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P E O P L E

B E A U T Y

H E A LT H

AUGUST

S P O R T S

| SEPTEMBER 2019

F O O D

H I S T O R Y


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PUBLISHER Sarah Cottrell

It’s hard to believe that it is time again for our football issue. The summer is going by so fast, but hopefully everyone has time to get away and make special memories with their loved ones. We went through Hurricane Barry and let’s hope that is the last we see of hurricanes this season. As we move towards the cooler and socially busy months of fall, so many of us look forward to spending Friday evenings watching high school football. Lake 94.7’s Sports Director, Mike Pervel, has put together a complete schedule of games, along with a full preview of our local high school football teams, interviewing all the head coaches to find out what they think of the upcoming season. We strive to bring you edgy stories from around the Northshore. In this issue we learn more about Roller Derby, get an update on what is happening with spray tanning, go visit the UCM Museum in Abita Springs and visit the Honey Island Swamp. The Northshore is such a culturally rich and diverse place to live. My favorite thing is exploring and meeting people who call the Northshore home. For those of us with children it is time to think about back to school or, in my case, off to college. So enjoy the last few days of summer, enjoy the issue and if you have any story ideas please send them to edgepublisher@ yahoo.com. PUBLISHER

EDITOR Patrick Bateman ART DIRECTOR Erich Belk STYLE DIRECTOR Patty Beal BEAUTY EDITOR Caitlin Picou COPY EDITOR Mary-Brent Brown CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Charles Dowdy Elaine Millers Mike Pervel Liz Genest Smith STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Jerry Cottrell CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Eduardo Benitez Paul Chauvin Matthew Schlenker Joel Treadwell SENIOR SALES EXECUTIVES Eloise Cottrell Rick Clasen ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Rebecca Blossman-Ferran Erin Bolton Debi Menasco Michelle Wallis-Croas

ON THE COVER UCM Museum Photographer - Jerry Cottrell

The entire contents of this magazine are copyrighted by EDGE Publishing. @ 2019 with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use without permission of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. Please email comments or story ideas to edgepublisher@yahoo.com. EDGE PUBLISHING • 69170 HWY 190 SERVICE RD. SUITE 1 COVINGTON, LA 70433 • 985.875.9691


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PESTS

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MY TURN BY VINCENT RICCOBONO

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WESTNILE

ON THE NORTHSHORE THE DIRTY TRUTH STORY LIZ GENEST SMITH

W

hen you think of the world’s deadliest creatures, what springs to mind? Black mambas? Saltwater crocodiles? Humans? All of those are good guesses, but wrong. According to the World Health Organization, mosquitoes top the list, far surpassing the others, killing about 725,000 people every year by infecting them with deadly diseases. Given that their annoying pervasiveness has earned them the tongue-in-cheek, honorary title of Louisiana’s state bird, this is especially disconcerting. Also disconcerting: a mere ten days before my son was scheduled to report to a camp in the dense, piney woods of Covington, the report came out that the West Nile Virus was detected not just in St. Tammany Parish, but specifically in Covington. Super. As a partlyto-mostly neurotic mom who was already worried about venomous snakes and brain eating amoebas, this caused a bit of alarm. I needed to know more.

About West Nile... While it’s true that most cases of death-by-mosquito in the world are attributed to malaria in Africa, West Nile Virus (WNV) is the leading cause of mosquito-borne disease in the United States. Louisiana had the highest rate of infection in the country in 2018, topping out at 53 cases and two deaths. Most people who contract it will experience no symptoms. However, West Nile Fever, the most common clinical presentation, causes flu-like symptoms, and West Nile Neuroinvasive Disease, the rarest but most serious type of illness associated with the virus, infects the brain and spinal cord and can lead to paralysis, brain damage and death. There is currently no vaccine to prevent WNV in humans, and there is no cure.

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EDGE August | September 2019

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West Nile on the Northshore Yikes. Now that we’ve got those discouraging factoids lodged in our brains, it’s time to delve into what we residents of the Northshore of Lake Pontchartrain need to know about our particular situation. Luckily, we can depend on the experts at the St. Tammany Mosquito Abatement District “to protect the health and quality of life of the residents of St. Tammany Parish by minimizing the risk of mosquito-transmitted diseases and managing nuisance mosquitoes to a tolerable level.” Their website (STPMAD.org) contains a wealth of information on this topic, and the program’s director, entomologist Dr. Kevin A. Caillouet, was kind enough to endure a ton of questions, more questions and then emails with follow-up questions. For some perspective, he started off by telling me, “Louisiana itself has a history of intractable mosquito-transmitted diseases, like malaria and West Nile, which have taken hold here more than other places. West Nile has been our biggest mosquito-borne threat since 2002.” So, what makes it prevalent in this area? “One of the main issues is sewage treatment,” Dr. Caillouet explains. “According to data from LDH (Louisiana Department of Health), St. Tammany Parish has more individual on-site sewage treatment systems than any other parish.” Sure enough, Nola.com reported in October of 2017 that of the thousands of individual aerated treatment units and septic tanks in unincorporated St. Tammany, many are old, inadequate, in bad condition and do not meet today’s more

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stringent design standards. But what’s the connection between sewage and West Nile? Apparently, of the 65 species of mosquitoes buzzing around these parts, only a handful present a problem. The worst culprit is the southern house mosquito, or culex quinquefasciatus, which primarily feeds on birds. Newsflash! Birds are the actual sources of that dreaded virus. And this bird-biting, pathogen-transmitting mosquito’s favorite larval habitat is organically rich water, commonly found in ditches with malfunctioning septic systems. It’s true. This breed of mosquito is a filthy beast who loves foul water, so don’t help them out by granting them access to your sewage or funky ditch sludge! It’s a dirty job, but homeowners have to maintain and/or upgrade their units. (NOTE: Thankfully, mosquitoes can’t transmit E. coli. Yes, I asked.) Dr. Caillouet recommends that you “check to make sure the unit is working properly, that the aerator is turned on, there are no cracks for mosquitoes to get in and that it gets pumped every 3-5 years. Also, eliminate vegetation in your roadside ditches to allow our larvicide products to reach the water, and empty water-holding containers in the yard.”

Parish Abatement Efforts The St. Tammany Mosquito Abatement District has their work cut out for them, as staying ahead of the virus is tricky business. Dr. Caillouet points out, “This time of year, a mosquito can go from egg to adult in 7 days, so problems can crop up quickly. It’s a bit like that game whack-a-mole. We monitor 90 different trap sites across the parish and test samples once a week to identify where problems arise.” A look at the Center for Disease Control’s records reveals that Louisiana was on a downward trend between 2007-2011, dropping from 180 cases of West Nile to only 10, followed by a massive spike up to 335 in 2012. Fortunately, that seems to have been an anomaly, and we appear to be holding fairly steady at between 51 and 64 annual cases over the last five years. Why do the numbers dip and surge, and what’s expected for 2019? “Year-to-year differences in case counts are probably a combination of weather, strain of virus circulating and the waxing and waning of

immunity in wild bird populations. There is no way to predict human case counts from year-toyear,” he admits. “This is why we conduct weekly surveillance.” The standard abatement program uses trucks and airplanes to spray adulticides – insecticides that target adult mosquitoes – in areas with high mosquito populations. (Details about the types of chemicals they use and the spray schedule are on the website.) But back in May, the STPMAD tried something new. They ran a pilot program that used a helicopter to spray larvicide over the Tammany Hills neighborhood of Covington, which is loaded with individual septic systems and is also where 20% of 2018’s infected mosquitoes were discovered. Larvicide targets mosquitoes in their larval stage, before they can grow into troublesome adults. It seems to have worked well in container environments, but the impact on roadside septic ditches is still being assessed. It’s important to reiterate what all this boils down to, especially given that many of us are spending more time outdoors and sending our kids to camps this summer. Dr. Caillouet, who coincidentally is sending his kids to the same woodsy camp my son attended, says, “I am very comfortable sending my kids there. As we discussed, our known hotspots (indeed the sites with the infected mosquito pools) are neighborhood sites that are suburban and not the deep woods. They are hotspots because of the associated production of the southern house mosquito with improperly treated sewage coming from residential on-site sewage systems.”

Repellent: Fact or Fiction While it’s comforting to know that STPMAD is on the job, and we know where the problem areas tend to be, it’s still important to do all you can to protect yourself and your family. When choosing mosquito sprays, Dr. Caillouet recommends looking for the following active ingredients: • DEET • Picaridin (known as KBR 3023 and icaridin outside the US) • IR3535 • Para-menthane-diol (PMD) • 2-undecanone • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) You read right – oil of lemon eucalyptus! That’s great news for fans of essential oils and holistic

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LETTER FROM THE PARISH PRESIDENT

remedies. Inspired by that surprising revelation, I thought I’d research other lesser-known, outsidethe-box ways to repel mosquitoes. But despite lots of anecdotal “evidence,” most actual research shows many are, at best, minimally effective and at worst, flat-out false. For instance, everyone’s grandmas, aunts and cousins swear by Avon’s Skin So Soft bath oil, but actual scientific studies have proven it’s not effective. The same goes for taking B vitamins. I was really hoping that the claim that the soap in bubble machines acts as a repellent would turn out to be legitimate, but sadly, Dr. Caillouet labelled it straight-up fiction. Bummer. Another popular online idea is to create friendly habitats for mosquito-eaters, like dragonflies, bats and birds. Dr. Caillouet calls this one “mostly fiction,” but adds, “Anything that eats a mosquito is a friend, and we should do whatever we can to encourage them to eat more. However, not everything that eats a mosquito eats enough mosquitoes to make a difference in the number of mosquitoes biting you.” In other words, feel free to install a bat house, but you still have to take the usual precautions. The only repellent claim that he deemed factual was sitting in the direct path of a powerful fan, as allegedly mosquitoes can’t fly in wind gusts over ten miles per hour. On the flipside, there are apparently common choices you could be making that attract mosquitoes. In 2016, CBS News spoke with Grayson Brown, director of the Public Health Entomology Laboratory in the Department of Entomology at the University of Kentucky, and he revealed a few interesting facts. According to him, mosquitoes are especially attracted to, among other things, dark-colored clothing and beer drinkers. Why beer? Alcohol raises body temperature, and therefore a person is more apt to sweat, which attracts mosquitoes. Plus, he said, drinks with bubbles release another mosquito favorite – carbon dioxide. So, lemonade, iced tea and wine are sounding like ideal options for your next barbecue, aren’t they? Maybe you can sip them while you check your septic tank.

Take Part Taking part in your Parish Government is now easier than ever. The St. Tammany Parish Government has never been more user-friendly, easily accessible or transparent. When you visit our website, www.stpgov.org, our recently launched Transparency Portal offers information like our budget, our revenues and expenditures, our “checkbook,” a listing of fees, information on public meetings, bids, contracts and purchases — all in one place. All of this information is now easier to navigate. Most of this information is already available on the respective departmental pages on our website, but we have corralled the information in one location to make it easier to find and use. We hope you will use this information regularly to stay plugged into Parish Government. Our goal as local government it to be the most open and transparent government agency in the state of Louisiana. We want everyone to take the opportunity to be informed, engaged and educated on how your Parish Government works. If you have questions about this or any other feature of our website, or you have suggestions on other information you’d like to see on this page, please email us at askpat@stpgov.org. Welcome to the St. Tammany Parish Government — we’re open for business. Pat Brister St. Tammany Parish President


August 9

th

SAFETY TIPS With St. Tammany Parish Schools opening on August 9th, we want to point out some guidelines and safety tips. By exercising a little extra care and caution, drivers and pedestrians can co-exist safely in school zones.

