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edible

No. 60 Sept/Oct | Cooks 2018

No. 59 July/August | Wellness 2018

Austin

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Celebrating Central Texas food culture, season by season

Cel eb ra ti n g Cen tra l Texa s fo o d cu lt u re, sea so n by sea so n

houseplants cooks tools & more


TAILGATE SEASON!

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CONTENTS COOKS at home 10

Chet and Laura Garner

14

Cathy and Rob Lippincott

18

Marshall Newhouse

22

Kelly Stocker

42

cooks TOOLBOX 46

38 Edible Must-Haves

22

COOKS features HOME guide Begins on page 27

42  Great Whites of Texas

Winemakers continue to explore white varietals.

46 Arnosky Family Farms Bringing flowers to Central Texans.

Sustainable Flooring Living with Plants Critter Condos

COVER: Plant Shopping at Barton Springs Nursery (page 32). Photography by Jenna Northcutt.

50  Vegan Ice Cream Whip up your own, or run out for a pint.

58  edible INK Guess the olde-tyme tool.


PUBLISHER’S NOTE END OF AN ERA

PUBLISHER Jenna Northcutt

EDITOR Kim Lane

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Dawn Weston

COPY EDITOR Anne Marie Hampshire

DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER Darby Kendall

W

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS elcome to our final Cooks issue! Earlier this year, the Edible Austin team and I decided this is our last year of publishing themed issues, but don’t worry readers, we promise you’ll be able to see

all the familiar Cooks issue features sprinkled in our other issues throughout the year—you just won’t have to wait until September to read them! If you have someone you’d like to see included in our Cooks at Home features, send us a tip at editorial@edibleaustin.com. Along with working on more frequent Cooks-inspired stories for the year, we’re also ramping up our website with all new exclusive content. In the next month, you’ll be able to read about natural mosquito control, techniques for home-cooking pork ribs and tips for making your own beverage infusions. Be sure to keep an eye out for updates, and subscribe to our newsletter for reminders. I’m particularly excited for the how-to article on houseplants, which hap-

Claire Cella, Dena Garcia

MARKETING SPECIALIST Rachel Davis

INTERN Meara Isenberg

DISTRIBUTION Craig Fisher, Flying Fish

FOUNDER Marla Camp

ADVISORY GROUP Terry Thompson-Anderson, Paula Angerstein, Dorsey Barger, Jim Hightower, Toni Tipton-Martin, Mary Sanger, Carol Ann Sayle

pens to be the cover story, by our office plant wizard, Darby Kendall. She has been helping me keep some plants alive, since I haven’t had the best track record with indoor plants. And a big thank you to Dawn Weston, Edible Austin’s associate publisher, for gracing our cover. Every year when this issue goes to press, the feeling of satisfaction is

CONTACT US 1101 Navasota St., Ste. 1, Austin, TX 78702 512-441-3971 info@edibleaustin.com edibleaustin.com

quickly followed by the buzz of planning the Chef Auction, our annual celebration of local food, cooking talent and noteworthy nonprofits. We’re very excited about this year’s event—our seventh annual—as we’ve been hard at work to make sure it’s the best possible evening for both the guests and our two nonprofit beneficiaries, Sustainable Food Center and Urban Roots. Nothing seems more fitting than announcing this year’s participating chefs in our final Cooks issue—look to the right to find our lineup! And as you flip through the issue, we hope you enjoy the features on some of the people who help make Austin the city we love. Cheers to Cooks!

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Edible Austin is published bimonthly by Edible Austin L.L.C. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be used without written permission of the publisher. ©2018. Every effort is made to avoid errors, misspellings and omissions. If, however, an error comes to your attention, please accept our sincere apologies and notify us.


Take Home a Chef!

October 4

at The Allan House

Charity event benefiting Sustainable Food Center & Urban Roots

Otoko

Parkside

The Brewer’s Table

Juniper

Il Brutto

Barley Swine

Intero

Eden East

Dai Due

Thanks to our Sponsors

Germer Insurance Services

Tickets at EdibleAustin.com/chefauction


W H AT ’ S

ON OUR

COUNTER

by DARBY KENDALL photography by JENNA NORTHCUTT


We’re always trying new local products. Take a look at what our staff is enjoying this month.

BEE TREE FARM & DAIRY If you caught a glimpse of the cover of our Outdoor issue, you already know that we can’t get enough of local cheesemaker Bee Tree Farm & Dairy. Not only are the goats on the farm completely enchanting, there’s also something about their fresh, creamy goat-milk cheese that we’ve fallen head over heels for. Maybe it’s the influence of this warm weather, but our current favorite is a cheese called Diablito, a chipotle-honey chèvre. It perfectly combines the creaminess of the dairy with the spice of the chipotle; all you need is a bag of good crackers to finish it off. Find it at Antonelli’s Cheese Shop, Boggy Creek’s farm stand and Texas Farmers Market at Mueller. 512-470-8824 txbeetree.com

STEAMIES DUMPLINGS Steamies is a local provider of perfectly sized, beautiful dumplings that are ready to take home. The dumplings come frozen; simply sear and steam them before chowing down. Options include chicken and shiitake, pork and cabbage (an office favorite), and a vegan option with seasonal veggies. It takes only 10 minutes to get these made-from-scratch dumplings ready to eat. And if you’re a dumpling-cooking novice, check out the how-to videos on their website. Find Steamies Dumplings at the Texas Farmers Market locations at Mueller and Lakeline or place an order online. 737-781-7545 steamiesdumplings.com

TEXAS KEEPER CIDER We’ll take all the delicious varieties of Texas Keeper Cider any day of the week, but our year-round favorite is hands down the Texas Keeper No. 1. This bubbly beverage is their flagship cider, built on the tradition of blending apple varieties to create more complex flavors. The 2017 Keeper blends six apple varieties and is on the drier side, giving it a crisp taste. With subtle hints of pear, raspberry and melon, this is not one to pass up. Find Texas Keeper Cider at local grocers and farmers markets, or visit their taproom in Manchaca. 512-910-3409 12521 Twin Creeks Rd., Manchaca texaskeeper.com

BEE DELIGHTFUL When you buy a jar of raw honey from local business Bee Delightful, you are supporting its mission to rescue and relocate millions of bees from residential properties in Central Texas. As a bonus, the blended honey contains cannabidiol (CBD), a legal, non-psychoactive byproduct of cannabis that’s often used to help with various ailments ranging from anxiety to arthritis. The Canna Bees Rescue Blend is sourced from wild, treatment-free colonies—including Bee Delightful’s own rescue hives. Recommended in 1-teaspoon servings, the blend is perfect for sweetening a cup of tea or pairing with cheese. Find the honey at Thom’s Market, People’s Rx and Wheatsville Food Co-op. beedelightful.com


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COOKS at Home

CHET AND LAURA GARNER BY K AT H L E E N T H O R N B E R RY • P H OTO G RA P H Y BY N AT H A N B E E LS

C

het Garner has made a career out of traveling the state of

and receptions in their part of Texas, “there were four essentials:

Texas, filming his Emmy award-winning show “The Day-

peanuts, mints, chocolate sheet cake and punch.”

tripper”—an approachable, sometimes adorably nerdy

The couple decided to test whether the cake might be better

look at various characters and locales across the Lone Star State.

made with butter instead of margarine. They tried out six differ-

It’s a career that’s inadvertently made him a Texas barbecue ex-

ent recipes, some with butter, some with margarine. “What we

pert—he’s hit all of our local barbecue joints—but when he’s at

found out,” Chet says, “was it’s much better made with margarine!

home with his family in Georgetown, Chet and his wife, Laura, are

The cake has a better texture, and the icing sets up completely

squarely in what he calls, “the kid zone.” With four kids ranging

different—it has a shine to it that is totally missing when you use

from 2 to 9, the Garners tend to eat very simply.

butter. Not to mention, in Texas, butter icing just melts away in

“We don’t cook a great variety of things,” Chet says, “but we do make dessert.” He brushes his youngest daughter’s hair out of her

the heat. Especially in the car, if you’re taking it somewhere. The margarine icing holds up.”

eyes with his free hand, while holding her in his lap with the oth-

“So, at our wedding,” Chet continues, “we had a little bitty

er. “And it’s usually Grandma’s chocolate cake.” Once the magic

one…serve maybe ten people, you know, for show. People were

words are said, all four children begin a delighted chant of “Choc-

looking at it, feeling anxious. But in the back, we had ten great big

olate cake! Chocolate cake!” until Laura gently tells them to hush.

pans! After we cut up the little bitty one, we started bringing the

Years ago, Chet and Laura were high school sweethearts at

great big chocolate sheet cakes in.” The practical joke aspect of

Port Neches-Groves High School in Southeast Texas. When they

it delights the kids; you can tell that the tiny show cake and the

got married after finishing their college degrees, nearly the entire

surprise giant sheets of cake will be passing into family legend.

town was at their wedding. “It’s a small town, and we’re related to most of ’em!” Chet says. “We had a bit of a wrangle about what cake to serve,” he continues. “I really thought that the best cake I had ever had was my

“How many people you think were there…three hundred?” Chet asks Laura. “Three hundred? More like five hundred!” she counters. “Three hundred invitations went out, but you know, people brought people with them.”

Grandma’s chocolate cake.” He grins across the room at Laura,

I ask the crucial question…pecans or no pecans. An unsettled

who takes her cue, adding: “And I thought the best cake to serve

hush falls over the room. Chet heaves a sigh. “I’m afraid there’s

would be what we called in my family, ‘Groom’s Cake.’” After go-

not agreement on that point,” he says. “Now me, I’m for pecans,

ing around and around about it, neither one backing down, they

but we’ve reached a compromise: we put pecans on half, and the

each got ahold of the family recipes, compared them and real-

other half, no pecans.” I try to relieve the tension by confessing

ized…it was the same cake.

that I used to not like pecans on cake, but that I’d crossed over

“Both our families were making the classic, post-World War II,

and now I do, so I understand both points of view. Laura turns to

Texas chocolate sheet cake—sometimes called ‘1945 Cake’—made

me and says, “I’ve crossed over, too.” “WAIT…WHAT?” Chet says

with margarine, not butter,” Chet says. “And if it didn’t get fin-

loudly. He turns to me and says, “This is a revelation!” He turns

ished, it gets kept nice and cold in the refrigerator. Though in my

back to Laura and says, “Say that again!”

family, there usually wasn’t any left.” Laura adds that at weddings

EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

11


OLD-FASHIONED 1945 CHOCOLATE SHEET CAKE Serves 24

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For the cake: 2 c. sugar 2 c. flour 1 t. baking soda 1 t. cinnamon 2 sticks margarine 1 c. water 4 T. unsweetened cocoa 2 eggs ½ c. buttermilk 1 t. vanilla For the icing: 1 stick margarine 4 T. unsweetened cocoa 6 T. milk 16-oz. box powdered sugar 1 c. chopped pecans 1 t. vanilla

To make the cake, sift together the sugar, flour, baking soda and cinnamon in a large bowl. In a saucepan, melt the margarine, then add the water and cocoa. In a small bowl, beat the eggs with the buttermilk and vanilla. Mix everything together in the larger bowl and pour into a greased and floured 11-by-16-inch baking pan. Bake at 400° for 25 minutes. Let cool for 20 minutes before icing. To make the icing, bring the margarine, cocoa and milk to a boil in a pan. Remove from the heat and beat in the sugar and vanilla. Pour half of the icing over half of the cake, add the pecans to the remaining icing and pour that over the other half of the cake.


