At first, I was pretty terrified as the leader of the kitchen. I was afraid to lose people who we had had for years, that we had invested time and money and created a relationship with, that those people were going to be separated from their families, or have to leave us. You know, at first, I think we took some pretty extreme measures. I was really ready to protect

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the staff. We had done things like figure out where they could go. We had done things like creating signals that could come from the front of the house to the back of the house via the computer system, so that if and when it happened, we could protect our staff, and we could have a shelter-in-place location for them. You know, I used to work for the state, so they taught us all about shelter-in-place, and they taught us things like having water and buckets. So the first thing I did was buy water and buckets, and I said, “This is where you’ll go and you’ll stay here until you get the all-clear signal.” Edible: How did your workers respond to you going to those measures? Local Chef: Oh man, they were like over-the-top grateful. They were like, we can’t believe that I, or the company, would stick its neck out for them—and I don’t know if it was the company because I didn’t go to my boss and ask him. I just said, “I’m the leader of the kitchen and this is what I’m doing to protect my staff.” But they couldn’t believe it. There were people that came to me with tears in their eyes, saying, “I can’t believe you are willing to do this. Thank you so much.” I think, in a lot of ways, all of us were operating out of fear, but it built a morale in the kitchen to be a more united family, because they saw that, though maybe not the very highest management, people were ready to take their back, and we were not just going to give them up. You know? Edible: Have these waves of raids affected how you’ll approach hiring practices down the road? Local Chef: I really try to have positive projections in my life. . . . Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t, but I try to just envision us not getting popped, you know? . . . I don’t know what we’d do if we did get raided, but right now I’m hiring off references, skill set, presentation at the interview—do they look me in the eye? It’s not, is this person a Latino or is this person an English speaker. Am I going to be safer building a team with English speakers? I’m not looking at it that way. I’m thinking about who is the best person for this job—to get the food out quickly and deliciously to that customer. So, I’d be interested to know if other people are, but I’m not and I do all the hiring. . . . You know, there were people at the beginning, who were like, “Chef, I have to quit, I’m going back to my country,” and I was terrified. I was like, “Man, I can’t lose you. You cook things perfectly, year after year, what am I going to do without you?” And you know, he didn’t end up leaving. He actually owns his own business [here in town] outside of us working together in the restaurant industry, and he was ready to walk away from it all. You know? He’s a responsible guy. . . . He’s a guy who does well for himself and has established himself in this town and he was ready to just give it all up and go back to to his country. Edible: Do you sense that many of your workers share that heightened fear right now? 64

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Local Chef: I think it’s dissipated. I don’t think people are still operating out of fear. With the recent raids, the ones in the last month, more of the management is talking about it. I have to be honest, I’ve been running around managing the company in a way that I haven’t had that one-on-one face time with a lot of my staff. . . . One thing I’d like to add is how I got into this conversation with a friend from my church, and quickly realized that we were of really different political opinions. I mean, this is a really tight friend of mine that I’ve been close with for many years and who I trust and love. And we were having a conversation over dinner and he brought up the fact that he supports what’s happening with people being sent back. It just hit me on a really deep level that you can know somebody and love them for the way that they operate in life, the way they interact with people, the way they interact with you, and conduct themselves in this world, but then on some really deep level you can disagree with somebody that you love. I’m not the kind of person who talks about religion with people, and I don’t talk about politics either. I’m embarrassingly enough apolitical, never having participated in our country’s politics ever. Now it’s embarrassing to me. But it’s interesting how you can love somebody, but think so opposite than them. And it was the first time I had felt I had something to say, and I did say it. And we’re still friends, but I definitely let that person, who I know and love and respect, know where I stand on this. I told him everything I just told you, about what steps I was prepared to take to prevent it. Edible: Do you think you feel so strongly about it because of how well you know your workers, or how important you know they are economically? Local Chef: For me, it’s when I get to know their kids. That’s when it messes with me. It’s like thinking about a raid that happens at work, and the parent goes away. What the hell happens to their kid? What happens now? It has to do with our bond, and the relationship, more than economics. I mean, my job is all about numbers, it’s all about labor budgets, food costing, and all that stuff. I’m held accountable for that stuff and I try to make the company succeed as much as possible in regard to those things, but I also feel that, if I’m doing my job right, I should be able to train anyone to do this work in the kitchen. So, it’s not about economics. If you think about it, every time you turn an employee, it’s about two thousand dollars in training before they are up to par to really replace that other person. This decision is not based on economics at all, it’s all about the relationship, of knowing the people, knowing their families, of going to their kids’ quinceañeras, going to their baptisms, really knowing these people. Which might be strange for a lot of chefs—I bet you not a lot of chefs get invited to their workers’ kids quinceañeras and baptisms—but I like to think that we have a special thing going on.


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The Freedom Behind the Pho NEW MEXICO'S VIETNAMESE LEGACY By Jason Strykowski · Photos by Stephanie Cameron

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Rice vermicelli bowl with grilled lemongrass beef at May Cafe.

