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ALSO

Dangers of Electronic Cigarettes

JUNE–AUGUST 2018

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THE SECRET TO SUCCESSFUL KIDS » The 40 Developmental Assets: Positive Identity » No Means NO (and I Love You) » Looking Behind the Screen


JUNE–AUGUST 2018

FEATURES

6 The Secret to Successful Kids 40 Developmental Assets: 14 The Positive Identity 16 No Means NO (and I Love You) 20 Looking Behind the Screen 22 Fostering Resilience to Talk: Dangers of 23 Time Electronic Cigarettes IN EVERY ISSUE

2 From the Director 5 The Kitchen Table 10 Faces in the Crowd 11 40 Developmental Assets 12 Assets in Action 18 Q&A and By the Numbers PRINTED BY

PRODUCED IN CONJUNCTION WITH

TO ADVERTISE OR CONTRIBUTE Barb Swierzbin: (989) 496-1425 bswierzbin@tlc4cs.org

COVER PHOTO BY

Megan Lane Photography www.tlc4cs.org

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Director FROM THE

Our staff is all female, so the Habitat for Humanity Women Build is the perfect opportunity for our team to log some team building hours and give back to the community. Front row (left to right): Jennifer Heronema, Pam Singer, Kristi Kline, and Lorna Strautman. Second row (left to right): Michelle Beeck, Julie Leto, Barb Swierzbin, Dawn Sequin, Lynn Baker (volunteer tutor), Kelly Jensen. Back row: Kathryn Tate and Sheryl Brown.

ABOUT THE LEGACY CENTER The Legacy Center provides evidence-based learning and developmental strategies, in collaboration with other organizations, to help individuals reach their full potential. Below are The Legacy Center’s program areas: LITERACY SERVICES: At The Legacy Center, we believe everyone deserves the chance to learn how to read. For more than 30 years, we’ve been providing literacy programming to the greater Midland Community. Today, we offer one-on-one tutoring in Adult Basic Education, English as a Second Language and the Barton Reading & Spelling Program (for those with dyslexia). YOUTH SERVICES: We support initiatives and programs that ensure area youth excel and become productive members of society. The Center has adopted the concept of Developmental Assets, which immunizes youth against risk-taking behaviors. We also coordinate the activities of the Community Alliance 4 Youth Success, a group of local community leaders who are dedicated to preventing teen substance abuse. CONSULTING & EVALUATION SERVICES: Since its inception, the Center has helped local nonprofit organizations establish outcomes and evaluate their programs to determine whether and to what extent the program is effective in achieving its objectives. The results derived from these projects allow our partners to make program adjustments, retain or increase funding, assess community impact, engage collaborators, and gain favorable public recognition.

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fter what seemed to be an endless winter, summer is finally here! We know that summer is a great time to spend with family, enjoying all Michigan has to offer. We also know that it is a time of increased youth drinking and drug use. The magazine committee has assembled a series of articles that will help parents navigate the risky side of summer. There is so much JENNIFER HERONEMA research about what alcohol and drugs do to the developing brain that we need to be extra vigilant during this time. We hope everyone can take at least one nugget of knowledge to implement to help kids be safer and healthier. We are especially excited to involve some college students this round. What better way to find out what worked, what didn’t work, and what would have worked in our attempt to keep our kids drug/ alcohol free than by asking college students? They reflected on their high school years and shared some tidbits with us. We are thrilled to have a therapist share why it’s important to tell our kids NO. It can be so hard sometimes, but it really does benefit them in the end. In speaking with parents, it became apparent that not all of us have the same knowledge about social media, the internet, and gaming. We researched some terms that parents should know. We also got some first-hand information from a gamer to give us a glimpse into the life of a teenager and advise us about information we should know. Lastly, I wanted to give you a heads up that we’ll be surveying parents this summer to get feedback on the challenges you and your kids face. We will use the input to guide our parent outreach efforts throughout the 2018-19 school year. I encourage you to take some time off and spend it with your kids this summer. Before you know it they are grown up, enrolled in college, and making a life for themselves. Have an awesome summer!

Follow The Legacy Center w w w.tlc4cs.org w w w.facebook.com/tlc4cs Follow the Community Alliance 4 Youth Success w w w.drugfreemidland.org

THE LEGACY CENTER FOR COMMUNITY SUCCESS Jennifer Heronema, President/CEO (989) 496-1425 jheronema@tlc4cs.org 3200 James Savage Rd, Ste 5 Midland, MI 48642


Sunday, August 12, 2018 Northwood University, Midland MI 8:30 AM – Registration/check-in

The Walk for Hope… Depression and Suicide Awareness is an annual 5k walk/run event hosted by Barb Smith Suicide Resource & Response Network In the event of rain, the walk will take place on the indoor track at the Hach Center

Register at: give.classy.org/walkforhope18 to start raising awareness and join or start a team, or simply donate suicideresourceandresponse.net | 989.781.5260

AUGUST 3 & 4, 2018

Riverdays has joined forces with Midland Balloon Festival for one action-packed weekend. Don’t miss out!

presented by:

Schedule and more details @ riverdaysmidland.com www.tlc4cs.org

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REAL MPC

CREATE A RELATIONSHIP WITH JESUS CHRIST AT MPC is a church filled with

REAL people growing our faith through REAL ministries while making life-long REAL connections.