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COOKS at Home

CATHY AND ROB LIPPINCOTT BY A M Y M CC U L LO U G H • P H OTO G RA P H Y BY N AT H A N B E E LS

Y

ou might expect Cathy and Rob Lippincott, co-owners of

on the deal and watched ’em,” he says with a slow, subtle drawl.

Güero’s Taco Bar, to make Mexican food if they had you over

“It came out fabulous every time.”

for dinner. Instead, they choose a decidedly American menu:

What he learned was to dust the ribs in seasoning first, then

Baby back pork ribs, bacon-wrapped Lockhart quail legs, potato sal-

cook them over very low heat for a long time (three to four hours,

ad, broccoli slaw and baked beans. To Cathy, this meal is “just the

preferably), and sop them every so often to keep them moist. He

way we are; the Lippincott comfort zone.” And Rob concurs. “It’s

admits that he forgot about the sop tonight, usually a blend of

what I do for the family more than any other dish,” he says. The

chicken stock and spices, in all the excitement of entertaining. But

whole spread is “the thing we love to do for us and our kids.”

he also didn’t cook these ribs quite as long, so he isn’t worried.

The kids include two grown daughters that Cathy and Rob say

The barbecue sauce he did not forget. He calls it “salsa,” an un-

are “helping us retire” by shifting into leadership at Güero’s, an in-

derstandable slip for the owner of a Mexican restaurant (“salsa”

stitution that’s been described by some as the restaurant that de-

means “sauce,” after all). He credits the base recipe to his mom—

fined SoCo. The South Congress staple, known for its salsa bar and

his Yankee mom, he adds with a laugh. “No, seriously,” he says,

hand-shaken margaritas, gets a lot of cred for being an early occupant

“it’s my mom’s Indiana barbecue sauce. I like it pretty good.” The

(they bought the building in 1995) of the now-famed tourist stretch.

only consistent ingredients are chili sauce, onion and vinegar.

But, tonight, they’re at home. Rob, wearing a lavender guayabera

“There’s no recipe,” says Cathy, noting that Rob will sometimes

and a gray braid, shows off his Big Green Egg on the back patio and

just open the refrigerator and start throwing in random condi-

explains what he likes about it. “They hold the heat real well and

ments like soy sauce, maple syrup, capers, “whatever he can find.”

they don’t break,” he says. Apparently, they’re made of material ini-

Despite all this Texas ranch and Midwestern “salsa” talk,

tially developed by NASA. “You can make it as hot or as cool as you

Cathy and Rob’s kitchen is adorned with other influences, such

want,” he says. The thermometer he uses for the grill is currently

as talavera plates and an alebrije mask (a style of Mexican art

broken, but he knows from experience that it’s a nice, low heat for

reminiscent of another local standby, Fonda San Miguel), and the

his ribs, which he grills over a combo of charcoal and wood.

spreaders on the cheese plate have handles of stacked skulls à la

Inside, Cathy goes over her classic, “nothing fancy” side dishes,

Día de los Muertos. It’s only later in the evening that Rob chuck-

like the potato salad and its main ingredient. “I don’t mash ’em

les and says, “Wow, we didn’t do any Mexican food. We love Mex-

or chop ’em,” she says. “I smash ’em with the end of a mason jar.

ican food like crazy,” he says, “but this is more traditional for us.”

They just taste better that way.” She admits that her broccoli slaw,

Finally around the dinner table are Cathy and Rob and a hand-

which is made with raw florets rather than matchsticks, is similar

ful of work associates. It’s a full dining room, the food is incred-

to Central Market’s, but she likes hers better. “This is all I want to

ible and the conversation flows freely. Cathy tells a funny story

eat tonight,” she says, sprinkling grated sharp cheddar on top. Her

about being stung (repeatedly) in the butt by a scorpion while

beans feature the tried-and-true add-ins of brown sugar and mus-

working at Güero’s; Philadelphia and Chicago connections are

tard with a topping of partially cooked bacon that finishes in the

discovered among the group; and one attendee is revealed to be

oven. “What do you do?” she asks. “You buy a can of baked beans

an award-winning homebrewer—which ties into fond memories

but then you add stuff to it.” Simple but true. “And they’re so good.”

of drinking beer on Güero’s front porch. With Mae, the Lippin-

The main attraction, though, is Rob’s baby back ribs. “I learned

cotts’ black Labrador, making rounds at the edge of the table hop-

those mostly [through] a friend of mine,” he explains. His friend’s

ing to score a scrap or two, it really does feel like a family meal

dad and uncles had a couple of ranches, and they’d host a barbe-

in a well-established comfort zone (if your family has an amazing

cue twice a year—cooking brisket, ribs and chicken. “I just got in

cook). EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

15


BARBECUED PORK RIBS AND BACON-WRAPPED QUAIL LEGS Ed Ruscha (American, b. 1937), Pool #2, from the portfolio Pools, 1968; printed 1997. © Ed Ruscha

Serves 6–8 For the ribs and quail-leg rub: ½ c. chili powder ½ c. garlic powder ½ c. onion powder ¼ c. black pepper 2 T. salt 2 full racks baby back pork ribs 20 bacon-wrapped quail legs

For the sop: 3 c. chicken stock 2 T. brown sugar 3 T. yellow mustard

Make the rub by combining the seasonings in a bowl. Make the sop by mixing everything in a different bowl. Using your hands or a shaker, liberally dust the ribs and quail with the rub. Put the ribs on a hot grill to sear on all sides. If using a gas grill, reduce the heat to 250° and cook for 1½ to 2 hours (or 3 to 4 hours if sopping every 30 minutes or so). If using a charcoal grill, move the ribs to the cooler side of the grill after searing. Periodically turn and swab ribs with barbecue sauce (recipe below). You should swab the ribs from the very beginning if not using sop, and if using both, start with sop and switch to barbecue sauce at the end. The quail legs don’t take as long to cook. Sear them on both sides, move them to the cooler side of the grill and turn until desired doneness—approximately 1 hour, total (no sop or barbecue sauce on the quail legs). For “Mom’s” barbecue sauce: 2 T. olive oil 1 onion, chopped 1 12-oz. jar chili sauce 1 T. yellow mustard 1–2 fresh jalapeños, chopped Ancho chile powder, to taste 1–2 T. vinegar Salt and pepper, to taste Random condiments you feel like adding Add the olive oil to a hot pan and sauté the onion. When the onion is transparent, add everything else. Simmer the sauce during the whole rib-grilling process (or keep on warm the second two hours if using the extended rib-cooking time).

ON VIEW NOW 21st and Guadalupe Streets www.hrc.utexas.edu

LIPPINCOTT “COMFORT ZONE” FEAST Find recipes for the entire feast including: broccoli slaw, potato salad and baked beans at EdibleAustin.com

FREE ADMISSION • DAILY TOURS

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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

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REAL FARMERS WHO MAKE

REAL WINE

Vineyard manager Jake Terrell and his dog, Willie.

From our farm to your table. Authentic Sonoma wines, handcrafted from Sonoma County grapes.

©2018 Kobrand Corporation, Purchase, NY www.kobrandwineandspirits.com


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COOKS at Home

MARSHALL NEWHOUSE BY N AT H A N M AT I SS E • P H OTO G RA P H Y BY N AT H A N B E E LS

A

common brick wrapped in tinfoil sits atop a split chicken in

ket, ribs and a German chocolate cake that left Newhouse with

a scalding hot 20-inches-or-so-wide cast-iron skillet. Getting

a lifelong sweet tooth. “I wish it wasn’t true for life after retire-

this thing into, or out of, a 500-degree oven seems a daunt-

ment,” he says with a laugh.

ing task given the heft and heat, but veteran NFL offensive lineman

None of that appears on this afternoon’s menu, however. New-

Marshall Newhouse does it deftly, and practically one-handed. This

house typically takes his cooking inspiration from something he

ain’t his first rodeo, and he’s quite literally made a career of using his

sees on a restaurant menu or in any of the food television shows

hands swiftly and strongly in restricted spaces.

he keeps up with (he’s a lifelong Alton Brown follower with a soft

Currently playing for the Buffalo Bills, Newhouse has bounced

spot for Emeril and Anthony Bourdain). The blueberry cobbler

around throughout his 8-year career. “But every place I’ve lived,

may borrow a little from Newhouse family desserts, but the brick

I’m like: I want to end up back in Texas,” he says. When Newhouse

chicken started when he saw Aziz Ansari mention it online. New-

recently decided the time had come to purchase a home away

house attempted it for the first time two off-seasons ago; now he

from New York, Austin beckoned. He’d been coming here since

confidently breaks down the bird and executes the multi-heat

high school—having grown up in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. A

cooking technique as effortlessly as he might perform a pull block.

few close friends and Texas Christian University-alum teammates

He notes his prized kitchen tool is an Aura chef ’s knife he ac-

had settled here earlier, too. So, Newhouse made the move official

quired while living in the Bay Area. “It’s honestly so much muscle

in January—giving him at least a little time to get situated before

memory,” he says, to deflect from a bit of knife-skills praise. “I

training camp resurfaced in the summer.

grew up watching cooking shows, and even to my surprise I was

His schedule may not always allow it, but Newhouse clearly

just picking up stuff. Like, how did I even realize how to do that?”

enjoys cooking. Today, in his appropriately modern-minimalist

As you’d expect from someone who meticulously researches

South Austin place, the kitchen has begun to feel lived-in even if

and preps for game day, the meal is casually excellent. The brick

the start of his Bills’ tenure looms. (His fondness for beloved local

ensures an even sear on the chicken skin and the hot oven keeps

institution Ace Mart doesn’t hurt on that front.) The grind of an

the meat juicy and perfectly cooked. He embraced his freelance

NFL season doesn’t leave much time for this—between practices

tendencies a tad with the dessert—opting for a more biscuit-y,

and meetings, a 13-hour day is pretty common. Eating out and

less rigid crust dolloped on top instead of premade pie dough for

ordering in become necessities at times. No matter where he’s

the cobbler.

played, though, Newhouse has always loved learning about the lo-

While he soon has to leave behind some of these tastes for now,

cal culture and cuisine—while playing for Green Bay, he enjoyed

a bit of food-related trivia does still follow him everywhere he goes.

fried cheese curds; when he was with the Giants, he had the best

During his high school days, Newhouse decided to sign up for what

omakase of his life; and being a Bengal introduced him to Cincin-

felt like every club knowing that it’d look good on college applica-

nati chili served over spaghetti and topped with beans, onions

tions. Among them, two now appear in virtually every profile, from

and cheese. These days in Buffalo, he’s pretty familiar with those

his TCU player page to a recent interview with ESPN: Horticulture

famous wings at the Anchor Bar, too.