Today, Paul Bunyan looms above one of the oldest Vietnamese restaurants in Albuquerque. The May Café opened in 1992 under the ownership of Liem Nguyen, a refugee from Saigon. Over the next several decades, other Vietnamese restaurants sprang up in the area. Eventually, dozens of Vietnamese restaurants would take root in Albuquerque, many owned by immigrants who had escaped their homeland for a new life in the United States. 66

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Left: Paul Bunyan towers over May Cafe. Right: Grilled beef skewers at May Cafe.

n New Mexico, Paul Bunyan is the avatar for Vietnamese food. Standing more than forty feet tall and dressed in his signature red shirt and blue pants, the Bunyan statue was originally built in 1968 to draw attention to the lumberyard below him. While Bunyan stood sentry, his little corner of Albuquerque near the intersections of Louisiana and Central transformed from the decaying remnants of Route 66 into a local hub for Asian culture. Today, Bunyan looms above one of the oldest Vietnamese restaurants in Albuquerque. The May CafĂŠ opened in 1992 under the ownership of Liem Nguyen, a refugee from Saigon. Over the next several decades, other Vietnamese restaurants sprang up in the area. Eventually, dozens of Vietnamese restaurants would take root in Albuquerque, many owned by immigrants who had escaped their homeland for a new life in the United States. The southern Vietnamese had endured two decades of fighting with the Communist North when their capital city of Saigon fell on April 30, 1975. While supporters of the northern regime reveled in the reunification of their country, many in the south feared life under a Communist regime. Those who had served or worked with the Americans during the war turned to Washington for help. Officially, Americans had ended their military efforts in Vietnam in 1973, but with the fall of Saigon, President Gerald Ford's administration rushed to evacuate Americans and their allies from Saigon. The Interagency Task Force ultimately assisted 130,000 Vietnamese in leaving the recently defeated South for the United States.

The roads out of Vietnam were treacherous for those with or without American assistance. Some marched for miles to get out of the country. Others bartered their way onto fishing and passenger boats. Once seaborne, evacuees had to take their chances with pirates, unwelcoming nations, and tempestuous weather. Interviewed by New Mexico PBS in 2017, Nu Nguyen, an Albuquerque resident, recalls reaching a United States envoy in the middle of the night. "When we met the US ship at night, I was very worried and scared," she told PBS. "I could not even see my hand." When they reached the American boats, Nguyen climbed up a net carrying two small cousins in each arm. About 110,000 of the evacuees were taken to Guam where American forces processed them in an effort called Operation New Life. Next, these refugees were moved to military bases in the United States. Eventually, many received help from church groups and charitable organizations. In concert with the United Nations Refugee Agency, these groups helped Vietnamese people reach far-flung destinations across the United States. About three thousand people of Vietnamese and Laotian heritage would arrive in Albuquerque. Prior to 1975, the United States Census recorded only 635 people of Asian descent in Albuquerque. By 1980, that number stood around 4,000. A decade later, it had risen to nearly 7,000. In Albuquerque, many recent immigrants and refugees gathered along Central Avenue, where the disintegration of Route 66 made real estate inexpensive. Naturally, restaurants featuring Vietnamese cuisine soon followed.


Pork sausage báhn mi at Coda Bakery.

Bordering China, Laos, Cambodia, and the South China Sea, Vietnam is a crossroads of culture and taste buds. Northern sections of the country serve dishes closely related to Chinese foods. The center of the country is known for spicier plates with less homage to the Chinese palate. Southern foods are often more fruit-forward and therefore a little sweeter. Nationwide staples include rice, fish sauce, shrimp, and herbs like mint and cilantro. Albuquerque menus today feature many Vietnamese specialities, including gỏicuốn, or spring rolls; bánh xeo, or crepes; and bun cha, grilled pork served with fresh herbs, lightly pickled vegetables, vermicelli rice noodles, and dipping sauce. Of course, the most common menu items remain pho and bánh mi, two street foods that both evolved during the colonial period and that have become the most ubiquitous Vietnamese foods in the United States (and much of the world) since the fall of Saigon. Purportedly only about a century old, pho is a rice-noodle soup usually made with beef broth and served with beef and fresh herbs. The vermicelli used in the soup came from a local tradition, but the beef was a direct result of colonization. French colonists and Chinese migrant laborers had a taste for steak, and they popularized the meat in active commercial regions like Hanoi. The city hosted the first pho shops in Vietnam. From Hanoi, the popularity of the soup spread south. By the end of the French colonial period in 1954, countless variations existed. Around the same time, Vietnamese cooks began to experiment with the baguettes brought to them decades prior by the French. For years, the bread had been served with pâté and butter in accordance 68

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with French tradition. The Vietnamese called the loaves bánh mi, or wheat bread. Vietnamese cooks put their own spin on the French staple by stuffing baguettes with local vegetables, herbs, and meats. Coda Bakery, just across the street from the May Café, specializes in bánh mi. The bakery serves a dozen varieties of bánh mi, spring rolls, and Vietnamese coffees in a cozy, deli-like setting. The use of fresh ingredients, baguettes baked in-house, and specialty items such as house made tofu have garnered an enthusiastic following. Around lunch time, a diverse crowd forms a line at Coda Bakery: families back from little league games; coworkers on break; and, of course, local Vietnamese customers shopping for fresh organic soy milk, sesame balls, and pastries, not readily available elsewhere in New Mexico. Today, roughly thirty restaurants serve Vietnamese food in locations throughout Albuquerque. Vietnamese culture and cuisine have become an integral part of a city that only a few generations ago was home to just a handful of people of Asian descent. Almost forty years after arriving in New Mexico, Liem Nguyen is still thankful for the freedom afforded to him by the United States. He was in Saigon as a teenager and remembers the threat of living under a Communist regime. Instead, he works today under a massive fiberglass statue of a lumberjack, a tribute to Paul Bunyan that is now at the crossroads of Vietnamese cuisine in the middle of the high desert. Coda Bakery 230 Louisiana SE, Albuquerque, 505-232-0085, codabakery.com May Cafe 111 Louisiana SE, Albuquerque, 505-265-4448, maycafe.com


COMPOST to LOCAL VEGETABLES FOOD WASTE to COMPOST FRYER OIL to BIODIESEL

Reunity Resources helps divert restaurant food waste from landfills to create healthy soil and biofuels. Our services include fryer oil collection, food-waste collection, and fresh produce from our farm to your restaurant. Engage in the full-circle food system, locally with Reunity Resources. 505.393.1196 • reunityresources.com

SEND US YOUR HEIRLOOM

we are collecting recipes to feature in our early winter issue. think you have the best mole recipe? best holiday cookie recipe? best adobo recipe? Now is your time to show off!