Rules for a child that rides the bus: Arrive at the bus stop a few minutes early. Establish a safe place to wait for the bus away from the street. Allow the bus to come to a complete stop and double check for other traďŹƒc out into the street. Cross 10 feet out in front of the bus and ensure the driver

Rules for a child that is driven to: Stay on the school grounds once you are dropped o and while waiting to be picked up. Never go with anyone other than your parent or previously agreed upon person. Watch your children until they safely enter the schoolyard or building. Always use age appropriate restraints such as a car seat, booster seat, or seat belt. The back seat is the safest place for children. PA I D F O R BY T H E R A N D Y S M I T H C A M PA I G N


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Uncommon

Denominator: Meet Abita Spring’s Curator of Curiosities STORY LIZ GENEST SMITH PHOTOS JERRY COTTRELL

L

et’s be honest. The Northshore of Lake Pontchartrain is not exactly known as a hotbed of eccentricity. Sure, it’s got way more character than your garden variety suburb, and we can easily venture into New Orleans for a funky fix whenever we want, but for the most part, our unassuming communities and their inhabitants are just focused on enjoying our own simple versions of the American dream. Except for Abita Springs, that is. Abita is like the mildly rebellious, slightly idiosyncratic, charcoal-grey sheep of the family. It recently made news when its Republican mayor signed on with the Sierra Club’s Ready for 100 campaign, pledging to have every municipal building, business and home powered by renewable energy by 2030. That’s pretty unexpected in a conservative parish within a state that’s heavily invested in fossil fuels. And what other town in this region could support and sustain such peculiar cultural phenomena as the wonderfully wacky Push Mow Mardi Gras parade, the free-spirited, loosely organized Louisiana Bicycle Festival and a world famous, delightfully bizarre oddities museum? Most self-respecting Northshorians immediately know that the aforementioned museum is, in fact, the Abita Mystery House, and many have toured it at least once. But in case you’ve been derelict in your duties as a local, or just plain out of the loop, let’s review.

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Tucked away, a block beyond the traffic circle in the middle of town, this old-gas-station-turnedroadside-attraction is jam-packed with interactive, Southern-themed dioramas, homemade inventions, folk art, kooky collections, strangely remixed taxidermy, random memorabilia, old arcade games and what the museum itself describes as “pure junk.” It’s no coincidence that there’s one common denominator in all the aforementioned phenomena… John Preble. He’s an artist, musician, inventor, curator, collector, father of funky festivals, you get the idea. He’s a complex dude, and to be honest, I’ve sort of wanted to meet him for a while, so I was thrilled when he agreed to meet up at his groovy establishment. Upon meeting John, I commented on how famous his place has become, and he replied, “I’ve been on more TV and network broadcasts than anyone in St. Tammany. Except maybe Lee Harvey Oswald. We’re brothers in media, he and I.” I knew in that moment, we’d get along just fine. I also knew that I’d probably have to let go of the conversational reins a bit, and just see where he’d take us. But let’s back up and get a little perspective. How in the world did a mischievous, artistically inclined youth from New Orleans wind up putting down roots in – and putting his stamp on – Abita Springs, anyway? “It was always an artist colony,” he explained. “It was a resort town back in the day, all these towns were resort towns. Covington was a railroad town, and Mandeville was Mandeville, but Abita was out of the way. I came here in 1972 and it was still undiscovered. It was still very authentic, much like it was 100 years ago, and it attracted people like me. But it was more of an industrial complex than a hippie commune.” One of those other people it attracted eventually became his wife. Ann O’Brien was a jewelry artist, art educator and founder of the Abita Springs Push Mow parade. They married, welcomed two sons, and during a family trip to Sante Fe in 1995 they visited an unusual roadside attraction that inspired John to put his own odd collections and inventions on display, and his museum was born. Years later, their home was damaged in Hurricane Katrina. Then soon after, Ann tragically lost a battle with

cancer. Understandably devastated, John “walked through the desert” for a year and credits that difficult, soul-searching experience with becoming more introspective and interested in the human experience. He likes to say he has earned the disdain of the local populace, claiming with a hint of mirth, “I’m very hated around here, because I don’t mince words.” But based on the interactions I witnessed with the surprisingly steady stream of customers, employees and friends (one of whom walked in all sweaty and helped himself to a clean, dry shirt from the gift shop rack) who drifted in and out on a random Tuesday morning – make no mistake, this playfully salty man has a huge heart. “As much as I give away, I get more in return,” he admitted at one point. And from what I gleaned from our time together, what he gets in return not only refers to all the stuff that gets donated to the museum, but also the satisfaction he gets from the effect his work has on other people. He shared multiple stories to illustrate that point, from the nine-year-old tourist who was inspired to announce to her mom that she was no longer planning to throw away her rock collection, to an old Polish gentleman who was overjoyed when he recognized a bottle cap on display from a beer made in his homeland, to a woman brought t tears by a color-by-numbers painting that resembled something her late father had created (John gifted it to her, by the way). Before you get all misty, this was merely one layer of a multi-faceted couple of hours. I have to admit, organizing my notes after our meeting proved to be a bit of a challenge. John has a remarkable ability to take many detours in the course of a conversation by way of stories, quotes and obscure references. In addition to chatting about his work, we proceeded to bond over things like a shared annoyance with inconsistent filmmaker Wes Anderson and bemusement at having celebrities recoil from us at festivals – Angelina Jolie at the Bicycle Fest for him, Alison Krauss at a children’s fest in Nashville for me. John was merely admiring Angelina’s sexy walk while I was trying to return money that Alison’s kid had dropped. Get over yourselves, ladies!

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But I digress. And so did he. Frequently, and in the most wonderful way. In hindsight, one of his seemingly random tangents offered valuable insight into his character. Apropos of nothing, he launched into the retelling of a nightmare he’d had the night before. It took place in “some apartment somewhere” that was made up of countless tiny, closet-sized rooms and co-starred a family of Swedish women and WWOZ deejay Cousin Dimitri. He couldn’t figure out which room was his and blamed the women for the confusion, leading to a bit of a laundry dispute. I take pride in being able to interpret weird dreams, so I instructed him to start by identifying the predominant emotion. He was way ahead of me. “Oh, it was frustration,” he said with a shrug. “I’m doing some work on my duplex and I have a huge punch list to deal with.” Considering his father was a mathematician and mom was a school teacher and artist, it doesn’t seem at all surprising that his subconscious would take a rather mundane problem and dress it up with some bizarre wrapping paper. “When I do something, I study it backward and forward,” he explained. “I just have a mind like that. I walk into a restaurant and scope out the room. I count the number of chairs and wonder, how do they make money? I always have a sense of money coming in and money going out.” His left brain and right brain appear to always be working in tandem. How else can you explain someone who can dream up the museum’s famous “bassigator” hybrid creature named Buford, create a critically acclaimed series of paintings of Creole women and organize construction and renovation projects? John is sort of a rare amalgamation, able to act as performer, ringmaster and tentmaster in the busy three-ring circus in his brain. But if you stop for too long to marvel at all the plates he’s spinning, he will have moved on to sawing a woman in half. So, you’d better keep up!

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LETTER FROM THE MAYOR

Keeping up is easier said than done. At somewhere just north of 70 years old, John’s still got a lot cooking. For one thing, he’s trying to find the right New Orleans location for an immersive art experience he’s concocted, which he described in his typically esoteric way as, “A two-hour experience looking at wacky stuff – mirrors, caves, blah blah blah.” He’s also planning to launch a new festival in Abita Springs: “The John Preble Mac & Cheese Festival.” Grinning impishly, he added, “I’m naming it after myself, for a joke.” And, by the way, along with continuing to write and produce music (and play a little boogie woogie piano), he still considers the Mystery House a work in progress. “When it first opened, I thought it was 80% finished, now I feel like there’s 80% left to do.” Not long after John told me that and talked about how people drop donations off all the time, a lady walked in with a treasure trove of incongruous items, including beads, bullets, origami, colored glass shards and half-used bottles of craft paint. Ever with his eye on the future, when I asked about his favorite exhibit, he told me, “I’m working on one now!” And just like that, a crazy contraption magically materialized from beneath the counter. It was a couple of wheels cobbled together with bits of wire and plywood, and it was all attached to what looked like a unabomber’s detonating device. We gave it a test run, and I had to admit – I didn’t get it. “Eventually,” he explained. “It’s going to tell you what’s going to happen on the worst day of your life.” Oh, yeah – this one’s destined to be my favorite, too. I think I’ll like it even better than his career counseling machine that told me my true calling in life is to be either a donut taster or casino owner. Spot. On. In case you couldn’t tell, humor is a very vital element in a lot of what John does and says. One of the many reasons I’ve wanted to meet him is because that humor often comes through loud and clear on the museum’s Facebook page. He and his young employee/friend Tori Rodriguez, who works in the museum and helps coordinate the Bicycle Festival, laughed together about posting pictures of not very convincing celebrity doppelgangers who’ve come into the museum. This happened recently with a visit from “Bruce Willis.” They will post the image as though it were definitely the celebrity, then sit back and watch the fallout. I agreed with them that the very funniest aspect of this is the fact that many people take it seriously and vigorously refute the claim. Thereby, becoming part of the joke. John is more or less an open book, but early in my visit, he would frequently tell me something, then laugh and say, “Don’t write that down. What are you writing? I don’t trust you.” But just before I left, he turned to me earnestly, and said, “Whatever you write down, I’m not going to say I didn’t say that.” I appreciated that vote of confidence. And now is probably a good time to mention that he said I’m now the sole heir to his entire estate. It was just as Anderson Cooper walked in. Just ask him.

“I Feel Good!!” The immortal James Brown sang that phrase in Covington’s historic West 30’s more than once. Today, the citizens of Covington can “Feel Good!” Subsequent to my recent election, Mayor Mike Cooper called for written reports from each of his department heads and key personnel. He then reviewed those reports with me, department by department, one organizational chart at a time, layer by layer. I then met with numerous key city employees and council members, as well as the mayors of Madisonville, Abita Springs and Mandeville, Parish President Pat Brister and the accounting firm that audits the city. From these meetings I can share this with you: Covington is in a good, solid place. We are blessed with employees who are not just excellent public servants, but also just good people. Financially, we pay our bills and we don’t waste money … because we don’t have money to waste. My administration is going to tackle the tough issues of traffic and flood mitigation – serious work. We will work to protect the heritage, the natural beauty and the quality of life so many of us enjoy. Our community will also enjoy the music in our streets, wonderful shops and galleries, and cuisine from the best restaurants on the North Shore ; ) “I Feel Good!”

MARK JOHNSON City of Covington Mayor


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ARCHBISHOP HANNAN HAWKS

BOGALUSA LUMBERJACKS

Archbishop Hannan’s program continues to flourish under fifth-year head coach Scott Wattigny, delivering highly competitive seasons coupled with deep playoff runs. Wattigny (31-14) guided the Hawks to Hannan’s first-ever 10-0 regular season, capturing the District 7-3A crown. The Hawks’ (11-1) magical journey ended in a dramatic, 17-14, quarterfinal home loss to De La Salle. Hannan nearly won on the game’s final play, but the desperation pass fell incomplete at the goal line. The Class 3A Hawks embark on an ambitious, challenging schedule facing two Class 5A and three Class 4A schools in non-district action. Coach Wattigny, who is expecting his second child this fall, said the team’s goal is to get past the second round with younger players needing to step up. Hannan graduated 18 talented seniors, but returns 14 players this year. Junior QB Brantley Taylor, Senior receiver Ezra Travers and Juniors Cade Hontiveros and Spencer Georges are back. Senior O-linemen Nicolas Vaccaro and Grant Windom provide experience. Seniors Eli Caillouet, Izzy Carrera and Brian Sisson spearhead the defense along with Junior Wyatt Coffey.