club and Japanese club. He remembers attending perhaps one meet-

The love for variety is what inspires Newhouse to spend as

ing between the two of them, but this smidge of truth may have odd-

much off-season time as he can in the kitchen. Both his mom and

ly grown more valid over the years. After all, one day he envisions

dad cooked when he was young (likely had to; Newhouse jokes

his backyard sporting both a lemon and a lime tree, and he admits

that he and his brother regularly ate the family out of their cab-

that Japan is high on his culinary bucket list. He wants to pick up a

inets), and the family staples mirrored Texas ones: smoked bris-

proper kitchen knife there, too. EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

19


BRICK CHICKEN Serves 6–8 For the chicken: 1 3- to 4-lb. chicken, fat trimmed, rinsed, dried, split, backbone removed 1 t. dried thyme 1 t. dried parsley Salt and pepper, to taste 1 T. coarsely chopped garlic 2 T. extra-virgin olive oil, divided 1 lemon, cut into quarters, for serving Prepare a large, rinsed brick by wrapping it tightly in foil. Place the chicken on a cutting board, skin-side down, and using your hands, press down hard to make it as flat as possible. Mix together the thyme, parsley, salt, pepper, garlic and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and rub all over the chicken—tucking some of the mixture under the skin, as well. If possible, cover and let marinate in the refrigerator for up to a day (even 20 minutes of marinating boosts the flavor). When you’re ready to cook, heat the oven to 500°. On the stovetop, heat a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat for about 3 minutes. Put the remaining olive oil in the pan and wait about 30 seconds for it to heat. Place the chicken in the skillet, skin-side down, and place the brick on top to help flatten the chicken. Cook for 5 minutes, then transfer the skillet to the oven and roast the chicken for 15 minutes more. Remove the chicken from the oven, take off the brick and turn the chicken over. Roast 10 minutes more, or until done (larger chickens may take an additional 5 minutes or so). Serve with lemon wedges.

MARSHALL’S BLUEBERRY COBBLER Find the recipe for this perfectly dolloped cobbler at EdibleAustin.com

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COOKS at home

KELLY STOCKER BY A N N E M A R I E H A M PS H I R E • P H OTO G RA P H Y BY N AT H A N B E E LS

N

obody puts Kelly Stocker in a corner. This creative, en-

It’s true, tonight’s menu items draw on simple, high-quality

trepreneurial dynamo with a penchant for microphones,

(and sustainable and local, whenever possible) ingredients that

technology and all-things-still-weird-about-Austin is

come together quickly and deliciously—an appetizer, a pasta dish

hard to pin down. She’s a DJ for KGSR, an emcee for community

and a dessert. As she slices the Easy Tiger baguette to pop in the

events (such as the annual Edible Austin Chef Auction and Keep

oven for the crostini, she says, “I thought I’d add some thyme…

Austin Weird Festival) and a writer for many local blogs and web-

but it’s too much. Three ingredients…no more! That’s it.” One of

sites. But all of these things she considers her “side hustles,” or

those holy trinity ingredients is honey that she collected from

gigs that allow her to dive into what really turns her on: the local

the hive in her backyard and, as with most any topic that comes

community. “For me, it’s such a core value to be connected to your

up in the banter that naturally happens while chopping and stir-

community and what’s happening in your community,” she says.

ring, she has hilarious stories to tell—like the random drunk lady

“Austin is an easy place to do that because there’s always some-

she found via Craigslist who was selling her fully loaded beehive;

thing to write about.”

the stinging that ensued when trying to cover the hive; and then

Stocker grew up in McAllen and moved to Austin after col-

there’s the moving of the beehive to her backyard “under the cov-

lege—and some requisite soul-searching—to work for Dell (“the

er of night.” She offers a taste of the amazing honey—a half-gallon

gateway drug to Austin”) before moving on to Yelp. Now, she’s

of which she and her boyfriend Robert harvested from just one

a self-employed “productivity consultant,” a title she admits she

tray in the hive. “The mesquite trees were blooming at the time,”

made up. Through a course called the “Productivity Power Hour,”

she says. “So you’ll get a little bit of mesquite, along with laven-

she teaches startups and individuals how to make life easier

der, which was all over the place. Do you taste the flowers?”

through the magic of technology—demonstrating plugins, short-

As Stocker plates the finished pasta on her grandmother’s be-

cuts, apps, hacks and how-tos on organizing email and so on. “You

loved Fiestaware, it’s clear that no matter how quickly and effi-

know how some people love to organize closets?” she explains.

ciently she wants the cooking to be over so “the fun can begin,”

“That’s how I feel about digital stuff. Let me see your nasty inbox.

she enjoys it immensely. “I think a lot of times, we come to cook-

Let’s make it happen!”

ing with this story about who we are and how we cook and what

Turns out, “making it happen” is how she approaches cooking,

we’re able to do,” she says. “Sometimes, you have to overcome the

as well. Apparently, the choice of what to make today was not an

story of who you are, not only as a person but as a cook. And then

easy one, so over brunch, she turned to her friends to discuss.

you can move forward with your adventures!”

“This question of what to make…and who I am…I was talking to my girlfriends today about it, and it was an existential crisis moment! Is your cooking style like your lifestyle? Is it an extension of

CHÈVRE CROSTINI

who you are? What’s your cooking spirit animal? It was quite the

Serves 4

moment; we all left with something to think about.” As she bustles around the kitchen organizing ingredients for a three-course dinner, she explains what informed her final, almost-last-minute decision: It’s about simplicity and finding the fastest path to the tastiest dish—the ultimate cooking hack. “I want for the cooking to be over so the fun can begin,” she says. “I like the bringing together of the people and the thing that happens when we eat—it’s about sharing and connecting.”

8 slices toasted baguette, ½-inch-thick 2 oz. whipped Pure Luck or other local goat cheese or chèvre 2 fresh peaches, sliced thinly 4 T. local honey Smear the toasted baguette slices liberally with chèvre. Top each with a peach slice. Drizzle liberally with honey. Wonder why your entire kitchen is sticky. EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM


Plan Your Visit in October for Texas Wine Month!

SPINACH FETTUCCINE WITH ADOBO CHIPOTLE CREAM SAUCE AND SEARED SCALLOPS Serves 4 1 lb. sea scallops, washed, side muscle removed (or substitute shrimp from the Texas Gulf) Freshly ground pepper, to taste 12 oz. spinach fettuccine 4 T. butter, divided 2 garlic cloves, grated 1 small onion, diced 2 pt. heavy whipping cream (or substitute 1 pt. of half & half) Handful grated Parmesan Liquid from a 7-oz. can chipotles in adobo sauce, solids reserved 1 bunch cilantro, chopped Put the washed scallops on a paper towel and pat dry, then season on all sides with pepper. Let the scallops rest while they come to room temperature—about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, get a big pot of salted water on the stove, heat to a boil and cook the fettuccine according to package instructions. Drain, set aside and keep warm. In a medium saucepan, heat 2 tablespoons of butter and add the garlic and onion. When the garlic and onion are softened, pour in the heavy cream and stir until warm enough to melt the Parmesan. Toss in the Parmesan and stir until it’s incorporated. Spoon in the adobo liquid, to taste, and keep warm. (You can also add the diced chipotle peppers for a stronger flavor.) Meanwhile, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat until the butter turns brown and smells nutty. Add the scallops to the hot butter and cook until deep golden brown on 1 side—about 1 or 2 minutes, depending on size. Flip the scallops and spoon the butter over them repeatedly until

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the second side is browned—about 1 more minute. Just before serving, stir the cilantro into the sauce. Toss the pasta with the cream sauce and plate. Top the pasta with the seared scallops.

FAKE-OUT BANANAS FOSTER Serves 4 4 T. butter 4 ripe bananas, sliced ½-inch thick ¾ c. brown sugar ½ c. rum (and 1 more for the cook) Ice cream, for serving Melt the butter in a medium saucepan. Toss in the banana slices and add the sugar. Stir together to caramelize. Once caramelized, add the rum. Spoon over ice cream and serve.

October 27, 2018

Market Square | Fredericksburg, Texas

A Celebration of Texas Food & Wine! Fest Office: 830-997-8515 www.FbgFoodandWineFest.com EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

25


Kathy’s Interior Renovation, 78751

We design and build around you so you feel right, at home. CGSDB.COM/Kathy | 512.444.1580


the

HOME guide

Sustainable Flooring // Houseplants // Critter Condos find more ways to make your home green at edibleaustin.com EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

27


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SPOTLIGHT

Spotlight on grilling

Weston Table Escape the Ordinary

V

isit Weston Table and you’ll find much more than an online marketplace—it is a visually captivating lifestyle platform with recipes, gardening inspiration and travel notes woven into a market of curated goods from around the world. Founder Dianne O’Connor created the website to provide a shopping experience in an online entertainment platform. “This isn’t just about shopping; it’s about coming to Weston Table and staying for a while,” O’Connor says. One of the items in the store is the OFYR, a wood-fire grill discovered during a visit to Sweden’s archipelago. “With other grills, the host cooks with his or her back to guests. The round shape of the OFYR actually brings people together to socialize around food and everyone can participate in meal preparation,” O’Connor says. The Netherlands-sourced grill provides an innovative way to cook healthily, as the radiant-heated surface is naturally non-stick and requires only a small amount of oil for cooking. As with every item on Weston Table, the OFYR grill was chosen for its superior quality. “We have items ranging from $3 small-batch South Carolina sea salt, to a $2,500 grill, and they’re all selected with the same attention to provenance and excellence,” O’Connor says. “We understand quality, and we want to make the people visiting Weston Table feel welcome and entertained.”

Shop today at westontable.com Visit edibleaustin.com to find Weston Table’s seasonal recipes for the OFYR grill.


HOME GUIDE

Sustainable Flooring by Jen Hamilton Hernandez

W

hen dreaming up a remodel or new build, flooring

1. MARMOLEUM: $5/SQUARE FOOT

may not be as sexy or Pinterest-worthy as say, wall-

This product is made from natural ingredients, such as flax-

paper, paint colors, kitchens or bathrooms. However,

seed oil and wood flour, and is finished with a jute backing, mak-

nothing supports the life coursing through a home each day quite

ing the floor comfortable to walk on. It’s available in squares or

like our floors. We play with our children and/or pets on them,

sheets in a wide variety of colors, allowing for a monotone look

stand on them for hours cooking and walk the same traffic pattern

or an intricate pattern. It can be used in wet areas like kitchens,

from room to room. The floor really anchors the entire home, and

bathrooms and laundry rooms, has antibacterial properties and

now homeowners are more conscientious than ever about remod-

helps reduce dust mites and allergens. Our experts warn that

eling or building with flooring that reflects their values and con-

Marmoleum can stain and dent easily, though, and—as with any

cerns for the environment.

type of flooring—you’ll want to make sure it’s installed by a con-

We spoke with interior-design experts Shannon Eddings of

tractor who has experience with the product.