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EDIBLE TRADITION

Seriously Smoking MEET THE CHEFS PRESERVING HISTORY THROUGH BARBEQUE IN ALBUQUERQUE By Nora Hickey · Photos by Sergio Salvador

Mr. Powdrell’s Barbeque serving up BBQ ribs since 1962.

You hear their voices—murmuring, satisfied—before you see them. A gathering of customers eats just around the corner, but when you first walk into Mr. Powdrell’s Barbeque on Central Avenue, you are hit with a literal wall of history. Mr. Powdrell’s, a fifty-six-year-old Albuquerque institution, welcomes visitors with reminders of the past: a wooden pie safe from a great-grandmother, a black and white photo of thirteen members of the Powdrell family, and the calm visage of the iconic Mr. Pete Powdrell himself. Under the serene gaze of Mr. Powdrell, pulled chicken spills from a bun that’s barely able to close. The Powdrell children, reared on father Pete’s and mother Catherine’s ever-present, fine-tuned barbeque 70

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sauce, now oversee two restaurants in the city, the second on Fourth Street in the North Valley. Although the Powdrell name has been synonymous with barbeque in Albuquerque since 1962, the term as used locally might mean grilling just as much as the lengthy smoking process that is both verb and noun. That is to say, barbeque in the Duke City does not evoke the same arguments over definition and purity as it might in sweet and saucy Kansas City, the vinegar-forward Carolinas, mellow Memphis, or the charred pits of Texas. And for residents and visitors, that’s a good thing—here, we can enjoy the fruits of all different types of barbeque, without the worry of “getting it right.”


Art, Culture, History and Beyond

Join The Circles Explorers, the Museum of New Mexico Foundation’s newest membership level, tailor-made for those with an adventurous spirit. We’re pioneering a new way to engage in the art, culture and history of our four state museums in Santa Fe and seven historic sites statewide.

Become a Circles Explorer today! For more information call Cara O’Brien, Director of The Circles, at 505.982.6366, ext. 118, email cara@museumfoundation.org or visit museumfoundation.org/explorers WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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Left: Joe Powdrell. Right: Brisket sandwich, collard greens, and black eyed peas.

Elsewhere in town, with its own storied past, Bottoms Up Barbecue cooks from the ultimate smoking setup: a food truck with a custommade pit built by a former welder at Sandia Labs. “We can handle a whole hog on there if we need to,” owner Keith White notes. White started barbecuing at his family’s farm in Georgia, where the scent of slowly roasting meats was as familiar as the heavy blue Southern sky. “We had pigs on our farm, and trees, and there it was, a primal thing—meat and fire,” White says. White and his cousin, pitmaster Chadrick Smith, can coax a multitude of flavor from their flames. Working in the tradition of Georgia 72

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As a tradition rooted in congregating and working with materials at hand, barbeque proved to be a convivial home to many communities, Black Americans in particular. In Albuquerque, the food was, quite literally, a refuge for Black travelers in an officially segregated midcentury America. Along Route 66, motorists knew they could safely stop at Aunt Brenda’s Pit Barbecue (owned and operated by Virginia Ballou) because of its listing in the Negro Motorist Green Book, a compilation of establishments that were friendly to Black travelers. At Aunt Brenda’s, on 406 N. Arno Street, patrons could sate themselves on barbecued beef and pork, ribs, and fried chicken. The legacy of hospitality is present today, with Powdrell’s and Bottoms Up providing a place for comfort to travelers and locals alike. Above all, barbeque makes any place a home. And nowhere is that more evident than in the cozy confines of the renovated house where Joe and his family serve beef brisket and collard greens—with a side of history. “It’s a social phenomenon, a way to philosophize, a theology,” says Joe, “Barbeque is a way to see and live life.” B

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Joe Powdrell, operator of the North Valley location, is highly attuned to the history that precedes him. “We’ve been on this journey for four generations,” he explains seated at a wooden table during the calm between lunch and dinner crowds. His great-grandfather, Isaac, was the first in a long line to practice barbeque as a way of life. “Isaac cooked mainly for community events. He fused barbeque with whatever work he could get in the post-slavery era. He was a naturalist and believed that everything was naturally endowed with flavor—a tomato needs no help being a tomato,” Joe explains. That belief is present in every meal that comes out of a Powdrell kitchen. “The ingredients Isaac used preceded a lot of the processed ones we now know as vinegar, ketchup, and mustard, and that’s what I appreciate about him.”

barbeque, Bottoms Up uses wood smoke to transform taste. “We focus on the type of smoke, often lighter, of oak, pecan, hickory, and peach wood,” White explains. And though the pair can turn out a mouthwatering brisket and pork shoulder, they reach beyond the archetypal ingredient to create vegetarian and vegan smoked fare. The barbecued jackfruit tacos have converted more than a few meat aficionados. As he experiments, White is grateful to the legacy of barbeque, and in particular Powdrell’s, which White describes as the “founding father of BBQ here.”

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Fusing flavors and techniques from some of the country’s, and the world’s, most significant histories, modern-day American barbeque emerged from a complex past. Many trace its origins back to the initial contact between Spanish conquistadors and indigenous peoples, when the Europeans modified the Natives’ practice of cooking meat under low heat for hours. The subsequent adaptations are emblematic of the flexible nature of the delicious preparation.