Bogalusa’s Adam Brumfield enters his second year running the Lumberjacks’ program, posting a 4-6 mark, falling in the first round of the playoffs. Brumfield said the team made big strides last year with players developing and things are shaping up, hoping to stay healthy and competitive. Bogalusa returns 8 offensive starters, including Junior QB Josh Taylor, who was named firstteam all-district athlete last season. Senior Tyrese Roussell and Junior Raheem Roberts are the top receivers, also playing defense. Senior RB Ladarrius Spikes is a transfer from Alabama who will contribute. Bogalusa returns 5 defensive starters, but are all young. Coach Brumfield spoke highly of his defensive coordinator Randall Ginn, referring to him as a savvy old-school coach providing the Lumberjacks continuity. His defensive prowess is a plus and he knows how to get the very best out of his players, who have ultimate respect for him. Senior DB DeMarcus Spikes is a solid player and will also play receiver. Junior lineman Derek Keating will be counted on to provide experience on both sides of the ball.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sept. 06

7 PM

Chalmette (A)

Sept. 06

7 PM

Istrouma (A)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Teurlings Catholic (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Pine (H)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Mandeville (A)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Franklinton (A)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Dunham (H)

Sept. 27

7 PM

East Marion High School, MS (H)

Oct. 04

7 PM

St. Michael the Archangel (A)

Oct. 04

7 PM

Varnado (A)

Oct. 11

7 PM

Lakeshore (H)

Oct. 10

7 PM

Albany (A)

Oct. 17

7 PM

Bogalusa (A)

Oct. 17

7 PM

Archbishop Hannan (H)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Jewel Sumner (H)

Oct. 25

7 PM

KIPP Booker T. Washington (H)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Loranger (A)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Jewel Sumner (A)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Albany (H)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Loranger (H)

024

EDGE August | September 2019


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025


COVINGTON LIONS

FONTAINEBLEAU BULLDOGS

Covington posted an uncharacteristic 3-7 mark, 2-5 in District 6-5A, after winning the 2017 district crown, advancing to the quarters, finishing 12-1. Seventh-year coach Greg Salter (43-30), carries on the family tradition, keeping the memory of his beloved late grand-paw, Jack, etched in the minds of Covington faithful. Twentyfour seniors return with 16 starters, 8 on each side. Salter likes his experience level, wanting to get back to playing Covington football, emphasizing attitude, effort and pride. Senior Edgerrin Cooper (Oklahoma verbal commitment), a superb two-way performer, anchored the Lions with 106 tackles. Salter said Oklahoma is getting an outstanding young man and player, who has athleticism, instincts and tremendous work ethic. Cooper gained 385 yards rushing, tallying 6 times. Seniors Reggie Gause and Coby Callahan are back, joined by slot receiver Chandler Washington (4.4 speed). Gause caught 22 passes for 273 yards and 4 scores. Junior Cade Rogers gained 320 yards, averaging 4.9 yards. Sr. Trent Rainey (68 tackles) and nose guard Kobe Amos (51) provide depth with Dyonati McDowell and Bobby Showers roaming the secondary.

Fontainebleau brought back excitement last season, finishing 6-5, posting a 5-2 district record. The Bulldogs entered the playoffs as a No. 20 seed, falling to Haughton (No. 13), 57-36, in a high scoring affair. Chris Blocker moves into his fifth season, welcoming back 20 seniors. The Bulldogs’ offense returns 6 starters, including Junior Iverson Celestine (first team all-district), a sensational back since he burst onto the scene as a freshman rushing for 1,680 yards on 294 carries. Celestine found pay dirt 18 times. Junior QB Josh Bailey (6-4, 200), who took over in week three as the starter, clicked on 115-of-238 passes for 1,391 yards, tossing 18 TDs with 6 picks. Juniors Dwayne Bernard and Braylon Fowler will also be weapons in the Dawgs’ offense. Five defensive starters are back led by Seniors Erin Damond and Grant Saizain. Coach Phillip Banko takes over defensive coordinator duties, replacing Steve Gremillion who served in that position for four years. New assistant Boomer Danford, who was a previous head coach at Pearl River, handles the offensive line.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sept. 06

7 PM

Franklinton (H)

Sept. 06

7 PM

Lakeshore (A)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Holy Cross (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Franklinton (A)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Dutchtown (A)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Walker (H)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Ponchatoula (A)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Hammond (H)

Oct. 03

7 PM

Fontainebleau (H)

Oct. 03

7 PM

Covington (A)

Oct. 11

7 PM

St. Paul’s (A)

Oct. 11

7 PM

Northshore (H)

Oct. 18

7 PM

Hammond (H)

Oct. 18

7 PM

Mandeville (A)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Slidell (H)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Ponchatoula (H)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Northshore (A)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Slidell (A)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Mandeville (H)

Nov. 08

7 PM

St. Paul’s (A)

026

EDGE August | September 2019


EDGE August | September 2019

027


FRANKLINTON DEMONS

HAMMOND TORS

Franklinton coach Jonathan Barber has a year under his belt after the Demons went 4-7, bowing out of the playoffs, falling to St. Martinville, 55-41. Barber said his players wouldn’t quit as they battled back from a 41-0 deficit, leaving it all out on the field, making him extremely proud. The Demons return 24 seniors and Barber said they provide tremendous leadership on both sides of the ball. Barber added that the team is hungry and eager, demonstrating a great work ethic and ready to build off last season’s playoff berth. The team had a great turnout for summer workouts with conditioning and weightlifting, setting a positive early tone. The Demons are ready to compete at a high level according to their second year coach. Senior QB Jasper LaSalle leads 7 returning offensive starters along with Senior RB Mike Martin. Eight defensive starters are back led by Senior linebackers Noah Breland (6-1, 195) and Malachi Martin (6-0, 230). John Lambert and Matt Hughes will share offensive coordinator duties, while Kevin Maddox was promoted to defensive coordinator.

Hammond’s Steve Jones is in his third year of rebuilding the Tornadoes’ program, going 6-5, earning a playoff appearance. The Tors (No. 31 seed) traveled to Destrehan (No. 2), being blanked 22-0. Hammond is counting on their 20 seniors carrying the load, returning 4 of the 5 starting interior linemen, a big plus for the offensive scheme. Jones said the offense features really good overall team speed and the skill guys can get after it. Jones calls the offense again and Rory Bell is back for his third season signaling the defense. QB Ryan Roberts, a two-year starter after winning the job in the fifth week two years ago, is battling Junior transfer Kaden Slocum (Oak Forest Academy) for the starting job. Seniors Mack McCraney and Larry Stewart will play line on both sides of the ball. Only 3 defensive starters return and the Tornadoes must replace their entire secondary. Seniors Nick Lawrence and Lorenzo Yates anchor the unit and Junior LB Jy’rell Oliver is quick to the ball and will see time at tailback.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sept. 06

7 PM

Covington (A)

Sept. 06

7 PM

Salmen (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Fontainebleau (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Biloxi High, MS (A)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Bogalusa (H)

Sept. 20

7 PM

D’Iberville High, MS (H)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Tylertown, MS (A)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Fontainebleau (A)

Oct. 03

7 PM

Jewel Summer (A)

Oct. 04

7 PM

St. Paul’s (H)

Oct. 11

7 PM

Belle Chasse (H)

Oct. 11

7 PM

Slidell (H)

Oct. 17

7 PM

St. Charles (H)

Oct. 18

7 PM

Covington (A)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Lakeshore (A)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Northshore (H)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Salmen (H)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Mandeville (A)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Pearl River (A)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Ponchatoula (H)

028

EDGE August | September 2019


LAKESHORE TITANS

MANDEVILLE SKIPPERS

Lakeshore posted its second straight undefeated regular season, capturing the District 8-4A crown and registering an impressive 26-2 record in the last two seasons. The Titans (No. 5 seed) fell in the quarterfinals at Neville (No. 4). Craig Jones (48-24) enters his seventh season boasting proven, experienced players, with 8 offensive and 7 defensive starters back. Jones plans to lean on his returning players, looking for contributions from underclassmen. Lakeshore (9-0) breezed through the Southeast Louisiana Invitational 7-on-7 tournament, featuring 24 teams, hosted at Titan Coliseum. Lakeshore won back-to-back titles, edging Holy Cross, 24-21, in overtime on Cullen Ziegler’s end zone interception. Senior Christian Westcott takes over at quarterback. In limited action, he gained 157 yards, netting 12 TDs. Senior Max Lowery rushed for 887 yards, tallying 6 times, with 3 receiving touchdowns. Senior Jake Smiroldo caught 45 passes for 731 yards and 12 scores. Westcott, a tenacious linebacker, registered 72 tackles with 8 sacks, blocking 7 punts. Junior Devin Weilbaecher recorded 103 tackles and Senior Zack Bernard added 3.5 sacks.

Mandeville’s “Big Blue” hopes to return to their traditional winning ways, after registering a 3-6 slate under Hutch Gonzales, who inherited just a nine-game schedule. Gonzales, a Covington grad and former Southeastern All-Conference receiver, who saw time in the Canadian and Arena Football Leagues, is turning over the offensive play calling responsibility to Mike Manguno, previous offensive coordinator at Woodlawn High in Baton Rouge. Defensive coordinator Eric Rebaudo, a former head coach at Holy Cross, returns calling defensive signals. Gonzales said having a full staff will allow him to oversee the program, letting his coaches develop players. Junior QB Devon Tott guides the spread offense, featuring sure-handed Senior receiver Will Sheppard and Senior back Zahn Diaz poised to produce big numbers. Gonzales bragged on Diaz’s ability and explosive quickness, combining speed and physicality. Gonzales plans to ride Diaz’s ability, handling the bulk of the carries. Seven defensive starters return led by Senior safety Noah Engolia. Juniors John O’Connor (LB) and Seth Pagart (DE) offer experience.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sept. 06

7 PM

Fontainebleau (H)

Sept. 06

7 PM

Poplarville, MS (A)

Sept. 13

7 PM

South Plaquemines (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Hahnville (H)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Northshore (H)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Archbishop Hannan (H)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Moss Point, MS (A)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Northshore (H)

Oct. 03

7 PM

De La Salle (H)

Oct. 04

7 PM

Slidell (A)

Oct. 11

7 PM

Archbishop Hannan (A)

Oct. 11

7 PM

Ponchatoula (A)

Oct. 18

7 PM

Westgate (A)

Oct. 18

7 PM

Fontainebleau (H)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Franklinton (H)

Oct. 25

7 PM

St. Paul’s (A)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Pearl River (H)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Hammond (H)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Salmen (A)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Covington (A)

030

EDGE August | September 2019


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031


NORTHLAKE CHRISTIAN WOLVERINES

NORTHSHORE PANTHERS

Northlake Christian School has a new head football coach for the first time in nearly a decade with the departure of Anthony Agresta (63-48) with eight playoff appearances in nine seasons. The Wolverines’ new guy, James Willis (46), brings 20 years of coaching knowledge and expertise. He coached with the Saints under Sean Payton along with coaching stints at Alabama, Auburn, Texas Tech and UL-Lafayette among others. Willis, a 1993 fifth-round pick by Green Bay, played linebacker with the Packers, Philadelphia and Seattle in his six-year NFL career. Willis said at his press conference, “I have a clear vision of what it takes to build a competitive program. I am fortunate to be a part of a very inspiring and talented group of coaches within our Athletic Department that share in one common goal of building upon the legacy at NCS. I look forward to serving our young students, not only on the football field and in the classroom, but in their spiritual growth as well.” Willis, the Wolverines’ new mentor, said every position is wide open.