Shannon Eddings Interiors, Mark Evans, project designer at CG&S Design-Build and Sarah Malek Barney, owner and principal design-

2. CORK: $5–$10/SQUARE FOOT

er at Bandd Design, to get their thoughts on the new wave of sus-

“Cork is softer on feet, durable, can even be used in the kitch-

tainable flooring options. Listed here—from most budget-friend-

en,” Evans notes. It’s also thermal and helps with acoustics, which

ly to most splurge-worthy—are seven of the sustainable flooring

is a plus in common areas. However, it can become scratched in

trends that our experts are seeing. Prices per square foot are ap-

a home with pets, and may damage easily. “But that’s just patina,”

proximate and do not include installation costs. Keep in mind these

Evans says. “I’ve even damaged my concrete floor—it happens

are starting prices, as products can range in quality and selection.

with flooring.” EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

29


3. RUBBER: $5–$10/SQUARE FOOT Great for laundry rooms, mudrooms and even busy kitchens, rubber flooring is available in a wide range of colors. Our experts note that some may be turned off by its industrial look but advise to view the options before ruling it out, as you may be surprised. Ask for rubber flooring made from recycled tires for an extra-sustainable option.

4. STAINED/POLISHED CONCRETE: $10/SQUARE FOOT This price reflects the amount it costs to float a new, thin concrete layer over an existing rough one and polish it. Staining is another $5–$10/square foot. “It’s budget-friendly because your slab is already there,” Malek Barney says. “It can be inexpensive to polish, and it’s indestructible.” Those are the pros. The cons are that polished concrete can be tough on your feet and body day after day, especially if you’re on your feet much of the time you’re at home. Also, it’s not very forgiving; it may not be a good choice for people who are prone to falling or dropping items.

5. BAMBOO: $10/SQUARE FOOT This is one of the most popular sustainable options because bamboo grows quickly and it’s aesthetically pleasing. Evans warns homeowners to “be sure to get a good quality bamboo because the cheaper ones damage easily.”

6. CEMENT TILE: $15/SQUARE FOOT If the goal is to use a sustainable flooring material and have your home reflect the Austin vibe you see in many of your favorite commercial spaces, then cement tile may be what you’re looking for. “Cement tile is very Austin,” says Eddings. “It’s handmade and doesn’t require a lot of energy to produce. You can find it on floors, walls, bar fronts—it’s everywhere and it’s colorful and eye-catching.”

7. RECLAIMED WOOD: $10–$30/SQUARE FOOT “There’s a ton of oak in Texas, but this option can get pricey unless you’re doing the reclaiming yourself,” says Malek Barney. Evans warns homeowners to check reclaimed wood for pesticides, dust or lead that may be present. Still, if you’re mindful of your sourcing and choice of contractor, reclaimed wood can bring an iconic look to your home. “I love anything reclaimed or salvaged and think that the old wood flooring is something that seems authentically Austin,” says Eddings. 30

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM


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HOME GUIDE

Living with Plants by Darby Kendall • Photography by Jenna Northcutt

P

lants can brighten up the interior of any home, but those who lack experience often avoid them. We’re here to say that the houseplant shouldn’t be feared! With some basic

knowledge about light, watering and the right plants to buy, you’ll soon be on the way to growing your own urban indoor jungle. The first step to success is giving your home a good hard look to find the best sunlit spots. Melissa Hagen, houseplant manager at Tillery Street Plant Company, notes how often people come to shop unprepared. “A lot of times, people will come to the store and get a few small plants, thinking ‘I’m going to start small,’” she says. “If you don’t have a good place to display them, or you put your three small plants on your win-

Cacti and succulents also do very well indoors, but there are a

dowsill and you stand back, you

few things to keep in mind before taking one home. They require

barely notice them. I recommend get-

coarse, sandy soil that allows for better drainage, and the pot has

ting a plant that’s proportional to your space, so that might be one large plant instead.” Once you determine the space the new greenery will live in, it’s time to pick a plant. Solid options for beginners include pothos ivy, aloe vera, spider plants and begonias. If your home’s interior isn’t well lit by the sun, opt for plants that do well in low and artificial lighting, such as peace lilies, ZZ plants and snake plants. For those seeking a tree-like houseplant, dracaena or the ‘Audrey’ ficus are a great place to start. Hagen is a self-proclaimed fan of

dracaena marginata, because of its hot-pink coloring. If fun colors also appeal to you, begonias come in a wide variety of hues, and pothos is available in several colors and variegations. Keep in mind that many of these houseplant varieties, such as dracaenas, peace lilies, begonias and pothos, are toxic to animals if ingested. On the other hand, varieties such as sword ferns, spider plants, African violets, prayer plants and echeveria are all nontoxic. If you have pets, do your research before selecting and placing your plants. (You can find searchable databases at aspca.org and petpoisonhelpline.com.) 32

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

to have holes in the bottom for additional drainage. (This applies to all houseplants, really.) “I would also recommend putting them outside sometimes for extra sun,” says Hagen. “I do that with all my normal houseplants, too. The key to a happy cactus or succulent is lots of light, and a little water.” When you do set plants outdoors, be sure to only leave them out for a day or two, and avoid direct sunlight that could burn the plant. When watering houseplants that aren’t drought tolerant, the road to success lies in knowing the signs of an under-watered plant. “A thirsty plant generally will look really droopy,” Hagen says. “You look for signs like either the top of the plant wilting or the plant not being as springy as normal. And then with plants like the snake plant, the whole paddle leaf will get wrinkles and start to curl.” Watering is also a good time to check for potential pests in your plant’s soil. Know what spider mites, mealybugs and scale look like, and keep an eye out for them whenever you water, so you can catch any issues early. There is a wide variety of ways to use plants as decor in the home. Nestle them in a macramé hanger, on a floating shelf or a trendy plant stand—you can even trail vines on the wall. Or


pick a pot that functions as a focal point. One of Hagen’s favorite ways to show off her pothos and spider plants is to suspend them in water in a transparent vase. “I feel like, hydroponically, plants are super underutilized,” she says. “A lot of plants you can keep in water. You just need to give them sunlight and some spring water to keep them happy. It’s just so easy.” Once your new plant is happily placed in your home under the right kind of light, the last step is to be patient, and ask for help if you need it. “So many people are like, ‘I love plants, but I kill them,’” says Hagen. “I just say, ‘Maybe you haven’t found the right plant for you!’ There are so many different varieties of plants and they all have different requirements. Sometimes it works out and sometimes it doesn’t, but when it does work out and you end up having a plant for years and years, it’s really nice.”

MELISSA HAGEN’S HYDROPONIC HOUSEPLANT HOW-TO Besides giving us an excuse to bring out our pretty vases, the benefits of growing houseplants hydroponically include eliminating the need for potting soil. Because the plant is permanently suspended in water, there’s no way to over- or under-water, and the lack of soil also keeps pests away. To get started, all you need are some plant cuttings, a transparent vessel and spring water. Two of Hagen’s favorite houseplants to keep in water are spider plants and pothos ivy, though spiderwort and philodendron are also popular options. Trim a cutting of the plant with several leaves on it (or in the case of the spider plant, cut a plantlet off the mother plant), and place in enough water to cover the stem, allowing the leaves to stay dry. You can also move a potted houseplant into water, but gently remove the soil from the roots first. Place the vase in the sun, providing the plant with as much sunlight as its potted counterparts require. Whenever the water level starts to drop—typically every week or so—top off the water to its original height. Feel free to add multiple cuttings of the same plant to one vessel, as long as the container is large enough; however, it’s best not to put different plants in the same container, because each houseplant has its own nutrient and sunlight requirements. The use of rainwater or bottled spring water allows the cuttings to root more easily, and provides the houseplant with the nutrients it would normally receive from soil. Hagen recommends these waters over tap because they have less chlorine. If the water starts to get murky, change it every few months. Also keep an eye out for any rotting roots and remove accordingly. Keep these tips in mind as you watch your new water plants, and you’ll be good to go! EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

33


HOME GUIDE

Critter Condos by Claudia Alarcón • Photography by Tyler Bruce

A

ustin has long been a haven for urban wildlife, but be-

observe their world. “We’ve had screech owls roosting in our boxes

cause of our recent rapid development, local habitats

all around the country and in some cases, within days after putting

continue to shrink. A simple way to support our critter

them up. Saw-whet owls will nest in these boxes, as well. The nest

friends—especially our beneficial flying critter friends—is to add low-maintenance, locally made nesting boxes.

box only needs to be placed 10 feet up in the tree.” Sunshine warns against installing a nest box facing north, as it

Emmy Westlake Sunshine and her family have always been

increases the chances of cold wind and rain penetration. And it’s

outdoor enthusiasts who love attracting wildlife to their yard, so

important that there isn’t a lot of brush surrounding the box or

when they saw the baby owls in a friend’s nest box, they knew they

the opening so that owls can easily fly in and out. Hardwood trees,

had to have a box of their own. Screech owls are abundant in our

such as oak, pine, pecan and other large trees are ideal; bushy trees

area and thrive in urban settings. They eat large insects and small

like juniper are not. “Nest boxes also work well on the side of a

rodents such as mice, thus making them effective pest control.

house, garage, barn or other tall structures. We recommend placing

“We made our first screech owl nest box several years ago and

a handful of dry leaves in the bottom of the box—and that’s it!”

it was amazing watching the owls come roost and begin nesting

Of course, we can’t talk about flying critters without mention-

almost immediately,” says Sunshine. “We started making screech

ing Austin’s most iconic resident: the Mexican free-tailed bat.

owl nest boxes for friends and family and soon we couldn’t keep

Debbie Zent grew up in Western Massachusetts, in a neighbor-

up with demand. OwlReach was born shortly thereafter.”

hood that ran alongside acres of woods where she played with

Sunshine’s company makes nest boxes out of cedar, which

her brothers. “We were familiar with the wildlife that lived there

weathers naturally and fades into a color similar to the bark of the

and saw many birds and animals up close…except bats,” she says.

tree. While most nest box openings are just big enough to allow

“At dusk, we would watch them flit about between the trees, much

access, her patented OwlView opening and roosting window is

too far over our heads to really see what they looked like.” This

larger, giving both adults and owlets plenty of room to sit, roost and

curiosity stayed with her for years, and when she moved to Austin

34

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM


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in 2011, there was no turning back. With help from Bat Conserva-

nursing colonies, which many enthusiasts find appealing,” says Zent.

tion International (BCI), Zent and her brother Dave started build-

The choice between a three- or four-chambered house is a matter of

ing bat houses to sell online. Their company, Austin Batworks,

preference; four chambers will house about 50 or more bats, which

currently sells handcrafted single and multichamber homes that

love to congregate in large numbers.

come in shades of black suede, amber leaf, canoe and toasted

Another beneficial local winged friend that thrives in man-made

marshmallow, depending on what region of the country you’re in.

colonies is the purple martin. They’re voracious insect eaters that

The success of a bat house depends on many factors, includ-

are a joy to watch, yet they’re threatened by invasive species, such

ing sun exposure, paint color and distance from tree branches or

as the sparrows and starlings that are multiplying at an alarming

other potential perches for predators. “The colors we chose are

rate. Concerned about the plight of the martins, Danny Sinclair

based on BCI’s twelve years of research on artificial bat roosts,”

opened Purple Martin Propagators, an Austin-based company spe-

says Zent. “BCI determined specific thresholds of temperature

cializing in 12 or 24 poly-gourd rack systems installed on 14-foot

needs for bat house success and created a map of the contiguous

aluminum poles. The gourds are made of food-grade polyethylene

United States—illustrating four distinct temperature gradients.

that provides great temperature control, and the systems are on

Bat houses are far more successful if painted or stained, as the

winches that allow you to easily lower the gourds for cleaning and

darkness or lightness of color determines solar absorption.”

maintenance. Some of the gourds have sparrow traps, and all come

Bat houses should be installed, at minimum, 10 feet above the

with starling resistant entrance holes.

ground, but 12 to 20 feet is better. The location should be sunny, with

In light of our dwindling wildlife habitats and resources, con-

a minimum of six to eight hours of sunlight per day, but if limited,

sider helping these three local and beneficial critters by providing

morning sun is preferable. The house should be 20 to 30 feet from

a home, and in return, they’ll provide you with years of beautiful

trees, wires or other potential predator perches. “If the recommend-

entertainment.

ed criteria are met, bat houses are more likely to be used during the first summer if installed before the bats return in spring,” says Zent.