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Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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A Chile-licious Event! GREEN CHILE CHEESEBURGER SMACKDOWN

Photo by Caitlin Jenkins, Simply Social Marc Quiñones of MÁS Tapas y Vino won the Judges' Award and David Sellers of Street Food Institute won the People's Choice Award.

Seven of Santa Fe's finest chefs competed in the sixth annual Green Chile Cheeseburger Smackdown on September 8. Two innovative iterations on the classic green chile cheeseburger took top honors: MÁS Tapas y Vino won the Judges' Award to become the Reigning Chomp, and Street Food Institute won the People's Choice Award for the second year in a row. As always, this year’s competition was open to any willing New Mexico restaurant. The eight finalists were: David Sellers of Street Food Institute, Marc Quiñones of MÁS Tapas y Vino at Hotel Andaluz, Jen and Evan Doughty of The Palace Restaurant and Saloon, Milton Villarrubia III of Second Street Brewery, Shane Alexander of El Farol, Marie Yniguez of Bocadillos, and David Ruiz of Toltec Brewing. The Smackdown grew the Loyal to Local Program, in which farmers and ranchers sponsor individual finalists to help offset the cost of providing samples at the event. Eleven producers donated to the chefs: Ranney Ranch, Peculiar Farms, El Morro Valley Ranch, Beck & Bulow, Silver Leaf Farms, Romero Farms, Wagner Farms, Young Guns Produce, Southwest Heritage Mills, Harris Ranch, Shamrock, and Bueno Foods. Each winning chef took home a $500 prize, and edible made a $750 donation to both Cooking with Kids and the Southwest Grassfed Livestock Alliance. Quiñones, executive chef of MÁS Tapas y Vino, said, “I’ve been blessed to be able to compete in competitions all over the country, literally from coast to coast. And without taking longer than a split second to think about it, I can easily say that the Green Chile Cheeseburger Smackdown is my favorite event to participate in! There’s nothing more symbolic of the great state of New Mexico than a green 74

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chile cheeseburger, and to be named the Reigning Chomp is a significant honor that me and my team are extra proud of! I love calling New Mexico my home and the people of our communities are what make it extra special.” Sellers, executive chef of Street Food Institute, recounted, “I told my team before the Smackdown the way to win this event is to come to the table with the best cooked burgers, juicy and well seasoned. They worked together as a strong team and turned out what we needed to win. I am so proud of them!" “We were thrilled with the new venue this year and look forward to making The Bridge at Santa Fe Brewing our permanent home,” Stephanie Cameron, the event’s producer, said. “We also want to give a special shout out to all the local grassfed ranchers, Ranney Ranch, El Morro Valley Ranch, Beck & Bulow, and Peculiar Farms, who supplied meat to four of this year’s competitors. They made our event that much more meaningful when we are trying to educate consumers on their local foodshed.” Edible thanks all our supporters, attendees, volunteers, and partners, including Tourism Santa Fe, Simply Santa Fe, Santa Fe Brewing Co., Bueno Foods, Young Guns Produce, La Montañita Co-op, and countless others who helped make this event a success. In particular, we want to thank all the restaurants and chefs for their efforts in showcasing the green chile cheeseburger. Without them, we wouldn’t have a reason to celebrate. See you again on September 7, 2019, at this chile-licious event.


Chef Marc Quiñones MAS Tapas y Vino 125 2nd Street NW Albuquerque • hotelandaluz.com

Chef shane Alexander el farol 808 Canyon Rd santa fe • elfarolsantafe.com

sponsored by

buenofoods.com

sponsored by

elmorrovalleyranch.com

Chef David Sellers Street Food Institute log on for locations streetfoodinstitute.org

Chef marie Yniguez slow roasted bocadillos 200 Lomas Blvd NW albuquerque • bocadillos505.com

sponsored by

ranneyranch.com

sponsored by

peculiarfarm.com WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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sponsored by

Chef Milton Villarrubia, III second street brewery 2920 Rufina St + 2 other locations Santa Fe • secondstreetbrewery.com

younggunsproduce.com

Chef david ruiz Toltec brewing 10250 cottonwood park nw Albuquerque • toltecbrewing.com

sponsored by eatsilverleaf.com

alace

Restaurant & Saloon

a special thank you to our sponsors which allowed us to stipend our chefs

Chefs Jen and Evan Doughty MAS Tapas y Vino 142 West Palace Ave Santa Fe • palacesantafe.com 76

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sponsored by

beckandbulow.com


#EDIBLENM ediblesantafe TAG us or use #edibleNM and your pics could be featured here. We always pick a favorite and send them a gift certificate to one of our favorite local joints.

WINNER

newmexico_foodie_in_fashion Can I officially declare myself the Burger Queen, now?! Yesterday, I had an absolute blast in Santa Fe running into old friends, making new ones, and tasting some of New Mexico’s best green chile burgers all in one place! #edibleNM #ediblesmackdown

excitedaboutfood Cheeseburger Smackdown, where the burgers to be judged just keep coming! But is the chile balanced with the cheese? Is the tomato on here actually ripe? Did someone forget the salt? #excitedaboutfood #edibleNM #ediblesmackdown

chefmq And the overall winner and REIGNING CHOMP of the 2018 Edible Smackdown. . .Wait for it. . .TEAM MAS!!! #EatMAS #ChefMQ #edibleNM #ediblesmackdown

cnordstrum And after a morning of canvassing there’s nothing like a green chile cheeseburger (or seven!). Yum yum yum. #edibleNM #ediblesmackdown WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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LOCAL FINDS

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Barrio Brinery i TA ex FE z New M

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TRIFECTA COFFEE COMPANY

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413 Montano NE, Albuquerque 505-803-7579, trifectacoffeecompany.com We roast coffee, and brew it in unique ways utilizing some of the best methods available. All of our baked goods, sweet, and savory are made in house.