KEEPING IT

COME GET REAL WITH US MEMPRES.ORG • 989-835-6759

Helping Families Grow and Thrive Preschool for three- and four-year-olds at four locations Childcare for children ages 12 and under After-school and summer programs for youth and teens Summer food program from the USDA for youth ages 18 and under Dow College Opportunity Program to support and mentor high school students Parent education and social services Community computer lab with Internet access Call us for details at 989.832.3256, or visit WMFC.org Located at 4011 West Isabella Rd. (M-20) 14 miles west of Downtown Midland

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CONFESSIONS FROM THE KITCHEN TABLE eenagers face peer pressure to use drugs and alcohol all the time. On the flip side, parents often feel confused as to why their teens often partake in risky behaviors. We asked a group of Carroll College students for their opinions on what their parents shared with them a few short years ago that worked, what they said that didn’t work, and what they think would have worked in trying to educate teens on the dangers of drugs and alcohol.

that if they could go back and make different decisions they would because it had really put them at a disadvantage for many things.” Another stated, “As a teenager, my parents told me that drugs and alcohol were bad for the developing brain and could cause you to do stupid things that you normally would not think to do. I think simply telling a kid ‘no’ does not work because it doesn’t give reasoning behind why you shouldn’t...As a teenager you need more than just a ‘no.’ ”

WHAT WORKED Surprisingly, much of what the college students remembered actually had an impact. One student shared that her parents’ advice helped her to prioritize her values and goals: “Some words of advice my parents told me about avoiding drugs and alcohol is that if people have to have drugs and alcohol to have fun, then they probably aren’t the friends and people you need in your life to be the best you can be.” Giving teens the guidance to prioritize their values gives them a sense of control over their situation. Other students were grateful for their parents’ openness about the topic which made it easy to ask questions and understand the consequences of using drugs and alcohol. One student said, “My parents shared some of their usage of drugs and alcohol with me when I was a teenager. They talked about it with a lot of regret, and I think this had one of the biggest impacts on me. They told me

WHAT DIDN’T WORK For other students, using alcohol stemmed out of rebellion. One student felt that his parents’ strict rules and expectations made him want to drink even more. Another student knew that her parents would come get her if she found herself in a situation where drugs or alcohol were present. They promised that, should this happen, she would not face any consequences. While she appreciated this, she also said, “I believe that this helped me stay away from drugs and alcohol because it took away the urge to go against the rules. On the other hand, it also made it easier for me to convince myself that drinking was okay, since they wouldn’t punish me for my actions.” Another student felt that sheltering youth from the realities of drugs and alcohol has more harmful effects than it does positive. Clearly students felt that parents who are overprotective or sheltering can make teens even more curious about drugs and alcohol.

WHAT COULD HAVE WORKED Often teens feel that they are the only ones not using drugs or alcohol. “I think a lot of teenagers engage in drugs and alcohol because they are trying to fit in or find a commonality with a group of friends,” one student said. “I think it’s helpful to hear statistics that the majority of teenagers are not smoking or chewing or drinking, etc, and then to reflect if you’re a part of that majority.” Other students wished that their parents would have taught them more about the legal consequences of getting caught and felt that this would have instilled better knowledge and shown them the bigger picture. One stated, “I would recommend openness and honesty above anything else. Teenagers, though young, are not dense. We know when you are trying to shelter us from things, and often will try to rebel directly against what you are saying.” They would just remind parents to be open and honest with their teenagers and to take the time to explain the reasons why drugs and alcohol should be avoided. Set clear expectations, hold them accountable for their choices, celebrate success, but also allow for mistakes so they learn how to fail and become resilient. Don’t be afraid to push your teen to have difficult, yet mature and collected, conversations. After all, you want your advice to work so that milk at the kitchen table doesn’t turn to beer at the beer pong table. ■

YOU CAN SUBMIT YOUR STORY AT: jheronema@tlc4cs.org For many of us the kitchen table represents the typical family experience. We have laughed while having family game night. We have cried over our children’s choices. We have blown out the candles on many cakes. We have argued our way out of doing the dishes. We have struggled through those “three more bites.” We have learned hard lessons and celebrated many deserved successes. One thing is for sure though—if our kitchen tables could talk, there would be plenty of stories! So often it is in relating to others’ stories that we realize there isn’t always one answer, or even a right answer. Parenting is hard work! If you have a story of lessons learned, we invite you to share it with our readers. Sometimes, knowing we aren’t the only ones struggling to find the answer is all the help we need.