For more information, visit:

Single-chambered bat houses are most successful when installed on

512-766-6378; owlreach.com

the side of a home, barn or other structure as opposed to poles, be-

512-327-9721; batcon.org

cause they lack thermal stability. Multichambered houses have bet-

512-861-8303; austinbatworks.com

ter thermal stability and are suited for either mount. “If placed with-

512-825-4712; birdhouseinfo.com

in a quarter mile of water, the multichambered houses tend to attract

Give your home the protection it deserves. Karen Easterling, Agent 2711 W Anderson Lane, Suite 201 Austin, TX 78757 Bus: 512-454-4784 karen.easterling.b4tn@statefarm.com

1708136

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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

Your home is where you make some of your best memories, and that’s worth protecting. I’m here to help. LET’S TALK TODAY.

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cooks TOOL BOX

EDIBLE MUST-HAVES

H

ere at Edible Austin, we seek out, review, ponder, write about and enjoy lots and lots of delicious, fresh local foods—pretty great job perk, yes? But our team also fancies celebrating that local abundance at home by rattling the old pots and pans. For this year’s Cooks issue, we thought it’d be fun to share with you our team picks for a couple of must-have kitchen tools. If you’d

like, share yours with us on Instagram using #edibleaustincooks

AH-SO WINE OPENER Growing up, I always used our Ah-So wine-opener for the church key on the handle. Then, as I got older, it was the first wine opener my dad taught me to use. It’s better for aged wines, but I like that it gets the cork out whole without putting a hole in it. It took me a few bottles to get the hang of it, but now if my wine doesn’t come with a screw top or in a can, I always look for my Ah-So and then call my dad to discuss my newest wine find. Jenna Northcutt Publisher

MRS. ANDERSON’S BAKING HAND-CRANK FLOUR SIFTER Nobody wants to bite into a dessert and come across a chunk of flour—eating baked goods should be nothing less than pure bliss! Enter the sifter, one of my favorite tools to use while baking. Though sieves also work to break down dry ingredients, the hand-crank sifter is easier to use in my opinion (and there’s something oddly satisfying about turning the handle). And it gets bonus points for adding a touch of nostalgia to the kitchen; its design has been going strong since the Victorian era! Darby Kendall Digital Content Manager, Contributor

VINTAGE FROSTED-GLASS CHAMPAGNE FLUTES These beauties are my absolute favorite things in the world, and they have been ever since I was a little girl. I inherited them from my grandmother on my 21st birthday—she remembered that during my childhood, I would beg her for permission to play with them whenever I came over for a visit. There is just something about their upbeat aqua color and the texture of the frosted glass that makes my heart so happy. What better way to jazz up any celebration? Dawn Weston Associate Publisher 38

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AMCO 12-INCH RUST-PROOF TONGS Wake up! Tongs are sexy and exciting! I have a million pairs, but I reach for this guy almost daily, while smugly eschewing his frustrating brothers and sisters. Why? Well, he’s the perfect length to safely reach into the oven, flip stuff in a hot sauté pan or fish a shot glass out of the disposal…SO I HEAR. He also has the right spring tension. This is hugely important because if the tension is too high, the tongs are difficult to use for long periods of time without getting unflattering and debilitating hand/thumb ache/cramp. Most importantly, he’s sturdy enough and loud enough when rapidly clacked together to hide up a sleeve and pretend he’s your claw hand as you chase a happily squealing child around the kitchen island while declaring you’re Tongo from the planet Utensilus sent to Earth to pinch kid bottoms…SO I HEAR. Kim Lane Editor

JOSEPH JOSEPH GARLIC ROCKER From veggie burgers and stir-fries to pesto, hummus and salad dressings, I use garlic almost daily. (And I just harvested the first garlic crop from my backyard garden, too!) Last year, at a class on how to make paella, I happily discovered this garlic rocker, which crushes and minces cloves uniformly and with minimal effort. Simply press down with both hands, rock the clove back and forth, and bam! Little pieces of juicy garlic goodness are ready to be spooned into whatever dish you’re making. Bonus: Your hands won’t smell like the pungent herb. It’s little things like this in the kitchen that make cooking so satisfying. Anne Marie Hampshire Copy Editor, Contributor

KITCHENAID CLASSIC NONSTICK LOAF PAN Baking is the bomb, and I would be lost without my nonstick loaf pan. It’s so versatile that I can use it to bake everything from bread to layer bars. My favorite use for the pan, though, is using it to turn my overripe bananas into warm banana bread. Meara Isenberg Intern

KITCHENAID IMMERSION BLENDER Every morning, I bond with my immersion blender as I make my butter coffee (French-pressed, locally roasted coffee + grassfed cow’s butter + MCT oil). This has been my ritual almost every single day for over two years. Another special moment I spend with this appliance is when I load up on antioxidants with my weekly blueberry and parsley smoothie. I also save so much time with it when I need to puree butternut squash soup, make a roasted sweet potato puree for a scallop dish or whip up a creamy avocado salad dressing (pro tip: thin any salad dressing with sauerkraut brine for added salt and probiotics). So many uses and far fewer dirty dishes! Rachel Davis Marketing Specialist 40

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

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TX009 Edible Austin Ad C PRESS2.pdf

1

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7 AUSTIN AREA LOCATIONS

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GREAT

WHITES OF TEXAS

by KRISTI WILLIS photography by JENNA NORTHCUTT 42

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R

ed and rosé wines often steal the headlines in Texas, but there’s a growing number of Texas white wines winning praise and awards in competitions across the state and

around the world. For example, Pedernales Cellars produces what is arguably the most lauded Texas white. Their viognier, a varietal common in the Rhône Valley of Southern France, has received gold

A Uniquely Texas Experience! Come Celebrate with Us! Our cellar or reception hall is perfect for your next meeting, holiday or birthday soiree.

and double-gold medals not only in the United States, but also in the Lyon International Competition, where the 2012 Viognier Reserve won a Grand Gold. “We want our viognier to be the full, unmoderated expression of the grape,” says Pedernales Cellars winemaker David Kuhlken. “This means big, ripe tropical fruit, honeysuckle and peach. We hang the fruit out to get maximum ripeness and look to

Hours: Monday - Thursday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Friday & Saturday, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday, Noon – 6 p.m.

accentuate those big notes in our style.”

Last wine tasting, 30 min before closing.

Also, Duchman Family Winery has had early and continued success with the Vermentino grape that originated from Sardinia, Italy. This varietal creates a bright, crisp wine perfect for Texas’ steamy summers, and thrives well in our tumultuous weather. “The beautiful thing about Vermentino is the consistency,” says

www.beckervineyards.com 830-644-2681 Directions: 11 miles east of Fredericksburg, 3 miles west of Stonewall, off US Hwy 290 at Jenschke Lane.

Duchman winemaker Dave Reilly. “We’ve had drought, we’ve had freezes, we’ve had floods and we’ve had big crops and small crops, and we’ve always been able to produce a consistent, high-quality wine.” And, Hilmy Cellars’ 2016 albariño, a grape from Spain and Portugal, won the top honors for a Texas white at the 2018 TEXSOM International Wine Awards. This year’s competition results included a lengthy list of awards for Texas white wines made from

o c n a l B t Visi

viognier, roussanne, Vermentino and other grapes that originate across the Mediterranean, such as marsanne, picpoul blanc and trebbiano. Other winemakers turn to blends as an alternative—selecting the best of their crop to produce an outstanding white. Blending the grapes means the winery is less reliant on one varietal and can avoid missing a vintage if the vines suffer from early frost, hail or rain damage. Brennan Vineyards’ Lily is edging up on almost a decade of accolades. The blend typically includes roussanne, a grape popular in France’s Rhône region, mixed with other grapes to bring out the best in the wine based on that year’s harvest. While the highly praised 2016 Lily was 100 percent roussanne, the much-awarded 2015 Lily included only 29 percent roussanne combined with Muscat of Alexandria and viognier. The just-bottled 2017 is 52 percent roussanne and 48 percent malvasia bianca. Whether producing single varietals or blends, Texas winemakers continue to explore the white grapes that thrive best in Texas’ unpredictable growing environments. While these varietal names may be unfamiliar today, they’re likely to be among your favorites in the not-too-distant future.

Tw i n S i s t e r s Da n c e h a l l

Come out and celebrate fall with us and enjoy the many fun events planned throughout the season. To plan your get-away ... explore our website

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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

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GUIDE TO THE GRAPES GRAPE

ORIGIN

VARIETAL SIMILAR IN STYLE

RECENT VINTAGES OF TEXAS AWARD WINNERS

albariño

Spain and Portugal

pinot grigio, chenin blanc, dry riesling

Hilmy Cellars Albariño 2016

blanc du bois

Florida

albariño to chardonnay, depending on the winemakers’ style

Haak Vineyards & Winery Blanc du Bois 2017

chenin blanc

Loire Valley and South Africa

albariño, picpoul blanc, Chablis

McPherson Cellars Old Vine Chenin Blanc 2015

marsanne

Southern Rhône

chardonnay, trebbiano, viognier

Wedding Oak Winery Texas Hill Country Marsanne 2016

picpoul blanc

Languedoc

pinot grigio, Chablis, sauvignon blanc

Lost Draw Cellars Texas High Plains Picpoul Blanc 2016

roussanne

Southern Rhône

chardonnay, viognier

Brennan Vineyards Lily 2016

Lewis Wines Texas High Plains Chenin Blanc 2016

Kuhlman Cellars Texas High Plains Roussanne 2017 Lost Draw Cellars Roussanne 2016 trebbiano

Italy

chardonnay, marsanne, viognier

Duchman Family Winery Texas Trebbiano 2016

Vermentino

Sardinia

sauvignon blanc, grüner veltliner

Duchman Family Winery Bingham Family Vineyard Vermentino 2016

viognier

Southern Rhône

chardonnay, marsanne

Becker Vineyards Viognier 2016 Brennan Vineyards Viognier 2016 Hilmy Cellars Viognier 2015 McPherson Cellars Viognier 2016 Pedernales Cellars Viognier Reserve 2016 Ron Yates Texas Hill Country Viognier 2016 Spicewood Vineyards Viognier 2016

GOOD FOOD SMART PEOPLE for

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TOUR. TASTE. EXPERIENCE. AUSTIN’S GRAIN-TO-GLASS WHISKEY DISTILLERY

Visit our “grain-to-glass” whiskey distillery where we do it all in-house: milling, mashing, fermenting, distilling, barreling and bottling. Enjoy tours, tastings and whiskey cocktails in our Tasting Room.