Northshore opens the Josh Buelle coaching era, taking over from long-time mentor Mike Bourg, who stepped down. The Panthers went 4-6, going 2-5 in district. Buelle, no stranger to District 6-5A, a 2006 Slidell grad, first team All-District and All-Metro linebacker, served as the Panthers’ defensive coordinator last year. Previously he was the Mandeville interim head coach for a season, also serving as the Skippers’ defensive coordinator. Buelle wants his players to compete day-in-and-day-out, grow up quick and handle any adversity. He hired Corey Bordelon as the offensive coordinator, who has previous head coaching experience at Archbishop Hannan and De La Salle. Bordelon has Buelle’s trust, employing a new scheme with a very different look and hoping for consistency. The Panthers return four offensive starters anchored by Senior center Jacob Tamborella and Senior WR/TE Kobe Muniz. Three defensive starters are back. Senior DE/LB Kershawn Fisher, a verbal commitment to Kansas, is also being recruited by a number of state schools. Senior NG Drake Brantley and Senior CB Jonathan Carroll provide experience and leadership.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sept. 06

7 PM

Resurrection Catholic,MS (A)

Sept. 06

7 PM

Dutchtown (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Livingston Collegiate (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Salmen (A)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Cohen College Prep (H)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Lakeshore (A)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Independence (A)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Mandeville (A)

Oct. 04

7 PM

Pine (H)

Oct. 03

7 PM

Ponchatoula (H)

Oct. 11

7 PM

Pearl River (H)

Oct. 11

7 PM

Fontaineleau (A)

Oct. 17

7 PM

Haynes Academy (H)

Oct. 17

7 PM

St. Paul’s (H)

Oct. 25

7 PM

St. Thomas Aquinas (A)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Hammond (A)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Pope John Paul II (A)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Covington (H)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Springfield (H)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Slidell (H)

032

EDGE August | September 2019


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033


PEARL RIVER REBELS

PINE RAIDERS

Pearl River surprised folks last year under rejuvenated Joe Harris (56), who reassumed the head job, posting a solid 8-3 record as a No. 13 seed, advancing to the second round. The Rebels defeated Franklin Parish, 2120, at home before falling to No. 4 Neville, 31-9, in the regional round. Harris guided the Rebels for 10 seasons, beginning back in 2001. Sixteen seniors add valuable experience with a winning attitude. Offensively, the Rebels have trust in their “do-it-all” back Senior Corey Warren (Heart and Soul), who garnered first team AllDistrict, All-Parish, All-Metro and All-State honors. Warren (5-11, 214) gained 1,400 yards, cashing in 27 times, and is described as fearless and extremely durable with great vision. Warren has a comfort zone with all 5 Senior linemen returning, including Wyatt Hanson, Jonathan Hill, Cameron Lee, Nick Schmiderer and Will Watts. Six defensive starters return led by four-year starter Senior LB Hayden DeJean, also a receiver, and Senior safety Nick Livingston. Coach Harris hired Mike Bourg, who ran the Northshore program for 13 years, to coach QBs and receivers.

Pine delivered a productive 7-3 season, earning a No. 9 seed, falling at home, losing to No. 24 Independence, 36-32, in a shoot-out. Bradley Seal enters his eighth year, saying his squad faces a brutal district schedule, including defending Class 2A state champion Amite and defending Class 1A champ Kentwood, which moves up in classification. Pine’s unit remains nearly intact, returning 17 starters, 9 offensive and 8 defensive, featuring 14 seniors. Senior QB Logan Temples operates the flexbone offense and clicked on 110-of-198 passes for 2,243 yards with 18 TDs and 7 picks. Seal described his QB as an accurate passer, willing to take hits, allowing his receivers to get open downfield. Temples’ go-to-guy is Senior WR Jordan Anderson, who has strong hands and runs great routes. Anderson caught 54 balls for 1,043 yards and 12 scores. A couple of the defensive leaders include Senior LBs Drake Westmoreland and Jahiem Williams, who are quick to the ball. Pine’s 6 team captains are Jordan Anderson, Jyrais Robinson, Logan Temples, Drake Westmoreland, Jahiem and Larry Williams.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sept. 06

7 PM

Pope John Paul ll (A)

Sept. 06

7 PM

Jewel SumNer (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Thomas Jefferson (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Bogalusa (A)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Pine (H)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Pearl River (A)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Springfield (A)

Sept. 27

7 PM

St. Thomas Aquinas (A)

Oct. 04

7 PM

Albany (A)

Oct. 04

7 PM

Northlake Christian (A)

Oct. 11

7 PM

Northlake Christian (A)

Oct. 11

7 PM

St. Helena College & Career Acad. (H)

Oct. 18

7 PM

OPEN WEEK

Oct. 18

7 PM

Independence (H)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Salmen (A)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Kentwood (H)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Lakeshore (A)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Amite (A)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Franklinton (H)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Varnado (H)

034

EDGE August | September 2019


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035


PONCHATOULA GREEN WAVE

POPE JOHN PAUL II

Ponchatoula’s head coach Hank Tierney, returns for his 12th season calling the Green Wave’s shots, after the Green Wave stumbled to a disappointing 2-8 record. Ponchatoula’s coaching staff remains intact with Tierney handling the play calling, looking for typical production from his Senior QB T. J. Finley (6-7, 230), a long-time verbal commitment to LSU, wanting to become a Bayou Bengal. Tierney described his signal caller as a “football junkie,” extremely smart who can make all the throws. Finley completed 158-of-333 passes for 2,736 yards, 23 TDs with just 5 picks. Senior center Paxton Crouse returns. Tierney says the Green Wave’s offense has a chance to be really good, despite returning just 3 starters. Coach Timmy Walters is entering his 6th season, charting the Wave’s defense. Five defensive starters return, including Senior LBs Christian Lemaire and Gabe Timmbrick. Senior safety Javier Dawson leads the secondary, and big contributions are expected from Sophomore Jacoby Matthews. Ponchatoula’s place kicking duties should be solid with Junior Jake Leitz performing well, after attending a number of camps.

Pope John Paul II looks to improve from last year’s 2-9 squad under second year coach Charlie Cryer, a former LSU lineman (1980-83). Cryer has hired a new offensive coordinator, Chase Hawthorne (Vandebilt Catholic). Defensive coordinator, Chris Cryer, the coach’s son, returns for his second season, calling the Jags’ signals. Chris Cryer and Hawthorne were teammates at Northwestern State University and should enjoy the reunion. PJP II has only 7 seniors, returning 6 offensive starters. Sophomore QB George Arata started the final 5 games for the Jags last year and should benefit from that experience. Junior Joey Estopinal, the workhorse, rushed for 460 yards on 187 totes, tallying 3 touchdowns. Junior slot receiver Collin Cahill tops the receiving corps. The Jaguars’ defense should be a strength, returning 6 starters. Senior free safety Easton Abernathy, Junior CB Colin Brindell and Sophomore lineman Spencer Woodruff are counted on to lead things on the defensive side of the ball. Coach Cryer likes the attitude of his club, working together to build the program, holding each other accountable.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sept. 06

7 PM

Live Oak (A)

Sept. 06

7 PM

Pearl River (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Denham Springs (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

St. Patrick, MS (A)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Brother Martin (H)

Sept. 19

7 PM

Thomas Jefferson (A)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Covington (H)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Episcopal (H)

Oct. 03

7 PM

Northshore (A)

Oct. 04

7 PM

Central Private (A)

Oct. 11

7 PM

Mandeville (H)

Oct. 10

7 PM

Hanyes Academy (A)

Oct. 18

7 PM

Slidell (A)

Oct. 18

7 PM

Kenner Discovery Health Science (H)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Fontainebleau (A)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Springfield (A)

Nov. 01

7 PM

St. Paul’s (H)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Northlake Christian (H)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Hammond (A)

Nov. 08

7 PM

St. Thomas Aquinas (H)

036

EDGE August | September 2019


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037


SALMEN SPARTANS Salmen struggled through a disappointing, 1-9, campaign under first-year head coach Eric Chuter, a longtime Spartans’ assistant, who replaced Jerry Leonard. Chuter said the Spartans weren’t a very good football team last season, but despite that poor showing, he is rejuvenated and likes the 2019 version. Salmen had its fair share of bad luck and couldn’t come up with many breaks. Salmen’s lone victory (27-18) over Bogalusa in week four at home was followed by a deflating, 20-19, overtime home loss to Loranger. Pitted against two-time District 8-4A champ Lakeshore, much improved Pearl River and Franklinton, the Spartans must find a way to compete. Chuter said the players are working hard and trying to improve every day. Putting last season behind them, he added it’s a fun bunch and a pleasure to be around. Senior QB Mikell Marco leads the offense and will also play safety. Senior linemen Darian Bowman and Peyton Gabel provide the main protection with Junior Karl Owens topping the running game. Senior strong safety Carl Jones and Junior Karl Simmons highlight the defense.

SLIDELL TIGERS Slidell (9-3) cruised to an unbeaten District 6-5A championship, the 1st unblemished district run since 2002 under Wayne Grubb. Slidell (12 seed) fell in the regional round, clipped by East Ascension (5 seed), 2825. Larry Favre (33-33), member of the 100-plus victory club, enters his seventh season with high expectations, featuring 21 seniors. Four offensive and 7 defensive starters return. Senior RB Harlan Dixon (LA Tech verbal commitment) provides a quality dual-threat. Dixon, first team All-State and All-Metro, rushed for 1,682 yards with 15 TDs, catching 41 passes for 819 yards and 8 scores. Senior safety Oscar Davis (46 tackles) also returned two kickoffs for touchdowns. Seniors Derius Crawford, Donte Daniels and Matthew Retif are solid. Defensive coordinator Jeremy Lynch enters his second season, while Chris “Floppy” Arnoult marks year four as the innovative play-caller. Slidell finished 8-1 in the Southeast Louisiana Invitational 7-on-7 tournament held at Lakeshore, falling in the semis. Favre likes the Tigers’ winning culture and recipe for success.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sept. 06

7 PM

Hammond (A)

Sept. 06

7 PM

KIPP Booker T. Washington (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Northshore (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Archbishop Rummel (H)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Belle Chasse (A)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Harrison Central (H)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Kenner Discovery Health Science (H)

Sept. 27

7 PM

St. Paul’s (A)

Oct. 03

7 PM

Loranger (A)

Oct. 03

7 PM

Mandeville (H)

Oct. 11

7 PM

West St. John (H)

Oct. 11

7 PM

Hammond (A)

Oct. 17

7 PM

McDonogh #35 (A)

Oct. 18

7 PM

Ponchatoula (H)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Pearl River (H)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Covington (A)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Franklinton (A)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Fontainebleau (H)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Lakeshore (H)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Northshore (A)

038

EDGE August | September 2019


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Slidell 985.639.3335

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ST. PAUL’S WOLVES

ST. THOMAS AQUINAS FALCONS

St. Paul’s looks to rebound after last season’s disappointing 5-6 mark, the first Wolves’ losing season since 2003. St. Paul’s fell in the Division I Select playoffs, trimmed by Jesuit, 21-17. Kenny Sears (145-75) is in his 20th season guiding the Wolves and hopes to again be in the hunt for the competitive District 6-5 crown. Defensive coordinator Lee Pierre is back, holding the position since 2006, giving St. Paul’s continuity with their schemes. Former Wolves’ QB Burt Periera, a 2005 grad, returns as the offensive coordinator, his fourth season. Sears said despite 27 seniors returning, it’s still a work in progress and younger players need to step up, especially on offense. Senior Caleb Frost and Sophomore Grant Billson are competing at quarterback. Senior RB Carter Elie and Junior Mitchell Smith return. The Wolves played strong defense and had effective special teams play. Seniors William Brand and Parker Pierson are battling at place kicker and Junior punter Justin Baham is back. The Crockett twins, Seniors Mica’h and Michael, return along with Senior DB Wayne Galloway.