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the secret to SUCCESSF By COLEEN SMITH, Prevention Specialist

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FUL KIDS

What does success for our kids look like? Is it graduating from high school with honors – or is just graduating a huge accomplishment? Is it getting “good grades” or is improving throughout the year more important? Is it going on to college, trade school, or finding a job out of high school? Is it being the best player on the team or even getting to play? Or is it that our kids live a long, healthy, enriched life? uccess can mean different things to different people and can be very child-dependent. But there is one key to increased success whether it’s academics, sports, activities, health, life, relationships, career, etc. The key to helping them be better at any part of life is this: help keep them drug/alcohol free. Because average first use is around 11 years old, this needs to start in elementary school, but it is never too late. Why is abstinence from substances important for youth? WHY Academics: Research shows that adolescents who regularly smoke pot will permanently lose 8-15 IQ points. Marijuana also affects their creativity, knowledge, and communication skills. It lowers their attention, affects their processing of information, and their memory – all skills needed to learn. Teens who drink have lower grades than those who don’t. Alcohol has a negative impact on cognitive functions (concentration, memory, and attention) for 48 hours, so it affects studying. Sport/Activities: Alcohol use increases youth’s chances of getting injured in sport by 50%. Research shows that one night of partying will erase two weeks of training. Male regular and heavy drinkers have testosterone levels the same as females, which affects building muscle. Marijuana continued on page 9

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Change a Teen’s Life: Become a Midland Mentor!

Midland Soccer Club Youth Recreational & Travel Soccer TOPSoccer (special needs) Adult Leagues

 Recreational youth leagues Ages u4 – u18  Developmental curriculum Ages u3 – u18  Specialized goalkeeping training  Youth academies We are seeking volunteers for our Midland Mentors program at the Juvenile Care Center. As few as two hours a week can make a huge difference in a teen’s life. No experience necessary. Training provided.

For more information contact: Sue Landis, Program Director slandis@co.midland.mi.us (989) 837-6255

 College recruiting / coordinator  Host of two tournaments annually  Low club fees Registration for Fall 2018 season begins June 16.

www.midlandsoccerclub.org 989.832.0895

One Club. One Community. One Goal.

RECOVERING YOUTH FUTURES

YOUR

CHILD ON

IS COUNTING

YOU

Since you first held that tiny bundle in your arms, you’ve wanted to protect your child from harm. Why stop now? Misuse of alcohol and controlled substances could harm your child’s health, impair judgment and even lead to criminal charges. The time to intervene is

NOW.

Call today to schedule a free, one-on-one evaluation. 989∙832∙6855

A substance use evaluation & treatment program for Midland County youth

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continued from page 7

use slows reaction time and speed. Seeing that only 2% of high school athletes will compete collegiately, their high school career is their limited time to shine. Why reduce the chances of success by using? Health: Kids who start drinking before the age of 15 are four to five times more likely to have issues with alcohol as an adult. Drinking lowers the immune system, so they’re more likely to become sick. Marijuana increases depression and anxiety, and heavy use can cause psychosis. Research shows that marijuana users are 2.44 times more likely to become opioid misusers. Approximately 70% of heroin users started with opioids. Career: Substance use increases the chance of drop out and decreased academic achievement, which affects college performance and graduation. Employers report students are not ready to enter the workforce. Marijuana lowers initiative. Relationships: Drug and alcohol use increases risky behaviors to include increased chance of physical and sexual assault, teen pregnancy, and dating violence. Life: Drug and alcohol use affects brain development, which brains continue to develop until a person is in their mid-20s. This includes both brain structure and function. One in seven drivers ages 16–20 involved in fatal crashes in 2016 had alcohol in their systems. Approximately 17% of individuals who smoke pot before the age of 12 become addicted. Now we know why they need to be drug/ alcohol free, but HOW can we ensure that? HOW We always hear we need to talk to our kids, but what is the secret on how to do it? 1) Set expectations. 2) Explain the consequences. 3) Follow through. This can be used for any behavior that we want repeated – from toddler to teen. Research shows if we do these three things, we know there’s an 80% chance we’ll be effective in helping them be successful in a myriad of things. Ultimately it will make our lives as a parent easier too. Wouldn’t it be great to reduce the fights and power struggles, the second-guessing if we made the right choice or said the right thing, and even the guilt trips we as parents are so good at putting ourselves on for usually no good reason? The secret here is to be very clear and concise. Have the consequences fit the behavior. And the hard part… follow through!