Source Guide CATERERS

PopFizz

Organic and health-conscious Southeast Asian Fusion. Personal chef service for Northern New Mexico. Can accommodate dietary preferences. hellochefnathsf@gmail.com, chefnath.com

Ranney Ranch

Nath’s Inspired Khmer Cuisine

FOOD ARTISANS / RETAILER Barrio Brinery

Bringing fine fermented foods to Santa Fe. We make our products by handcrafting small batches of flavorful goodness using only the finest ingredients.1413-B W Alameda, Santa Fe, 505-699-9812, barriobrinery.com

Beck and Bulow Buffalo

Featuring Lamont’s grassfed and pastureraised bison.32 Wilowa, Santa Fe, 505-9808733, beckandbulow.com

Cheesemongers of Santa Fe

Specializing in artisan cheese, charcuterie, and specialty foods from farm and field. 130 E Marcy, Santa Fe, 505-798-7878, cheesemongersofsantafe.com

Eldora Chocolate

Eldora crafts chocolate using natural, organic, and fair trade ingredients. 8114 Edith NE, Albuquerque, 505-433-4076, eldorachocolate.com

Europa

A new concept by Peculiar Farms. 2105 Highway 314 NW, Los Lunas, 505-261-3605, facebook.com/europacafeandmarket

Heidi's Raspberry Farm

Sumptuous, organic raspberry jams available throughout New Mexico and online! 600 Andrews, Corrales, 505-898-1784, heidisraspberryfarm.com

La Montañita Coop

La Montañita Co-op is New Mexico's largest community-owned natural and organic food market. Locations in Albuquerque, Gallup, and Santa Fe, lamontanita.coop

Las Cosas Kichen Shoppe

Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe has been helping customers find the newest gadgets, the best cookware, the perfect home accessories, and beautiful tableware for over 35 years! 181 Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com

New Mexico Ferments

Local, fresh, probiotic kombucha. Find us on tap at Albuquerque farmers markets as well as breweries and distilleries in Albuquerque, Santa Fe, and Taos. More info at newmexicoferments.com

Pop Fizz is a Mexican-style paleteria with an American soda fountain twist. Catering available. pop-fizz.net We are proud to carry three certifications on our beef: American Grassfed Association (AGA), Animal Welfare Approved (AWA), and Audubon Certified Bird-Friendly Beef. ranneyranch.com

Creative Casual Cuisine 221 Highway 165, Placitas 505-771-0695, www.bladesbistro.com Chef and owner Kevin Bladergroen brings together fine and fresh ingredients, artistic vision, and European flair in every dish. Sunday brunch, fabulous cocktails, and an award-winning wine list.

Santa Fe Olive Oil & Balsamic Company

Balsamic Company offers the finest quality extra virgin olive oils, balsamic vinegar, gourmet salts, and delicious specialty foods. Locations in Santa Fe, Albuquerque, and Taos. santafeoliveoil.com

Savory Spice Shop

Spice specialist with a variety of blends as well as extracts, sauces, and specialty foods. 225 Galisteo, Santa Fe, 505-819-5659, savoryspiceshop.com/santafe

Skarsgard Farms

Delivering fresh, local, and organically grown produce and natural groceries to doorsteps across New Mexico. 505-681-4060, skarsgardfarms.com

Talin Market

88 Louisiana SE, Albuquerque, 505-268-0206, talinmarket.com

LODGING

Buffalo Thunder, Hilton Santa Fe

Enjoy Santa Fe’s most unique resort, with relaxing ambiance and luxurious amenities. 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, Santa Fe, 505-455-5555, buffalothunderresort.com

El Morro RV Park and Cabin Rental

1 mile east of El Morro National Monument in Ramah, 505-783-4612, elmorro-nm.com

Genuine Food & Drink Enchanting, Dusty... Wild West Style 28 MAIN STREET LOS CERRILLOS 505.438.1821 Thursday - Sunday blackbirdsaloon.com

El Paradero

Come stay with us at El Paradero Bed and Breakfast Inn. Our 200-year-old farmhouse, Santa Fe's oldest inn, is located in historic downtown Santa Fe. 220 West Manhattan, Santa Fe, 505-988-1177, elparadero.com

Inn of the Anasazi

Featuring 58 rooms which reflect a sophisticated modern aesthetic celebrating the hotel’s southwestern spirit. 113 Washington, Santa Fe, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels. com/en/inn-of-the-anasazi-santa-fe

Inn on the Alameda

Relax and refresh–-just two blocks from the historic Santa Fe plaza. 303 E Alameda, Santa Fe, 888-984-2121, innonthealameda.com

TAOS DINER I & II

908 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, 575-758-2374 216 B Paseo del Pueblo Sur, 575-751-1989 www.taosdinner.com Home to New Mexican and American homemade, homegrown, and organic breakfast, lunch, and dinners. Gluten-free choices. Beer and wine. WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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Los Poblanos Historic Inn & Organic Farm

4803 Rio Grande NW, Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, 505-344-9297, lospoblanos.com

Rancho Gallina

Rancho Gallina

Santa Fe Inn & Eco-Retreat

Located 20 minutes south of town off the Turquoise Trail Scenic Byway, Rancho Gallina is the greenest place to stay in Santa Fe. 31 Bonanza Creek, 505-438-1871, ranchogallina. com

Sarabande B & B

Comfort, elegance, and simplicity exist in harmony to provide you a relaxing home away from home in Albuquerque. 5637 Rio Grande NW, Albuquerque, 505-348-5593, sarabandebnb.com