St. Thomas Aquinas turned in a competitive 5-6 mark under first-year head coach Randell Legette. The Falcons (11 seed) traveled to Catholic of New Iberia (6 seed), running into a buzz-saw, 48-0. Catholic finished the Division III state runner up, falling to No. 1 Notre Dame, 42-21. Legette was named head coach last season, replacing former head coach Hutch Gonzales, who departed after just one season to coach Class 5A Mandeville. Legette will call the offense again, working with eight returning starters. He said the goal is to be balanced with contributions from freshman and sophomores, gelling together and executing the Falcons’ triple option offense. Junior Antron Dillon sparked the running game with 620 yards and 8 TDs, while Senior Devon Wilson, a key contributor, gained 559 all-purpose yards with 2 touchdowns. Second-year defensive coordinator Stephen Champagne returns 6 starters. Senior DE Dustin Dyson, returning from ACL surgery, is coveted by D-1 schools LSU, Mississippi State and Missouri, along with state schools. Junior DL Kylen Smith adds experience and Sophomore LB Devaki Williams returns.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sept. 06

7 PM

Eleanor McMain (H)

Sept. 06

7 PM

Ascension Catholic (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Jesuit (H)

Sept. 13

7 PM

Episcopal (A)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Destrehan (A)

Sept. 20

7 PM

Loranger (H)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Slidell (H)

Sept. 27

7 PM

Pine (H)

Oct. 04

7 PM

Hammond (A)

Oct. 03

7 PM

Independence (A)

Oct. 11

7 PM

Covington (H)

Oct. 11

7 PM

Isidore Newman (H)

Oct. 18

7 PM

Northshore (A)

Oct. 18

7 PM

Livingston Collegiate (H)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Mandeville (H)

Oct. 25

7 PM

Northlake Christian (H)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Ponchatoula (A)

Nov. 01

7 PM

Springfield (A)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Fontainebleau (H)

Nov. 08

7 PM

Pope John Paul ll (A)

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PROOF SHEET

ur ad that will run in the June/July issue of EDGE of the Lake magazine. This ad will run as nges by (7.12.2019) at 5:00 PM. Please make any changes or approve via email.

Art for Cat’s Sake + Big Sky Ranch presents:

Cat Party 2019 Covington Cat Art & Film Festival

Saturday, August 31 10:00 am to 5:00 pm PRESENTING:

THE YARNOVER RETREAT Friday, January 9th, through Sunday, January 12th Courtyard Marriott in Covington, LA.

Featuring Melissa Leapman, the cable queen with more than 900 knitwear patterns in print, and Keith Leonard, a hot new designer and professional knitwear finisher! Evening events include the Fashion Show, a dinner with instructors, and a meet and great.

The McNeedles’ Pop Up Shop

open to the public / will be held throughout the event!

Fuhrmann Auditorium 317 N Jefferson Ave, Covington

Tickets: eventbrite.com Search: “Cat Party” on Facebook The Celebrity cats “ Back by Popular Demand “ Boo the Deaf Kitty & Jeffy the Journalist Artists Wess Foreman • Cary Chun Lee David Guastella • Melanie Wallace Celebrity Chefs, Kitty cocktails, Cat cookies, amazing Vegan delicacies, and more. . . Learn CPR, TNR and how to paint your kitty!

Food + Beverages Jewelry

Cat Yoga Cat-Themed Art Feline Info Sessions Funny Cat Videos Cat Cafe Adoption Center Art Gallery

Price is $475 for four classes and three evening events.

To Register call 985.882.7144

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Cat BINGO


Compassionate Care in the

Heart of Old Mandeville

Mandeville Live! Free Friday Concerts

6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

September 6 September 13 September 20 September 27 Live Taping & Concert

**The public is invited to participate in the live tapings**

Friday, October 4 Tapings at 5:00 & 6:00 concert begins at 6:30 p.m.

Little Hospital. Big Heart.

Rain Date: Friday, October 11 R E A D E R S ’

C H O I C E

A W A R D S

*No outside food, beverages or coolers. Concessions provided by local restaurants and non-profit organizations for purchase.

2 0 1 8

The Mandeville Trailhead 675 lafitte Street Historic Old Mandeville

Liza Ledet, DVM 419 Girod St. Mandeville, LA 70448 | 985.377.0800 | mandevilleah.com

www.cityofmandeville.com

(985) 624-3147

Election Day is Oct. 12 Early voting is Sept. 28-Oct.  5  (except Sunday, Sept. 29) from 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m.

LAKE • 69170 HWY 190. SUITE 1 • COVINGTON, LA 70433 • PHONE 985 733 4670

P.O. Box 1468, Covington, LA 70434 985.966.2024 www.VoteMikeCooper.com

MikeCooperSTP@gmail.com CooperForPresident EDGE August | September 2019

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Spray T NOT YOUR MOMMA’S


Tan STORY CAITLIN PICOU PHOTOS JOEL TREADWELL

W

e were orange. It was the 90’s; we didn’t know any better. We took UV radiation by visiting tanning beds daily. I would drive all the way from downtown Covington to Mandeville because that one tanning place by Starbucks didn’t need parental consent. Now we are decades older, which means a few years wiser. Us 1900-born babies (yes, that is scary) have quit the tanning beds, but now what? I remember trying my first self-tanning lotion as a junior in high school. I had no idea what I was doing. Needless to say, my sparkle turquoise dress was a nice compliment to my orange-glow, you know, being complimentary colors and all. Thankfully, that fake tan only lasted a cool 72 hours. About a decade post-graduation, I decided to give the spray-tanning booth another go. I selected my “tan number,” stepped au natural into a machine and hoped for the best. The orange color wasn’t as prominent as I expected, but the heavy spray on my face, feet and hands didn’t exactly look beach-babe-basking-in-the-sun, if you know what I mean. I suppose you could say my creation of Opulent Bronzing Lotion by Kismet Cosmetics was because of these experiences. DHA, or dihydroxyacetone, is what makes a spray tan last, but it also causes that too orange color. Opulent is DHA-Free and can be washed off in the shower. For longer lasting color, I began trying out as many spray tans as I could to find a good one that lasts. Through this process I became obsessed with having a natural, dark tan. Something tells me you will be too. A LOT has changed in the landscape of spray tanning. I am here to tell you that if you book your tanning appointment with an actual “spray tan artist” you won’t be disappointed. But how has spray tanning evolved over the years?

Pictured: Taylor Hooper, Caitlin Picou, Kaitlyn Raykiewicz, Laney Toohey,

BEFORE

AFTER EDGE August | September 2019

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HERE ARE YOUR SPRAY TAN OPTIONS TODAY: BRONZER vs. NO-BRONZER The bronzer isn’t necessary, but the color lets the spray tan artist know where they have sprayed previously. For brides, I recommend non-bronzing formulas, just to prevent any bronzing from coloring the dress. RAPID vs. OVERNIGHT All spray tans used to take 8-12 hours to develop, meaning you couldn’t workout, wear tight clothes or shower from the time you get sprayed until the next day. But now there are formulas called Rapid Rinse Solutions, which allow you to shower and resume normal activities 2-4 hours after getting sprayed. No more stained sheets! AIRBRUSH vs. MACHINE Airbrush tanning has become an art. Spray Tan Artists have been independently attending minitraining schools not required by the state to get really good at what they do. They know the proper techniques to spray your knees, elbows and face. The result is a natural, not one-size fits all tan that’s much better than a spray-tanning booth tends to give you. Airbrush tanners can also pick the right shade/tone for your skin so no more guessing. And now these talented artists, like Aly Mikell from Naked Magnolia, come to your house. DYES vs. NO DYES In order for spray tans to last, the formula must include DHS, which means that an orange tan is almost inevitable. One of the biggest things you learn in makeup artistry school is which colors offset others. We all know that in order to cover a red zit you need some green color corrector to tone down the redness. Have you heard of a violet-based tan? The violet dye, which is visible when sprayed, offsets any orange color that typically happens with cool undertones. Neutral skin tones can use a blend of violet and green, and warm skin tones can use a blend of red and green. This color science, using natural dyes, is what I used to create my own spray tan line (available to spray tan artists), so you will never be orange, no matter your undertones. With these developments, it is time to ditch the tanning beds, lather on the sunscreen, wear the floppy hats, prevent skin cancer and premature aging (I mean the list goes on) and find a local spray tan artist. My only warning: you will be addicted to that natural glow, so be prepared.

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BEFORE

AFTER

BEFORE

AFTER


OVER 300 ATVS IN STOCK! NO FREIGHT AND DEALER FEES EVER!

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SEPT. 27-28 CASSIDY PARK - BOGALUSA, LA Friday, Sept. 27, 2019 MAIN STAGE 5:30 - PAPA MALI 7:15 - MIA BORDERS 9:00 - HONEY ISLAND SWAMP BAND

Saturday, Sept. 28, 2019

MAIN STAGE 3:00 - TERRY “HARMONICA” BEAN 5:00 - BAND OF HEATHENS 7:00 - ERIC GALES 9:00 - PAUL THORN HERITAGE STAGE 11:45 - FHS JAZZ BAND 12:45 - BELIEVE/WPCAA 1:45 - CLAIRE KELLAR 3:00 - DAVID ST. ROMAIN 5:00 - DWAYNE DOPSIE

To Purchase Tickets visit BogalusaBlues.com


Quality menswear that comes to you. Call for appointment today.

As our state representative, Reid Falconer voted against more than $1.2 billion in additional taxes.

EDGE OF THE LAKE • 69170 HWY 190. SUITE 1 • COVINGTON, LA 70433 • PHO

PEOPLE BEFORE POLITICS ELECTION DAY: Oct. 12,2019 VOTE EARLY: Sep. 28-Oct. 5 SENATE • DISTRICT 11

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honey island

SWAMP


P


STORY ELAINE MILLER PHOTOS PAUL CHAUVIN

B

eing from Louisiana, I take so much of the unique landscape for granted. It is only when I have visitors that I really take a deep look at where we live. Visiting the Honey Island Swamp was no exception. When we asked our friends visiting from Michigan what they wanted to see it was the French Quarter and a swamp tour. I think the History Channel’s Swamp People has made people more interested in swamps over the years. I explained that we wouldn’t be bumping into Troy Landry wrestling a gator, but I was more than happy to book a tour. Honey Island Swamp is located in Slidell and is bordered on the north by U.S. 11, on the south by Lake Borgne, on the east by the Pearl River and the west by the West Pearl River. The swamp is considered one of the most pristine swamplands in the United States, covering an area of over 20 wildlife-protected miles. Multiple companies offer tours of the area, including colorful accounts of the swamp ecology and natural history along with sightings of many of the animals that live in the area. On any given day you have the opportunity to see alligators, raccoons, owls, wild boars, nutria, snakes, turtles, bald eagles and black bears. As we left the dock and headed down the river, I loved seeing all the camps lining the riverbanks with their unique

names and style. I was surprised to learn that some of the camps are inhabited year round. Once we were out of the no wake zone (an area where boats are required to go slow to avoid producing wakes/ waves) we were able to speed up and enjoy the wind in our hair as we glided around river bends. Navigating the shallow waters in a flatboat, we were able to venture deep into the swamp to more isolated areas. Surrounded by towering cypress and willow trees draped with Spanish moss our eyes were peeled to the banks looking for the elusive alligator. It didn’t take long for someone to spot two eyes poking out of the water. We were able to get very close. And it wasn’t just alligators that we saw but also wild hogs, something I hadn’t seen in the wild. Considering the number of feral hogs we saw on the tour I am surprised I haven’t seen more in my lifetime. According to the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries there are an estimated 700,000 feral hogs in the state. Feral Hogs are considered a pest due to their behavior: uprooting both planted and naturally regenerated conifers and hardwood seedlings, destroying crops and uprooting hayfields. Also, they increase erosion and shed coliform bacteria into the waterways. Feral hogs cause $75 million in agricultural damage in Louisiana annually (LSU AgCenter).