SETTING THE EXPECTATION From early on, we need to set the expectations: “I expect you to not drink or do drugs,” “I expect that you will graduate from high school,” “I expect that if you are going to be late you will call and let me know where you are.” Whatever it is, the expectation needs to be very clear. Just like adults in the ‘real world,’ we need to know what our expectations are. At work we are expected to show up on time, complete tasks as required, and even clean up after ourselves in the kitchen. Kids are no different; they need and even WANT to know what is expected of them. Children thrive if parents set clear expectations for behavior and enforce them in a consistent manner. Even as an adult, how do any of us know how we are doing if we don’t have expectations in which to strive? None of us wants to get in trouble for something we did or didn’t do – especially if we didn’t know it was expected of us! One idea to keep this front and center is to put the expectations and consequences in writing and place them somewhere in the home where everyone can see them. Then there is no surprise what will happen if someone breaks the rules. As kids become tweens/teens, it can include a contract that the parents and child agree to and sign, especially outlining the expectations of no drug/alcohol use. By doing this, the expectations and consequences are clearly laid out so there are no grey areas. Many of us need to know why a rule is in place. The ‘why’ is seemingly important in the teen years. Educating our kids that we want them to get enough sleep because it affects their health and ability to concentrate in school goes a lot farther than just saying they need to go to bed early. The same goes for drugs and alcohol. Just telling them not to do it will not carry as much weight as explaining the detriments that substances do to their developing brains, like permanent IQ loss from regular pot smoking as an adolescent, losing two weeks of training after one night of partying, and reduced speed and reaction time in sport from using substances. EXPLAINING THE CONSEQUENCE Again, this step needs to be very clear and concise. Just saying they’ll be in big trouble does not explain what the consequence will be. The consequence also needs to fit the un-met expectation. Taking the car away for not making a bed doesn’t make much sense. However, getting caught drinking and losing the car privileges makes a lot of sense. Taking the phone away for forgetting to take the garbage out doesn’t connect with the expectation as much as taking the phone

away for the reason homework wasn’t done because the child spent the entire evening on social media or playing games. The consequence also needs to be substantial enough to deter future unwanted behaviors, but not so outlandish that it could never be applied. The threat of ‘never getting to leave the house again’ will be impossible to enforce and so the consequence is not seen as valid. But saying that there will be no activities with friends for two weeks is much more realistic, and a teen can actually conceptualize that consequence. FOLLOWING THROUGH This is the hard one. It’s hard enough to clearly explain the expectation, then find a relatable consequence, but following through is where we as parents often drop the ball. It’s especially hard when the consequence may inconvenience us. If we take the car away, that means we’re back to playing taxi service. Ugh. However, a week or two of being inconvenienced would certainly be worth instilling that unmet expectations do have consequences, and may even ensure the health and safety of our child if it were because of substance use. It is important to remember that we need to use a caring response when enforcing the consequence. While they might be in trouble for getting caught drinking or doing drugs, we ultimately want to teach them why we don’t want them to do that – their health and safety is our top priority. Our goal is to help them reach their full potential. OVERCOMING OUR EXCUSES We can’t let the fact that maybe we used substances when we were growing up as an excuse not to enforce an abstinence policy with our kids. There is so much more research on the effects of drugs and alcohol on the developing brain than when we were growing up, that we really have science on our side. The argument that, “I did it when I was younger and I turned out just fine” isn’t effective either because in the case of marijuana it is a VERY DIFFERENT drug now. If our kids try to say that the good athletes in school or professional sport use, the question is ‘how much better could they be if they didn’t’? And if we think they’re just going to do it anyway, we’d be wrong. Kids live up to (or down to) the expectations we set for them. Oftentimes they use substances because we’ve given them the message that it’s okay. Let’s make their health a priority and tell them it’s not. While this is a tough subject to broach with our kids, there are lots of resources that can help walk us through it. Ultimately our goal is the health, safety, and success of our kids. ■

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Check out who’s standing out in our community. IS THERE SOMEONE YOU’D LIKE TO NOMINATE? Please visit our website http://tlc4cs.org/faces-in-the-crowd/ and tell us why this individual has stood out in your crowd.

Sophie Wirtz

FACES IN THE CROWD

BULLOCK CREEK HIGH SCHOOL, 9TH GRADE

Sophie has quickly become a leader among her peers. As a member of the Dow College Opportunity Program at the West Midland Family Center (WMFC), she takes part in many enrichment activities. Many of those activities are volunteer opportunities around the community. While on outings, Sophie often helps keep everyone engaged and does her best to offer help to anyone in need. Outside of the program, she spends many hours volunteering at the WMFC helping in Childcare and Family Services programs. Sophie brings that same, incredible work ethic to her school’s theater program. As a student and a citizen, she definitely stands out in the crowd!