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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

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FARMERS diary

ARNOSKY FAMILY FARM BY V I V É G R I F F I T H • P H OTO G RA P H Y BY CAS EY WO O DS

H

eading out Texas RM 165 toward Blanco, there’s a moment

inal 12 acres. They lived in a tent while they cleared the land and

when you crest a hill and the breathtaking expanse of the

built their first greenhouse. That greenhouse still stands, along

Hill Country spreads out before you. Only a few minutes

with several others, plus workers’ quarters, the Arnoskys’ home

farther along stands the cheerful Blue Barn of Arnosky Family

and the packing shed where they assemble 1,500 bouquets of

Farm. A local landmark, the barn draws tourists, day-trippers and

flowers each week.

neighbors, who gather up buckets of sunflowers, mixed bouquets

Pamela runs the packing crew. A straightforward woman in

of seasonal color and hanging baskets to grace their homes, front

braids who hiked the Pacific Crest Trail from Mexico to Canada

porches and special events.

decades before it was popular, Pamela deftly recuts and strips the

Frank and Pamela Arnosky started their flower farm in 1990,

leaves from bachelor’s buttons while we talk. At another table,

when a $1,000 down payment enabled them to purchase the orig-

employees work through buckets of celosia in yellow and flame red. Two dogs nap in the shade. We discuss the logistics of running a family farm in an age of industrial farming, supplying flowers for the First Ladies’ Luncheon and helping pioneer the American Grown Flowers movement, which certifies farms for consumers seeking homegrown flowers. But conversation often drifts to the larger philosophy driving the Arnoskys’ work. “We’re trying to do something that’s bigger than we are,” she says. That “something bigger” comes through in the awareness that the farm supports 12 families—some of them workers hired through the federal H-2A agricultural guest-worker program. It’s also expressed in the desire to preserve the land—especially the acres that were part of Peyton Colony, a freedmen’s community established after the Civil War. The Arnoskys bought the land from an African-American family whose ancestors had owned it since 1874, and they want to keep that history alive. Then there’s the Blue Barn itself—painted the color of the morning glories that climb the trellises of the packing shed. Designed by furniture maker Gary Weeks of Wimberley, the barn was constructed in 2008 through an old-fashioned barn-raising. “A barn-raising brings the community together, and we envision this as a community space,” Pamela says. “We’re expanding our mission beyond just a wholesale cut-flower farm to be more of a destination where people can come for flowers, vegetables, picnics and events. This will help us preserve the beauty and rural character of the valley.” Pamela notes that growing flowers in Texas is a four-season operation. Each week, about 30,000 plants go into the ground— working on a four-to-six-month cycle ahead of harvest. In the summer, they put in poinsettia cuttings to prepare for December. In November, they are readying for January’s sweet peas and dianthus. Spring features lilies, larkspur, tulips and an array of Texas wildflowers. EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

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e

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nc Y: Allia System B ED om od NT Freedlthy Fo E ES ch a PR d Ran for He

LIFE LOVE Celebrate FAMILY BLESSINGS

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*some creative license taken

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Bouquets go out to Central Markets under the Texas Specialty Cut Flowers label, as well as to H-E-B Blooms and other vendors. And the farm receives regular flower requests for funerals, special events and weddings. (My own wedding in 2008 featured vases filled with sunflowers and salvias from the farm.) In the fall, the farm is ablaze with marigolds. Spurred by the increasing interest in Día de los Muertos celebrations, the Arnoskys now produce more marigolds than any farm outside of California. The flowers are used to decorate elaborate altars, known as ofrendas, and are believed to help guide the dead back with their bright color and scent. And if the dead are drawn to the marigolds, so are the butterflies. In mid-October, the flowers are literally “dripping with monarchs” who stop over for nectar on their annual migration to Mexico. The thousands of buckets of marigolds sold in late October are “confirmation of how incredibly valuable that tradition is,” says Pamela. “It’s another way of bringing people together and honoring those who have come before us. That’s truly the way we go into the next generation, by passing down our knowledge and remembering what people have taught us.”

Life, like food, should be savored and celebrated.

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After nearly 30 years and raising four children on the farm, you might think the Arnoskys would be slowing down. Instead, their curiosity and passion drives them to keep expanding. They’ve purchased land in Minnesota, where they’re growing fields of stunning peonies. And they’ve also got a new farm in Fort Davis, where the altitude means cooler weather, perfect for raspberries. Reflecting on a life surrounded by flowers, the sounds of birds,

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migrating butterflies and families who come out on Saturday mornings to discover what’s blooming, Pamela hasn’t stopped feeling fortunate. “There’s a sense of wonder we get to tap into,” she says. “We are really privileged to get to be part of it.” Arnosky Family Farm will celebrate Day of the Dead with two days of activities at the Blue Barn. On October 26, gather for a family potluck and screening of the movie “Coco,” and on October 27, dance to Brave Combo amid the marigolds. Visit texascolor.com for more information and tickets.

www.JuniperHillsFarm.com | 830.833.0910 EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

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COOKING basics

VEGAN ICE CREAM BY JEN HAMILTON HERNANDEZ • PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAM SANITCHAT & AMELIA RALEY

A

ccording to Amelia Raley, co-owner of Sweet Ritual, Austin

when she had an abundance of mangoes that were going to be

might just be the vegan ice cream capital of the U.S. Wheth-

wasted if she didn’t come up with a plan to use them. An em-

er true or not, it’s no surprise that such a creative, vibrant

ployee suggested she make ice cream, and because she had plenty

city could be considered the epicenter of a national trend toward

of coconut cream on hand (it’s a foundational ingredient in Thai

dairy-free ice cream. And vegan ice cream isn’t just popular with

cooking, after all), she made her first batch. Thai Fresh has been a

vegans; people looking to remove dairy from their diet for a variety

vegan-friendly dessert destination ever since.

of reasons are enjoying scoops.

“Ice cream is less of a science than baking,” Sanitchat says,

Those who grew up getting that free birthday scoop at

“so you can learn faster.” She encourages home cooks to exper-

Baskin-Robbins may be skeptical. Can vegan ice cream match the

iment—substituting fruit that’s available seasonally and playing

creaminess of its dairy-forward counterpart? The answer is a re-

with different ingredients like palm sugar instead of cane sugar.

sounding yes, and those at the forefront of Austin’s vegan ice cream

“If you’re worried about the outcome, just make half a batch and

scene have already done much of the trial and error for you. Just

taste it. You can improve on your recipe from there.”

follow their tips and recipes, and you’ll soon be creating your own snap-worthy cone at home.

Newcomer to the Austin vegan ice cream scene, Chi Ndika started Luv Fats as a vegan avocado-based ice cream pop-up at popular

While many commercial dairy-free ice creams are whipped

events like Festival de Cumbia en la Capital, Let It Ring! Juneteenth

with air and use an almond-milk base, the local vegan ice cream

Celebration and monthly BossBabes ATX meetups. Demand for her

entrepreneurs we talked to prefer richer bases, such as coconut

creations grew, and now Luv Fats is available on Saturdays at the

milk, coconut cream, almond butter, sunflower-seed butter and av-

downtown SFC Farmers’ Market and on Sundays at the HOPE Farm-

ocados, with coconut milk and coconut cream being their favorites.

ers Market. “If you’re going to go to the work of making homemade

Jam Sanitchat, owner of Thai Fresh and Gati—a vegan dessert

ice cream, use the freshest ingredients. When I buy avocados, I buy

shop set to open on Holly Street by the end of 2018—prefers a co-

a small amount and use them that day.”

conut-cream base but adds that coconut milk can be used to cut

For equipment, Ndika has tried everything from a Cuisinart

fat content. Sanitchat, known for her cooking classes and delicious

ice cream maker to the ice cream attachment for her KitchenAid

noodle dishes, started offering vegan ice creams almost by accident

stand mixer, but says by far the best results come from “the old-

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school wooden bucket that you have to churn yourself ” (a product that’s enjoying a resurgence in the market). Moni Burgin and Rachel Horesovsky opened their Milky Way

THE LEANING PEAR H ill Country -inspired C uisine

Shakes vegan milkshake truck at Spider House Café last year—offering a range of milkshakes with fun toppings and mix-ins, such as edible glitter stars, candied pecans and glittery peach slices. While their chocolate and vanilla ice cream bases are made with a mix of coconut cream and coconut milk, they blend their vegan ice cream with almond milk for a satisfying shake. “For my vanilla ice cream, I just use coconut milk, coconut cream, sugar, vanilla and salt,” says Horesovsky. She notes that Fiesta Mart has a great selection of coconut milks that work well in ice cream, while coconut cream is better sourced online.

Unique. Well Crafted. Delicious.

111 river road, Wimberley, texas 512-847-pear | leaningpear.Com

Amelia Raley started Sweet Ritual with her business partner, Valerie Ward, in December 2011, and on any given Saturday, there’s a line out the door of their shop on Airport Boulevard, with ice cream-devouring patrons flooding out onto the sidewalks of the shopping center. “The cones we use in the shop are from The

Est. 1986

Konery—a Brooklyn-based company—and they’re available at

"Best place to cure what ails you." 512-444-6251 Mon-Sat 10:00a-6:30p theherbbar.com

Central Market, so you can build your own Insta-worthy cones at home!” says Raley. Regulars at Sweet Ritual are also in love with the shop’s toppings, especially the Peanut Butter Magic Shell. With the tips and recipes below, there’s nothing stopping you

Creams even suggests adding a little bourbon to your creation—

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couldn’t hurt. And, if you do make a few mistakes along the way,

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from whipping up your own vegan ice cream creations at home with fun toppings! In fact, Anthony Sobotik of Lick Honest Ice

there’s sweet relief in knowing there are many options for a last-minute ice cream run here in the vegan ice cream capital.

BASIC VEGAN VANILLA ICE CREAM Makes about 1½ quarts Courtesy of Lick Honest Ice Creams 4 c. coconut milk, divided 2 T. tapioca starch 1¼ c. granulated sugar ¼ c. brown-rice syrup ¼ t. pure vanilla extract Generous splash bourbon (optional)

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Pour ¾ cup coconut milk into a small bowl. Whisk in the tapioca starch and set aside. In a saucepan, whisk together the remaining coconut milk, sugar and brown-rice syrup. Place over medium-high heat and whisk continuously until the mixture comes to a soft boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low and continue cooking for 5 more minutes—whisking each minute. While whisking, pour the coconut milk and tapioca mixture into the saucepan and whisk continuously. The mixture will thicken almost immediately. Remove the saucepan from the heat and add the vanilla. Cover the mixture—preferably directly on top with plastic wrap to prevent a skin from forming—and refrigerate until cold, or overnight. Once cold, pour the liquid into a prepared ice cream maker, add the bourbon if using and churn until thickened to a soft-serve consistency—15 to 20 minutes. With a spatula, transfer the ice cream to a freezer-safe container and freeze for at least 2 hours or until hard. EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

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VEGAN NUT BUTTER MAGIC SHELL Makes about 1 cup Courtesy of Sweet Ritual ½ c. coconut oil ½ c. creamy nut butter (such as almond butter, peanut butter, cashew butter or sunbutter) ¹/³ c. powdered sugar ½ t. vanilla extract ¼ t. salt In a small pan, combine all the ingredients over medium-low heat—stirring until combined. Let the mixture cool slightly before pouring over ice cream. When applied to ice cream, the mixture will form a solid shell that’s fun to shatter with a spoon.