The Historic Taos Inn

125 Paseo Del Pueblo Norte, Taos, 575-758-2233, taosinn.com

NURSERIES & SERVICES deerBrooke

Irrigation and backflow prevention specialists. Repairs, installations, and consulting. 505-319-5730, NMLawnsprinklerexperts.com

Osuna Nursery

A family-owned and operated nursery, gardening center, and landscaping company. 501 Osuna NE, Albuquerque, 505345-6644, osunanursery.com

Best Kept Secret on the Turquoise Trail

ORGANIZATIONS, EVENTS, & EDUCATION El Camino Real Trade Fair

October 21, 10am - 4pm at the GutierrezHubbell House, 6029 Isleta, SW, Albuquerque, bernco.gov/ElCaminoRealTradeFair

El Ranchito de los Niños

Provides a permanent home for sibling groups who were separated in foster care. Located in Los Lunas. 505-565-4470, elranchitonm.org

Local. Organic. Authentic. Retreats · Celebrations Bed & Breakfast

8449 Lomas NE, Albuquerque, garciacars.com

Kure

We pride ourselves on providing a unique, friendly, and welcoming environment. 220 North Guadalupe Street, 505-930-5339, kureforlife.com

Los Alamos National Bank

Los Alamos, Santa Fe, Albuquerque, lanb.com

Moonlight Makes

Passionate about arts & culture, we bring people together to create memories while learning something new. 505-803-1346, moonlightmakes@gmail.com, moonlightmakes.com

Reunity Resources

Reunity Resources is a northern New Mexicobased nonprofit social enterprise with a zero waste mission: to reunite our waste streams with value for our community. 1829 San Ysidro Crossing, Santa Fe, 505393-1196, reunityresources.com

RETAILERS

Next Best Thing to Being There

An eclectic shop for handmade products. 1315 Mountain NW, Albuquerque, 505-433-3204, beingthereabq.com

Sarabande Home

At sarabande home we have a passion for finding the perfect gift. 4022 Rio Grande NW, Albuquerque,.505-344-1253, sarabandehome.com

The Golden Eye

New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs

WINE STORES

New Mexico Museum Foundation

The Arroyo Vino Wine Shop has nearly 1,000 hand-selected wines, beers, and spirits available to choose from, and the staff to help you decide. 218 Camino La Tierra, Santa Fe, 505-983-2100, arroyovino.com

On November 18, join Rio Grand Agricultural Land Trust for an all locally produced feast in the field on La Joya Farms. rgalt.com

505-827-6364, newmexicoculture.org

New Mexico Wine promotes local grape growing and winemaking industries. winecountrynm.com

OTHER SERVICES Center for Ageless Living

edible Santa Fe | FALL 2018

Garcia Auto Group

Located in Santa Fe, we offer 18 karat and 22 karat gold jewelry handmade by local artisans. 115 Don Gaspar, Santa Fe, 505-984-0040, goldeneyesantafe.com

New Mexico Wine

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Our flowers are farmed with love from seed, to stem, to your special day. floriographyflowers.com

Fall Matanza on the Farm

116 Lincoln, Santa Fe, 505-982-6366 ext.100, museumfoundation.org

ranchogallina.com 505-438-1871

Floriography

Bistro, bakery, day spa, sustainable communities for senior care, personal living systems. 5 Thomas, Los Lunas, 505-864-8813, nmagelessliving.com

Arroyo Vino

Parcht  

We are a wine and beer retail shop specializing in unique finds and local favorites. 103 East Plaza, Taos, 575-758-1994, parcht.com

Susan's Fine Wine and Spirits  

Offering the selection you desire, and the service you deserve. 1005 S St. Francis, Santa Fe, 505-984-1582, sfwineandspirits.com


EATGRASSBURGER.COM

505 Central Ave NW | 4200 Lomas Blvd NE

Albuquerque • @humblecoffee

Eat & Drink Local Guide ALBUQUERQUE Ajiaco Colombian Bistro

Ajiaco’s varied Colombian cuisine is influenced by the diverse flora and fauna found around Colombia. 3216 Silver SE, 505-2662305, ajiacobistro.com

Artichoke Café

Fresh, local, seasonal ingredients, classic French techniques, extensive wine list, private dining, catering, and great atmosphere. 424 Central SE, 505-243-0200, artichokecafe.com

Campo at Los Poblanos Historic Inn & Organic Farm

Rio Grande Valley cuisine rooted in seasonal organic ingredients from our own farm. 4803 Rio Grande NW, 505-344-9297, lospoblanos.com

Cutbow Coffee

Roastery, tasting room, coffee bar. The culmination of more than 25 years experience by one of the nation's most accomplished artisan coffee roasters, Paul Gallegos. 1208 Rio Grande, 505-355-5563, cutbowcoffee.com

Farina

Starting with the finest organic flour, our pizza crusts are made by hand and topped with the freshest ingredients, including artisan cured meats. 510 Central SE, 505243-0130, farinapizzeria.com

Farina Alto

Farina Alto offers fresh, creative fare. Gather over a glass of wine, a good story, and a

phenomenal plate of food. 10721 Montgomery NE, 505-298-0035, farinaalto.com

Kosmos Restaurant

Farm & Table

Level 5 - Rooftop Restaurant & Lounge

A wonderful dining experience! Enjoy delectable seasonal dishes created from scratch, sourced from local farmers and our beautiful on-site farm. 8917 Fourth Street NW, 505-503-7124, farmandtablenm.com

Five Star Burger

Fresh beef, free of hormones and antibiotics. A wide selection of sandwiches, entrées, salads, a kids menu, beer, and wine. Happy hour 4–6pm every day. 1710 Central SW; 5901 Wyoming NE, 505-821-1909, www.5starburgers.com

Flying Star

Fine cuisine in a coffee shop scene. Six locations in Albuquerque, flyingstarcafe.com