Lucas Merrington

HH DOW HIGH SCHOOL, 12th GRADE

Lucas is a well-rounded young man. Throughout middle and high school, he has actively participated in multiple activities in his school, church, and community. A percussionist since 2009, Lucas performs in the Dow Symphonic Band, Malletheads, Drumline, and Resonators. As a four-year member of his school’s robotics team, Lucas has served on the Mechanical and Scouting Teams and was a Pit Boss. He volunteers in the community with the robotics team and has volunteered at Grace A. Dow Memorial Library. He participates in Faith Formation/Youth Ministry at Blessed Sacrament, becoming a hospitality minister in 2009. His hard work and dedication has resulted in a top 10% rank in his class, with an International Baccalaureate Diploma.

Haleigh Stewart BULLOCK CREEK HIGH SCHOOL, 12TH GRADE

Haleigh is an extraordinary young woman with a huge, caring heart. Her honorable character provides a wonderful, positive role model for younger students. She is a very active member of Creekers for a Cause (C4AC), and she devotes many hours to ensure that children and families in the Bullock Creek community have their needs met. She volunteers her time preparing for C4AC projects, as well as at the events. Consistently stepping up for all projects is one of her many strengths. Following through to the end of all projects is another. In addition to her leadership in C4AC, Haleigh is also actively involved in National Honor Society and Varsity Soccer.

Tabitha Patty FAMILY PRACTICE NURSE

Tabitha is on a mission to educate as many students as she can about opioid addiction. She was driven to this cause after watching her son live through addiction and recovery. In October 2017, Tabitha joined The Legacy Center as a volunteer to help offer opioid education to students. She has shared her experience with a number of classes. Her story, which is one of hope, helps students understand that addiction affects everyone, but recovery is possible. This passion has driven her to volunteer as an angel for Hope Not Handcuffs, a program that enables law enforcement to connect people with treatment. Tabitha also educates patients about opioids and helps them identify alternative methods of pain management.

Little Forks Conservancy

ORGANIZATION

In November 2017, Little Forks Conservancy launched the Nature/Nurture program in an effort to narrow the gap between teens and nature. The program, which was created by Andrea Foster, community programs manager, uses environmental education and conservation principles to teach youth in alternative high schools the benefits of nature. The program uses nature to create avenues for solace, problem solving, and relief. Nature is something the students may not have connected to during their lives. By giving them the chance to learn about the environment and the non-profit world, and to connect with their community through service, they are learning life skills, job skills, and coping mechanisms to help them make better choices. Learn more at www.littleforks.org.

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June 11–August 11 Pick up a log, READ, earn coupons and a book. Enter to win a gift card.

SAT Practice Test Grades 10–12 Wednesday, June 20, 1:00pm–4:30 pm Start your preparation for the SAT at the Library. Registration Required.

Grace A. Dow Memorial Library Youth Services: 837-3466 www.cityofmidlandmi.gov/library

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC PRESENTS

RARELY SEEN:

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE EXTRAORDINARY

JUN 23 – SEP 30 / 2018

40 DEVELOPMENTAL ASSETS

“Libraries ROCK” Summer Reading Program

40 Developmental Assets are essential qualities of life that help young people thrive, do well in school, and avoid risky behavior. Youth Connections utilizes the 40 Developmental Assets Framework to guide the work we do in promoting positive youth development. The 40 Assets model was developed by the Minneapolis-based Search Institute based on extensive research. Just as we are coached to diversify our financial assets so that all our eggs are not in one basket, the strength that the 40 Assets model can build in our youth comes through diversity. In a nutshell, the more of the 40 Assets youth possess, the more likely they are to exhibit positive behaviors and attitudes (such as good health and school success) and the less likely they are to exhibit risky behaviors (such as drug use and promiscuity). It’s that simple: if we want to empower and protect our children, building the 40 Assets in our youth is a great way to start. Look over the list of Assets on the following page and think about what Assets may be lacking in our community and what Assets you can help build in our young people. Do what you can do with the knowledge that even through helping build one asset in one child, you are increasing the chances that child will grow up safe and successful. Through our combined efforts, we will continue to be a place where Great Kids Make Great Communities.

Turn the page to learn more!

Some of the world’s finest photographers reveal a world very few of us have the chance to see in this new exhibit.

midlandcenter.org

The 40 Developmental Assets® may be reproduced for educational, noncommercial uses only. Copyright © 1997 Search Institute®, 615 First Avenue NE, Suite 125, Minneapolis, MN 55413; 800-888-7828; www.search-institute.org. All rights reserved.

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assets in action

40 DEVELOPMENTAL ASSETS

9 SUPPORT

1. Family support: Family life provides high levels of love and support. 2. Positive family communication: Young person and her or his parent(s) communicate positively, and young person is willing to seek advice and counsel from parent(s). 3. Other adult relationships: Young person receives support from three or more nonparent adults. 4. Caring neighborhood: Young person experiences caring neighbors. 5. Caring school climate: School provides a caring, encouraging environment. 6. Parent involvement in school: Parent(s) are actively involved in helping young person succeed in school.