VEGAN MANGO ICE CREAM Makes about 3 quarts Courtesy of Thai Fresh and Gati 3 fresh mangoes, cut into small pieces (about 5 c. total. Frozen mangoes work well, too.) 6 c. coconut cream 2 c. sugar Pinch salt 3 T. lime juice

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honest ice creams

VEGAN COFFEE MILKSHAKE Makes 1 shake Courtesy of Milky Way Shakes For the coffee milk: 2 c. almond milk ¼ c. ground coffee

For the shake: 1 c. vegan vanilla ice cream ¼ c. cold coffee milk

Austin

South Lamar Boulevard, North Burnet Road & Aldrich Street in Mueller

Blend to desired consistency. This is also yummy with a brownie or favorite vegan candy bar mixed in.

ilikelick.com

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

Notes: Add natural vanilla in the process if you want a little vanilla flavor, but the fruit is already pretty fragrant on its own. Replace mangoes with any other fruits. Use lemon juice in place of lime juice for other fruits such as peach and berries. Or use less lime juice if you want it less sour.

Heat the almond milk in a saucepan over high heat. Once it comes to a boil, remove it from the heat and mix in the coffee grounds. Let the coffee steep for 4 minutes, then strain out the grounds with a fine sieve or a French press. Place the coffee milk in the fridge for a few hours (ideally overnight) before using.

lick 52

Set aside some pieces of the mango to add once the blend goes into the maker. In a blender or food processor, blend the rest of the ingredients. Add the pieces of mango to the mixture, then follow your ice cream maker’s directions.

EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM


CENTRAL TEXAS FOOD BANK

HUNGER ACTION BY DERRICK CHUBBS, President and CEO, Central Texas Food Bank

S

eptember is Hunger Action Month, a nationwide campaign to mobilize the public to take action on the issue of hunger. Throughout the month, the Central Texas Food Bank

(CTFB) will be encouraging participation through our “Nothing Runs on Empty” campaign—a way for Central Texans to donate, volunteer and advocate in the fight against hunger. CTFB and our partner agencies lead the charge in the battle against hunger in a 21-county service area twice the size of Massachusetts, where nearly 450,000 people face hunger—a quarter of whom are children. It’s important that all our neighbors have access to enough healthy food to reach their full potential—especially our children, who cannot grow, succeed or learn on an empty stomach. But we can’t win the fight against this public health crisis without your help. To shine a light on the toll hunger takes on individuals and our community, the “Nothing Runs on Empty” campaign asks you to consider and share how it must feel to live with an empty stomach—putting a healthy life and a promising future at risk. Here’s how it works: 1.

Grab a paper plate (or use the printable template at centraltexasfoodbank.org/HAM2018).

2.

Jot down something you can’t do on an empty stomach: “On an empty stomach I can’t ______.”

3.

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Then post/share a picture of you holding the plate on your social networks using #HungerActionMonth and tag @Central Texas Food Bank on Facebook, and @CTXFoodBank on Twitter and Instagram.

Or, if you’d like to step up your commitment and participate more actively, explore opportunities ranging from holding your own virtual food drive to volunteering in CTFB’s warehouse, kitchen or garden. In fact, if you volunteer on Thursday, September 6, our friends from Whataburger will be treating you to lunch. Another way to help is to make sure you’re registered to vote and then head to the polls on election day. Many decisions made in Wash-

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ington, D.C. and Austin affect CTFB and the people we serve—things like how much food we have to distribute, who is able to get food assistance and how much, and whether we can provide summer and

C R AF T BE E R

afterschool meals to kids. The voter registration deadline is Tuesday,

C H O CO LAT E

October 9; Election Day is Tuesday, November 6. Please educate your-

O LI V E O I L O N

self and VOTE!

TA P

Finally, make plans to join us for our annual Hunger Heroes

WI N E

dinner on September 13, which celebrates CTFB’s partners working to end hunger. Food & Wine Magazine’s Best New Chef of 2016, Chef Kevin Fink of Emmer & Rye and Henbit, will create a custom menu designed exclusively for event guests and serve the food onsite at CTFB. (Event details and ticket options can be found at centraltexasfoodbank.org/HungerHeroes). As always,

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thank you for your support. EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

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MARKETPLACE Over 80% of readers tell us they have contacted or purchased from an advertiser after seeing ads in Edible Austin. Let’s chat today! dawn@edibleaustin.com

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Southbound I-35 just before Oltorf

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THE DIRECTORY ARTISANAL FOODS

BEVERAGES

Gillen’s Candies + Wine Chocolate shop, wine bar and market. A place to come experience a myriad of flavors. Enjoy cheese, coffee, jerky and craft beer. Taste olive oil and vinegar on tap. 830-833-3233 1725 S. Hwy. 281, Blanco gillenscandies.com

Lick Honest Ice Creams Artisan ice creams celebrating the finest ingredients Texas has to offer! Handmade in small batches in our Austin kitchen. Natural, local and seasonal. 512-363-5622 1100 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 1135 512-609-8029 6555 Burnet Rd., Ste. 200 512-502-5949 1905 Aldrich St., Ste. 150 ilikelick.com 54

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

AquaBrew Brewery & Beer Garden Craft beer, culinary delights, local music and community all meet here. Come get a taste of what we’re all about. 512-353-2739 150 S. LBJ Dr., San Marcos aqua-brew.com

Becker Vineyards Winery, vineyards and tasting room with wines for tasting and for sale. Lavender fields, lavender products and annual Lavender Fest. 830-644-2681 464 Becker Farms Rd., Stonewall 307 E. Main St., Fredericksburg beckervineyards.com EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

Bending Branch Winery

Craft Pride

Bending Branch Winery is a premier Hill Country winery with award-winning wines, including our signature Texas Tannat. Visit us Thursday through Sunday. 830-995-2948 142 Lindner Branch Trl., Comfort 830-995-3394 704 High St., Comfort bendingbranchwinery.com

A Texas-only craft beer bar serving up the highest quality beer from regional breweries. With 54 taps and a knowledgeable staff, it’s an inviting space for dedicated beer lovers and casual drinkers alike. 512-428-5571 61 Rainey St. craftprideaustin.com

Bloody Revolution From Bloody Revolution Gourmet Mixes in Austin, TX comes a nothing-else-needed Bloody Mary Mix that’s as great for cocktails as it is for cooking. Start a REVOLUTION! bloodyrevolution.com

Growler Express Taproom and growler fill station serving craft beer, ciders and wine. 512-361-0911 1567 Main St., Ste. 800, Buda growlerexpresstx.com

KTonic Kombucha Civil Goat Coffee Cafe, roastery and artisanal wholesale coffee. 512-792-9929 704 N. Cuernavaca Dr. civilgoats.com

Proudly brewed in Austin. We produce Texas’ only 100 percent organic, low-sugar and all-tea kombuchas. Our delicious varieties are great on their own or added to your favorite spirit. ktonickombucha.com


Perrisos Vineyards

Tito’s Handmade Vodka

Only one hour west of Austin, Perissos Vineyards is passionate about using only Texas-grown fruit to produce exceptional wines. Casual atmosphere. 512-820-2950 7214 Park Rd. 4, Burnet perrisosvineyards.com

Tito’s Handmade Vodka is handcrafted from 100% corn and distilled six times by Tito Beveridge in Austin, TX at America’s original microdistillery. Gluten-free! 512-389-9011 titosvodka.com

Republic Whiskey

Torr Na Lochs Vineyard & Winery

Republic Whiskey has notes of rich oak and vanilla bean fading into dark cherry, with a bold finish like a West Texas sunset. Barreled and bottled in Central Texas by Dripping Springs Distilling. republictxwhiskey.com

Spec’s Wine Spirits and Finer Foods Family-owned since 1962, Spec’s offers expert service and Texas’ largest selection of wines, spirits and beers along with gourmet foods and more! 512-366-8260 4970 W. US Hwy. 290 512-342-6893 10515 N. MoPac Hwy. 512-280-7400 9900 S. I-35 512-263-9981 13015 Shops Pkwy. 512-366-8300 5775 Airport Blvd. specsonline.com

St. Francis Winery & Vineyards For more than four decades, the wines of St. Francis Winery & Vineyards have reflected the finest mountain and valley vineyards in Sonoma County. 888-675-9463 100 Pythian Rd., Santa Rosa, CA stfranciswinery.com

Still Austin Whiskey Co. Whiskey distillery. 512-276-2700 440 E. Saint Elmo Rd., Bldg. F stillaustin.com

Texas Coffee Traders East Austin’s artisinal coffee roaster and one-stop shop offering a wide selection of certified organic and fair trade options for wholesale and retail. 512-476-2279 1400 E. 4th St. texascoffeetraders.com

Texas Keeper Ciders Local cidery making dry, small-batch ciders from 100% pressed juice. Beautiful taproom in far South Austin open to the public Friday through Sunday, and weekdays for private events. 512-910-3409 12521 Twin Creeks Rd. texaskeeper.com

Texas Hill Country vineyard and winery with a tasting room and event space. Stop by, relax and enjoy the view! 512-766-0555 7055 W. State Hwy. 29, Burnet torrnalochs.com

BOOKSELLERS BookPeople Texas’ leading independent bookstore since 1970. Located in the heart of downtown, BookPeople has been voted best bookstore in Austin for over 15 years! 512-472-5050 603 N. Lamar Blvd. bookpeople.com

BUILDING AND ARCHITECTURE CG&S Design-Build CG&S Design-Build is a high-end Austin residential remodeling firm specializing in full-service design and construction services. 512-444-1580 402 Corral Ln. cgsdb.com

Trinity White Architecture We help individuals and families through the dreaming, design and creation of sustainable and inspiring homes. LEED Accredited Architect and Austin Green Building participant. 401-662-1367 2304-B E. 16th St. trinitywhite.com

EDUCATION Julia’s Garden Montessori School Offering a nature-based Association Montessori International curriculum, with a focus on gardening and foreign languages, to ages 0 to 9 years in Central Austin. 512-790-4094 juliasgardenmontessori.com

EVENTS Fredericksburg Food & Wine Fest Celebrating Texas wine and food on Saturday, October 27. A full-course celebration of Texas food, wine, beer, music, specialty booths, food court and fun for all! 830-997-8515 100 W. Main St., Fredericksburg fbgfoodandwinefest.com

Hill Country Living + Rainwater Revival Festival Free fun on Saturday, October 20! This festival focuses on living lightly, growing wisely, resource conservation and good stewardship of our beloved Texas Hill Country. 1042 Event Center Dr., Dripping Springs hillcountryalliance.org