Grassburger

The feel-good, award-winning burger— 100% grassfed beef, vegan, or poultry! 11225 Montgomery, 505-200-0571, eatgrassburger.com

Humble Coffee

Extraordinary coffee. Friendly service. A thoughtfully designed, relaxed space. A craft coffee shop specializing in singleorigin espresso and brews. 505 Central SE and 4200 Lomas, humblecoffeeco.com

Il Vicino

Serving authentic wood oven pizza. Multiple locations in Albuquerque and Santa Fe, ilvicino.com

Great food, great beer, great vibe! 1715 Fifth Street NW, factoryon5.com

Located on the top floor of Hotel Chaco— experience a refined, chic, and contemporary atmosphere. 2000 Bellamah NW, 505-246-9989, hotelchaco.com

Mata G

Vegitarian kitchen. 116 Amherst SE, 505-266-6374, mata-g.com

Salt and Board

Salt and Board, a charcuterie-based cork and tap room in the heart of the Brick Light District. We specialize in cured meat and cheese boards, gourmet toasts, pressed sandwiches, and salads. 115 Harvard SE, 505-219-2001, saltandboard.com

Savoy Bar & Grill

California wine country in the Northeast Heights. Farm-to-table dining and a casual patio. 10601 Montgomery NE, 505-294-9463, savoyabq.com

Seasons Rotisserie & Grill

Oak-fired grill, local and seasonal ingredients, and the best patio dining in Old Town. 2031 Mountain NW, 505-766-5100, seasonsabq.com

The Cellar

Featuring a large variety of Spanish style authentic tapas and a large selection of local beer and wine. 1025 Lomas NW, Albuquerque, 505-242-3117, thecellartapas.com

WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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colombian bistro

now open

tuesday-saturday 11am-8pm

NEW DRIVE THRU LOCATION 6770 4TH ST NW, LOS RANCHOS PALETAS, ICE CREAM TACOS, BEVERAGES, AND AWESOME FOOD! FIND OUR TRUCK OR COME TO OUR SHOP AT THE NATIONAL HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER! www.Pop-Fizz.net

3216 Silver SE, Albuquerque 505-266-2305, www.ajiacobistro.com Ajiaco’s varied Colombian cuisine is influenced by a diverse flora and fauna found around Colombia. Cultural traditions of different Colombian ethnic groups play a role in our choice of ingredients.

The Grove Cafe & Market

Anasazi Restaurant & Bar

The Shop Breakfast & Lunch

Arable

The Grove features a bustling café experience serving breakfast, brunch, and lunch. 600 Central SE, 505-248-9800, thegrovecafemarket.com Come in for breakfast or lunch, creative American classics with Latin and creole influences, made from local and organic ingredients. 2933 Monte Vista NE, 505-433-2795, theshopbreakfastandlunch.com

Trifecta Coffee Company

We roast coffee and brew it in unique ways utilizing some of the best methods available. All of our baked goods, sweet and savory, are made in house. 413 Montano NE, 505-803-7579, trifectacoffeecompany.com

Zacatecas

Zacatecas, a real taquería, features recipes handed down from generation to generation with flavors that are true to the history and culture of Mexico. 3423 Central NE, 505-255-8226, zacatecastacos.com

Zinc Restaurant & Wine Bar

A three-level bistro featuring contemporary cuisine and late night bar bites. 3009 Central NE, 505-254-9462, zincabq.com

SANTA FE

AGAVE Restaurant and Lounge

Enter a world of celebrated culinary delight and Santa Fe nightlife at Eldorado Hotel's AGAVE Lounge. 309 W San Francisco, 505-995-4530, eldoradohotel.com/agave-lounge

Contemporary American Cuisine inspired by locally sourced seasonal ingredients. 113 Washington, 505-988-3030, innoftheanasazi.com Inspired by the bounty of New Mexico, and the small community of Eldorado, Arable was born. 7 Avenida Vista Grande, 505-3033816, arablesantafe.com

Arroyo Vino

Arroyo Vino, voted a top 100 restaurant in America by OpenTable reviewers, serves progressive American fare inspired by our on-premise garden and local purveyors. 218 Camino La Tierra, 505-983-2100, arroyovino.com

Coyote Cafe & Rooftop Cantina

Elegant eatery featuring local cuisine with Southwestern flair, cocktails, and a rooftop bar. 132 W Water, 505-983-1615, coyotecafe.com

Dinner for Two

Elegant bistro known for tableside preparations, plus a menu of locally sourced fare, and global wines. 106 N Guadalupe, 505-820-2075, dinnerfortwonm.com

Dolina

We serve modern American brunch with Eastern European influences. Open 7 days a week. 402 N Guadalupe, 505-982-9394, dolinasantafe.com

Eloisa

Creative, elevated takes on traditional New Mexican fare plus tasting menus and craft cocktails. 228 E Palace, 505-982-0883, eloisasantafe.com

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edible Santa Fe | FALL 2018

Joseph's Culinary Pub

Chef Wrede has a unique and uncompromising vision on traditional and contemporary cuisine, both regional and international. 428 Agua Fria, 505-982-1272, josephsofsantafe.com

Luminaria Restaurant & Patio

Inventive Southwestern fare served amid rustic-sleek decor inside the Inn and Spa at Loretto. 211 Old Santa Fe Trail, 505-984-7915, hotelloretto.com

Loyal Hound

Locally sourced modern comfort food paired with craft beer, cider, and wine. 730 St. Michaels, 505-471-0440, loyalhoundpub.com

Market Steer Steakhouse

Where refined dining meets fun dining. 210 Don Gaspar in the Hotel St. Francis, 505992-6354, marketsteersteakhouse.com