ROCK students volunteer during Good Deeds Day

EMPOWERMENT

7. Community values youth: Young person perceives that adults in the community value youth. 8. Youth as resources: Young people are given useful roles in the community. 9. Service to others: Young person serves in the community one hour or more per week. 10. Safety: Young person feels safe at home, at school, and in the neighborhood.

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BOUNDARIES & EXPECTATIONS Northeast robotics team wins qualifing round

A mom gives positive praise to her daughter

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11. Family boundaries: Family has clear rules and consequences and monitors the young person’s whereabouts. 12. School boundaries: School provides clear rules and consequences. 13. Neighborhood boundaries: Neighbors take responsibility for monitoring young people’s behavior. 14. Adult role models: Parent(s) and other adults model positive, responsible behavior. 15. Positive peer influence: Young person’s best friends model responsible behavior. 16. High expectations: Both parent(s) and teachers encourage the young person to do well.

CONSTRUCTIVE USE OF TIME

Students celebrate seniors in Midland High Symphonic Band

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17. Creative activities: Young person spends three or more hours per week in lessons or practice in music, theater, or other arts. 18. Youth programs: Young person spends three or more hours per week in sports, clubs, or organizations at school and/or in the community. 19. Religious community: Young person spends one or more hours per week in activities in a religious institution. 20. Time at home: Young person is out with friends “with nothing special to do” two or fewer nights per week.


If you or your child would like to submit a picture that represents one of the 40 Developmental Assets, please submit the information through http://tlc4cs.org/assets-in-action/ with a picture and the number of the asset the picture represents.

Not all pictures are guaranteed publication.

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Meridian student recognized as Rising Star

COMMITMENT TO LEARNING

21. Achievement motivation: Young person is motivated to do well in school. 22. School engagement: Young person is actively engaged in learning. 23. Homework: Young person reports doing at least one hour of homework every school day. 24. Bonding to school: Young person cares about her or his school. 25. Reading for pleasure: Young person reads for pleasure three or more hours per week.

POSITIVE VALUES

26. Caring: Young person places high value on helping other people. 27. Equality and social justice: Young person places high value on promoting equality and reducing hunger and poverty. 28. Integrity: Young person acts on convictions and stands up for her or his beliefs. 29. Honesty: Young person “tells the truth even when it is not easy.” 30. Responsibility: Young person accepts and takes personal responsibility. 31. Restraint: Young person believes it is important not to be sexually active or to use alcohol or other drugs.

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Camp Timbers allows kids to control their destiny

SOCIAL COMPETENCIES

32. Planning and decision making: Young person knows how to plan ahead and make choices. 33. Interpersonal competence: Young person has empathy, sensitivity, and friendship skills. 34. Cultural competence: Young person has knowledge of and comfort with people of different cultural/racial/ethnic backgrounds. 35. Resistance skills: Young person can resist negative peer pressure and dangerous situations. 36. Peaceful conflict resolution: Young person seeks to resolve conflict nonviolently.

Bullock Creek students volunteer at Messiah Lutheran Church

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POSITIVE IDENTITY

37. Personal power: Young person feels he or she has control over “things that happen to me.” 38. Self-esteem: Young person reports having a high self-esteem. 39. Sense of purpose: Young person reports that “my life has a purpose.” 40. Positive view of personal future: Young person is optimistic about her or his personal future.

Dow High students learn about making good driving choices

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positive IDENTITY By KELLY ACKERMAN, Parent Educator

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YC Magazine highlights 40 Developmental Assets in each issue. These assets are evidence-based to positively contribute to the development of children across their lifespan.

esearch clearly shows that the more assets a young person has, the less likely they are to participate in risk-taking behaviors during adolescence including drug and alcohol use, violence, illicit drug use, and sexual activity. Sadly, the average young person has less than half of these assets according to Search Institute. This article is one in a series to highlight the eight categories of assets in order to more fully engage families, schools, agencies, businesses, and community members in ensuring our children experience as many assets as possible.

consequences. So if they feel that their increased effort in school results in better grades, they have control over the outcomes. If they feel that achievement is because of luck or chance, they will feel they have no control over the situation. Studies have shown that having a feeling of control protects youth from social and emotional risk. One idea to help kids realize what strengths they have to cope with adversity is have them write down answers to these three questions:

POSITIVE IDENTITY This Asset encompasses the following aspects:

2) What protects you, or what has protected you?

1. PERSONAL POWER

3) What inner resources or strengths do you have?