Palm Door Our facilities boast a total square footage of 7255 versatile indoor and outdoor space available for private events for groups up to 1000. Each section can be customized to suit the needs of creative and functional events. 512-386-1295 508 E. 6th St. 512-391-1994 401 Sabine St. palmdoor.com

FARMERS MARKETS Sustainable Food Center SFC cultivates a healthy community by strengthening the local food system and improving access to nutritious, affordable food. 512-236-0074 400 W. Guadalupe St. 3200 Jones Rd., Sunset Valley 2921 E. 17 St., Bldg C (Office) sustainablefoodcenter.org

FARMS 44 Farms Founded and Family-owned since 1909 in Cameron, 44 Farms is the U.S. premier producer of ethically raised Angus beef. Our ranchers produce beef with no added hormones, antibiotics or artificial ingredients. 254-697-4401 963 PR 44, Cameron 1509 S. Hwy 36, Cameron 44farms.com

GROCERS Royal Blue Grocery Downtown Austin’s neighborhood grocer—with dairy, prepared foods, beer and wine, Royal Blue has it all, in a convenient and compact format. Catering too! 512-499-3993; 247 W. 3rd St. 512-476-5700; 360 Nueces St. 512-469-5888; 609 Congress Ave. 512-386-1617; 301 Brazos St., Ste. 110 512-480-0061; 51 Rainey St. 512-524-0740; 1645 E. 6th St. royalbluegrocery.com EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

Whole Foods Market Selling the highest quality natural and organic products. 512-542-2200 525 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-345-5003 9607 Research Blvd. 512-206-2730 12601 Hill Country Blvd., Bee Cave 512-358-2460 4301 W. William Cannon Dr. 512-690-2605 5001 183 Toll Rd., Bldg. A, Ste. 100 wholefoodsmarket.com

HEALTH AND WELLNESS Modern Acupuncture Offering an approachable, natural pathway, validated by thousands of years of practice, to better health and well-being for all, in a convenient, peaceful and modern location. 512-599-4506 9722 Great Hills Trl., Ste. 125 512-920-3791 3300 Bee Caves Rd., Ste. 610 modernacupuncture.com

Peoples Rx Pharmacy and Deli Since 1980, Austin’s favorite pharmacy keeps locals healthy through Rx compounding, supplements and prescriptions, holistic practitioners and natural foods. 512-459-9090 4018 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-444-8866 3801 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-327-8877 4201 Westbank Dr. 512-219-9499 13860 Hwy. 183 N. peoplesrx.com

Rawsome LLC We sell all organic, Colorado-grown, Texas-blended CBD oils. 856-422-3669 2907 Race St., Fort Worth 1210 Rosewood Ave., Ste. 10 getrawsome.com

HOUSEWARES AND GIFTS Der Küchen Laden Retail gourmet kitchen shop, featuring cookware, cutlery, bakeware, small electrics, textiles and kitchen gadgets. 830-997-4937 258 E. Main St., Fredericksburg littlechef.com

The Herb Bar Best place to cure what ails you and a resource center since 1986. Our Optimal Health Advisers are highly trained, knowledgeable and compassionate. 512-444-6251 200 W. Mary St. theherbbar.com SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

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Weston Table Weston Table seeks to provide beautiful online entertainment driven by a passion to share extraordinary experiences, personal memories and cherished traditions. 617-899-4907 14 Irving Rd., Weston, MA westontable.com

INSURANCE Karen Easterling, State Farm Agent Your home is where you make some of your best memories and that’s worth protecting. I’m here to help. 512-454-4784 2711 W. Anderson Ln., Ste. 201 kareneasterling.net

Onion Creek Kitchens at Juniper Hills Farm Cooking classes, beautiful dining room venue for private events, hill country cabin rental. 830-833-0910 5818 RR 165, Dripping Springs juniperhillsfarm.com

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ART The Harry Ransom Center An internationally renowned humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin showcasing impressive collections and hosting diverse exhibits. 512-471-8944 300 W. 21st St. hrc.utexas.edu

LANDSCAPE AND GARDENING Articulture Designs Plant nursery plus home and garden decor boutique, featuring living art, air plants, succulents and hundreds of one-of-a-kind vessels, ceramics, decor and more. Art is alive! 512-762-5228 6405 Manchaca Rd. articulturedesigns.com

Barton Springs Nursery Locally grown Texas native plants. Organic pest management. Environmentally friendly soil amendments. Beautiful gifts. 512-328-6655 3601 Bee Caves Rd. bartonspringsnursery.net

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center The Wildflower Center is a native plant botanic garden, a university research center and one of the 1,000 places to see before you die. 512-232-0100 4801 La Crosse Ave. wildflower.org

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Austin Label Company Custom labels up to 10 x 20 on paper, foil, synthetics, multiple adhesives, embossing, hot foil and UV coatings. Proud members of Go Texan, FTA and TWGGA. 512-302-0204 1610 Dungan Ln. austinlabel.com

Austin Resource Recovery Austin Resource Recovery provides a range of services designed to transform waste into resources while keeping our community clean. Our goal is to reach Zero Waste by 2040. 512-974-9727 austinrecycles.com

Bronko Box Recycled plastic moving boxes for rent. 512-815-0234 bronkobox.com

REAL ESTATE Judd Waggoman Real Estate

Natural Gardener We are a garden center and teaching facility dedicated to promoting organic time-tested gardening practices. 512-288-6113 8648 Old Bee Caves Rd. naturalgardeneraustin.com

Your ultimate source for luxury real estate in Los Cabos. Ranked #1 Realtor in Los Cabos, Mexico by InMexico Magazine. 530-751-6797 judcaborealestate.com

RESTAURANTS LODGING AND TOURISM Blanco Chamber of Commerce Visit us online to plan your getaway to the heart and hub of the Hill Country. 830-833-5101 300 Main St., Blanco blancochamber.com

Barlata Tapas Bar

Lenoir

Located in the heart of South Lamar. Barlata offers a variety of tapas, paellas, regional Spanish wines and cavas. Come and enjoy a bit of Spain with us. 512-473-2211 1500 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 150 barlataaustin.com

Lenoir is an intimate, family-run restaurant offering a weekly, local prix-fixe menu, great wine and friendly service. 512-215-9778 1807 S. 1st St. lenoirrestaurant.com

Cannon + Belle Cannon + Belle is a dynamic, multi-station open kitchen restaurant featuring a delicious Texas-fresh menu plus specialty tap wine and cocktail program. 512-482-8000 500 E. 4th St. cannonandbelle.com

East Side Pies Fresh, local thin crust pizza - we know what you want. 512-524-0933 1401B Rosewood Ave. 512-454-7437 5312 G Airport Blvd. 512-467-8900 1809-1 W. Anderson Ln. eastsidepies.com

Flyrite Chicken At Flyrite, we believe fast food should be real food. Our delicious sandwiches, wraps and shakes are fresh and made to order. Drive Thru. Eat Well! 512-284-8014 2129 E. 7th St. 512-243-6258 6539 Burnet Rd. flyritechicken.com

Fonda San Miguel

Maudie’s Tex-Mex has been serving up tried & true Tex-Mex for over 25 years. Creating handmade dishes right in your neighborhood. Quintessential Tex-Mex for today’s Austin. 512-473-3740; 2608 W. 7th St. 512-440-8088; 1212 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-832-0900; 10205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-306-8080; 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-280-8700; 9911 Brodie Ln. 512-263-1116; 12506 Shops Pkwy. 512-381-5500; 4600 W. Guadalupe St. maudies.com

ThunderCloud Subs For fresh, fast and healthy, head on over to your neighborhood ThunderCloud Subs, Austin’s original sub shop. Founded in 1975 with the simple philosophy of selling a great sub at a reasonable price. Now with 30 locations throughout Central Texas. 512-479-8805 thundercloud.com

Tillie’s Tillie’s menu strives to take what’s familiar and infuses it with an array of international flavors and techniques to create a new set of rules for fine dining in Central Texas. 512-894-2633 3509 Creek Rd., Dripping Springs tilliesdrippingsprings.com

Zax Restaurant and Bar

Distinctive interior Mexican cuisine and fine art. 512-459-4121 2330 W. North Loop fondasanmiguel.com

Casual American bistro. 512-481-0100 312 Barton Springs Rd. zaxaustin.com

Intero Ristorante

Fulton Fish Market

An Italian inspired menu that highlights the changing seasons in Central Texas. Embracing the importance of sustainability with locally raised animals and farmed produce. 512-599-4052 2612 E. Cesar Chavez St. interorestaurant.com

A new and better way to buy the best seafood. Shop online for our freshest catch! Delivered to your doorstep just a day after catch. 718-842-8908 fultonfishmarket.com

Kerbey Lane Cafe Kerbey Lane Cafe is a local Austin haunt serving up tasty, healthy food (mostly) 24/7. Stop by any of our 6 locations for a delicious stack of pancakes! 512-451-1436 kerbeylanecafe.com

Austin Beer Garden Brewing Co. Locally-sourced lunch and dinner. Craft brewery, live music, good people, dog friendly, creative community. #beermakesitbetter #ouratx 512-298-2242 1305 W. Oltorf St. theabgb.com

Maudie’s Tex-Mex

SPECIALTY MARKETS

Make It Sweet At Make It Sweet, you can find tools, supplies and ingredients to make cakes, cookies and candies and learn fun, new techniques in the classes offered. 512-371-3401 9070 Research Blvd. makeitsweet.com

Nature’s Treasures of Texas The Leaning Pear Café & Eatery Serving the Texas Hill Country fresh and seasonal favorites using local ingredients. 512-847-7327 111 River Rd., Wimberley leaningpear.com EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

Locally-owned and operated, Nature’s Treasures is a 14,000 sq. ft. venue featuring rocks, minerals, crystals and fossils as well as all of your metaphysical and collector needs. 512-472-5015; 4103 N. I-35 ntrocks.com SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

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BY BAMBI EDLUND

A

C

B

I

D OKAY, SMARTYPANTS, LET’S SEE HOW MUCH YOU KNOW. MATCH THE DESCRIPTION TO THE OLDE-TYME TOOL.

1 2 3

Lemon Juicer Cake Cutter Apple Corer

4 5 6

Egg Boiler

Meat Tenderizer Can Opener

7 8 9

Sugar nippers Ice Shaver

Lamb Leg Holder

F H

58

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

EDIBLEAUSTIN.COM

E

bambiedlund.com

ANSWERS: A:5 B:9 C:1 D:4 E:8 F:3 G:7 H:6 I:2

G


Try taking Tito’s beyond the bar... and into the kitchen! FOR INTOXICATING RECIPE IDEAS, VISIT TITOSVODKA.COM

Tipsy Antipast

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Buzzy Kale Salad


Maybe you and toast should see other toppings. #EpicToast #MakesMeWhole

Edible Austin Cooks 2018  

Welcome to our final Cooks issue! Don’t worry readers, we promise you’ll be able to see all the familiar Cooks issue features sprinkled in o...

Edible Austin Cooks 2018  

Welcome to our final Cooks issue! Don’t worry readers, we promise you’ll be able to see all the familiar Cooks issue features sprinkled in o...

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