Milad Persian Bistro

Milad Bistro brings authentic middle eastern cuisine to the American Southwest. Traditional Persian dishes are counterbalanced by modern interpretations. 802 Canyon Road, 505-303-3581, miladbistro.com

Ohori's Coffee Roasters The original source for locally roasted coffee beans, gifts, and gathering. 505 Cerrillos and 1098 St. Francis, 505-982-9692, 507 Old Santa Fe Trail, ohoriscoffee.com

Paper Dosa Paper Dosa brings fresh, authentic homestyle South Indian dishes to your table. These bright and exciting flavors will leave you wanting more. 551 W Cordova, 505-930-5521, paper-dosa.com


South Indian cuisine

Radish & Rye Farm-inspired cuisine: simple yet innovative food and drinks sourced locally whenever possible. We work closely with local farmers and ranchers to build our menu. 548 Agua Fria, 505-930-5325, radishandrye.com

Red Sage Red Sage at Buffalo Thunder is perfect for your next romantic night out. Fare rotates seasonally. Enjoy the extensive wine list. 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 505-819-2056, buffalothunderresort.com

Second Street Brewery

Over sixty handcrafted beers, food, music, and events. Three locations in Santa Fe. secondstreetbrewery.com

Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen

Discover Sweetwater Dinner—Tuesday through Saturday. 1512 Pacheco, 505-795-7383, sweetwatersf.com

TerraCotta A smart, casual restaurant located in a charming one-hundred-year-old adobe. Seasonally changing, globally inspired cuisine and an extensive, value-priced wine list. 304 Johnson, 505-989-1166, terracottawinebistro.com

The Compound Restaurant Chef Mark Kiffin preserves a landmark tradition of elegant food and service at his Canyon Road institution. 653 Canyon Road, 505-982-4353, compoundrestaurant.com

TAOS Doc Martin’s 30+ year Wine Spectator Award Winner. Patio dining, fresh local foods, and live entertainment. 125 Paseo Del Pueblo Norte, 575-758-1977, taosinn.com

Five Star Burger

Fresh beef, free of hormones and antibiotics. A wide selection of sandwiches, entrées, salads, a kids menu, beer, and wine. Happy hour 4–6pm every day. 1032 Paseo Del Pueblo Sur, 5starburgers.com

Parcht /pärCHt/= the physical condition resulting from the need to drink wine, eat good food, and shop…in Taos. 103 E Plaza, 575-758-1994, parcht.com

Taos Diner I & II Home to New Mexican and American homemade, homegrown, and organic breakfast, lunch, and dinners. Gluten-free choices. Beer and wine. 908 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, 575-758-2374; 216 B Paseo del Pueblo Sur, 575-751-1989, taosdinner.com

The Gorge: Bar and Grill

Our menu is straightforward, yet eclectic, and chock-full of favorites made from scratch using as many fresh and local ingredients as possible. 103 E Plaza, 575-758-8866, thegorgebarandgrill.com

GREATER NEW MEXICO Ancient Way Cafe

A unique outpost offering great meals from scratch and fresh baked goods. Located 1

mile east of El Morro National Monument in Ramah, 505-783-4612, elmorro-nm.com

Black Bird Saloon

Indulge yourself in the grub, Wild West style, perhaps a juicy and flavorful El Chivato Burger or a Black Jack Ketchum. Offerings here are genuine, simple, and good. 28 Main Street, Los Cerrillos, 505-438-1821, blackbirdsaloon.com

Blades’ Bistro

Chef and owner Kevin Bladergroen brings together fine and fresh ingredients, artistic vision, and European flair in every dish. Sunday brunch, fabulous cocktails, and an award-winning wine list. 221 Highway 165, Placitas, 505-771-0695, bladesbistro.com

Greenhouse Bistro

Good food always puts you in a good mood! Fresh, seasonal ingredients provide the basis for a meal that promotes healthy living. 5 Thomas, Los Lunas, 505-866-1936, greenhousebistro.com

Pajarito Brewpub & Grill

Open for lunch Tuesday–Sunday. Open for dinner every day. Happy hour Tuesday– Sunday 2–5pm. 30 craft beers on tap. 614 Trinity, Los Alamos, 505-662-8877, pajaritobrewpubandgrill.com

Pig + Fig

Whether you're strictly vegan or strictly meat and potatoes, our goal is to create comfort food for everyone using high quality, ethically sourced, seasonal ingredients. 11 Sherwood Blvd, White Rock, 505-672-2742, pigandfigcafe.com

we are collecting recipes to feature in our early winter issue. think you have the best mole recipe? best holiday cookie recipe? best adobo recipe? Now is your time to show off!

submit by october 20 to ediblenm.com/recipecall WWW.EDIBLENM.COM

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CRAFT COCKTAIL

FAROLITO

By Quinn Stephenson Get ready to turn up the heat this fall with this tequila hot toddy. 2 ounces Patron Roca Añejo 4 ounces hot water 1/2 ounce agave syrup 1/2 ounce lemon juice Add all the ingredients to a mug. Stir, and let steep for one minute. Garnish with lemon wedge, sprig of rosemary, and enjoy.

Photo by Lois Ellen Frank.

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edible Santa Fe | FALL 2018


COYOTE CANTINA IS NOW OPEN YEAR ROUND! VISIT US THIS WINTER!

132 W Water St, Santa Fe • CALL FOR RESERVATIONS • 505-983-1615 • coyotecafe.com


✷ THE DESTINATION FOR THE BEST IN FOOD & WINE W E E K LY W I N E S E M I N A R S WINE DINNERS & MORE

ARROYOVINO.COM 505.983.2100 6 Y E A R S I N S A N TA F E

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Fall 2018: Migrations