2. SELF-ESTEEM 3. SENSE OF PURPOSE 4. POSITIVE VIEW OF PERSONAL FUTURE Identity development is one of the central tasks of the adolescent period. It focuses on how youth view themselves – their sense of purpose, worth, and promise. Without a positive sense of who they are, they may feel powerless, without a sense of direction or initiative. These assets represent how comfortable a youth is in being him/herself and whether they feel they have control over, and reasons for engaging in all aspects of life. It also signifies whether they are optimistic about the future. Personal Power This is defined as the adolescent feeling like he/she has some measure of control over things that happen. It also includes youth understanding that their choices have certain

1) Who protects you, or who has protected you?

It helps to show them how to choose their own attitude about themselves, and to focus on the positive rather than the negative. Self-Esteem Self-esteem pertains to the way an individual views his/herself and is thought to be an important aspect of overall well-being. Low self-esteem was a significant predictor of loneliness for males, but not for females. It could be because males’ friendships are more group oriented and center around activities, and female friendships are centered around friendship and intimacy. However, physical appearance is an important predictor of overall self-worth for females. They tend to be more dissatisfied with their appearance than males, which takes a toll on their selfesteem. A benefit of self-esteem is that it can reduce a young person’s susceptibility to peer pressure, so it’s important to nurture it. Ideas to help build self-esteem are public recognition for a job well-done. It could be in front of the class, at the dinner table, or in front of a small group at church or extra-

curricular activity. Notes in a child’s lunch bag, school bag, or notebook go a long way in building self-esteem. Sense of Purpose Youth report that their lives have a purpose. We all want to feel like we’re here for a reason, but kids especially. It’s associated with psychological well-being. Research shows that youth who have a sense of purpose have increased self-esteem and decreased emotional or behavioral problems such as depression and sexual risk taking. One community set up a “Vocations On-site.” They had youth who were taking vocational classes serve senior citizens at a nearby care facility by using skills they had learned. Residents were given manicures, culinary students prepared lunch, and students in public services made presentations on fraud and safety tips. What a great experience for both the youth and the senior citizens, and how valued they both must have felt. Positive View of Personal Future Researchers found that emotional distress and suicide were associated with a youth’s lack of a positive view of personal future. Kids who feel they do not have a future may be at risk for a number of different behavioral and emotional problems. It’s important for youth to look at the positive aspects of their future. This can be done by helping them identify what things they want to accomplish and the steps to reach those. Studies have shown that school-based efforts may nurture feelings of selfworth in both children and adolescents. It’s important that parent, teacher, and community be involved in fostering selfesteem among youth. We can all play a part in increasing our youth’s positive identity which can help them be optimistic about their personal future. ■

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No Means NO (and I Love You) By STEFFANI TURNER, LCSW

Well, it happened again last night . . . and we both went to bed feeling terrible. I said NO! Again. For the umpteenth time. It seems like I say NO every day, all the time, in fact. One little, teeny word is so powerful.

aying NO feels like it creates a rift in the relationship between you and your child, a rift that sometimes becomes an insurmountable mountain that you precariously traverse with a rock pick in hand. Along the way, you get harsh words, yelling, tantrum, pouting, “I hate you,” and all the other heart-puncturing weapons thrown at you to dissuade. It almost makes you want to quit, back down, take another path, an easier one, one where your child is smiling and hugging you! Why is that little word so important to all human wellbeing? Well, for a moment, let’s imagine a world where we were never told NO. Those stop signs around town? They would be meaningless – just suggestions, really. Being told NO, gently, by our parents and teachers taught us to wait our turn. Think of all the ways adults tolerate NO on a daily basis: Doing a project for your boss when you don’t agree with the premise. Fixing the lawnmower for your spouse when you would rather go fishing. Stopping after only one cookie when your inner child is telling you to have another. As parents, I think we struggle with NO for a lot of reasons. We are tired. It’s a crazy-busy world. You may be exhausted, insecure in your parenting role, or afraid of how your child will react, especially in a public place. (I swear Walmart is the best place to throw a tantrum.) We are afraid of

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how our children will feel about us, if they will be mad at us. We are afraid that it will stifle their creativity – they won’t be such free thinkers. The reality is, learning NO is all a part of the human condition. It is a part of learning boundaries and limits, how far to go, and how much to have. We are survivalists by biology. It is how we were engineered (or we would probably have died out long ago). We take what we can get when we can get it. But we also learn societal rules, because you don’t want to be left out of the clan when the saber-tooth tigers are out hunting. We learned that by being together, we can do more, but we have to have rules or we don’t accomplish anything. Weirdly, NO is good. NO makes us feel safe. NO makes our children feel like we love them and care about their wellbeing. NO is extremely important. I had to say NO to my son again today, but I did it with a kind word and an understanding that he will be upset because he doesn’t like my NO. NO, a well-balanced NO, is not a punishment. It is meant to teach a child frustration tolerance, disappointment, self-regulation. As adults, not only do we get told NO in some way a 100 times a day, we also have to tell ourselves NO. If not, we would spend all our money, not pay bills, eat to excess, and make terrible decisions with our relationships. But mostly we have learned to self-regulate, which is the outcome of being told NO as a child. A good NO must be couched with a firmness (so the kid knows you won’t give in) and a kindness (so they know you are