LETTER FROM THE MAYOR

Our captain was able to tell us about the different types of flora and fauna that surrounded us along with information about the myriad birds we saw. I am a “look, a white bird!” kind of birdwatcher so having someone on board that could identify the birds was helpful. The tour was both entertaining and educational, leaving me with a deeper understanding of what makes the ecosystems here so unique, along with many opportunities for nature photography. Heading back to the dock, as talk turned to what local spot would serve the best local seafood, I was glad that my visitors had suggest a visit to the swamps. It is always nice to be reminded of the rich nature that surrounds us on the Northshore. DEAR CITIZENS, Hurricane season is here and one of the most important things you can do is stay informed. As in years past, the City of Slidell will post all emergency information to our city website, www. MySlidell.com and our Facebook and Twitter “Slidell SOS” accounts. One of the easiest ways to stay updated is by signing up for email notifications on our website. It’s as easy as clicking on the “Stay in the know. Join our email list!” at the top of the page and entering your name and email address. Information is also posted on our social media pages. General news and emergency news is posted at the “City of Slidell, Louisiana” Facebook page and emergency news can be found at @ SlidellSOS on Twitter. To be notified via text or email when something is posted on the @SlidellSOS page, visit Enabling Mobile Notifications under the Twitter Help Center for more information. All of these services can be accessed from virtually anywhere, whether it’s a cell phone, desktop, laptop or tablet. Even if you evacuate, you can still get continuous updates about Slidell. I encourage you to take advantage of these useful capabilities. Greg Cromer City of Slidell Mayor


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EDGE August | September 2019

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Cross & Blur: Tracing Lacombe’s Culture, History & Lore STORY LIZ GENEST SMITH

R

esearching Northshore history is often a bit of a treasure hunt. You may hear colorful anecdotes from locals or catch snippets of interesting information from seemingly official sources, but when you actually try to map things out and verify your findings, it often results in dead ends or confusing, contradictory details. While this can be charmingly mysterious at times, it can be downright frustrating when you’re tasked with writing about it. Or even if you’re just curious to learn more. In all my digging and snooping around, no Northshore town has

proven to be more nebulous than Lacombe. Even before we moved here, I was intrigued by its well-known distinction for being the only Creole-Catholic settlement on the Northshore, with deep Choctaw ancestral roots and a famously celebrated poet-priest named Père Adrien Rouquette. Reading about this was all well and good, but it always left me wanting something more tangible. Cue the grand opening of the newly refurbished Bayou Lacombe Museum. Board member and volunteer tour guide, or as he calls himself, “Thursday sitter,” Brian Schneider was kind enough to show me

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around the lovely facility and give me some history lessons on both the museum and the town. He explained that back in the 1970s the museum set up residence in a former two-room school house built in 1912 by John Davis Sr. It’s the oldest wooden schoolhouse in St. Tammany Parish and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1990, but it became a bit rundown, plus its former board members scaled back the hours of operation to only one Sunday a month. New life was breathed into it a few years ago, however, when the enthusiastic new board took over and began repairs and upgrades on the structure (including historically renovated floor, roof and windows, new air conditioning and bathrooms, and no more termites). They also overhauled the collection, which is still a work in progress thanks to the steady flow of donated historical items from locals and the board’s ambitious future projects. Brian shared his wealth of knowledge and genuine love for Lacombe as he showed me the main exhibits, which cover the history of the local Choctaw, the life of Père Adrien Roquette, the John Davis Lumber Company and its influence on the area, rural life in early 20th century Lacombe and the Hall of Heroes, which honors local residents for their military service. While they were all interesting subjects, I have to admit that I was a bit hung up on Adrien Rouquette. A sucker for an interesting historical character, I peppered Brian with questions, and he warned me, “You could do a lifetime of work researching him.” And he wasn’t kidding. After my visit, I spent a great deal of time talking to local historians, librarians, and even a professor who teaches a class


on Rouquette’s poetry at the University of Louisiana at Monroe. Source after source – whether it was human, paper or electronic – frequently were inconsistent, leaving me with more questions than answers. Was Rouqette sent to law school in France because his family didn’t want him marrying a Choctaw princess, or because they wanted him to settle down and grow up? Did he party his way through Europe like a rock star, or was he a despondent, lost soul searching for the meaning of life? Was he friends with famous writers, like Longfellow, Thoreau and Whitman, or did he merely send his literary heroes copies of his work to review and reciprocate? My brain and research notes became unwieldy spiderwebs of unsubstantiated information, leading in a hundred different directions. But one particular passage on display in the Rouquette exhibit helped me to narrow my focus. “As a young boy coming up in New Orleans and Lacombe, Adrien was spoiled, introspective, and indolent. He played hooky from school and would steal aboard his family schooners for a ride to the Northshore. As a teenager confined in a Kentucky boarding school, he was truculent and troublesome. He ran away back to Louisiana. Condemned by his guardians to study law in Philadelphia and later Nantes, France, he rebelled and deliberately failed his bar exam.” So, I whittled it down to one question… How in the world did a pampered rich kid from New Orleans wind up a missionary-poet living with Choctaws in the wilds of St. Tammany Parish? I reviewed his story and looked at his family tree to see if I could find any solid clues. And I believe I did. I started off with what we more-or-less, partly-tomostly know for sure. On February 26, 1813, Adrien Emmanuel Rouquette was born into a wealthy family who lived at 413 Royal Street in the French Quarter. It appears his father, Dominique Rouquette, was a selfmade man, who moved to New Orleans from France, and became a successful enough wine merchant that he was allowed to court and marry Louise Cousin, daughter of Francois Cousin, the largest landowner in St. Tammany Parish. Dominique is said to have owned a 1,300-volume library, so perhaps his love of literature was passed down to his children, who became writers and poets. It’s certainly possible, but sadly Adrien was only six when his father drowned himself in the Mississippi River when gambling debts left him financially ruined. Widowed and homeless, Adrien’s mother first moved the family to the swampy suburb of Bayou St. John, then to the wilderness of Lacombe, where her family owned a great deal of property stretching from Slidell to Mandeville. Louise’s choice to create a home base amongst her kinsmen was especially wise, as she died suddenly a few short years later in 1824, leaving her orphaned children in the care of her brother Francois and her half-brother, Terence. By all accounts, the children adored running wild in the woods

and swamps on both shores, and were devastated each time they were sent off to private schools. Couple that culture shock with the devastating loss of both parents by the age of eleven, and this may help to explain young Adrien’s confusion and rebellious behavior. Many sources say he resented being sent to law school in France, though one of his own journal entries reads, “Not having discovered in Louisiana the fruit of the tree of knowledge, I determined to cross the sea, like a migratory fowl and taste of it in a foreign land.” Whether he chose to go or not, it would seem he wound up having a Dorothy Gale moment. Once he arrived in Oz, he must have realized, or confirmed, there’s no place like home. And he tried his best to go back. Suddenly, he had direction. After returning to Louisiana, he became the first Creole-American Catholic priest, but he felt trapped by his assignment at St. Louis Cathedral in New Orleans, where he is said to have delivered many eloquent sermons. It took fourteen years for the archbishop to relent, but he was finally allowed to return to Lacombe to live among and minister to the Choctaw people. While he was definitely serving as a man of the cloth, he also worked incredibly hard to preserve the Choctaw culture and language, and he tried to both protect them from and help them avoid conflict with the destructive, invasive British Americans. In his efforts to advocate on their behalf he told his contemporaries, “You must not try to civilize him – you must take him as he is… If you try to educate him in our way, he will learn the evil ways and leave the good alone.” Adrien became so accepted and beloved that he was given the nickname “Chahta-Ima,” meaning like a Choctaw. As yet more proof of his wisdom, benevolence and cultural sensitivity, later in life he was said to have openly preached against the institution of slavery, which was not a particularly popular stance in the state of Louisiana at the time. In his final years, he retired back to the place of his birth, the French Quarter, first to be cared for by the nuns in the Ursuline Convent, then the Hotel Dieu hospital. Upon his death on July 15, 1887, the Daily Picayune newspaper printed a glowing obituary (which, maddeningly, contradicts much of the other biographical information I gathered), mentioning that, “His adopted children of the wilderness were frequent visitors and brought gifts of herbs and dainties. Yesterday, some came again to find the soul departed, and they sat around the coffin in tearful grief.” Legend has it that the Choctaws solemnly attended his funeral, then stole his body from New Orleans and buried him “in” an oak tree in Lacombe. I’ve come across multiple accounts regarding his funeral and final resting place, but I like this one the best, and I’m guessing he would, too. There’s no doubt that his humility and sincere dedication must have gone a long way to winning the people over, but it probably didn’t hurt that a bunch of his Cousin cousins were part Choctaw. This is where the museum’s Rouquette collection intersects with EDGE August | September 2019

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LETTER FROM THE MAYOR

what is destined to become a fascinating display that’s currently in development: a detailed genealogy of Lacombe’s oldest families, such as Ducre, Carriere and, of course, Cousin. While Adrien’s grandfather, Francois Cousin, Sr., originally settled the family on the Northshore, and through marriages connected multiple French families, it was Adrien’s uncle Francois who seems to be the one who started the true Creole bloodline. He never married, but had eleven children with two different women – one was thought to be half Choctaw, the other one-fourth. So, in addition to probably contributing to Adrien’s love of nature and the Choctaw culture, he created familial ties that must have further endeared Adrien to the tribe. And in the next generations the Cousin family became an even more colorful genetic gumbo. Many of today’s Lacombe residents are at least distantly related and can trace their lineage back to one or more of the original families. In October of 1993, a writer from the Times-Picayune spoke about what he referred to as “Lacombe’s racial ambiguity” with the late Peter Cousin, a local resident and artist who provided the museum with a great deal of genealogical information that will be included in the future exhibit. Peter explained that his paternal grandfather was part Indian and French, his paternal grandmother was part European and African, and he believed his mother was part Cuban, African and French. If that doesn’t illustrate the wonderful tapestry of Lacombe culture, I don’t know what would. It stood out to me when the Times-Picayune writer observed that in this town racial lines “cross and blur.” That phrase resonated with me because, not only does it perfectly illustrate the zig-zagging local bloodlines, but it is exactly what often happens when you try to research Lacombe’s history and lore. The lines between fact and fiction may cross and blur, but when it’s all pulled together you can stand back and marvel at the vivid picture it creates. After speaking with museum board chairman Karen Raymond, a descendant of Francois Cousin, it became immediately apparent that she is a huge asset to the museum. She successfully led the effort to bring this community treasure back to life. Raymond was able to share and confirm some information based on family stories, and she has striking personal memories of when Lacombe’s “La Toussaint,” the traditional Lighting of the Graves on All Saints’ Day, still included lively Choctaw festivities that date back to Père Adrien Roquette’s days. As the museum continues to grow, and its dedicated, emotionally invested board continues to gather and display more stories, relics and documents, it is sure to be an increasingly valuable source of culture and history to Lacombe’s citizens, visitors and maybe even to curious journalists, just trying to piece the puzzle together.

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The City is in the process of budget approval for Fiscal Year 2020 and our citizens can view the proposed budget on the front of our website under “What’s New.” We will also keep you up to date with amendments to the budget at the same location or on our Financial Department Page. The budget is scheduled to be approved by August 8, 2020. Mandeville just received “The Distinguished Budget Presentation Award” by the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for the fourth year in a row. The award represents a significant achievement and reflects the commitment of the governing body and staff to meeting the highest principles of governmental budgeting. In order to receive the budget award, Mandeville had to satisfy nationally recognized guidelines for effective budget presentation. These guidelines are designed to assess how well an entity’s budget serves as a policy document, financial plan, operations guide and communications device. Budget documents must be rated “proficient” in all four categories and in the fourteen mandatory criteria within those categories to receive the award. There are over 1600 participants in the Budget Awards Program. Finally, as a reminder to our citizens, we have a new “pick up” schedule for garbage and recyclables. Recycle is now on Tuesday and Garbage is on Wednesday. Green Waste will be picked up weekly and citizens are urged to call Coastal Environmental directly at 985781-3171 to schedule large pile pick-ups or if they incur any problems with waste collection. Information on identifying recyclables can be found on our website in the Mayor’s Message.

Donald Villere City of Mandeville Mayor


Election Day is Oct. 12 Early voting is Sept. 28-Oct.  5  (except Sunday, Sept. 29) from 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m.

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EXCELLENCE. EDGE August | September 2019

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Runway Ready

STORY PATTY BEAL PHOTOS EDUARDO BENITEZ

Where will you find the Northshore’s style trendsetters, influencers and fashion-curious this fall?


At

New Orleans Fashion Week, of course. September 26-28, 2019 to be exact. Wait, New Orleans has a fashion week? Yep, a big one too. Over the last eight years, New Orleanian Tracee Dundas has put Louisiana on the fashion map, hosting an impressive multi day event in our eclectic, creative, intriguing city of New Orleans. In true EDGE style, I had a lovely conversation with Tracee, learning the who, the why, and especially the how a young lady from the Louisiana country founded New Orleans Fashion Week. PATTY BEAL: Hello, Tracee. Thanks for taking the time to chat with me. I’m a big fan of New Orleans Fashion Week and have attended many years. It’s quite an impressive experience. How does a young girl “from the country” pull off the area’s largest fashion event of the year? TRACEE DUNDAS: It’s my pleasure, Patty. I’m always willing to talk shop with others in the industry. It’s true, I’m a country girl from St. Martinville, Louisiana. PB: Take us to the beginning. Is your background in the fashion industry? TD: I got my fashion interest from modeling actually. I started in high school and I think that exposure is what led me to get a degree in apparel design from the University of Louisiana, Lafayette. I continued modeling on the side throughout college and after. PB: And you’ve remained in the industry ever since? TD: Well, minus a stint in the corporate world just after college, I’ve been in the industry in one form or another. PB: Sounds like your passion was stronger than the paycheck. What came next? TD: Yes! I decided to open my own modeling agency, About Faces Modeling and Talent, as I was mentoring some models anyway so it just made sense. I had an office in Lafayette and New Orleans. I had great local talent. We worked with stores like Saks, Maison Blanche and so many others doing runway work, print, and music videos. All the while I had a growing clientele that I was a stylist for. PB: Sounds like a dream-come-true career. TD: It was! Until Katrina came along. Sadly for us, our industry was the last on the list to reopen in the area. PB: Heartbreaking! So no clients, no business? TD: Right. I revised my resume to become a costumer. I had a few contacts and I did end up being a set costumer in the local movie industry.

PB: Did you enjoy that? Because it sounds amazing to me. TD: Yes, but there were some long, grueling hours. After a while, I yearned for more true fashion. The New Orleans fashion scene seemed bleak. There was nothing fashion forward happening. I had traveled abroad, to New York, Miami and was inspired by their fashion footprint. PB: I’m sensing an idea brewing! TD: Yes, I revised my resume again and I got my foot in the door with New York Fashion Week. Eventually, as I was researching online, I noticed that there were regional fashion weeks popping up everywhere – South Carolina, Florida, Georgia etc. – and I thought, “Why not New Orleans?” And that’s when I decided to do it here. To embrace, bring together and support emerging artisans and designers in the community. PB: And how long from idea to inception? TD: That was 2008. Starting the process was like scaling a wall. I did tons of research and journaled a lot. So many ideas needed to be put on paper. I can do fashion shows, no problem, but this was a huge scale! And it was just me. I was like a sponge, traveling and attending events and shows to learn as much as I could to mesh it all together and add the spirit and flair of New Orleans. I had no tangible product or object, no sample to work with, so I created a Prezi deck on the computer and reached out to my industry friends to get their insights and feedback. I got mixed reviews. Some support and some nay-sayers. I pushed on with enthusiasm and the first New Orleans Fashion Week was in 2011. PB: Triumph!! How did it go? TD: The first one was just two and a half days with two evenings of runway shows. I had a database but had to practically stalk designers and ask them to be in my fashion week program. Now designers come to me, and I can fill a week with events and shows. PB: I’ve attended New Orleans Fashion Week many times and love the variety of shows and the level of entertainment it brings. I love the Top Design Competition. TD: Yes, we’ve done a variety of runway shows: menswear, petite, plus, re/upcycle fashions. We have featured designers, new designers and boutiques. We include veteran designers, student designers, a wide variety from the area, including the Northshore and surrounding states. Our judges are all esteemed experts in their field of work. It’s a joy and privilege to bring us all together under one roof. PB: And courtyard! The vender experience is not to be missed.


TD: I’ve met so manly talented fashion artisans that come to set up shop at our Luxe Marketplace. From jewelry and accessories, to custom ties, belts and boots. It’s a wonderful mix of creative energy under the ambiance of outdoor lighting and cocktails and delicious eats. PB: How many runway shows are there throughout the week? TD: We get over 150 applications to show. I’d say between 40-50 runway shows over the week with 60-75 models, many makeup artists, hair stylists, fashion stylists and fashion photographers. We have a career day, panel discussions with the industry’s leading influencers and kick off parties throughout the week. PB: The scope of the effort to put on such a first rate event is staggering. TD: Oh definitely, from model casting calls in various cities, designer applications, retailers, interns, volunteers, marketing and media to the behind-the-scene production. It’s defiantly a product built from passion. But it’s my goal to continually support the

fashion and beauty sector that is part of our creative culture here in south Louisiana and the entire Gulf Coast area. To connect and inspire emerging talent with opportunities that will build their own success stories fuels my motivation, as well as providing a platform for all those fashion enthusiasts to view and experience. I just feel I’m a vessel creating an event dedicated to fashion and beauty. PB: Well, I for one am thrilled you followed your passion. I will be in attendance for the September event along with many of our readers! TD: Yes, this year the event will be in early fall: September 22-28, 2019 at the Board of Trade venue in New Orleans. You can find New Orleans Fashion Week on Facebook and at @nolafashionweek on Instagram. I would love to have my Northshore friends, new and old, join me in September. PB: Tracee, it’s been a pleasure. Thank you for your impactful contribution to this exciting industry and I’ll see ya on the runway!


EDGE August | September 2019

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Northshore Roller Derby info@northshorerollerderby.com northshorerollerderby.com


ROCKIN’ and

ROLLIN’ STORY SARAH COTTRELL PHOTOS JERRY COTTRELL

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nspired by a friend’s mission to do one new thing a month, I recently headed to the Castine Center for an evening of Roller Derby. Having no preconceived idea of what I was going to see, I took a seat on the edge of a marked track. The program that we were provided with was immensely helpful. Once I understood the basic rules I was ready! Roller Derby has been around since the 1940’s, its origins in banked roller tracks. Once considered sports entertainment, it has evolved into an amateur sport, but still retains elements of entertainment with colorful costumes, make up and “stage” names. These ladies had come to win, sporting names like Kim QuadSHASian, Captain Psycho Sis and Offer Rocker! With whistles blowing and more referees than a high school football game the match lived up to the billing of a full contact sport. The crowd in attendance understood the nuances and varied pacing more than I did, but it was easy to follow with an ongoing commentary explaining fouls and scoring. Roller Derby is a contact sport played by two all-female teams skating counter clockwise around the track. Teams have 5 players on the track at one time. The game consists of short, 2-minute match ups which are called Jams. Each team consists of 1 Jammer, who is the points scorer, 3 Blockers, 1 Defense and lastly 1 Pivot who controls the pace and is the last line of defense. Each Jammer wears a helmet cover with a star so they can be easily identified. Their job is to score points for the team by passing all of

the Blockers for the opposing team. Jammers earn a point every time they legally pass a Blocker from the opposing team until either they call off the Jam or the Jam is over. According to the coach and president of the Northshore Roller Derby, Sarina Bourg aka Psychosis, the non-profit group raises funds for practice space and bout space. They work hard so they can play even harder! “We are a diverse group of women who love to have fun together and to support our community through volunteering and raising money for local charities. You can check out our website for upcoming events where we will sign autographs and you can meet the team and snap photos.” As of 2019, the Women’s Flat Track Derby Association had 468 full member leagues and 46 apprentice leagues. The Northshore Roller Derby team was founded in 2011. Their mission is to provide a place for all women to challenge and strengthen themselves physically and mentally through the sisterhood of roller derby. Their season runs from March to October, competing against other teams from cities around our state such as Houma, Monroe and Shreveport, and teams in surrounding states such as Mississippi, Texas, Alabama and Florida. The Northshore Roller Derby has 15 team members at the moment, but they are always looking for new members. Anyone interested should email the team to get more information. Prospective players do not need to know how to skate to join the team. They will train anyone who is ready to learn! EDGE August | September 2019

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The City of

COVINGTON

AUGUST & SEPTEMBER 2019 EVENTS

St. Tammany Art Association’s Covington Art Market               OnSTAGE at the Fuhrmann • One Stop Pony Band           

Sunset at the Landing Concert                Covington White Linen for Public Art            

Columbia Street Block Party               

Farmers Markets Attached is a proof of your ad that will run in the June/July issue of EDGE of the Lake maga              is unless we receive changes by (7.12.2019) at 5:00 PM. Please make any changes or appro              

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My turn:

by Vincent Riccobono

ABOUT VINCENT RICCOBONO In every issue, EDGE of the Lake invites a local chef or restauranteur to visit another eatery on the Northshore. Vincent Riccobono owns Mattina Bella in downtown Covington. For 13 years his breakfast and brunch spot has been serving great meals to start the day and traditional American lunch fare. Vincent grew up in the restaurant business with stints in the city, across the river in Gretna and in Metairie with his family at The Riccobono Peppermill. He also worked for ten years at Beau Chene Country Club as both a manager and a cook. Mattina Bella is open from 7 a.m. – 2 p.m. each day.


ST. ANN’S WINE BAR 22 St. Ann Drive Mandeville 985.778.0505

My wife and I took my daughter and son-in-law to St Ann Wine Bar in Mandeville to celebrate their twenty-second anniversary. It was our first visit. I had heard of the place and looked forward to checking it out. There’s sofa seating available, but we sat at a table. It is a great place with a nice vibe, very comfortable. When we went, there was a good crowd of sweet, young people enjoying themselves and having drinks. So, we hit the happy hour for our celebration. The ladies had wine while my son-in-law had cranberry and vodka and I had a Bombay martini, dirty, with olives. My wife is a pinot grigio lady so our server recommended something from their wine list that was very nice. Same thing with my daughter. She wanted a pinot noir. The server recommended a few and she was pleased with the one she selected. The list is extensive, lots of different wines. The server was really on top of his game. He took good care of us the whole time we were there: refreshed our drinks, brought our food out timely. He was punctual and there when you needed him but didn’t bother you. And this was a crowded room. It would have been easy for us to get lost in the crowd, but that server did exactly what he was supposed to do and helped make it a nice evening. And he knew his wine; this guy was well trained. So, if you know someone who is a real wine person, I would recommend this place because you will be served by someone who knows how to talk wine. The food was small plates, which is a big thing these days. We shared the St Ann Cheese Board, which comes with some excellent cheese and meats. I liked the prosciutto and salami. It came with olives and candied almonds, too. We also had a crabmeat dip, which was lump crabmeat with cream cheese, Asiago and Romano and is served with wonton crisps. The hummus was good and it was filling. And the Italian meatballs were also nicely done. People want a nice place to slow down, drink, eat a little food, relax and enjoy the company they are with. St Ann Wine Bar is a place where I would not hesitate to send someone if they were looking for a nice spot to talk and have a drink. There was music, but it wasn’t overwhelming like a lot of places will do. It would be a great place to take a date. This place is something people want right now.


The City of Slidell presents the 2019-2020 Cultural Season Calendar All events offer free admission. Art exhibitions are on display at the Slidell Cultural Center at City Hall, located at 2055 Second Street. Gallery hours are Wednesdays & Fridays, 12-4 pm. Thursdays, 12-6 pm. Olde Towne Arts Commission Summer Show Christmas Under the Stars July 17 - August 16, 2019 • Slidell Cultural Center

Dec. 6, 7, 13, 14, 2019 • 6 - 9 pm • Griffith Park

Saturday, July 27 & Saturday, August 3, 2019 Heritage Park • 8:30 - 10:30 pm

Saturday, Dec. 7, 2018 • 5 - 9 pm • Olde Towne Slidell

Saturday, August 10, 2019 • 5 - 9 pm • Olde Towne Slidell

Thiursday, Dec. 19, 2019 • 7 - 8 pm • Slidell Auditorium

Slidell Movie Nights

White Linen & Lagniappe 2019

Slidell Art League’s Artists of the Year 2019

Opening Reception: Friday, August 30, 2019 • 6 - 9 pm Sept. 4 - 27, 2019 • Slidell Cultural Center

Patriot Day Concert with the Northshore Community Orchestra

Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019 • 6 - 8 pm • Slidell Auditorium

Mixed Media Juried Exhibit 2018

Opening Reception: Friday, Oct. 4, 2019 • 6 - 9 pm Oct. 9 - Nov. 8, 2019 • Slidell Cultural Center

Bayou Jam Concert - Ronnie Kole and Friends Sunday, Oct. 6, 2019 • 5 - 7 pm • Heritage Park

Christmas in Olde Towne Slidell

Holiday Concert with the Northshore Community Orchestra

Slidell Movie Nights at Slidell’s Bayou Christmas Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019 • 7 pm • Heritage Park

Salad Days Juried Exhibition of Student Art Opening Reception: Feb. 7, 2020 • 6 - 8 pm Feb. 12 - March 13, 2020 • Slidell Cultural Center

Arts Evening 2020

Saturday, March 21, 2019 • 5 - 9 pm • Olde Towne Slidell

From the Vaults of the New Orleans Museum of Art Opening Reception: Friday, March 27, 2020 • 6 - 9 pm April 1 - May 1, 2020 • Slidell Cultural Center

Bayou Jam Concert - Box Office Giants

Bayou Jam Concert Northshore Community Orchestra

Sunday, April 15, 2020 • 5 - 7 pm • Heritage Park

Bayou Jam Halloween Bash with Vince Vance & the Valiants

Some Enchanted Evening with the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra

Bayou Jam Concert - Cuisine

Sunday, October 13, 2019 • 5 - 6:30 pm • Heritage Park

Sunday, April 19, 2020 • 5 - 7 pm • Heritage Park

Sunday, October 27, 2019 • 5 - 7 pm • Heritage Park

Sunday, April 26, 2020 • 6 - 7:30 pm • Heritage Park

All in the Family The Works of Keith & Kelly Dellsperger

Opening Reception: Friday, Nov. 15 • 6 - 9 pm Nov. 20 - Dec. 20, 2019 • Slidell Cultural Center

Slidell Photo Club Exhibit

May 20 - June 12, 2020 • Slidell Cultural Center

Slidell Movie Nights - Summer 2019

June 6, 20 & July 11, 25 • 8:30 pm • Heritage Park

Thank you to our 2019 Cultural Season Sponsors for supporting the arts in Slidell! Renaissance, $5,000: Sophisticated Woman Magazine

Baroque, $2,500 Sponsors: Acadian Ambulance • C. Ray Murry, Attorney At Law Jazz on the Bayou/Ronnie Kole Foundation • Silver Slipper Casino Neoclassical, $1,000 Sponsors: Councilman Bill & Laura Borchert • Lori Gomez Art Lowry-Dunham, Case & Vivien Insurance Agency • Purple Armadillo Again

Impressionism, $500 Sponsors: Chateau Bleu • CiCi’s Pizza • Slidell Mayor Greg Cromer • Flatliners Entertainment Old School Eats Food Truck • Olde Towne Slidell Print Shop • Pontchartrain Investment Management Roberta’s Cleaners • Semplice’s Pizza • Sirocco Coffee Company • Slidell Historic Antique Association Terry Lynn’s Café & Creative Catering • Weston Three 19 • Tanya Witchen - RE/MAX Alliance

(985) 646-4375

MySlidell.com


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The Inauguration Ceremony for Mayor Mark Johnson and the city government took place in Covington. The Northshore Food Bank held a Ground Breaking Ceremony for its new food bank warehouse & administration building. The City of Covington held a Dedication Ceremony recognizing the completion of the 2-bay expansion and the interior renovations of the Ernest J. Cooper Memorial Fire Station. Habitat for Humanity St. Tammany West celebrated with the Diaz Family at their home dedication. Habitat STW President and CEO Jeff St. Romain presented Maria Diaz with a bible and hammer at the celebration. Northshore High School is proud to work with Addie’s Angels in the research, development and creation of 3D printed prosthetic hands for children in developing countries. Students in Molly Graham’s CIW Internet Business Associate class learn how to operate 3D printers, on loan to the school from Addie’s Angels, to create the hands. What started as a Senior Prank at St. Paul’s School was endorsed by the administration and will now become part of the school calendar. The Class of 2019 imitated the

traditional seniors’ Walk Through the Arch with their dogs. Initially the prank was shut down, but the administration invited the class to come back and do it again. So, greeted by the student body and amused facility, the proud canines walked the route along the traditional path through the school grounds and received their diplomas. 7. The Covington Business Association held its third Kokemo Stroll where the streets of Covington were lined with guests dressed in their beach inspired clothing and sipping cocktails and food bites provided by local business. 8. The Northshore Heart Walk took place in Fontainbleau State Park. Teams raised over $300,000 to help fund lifesaving research to fight heart disease and stroke. 9. Duane Dog Chapman enjoyed dinner at The Shack in Covington while filming an episode of the reality show Dog the Bounty. He is pictured with Chef Lolo. 10. Girl Scouts Louisiana East awarded Girl Scouting’s highest honor to five worthy Gold Award Girl Scouts from St. Tammany Parish at a statewide Gold Award ceremony. The 2019 Gold Award Girl Scouts from St. Tammany Parish are Cecilia Falkenstein, Meghan Lackner,

to benefit:

2019

RESCUE ME GALA

Saturday, September 28, 2019 ● 7:00-11PM Pontchartrain Yacht Club ● Old Mandeville tickets: Eventbrite.com For Sponsorship Opportunities, Contact: Alex Coogan: acoogan@nshumane.org

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Caitlin Weid, Sara Howell and Kayla Wort. Zane Galbert & Brooklyn Galbert took EDGE on a flight from Atlanta to Fort Lauderdale Rich ‘Mo’ and Cara Clasen travelled with their EDGE magazine to Cancun, Mexico. St. Scholastica Academy’s Dance Team members came away with awards at the Universal Dance Association competition. St. Tammany Parish Hospital cut the ribbon on the level two pediatric intensive care unit. Staffed by Ochsner Hospital for Children pediatric intensivists, the new PICU delivers a team with specialized training in caring for patients age 18 and under in need of higheracuity care. The inaugural Bluesberry Festival took place in the Bogue Falaya Park. Crowds enjoyed a wonderful day filled with music from local, regional and national acts, a food truck round-up, work from more than 35 visual artists, a kids’ area, a beer garden and an interactive arts experience where guests created their own artwork. Want to be featured in Around The Lake? Send your pictures to edgepublisher@yahoo.com


Pep Talks in the Shower STORY CHARLES DOWDY

Charles Dowdy is a broadcaster and writer living with his wife and four children on the Northshore. You can hear him each weekday morning from 6 to 10 on Lake 94.7.

I get up every morning at 4:21. I don’t mind it. I stagger around for a minute, start the coffee, then put together the day’s news and prep materials that I’ll talk about on the radio. We live in an awesome place, but the news stories mostly fall into one of three categories: someone shot someone, someone stole from someone or someone violated someone. A hot shower washes away the revelations of what people are willing to do to one another. My personal concerns even seem to make sense behind a plastic curtain and a wall of steam. Basically, every morning I have my own locker room pep talk in the shower. Some of it is out loud, some of it just in my head. Somehow in the warmth and steam I see solutions that did not exist the night before. By the time I cut off the water, I feel ready to face the day. I try to carry the pep talk to the bathroom mirror. But I don’t look too closely. I don’t like the circles near my eyes. There are missed workouts in my shoulders. A dubious family heart history lurks unseen in my chest. Almost weekly someone I know is dying. A lot of times it is from something weird. Is this my week? Is it wrong that I try to figure out if said dead person was healthy? Did they exercise? Eat right? Worry a lot? Floss? And don’t get me started about hair. It is like someone put Miracle Grow in my ear canal. It is the same thing for my nose hairs. They have become kudzu vines suddenly running for the light. The longer I linger in front of the mirror the more my “I am” becomes “I could.” I could have accomplished this. I could have accomplished that. My God! There are rabid caterpillars on my forehead. Oh, those are my eyebrows. EDGE August | September 2019

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Let’s face it. My wife is sleeping in a warm bed. There’s a dark world outside our steamed-up windows and there are things real and imagined wandering around out there that I don’t want to face. In college we held shower parties in our dorm’s bathroom. Think eight showerheads along four walls, prison shower décor, and towels stopping up the drains to produce a London type fog in ankle deep hot water. These were co-ed events. A crowd would form in the actual bathroom, looking in. The rest of us would stand around in the shower. If you think this was a good place to be single and mingle it wasn’t. If you think it was a perfect place for drinking lukewarm beer while wearing an impromptu bathing suit and getting a mysterious rash, it was. We usually held these parties in the winter. Even in a dorm bathroom petri dish there was something about warm water and steam that was good. My wife deals with the troubling noise the world makes by creating her own. She has a no earbud policy and a lot of times she’s got people from social media blaring on her phone. If the TV is not on, then why does it matter? Well, she is listening to poorly recorded audio of some woman explaining a new application process for nail polish. Then someone stage whispering gossip

Good Thing. Good thing you have a partner you can count on.

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about Gwyneth and something called Goop. Then some woman in her closet explaining a strategy for organizing shoes. (And then she’ll report from Facebook that someone we know just died from something random, something I did not know I had to be afraid of. Did he exercise, I’ll ask offhandedly.) I guess I should welcome this distraction like she does. But I don’t. Is it just me or does most of that stuff sound like conversations someone would have with themselves while dismembering their neighbor before burying them in the backyard? Oversharing on social media bugs me. I mean, you are looking right at the screen and telling people things. Some of it is even real. Most of it isn’t. (Obviously it is much better to hide behind the written word, or a radio mic.) Of course, my wife is tougher than I am. She always has been. It is still dark when I step through the door, enough energy left over from my shower pep talk to provide purpose to my step. Despite the mirror, I am ready to face whatever the day throws at me. Then I’m hit with a wave of humid heat. It is wet and warm, not unlike my shower. My glasses immediately fog. And between the house and the car my steps become unsteady and a little tentative.

At Keesler Federal Credit Union, if it’s important to you, it’s important to us. Here, you’re more than a customer, you’re a member. And we’re more than a financial services provider—we’re your financial partner, with a genuine interest in your life. So whether you want the best rate on a credit card for the things you love or a home loan for the people you love, or savings and checking that work as hard as you do, we’ve got you covered. And that’s a good thing! Stop by, get to know us... and discover what Keesler Federal can do for you.


a l a g THE

STEP INTO PARADISE

OCTOBER 3

SOUTHERN HOTEL THEGALANORTHSHORE.ORG

PRESENTED BY

BENEFITING THE PATIENTS & FAMILIES AT

EDGE August | September 2019

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LUXURY has Arrived on the Northshore.

“Proud to bring Mercedes-Benz to the Northshore.” – Operating Partner and General Manager Laurie McCants

8080 Westshore Drive Covington, LA 70433 | 985-900-1212

MBofCovington.com

Profile for EDGE of the Lake

Edge of the Lake Magazine August | September 2019  

EDGE of the Lake gives a fresh edgy look at the parishes north of the lake and the unique people that make up our community. Expect the unex...

Edge of the Lake Magazine August | September 2019  

EDGE of the Lake gives a fresh edgy look at the parishes north of the lake and the unique people that make up our community. Expect the unex...

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