not just punishing them because you want to be mean). This helps them focus on what is important – what lesson we want them to learn with this NO. One of my favorite examples of a good well-balanced NO is from a few years ago when my child was four. He went through a phase where, every day, about 15 minutes before dinner, he would ask for a cookie. I took it to heart and tried really hard not to do what I had experienced (a lot of yelling and screaming on my mom’s part to get out of the kitchen). It was hard! But I was able to use kindness, saying “I’m sorry, honey. You cannot have a cookie. We are going to eat soon,” while still using firmness and standing by my NO. I worked hard not to waver, as he cried and pled, even threw a tantrum a time or two. But eventually, he no longer asked for a cookie and, if he needed a snack, he had a carrot stick instead. In this one instance, I could really connect to why my son was hating NO so much – who doesn’t want a cookie pretty much anytime? All of this aside, what I want most for my children is that they will grow up kind and caring people. This is real success. Hearing NO is just one step in that direction. Look for opportunities to tell your children NO in a safe and caring manner, where the price tag is low and where you are there to help them learn frustration tolerance and self-regulation. Be ok that they get upset at the NO, and help them with that feeling. Practice having kindness and firmness – it’s not an easy combination! It’s hard for us all. Go out there and love your kids with a big well-intentioned NO! ■


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NUMBERS PLEASE HELP! My parents keep embarrassing me at my games because they are always yelling at me and the coach. What should I do? Dear Mom and Dad, Please read this quote from John W. Gardiner: “The toughest thing kids have to face is the unfulfilled lives of their parents.” You have the most important role of being the parent so let the coaches coach, let the officials officiate and let the kids play. In this way everyone is doing their specialty. – Jim: activities administrator Dear Athlete, Find a time to talk to your parents about how you are feeling. What you could say to them: I am extremely proud that you support me in my athletics; however, you need to release me to the game that I love and allow me and my teammates to play the game without added pressure and criticism. Please don’t allow your pride for me and our team get in the way of you enjoying me playing the sports that we love.

18.3

The cost to make Darth Vader’s suit in real life, in millions.

3

The number of species on earth capable of laughter – humans, chimpanzees, and rats.

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– Justin: athlete, coach, and parent of athletes Dear Athlete, I would suggest sitting down and talking to your parents about the yelling. Let them know that this embarrasses you. Maybe suggest that no doubt they will get caught up in the game, etc. but that the yelling is not going to accomplish anything. If they do need to tell you something, ask them to wait until after the game when you are home or at least in private and done constructively. If they cannot control their emotions, you could ask your parent to sit farther away. – Donna and Jay: parents of student athletes

The number of years an ant can live.

2016

The weight in pounds of the largest turtle ever recorded.

A recent study stated that the number one reason a child quits a sport is the ride home. We as parents need to make sure we’re supportive, but not overbearing, and most of all don’t undermine the coach. Granted, there are some times it is justified, but that’s more the exception than the norm. Sport is supposed to be fun. It’s a great way to meet new friends, get exercise, learn a new skill, and relieve stress. Let’s make sure we make it a positive experience for our kids.

189

The number of people named Lol in the U.S.

– The Editor

HAVE A QUESTION?

email: jheronema@tlc4cs.org We cannot guarantee all questions will be published; however, we will do our best to respond to all questions submitted.

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The most children born to one woman.


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STAY WITH THAT PERSON LISTEN, REALLY LISTEN GET THEM TO HELP OR CALL SOMEONE WHO CAN HELP NEVER KEEP A SECRET ABOUT SUICIDE. IT IS BETTER TO LOSE A FRIEND THAN FOR A FRIEND TO LOSE THEIR LIFE.

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BEHIND THE SCREEN By TINA EBLEN

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In today’s world, we have to do more as parents than just worry about our children playing outside and getting hurt. We now have to worry about the real issues that come with modern technology. How much do we need to know about social media? What can we do about exposing our children to social media yet keep them safe from the danger lurking behind the screen?

f you can, prior to getting your child a smart phone or allowing them on a device, have a discussion about social media apps and the internet. It is never too late to start talking to your child about technology and the dangers lurking behind the screen. Regular conversations with your children can help your child feel comfortable coming to you when things get difficult. Having conversations in the car is a great way to open door to a real discussion about technology. IMPORTANT INFORMATION Here are a couple vital things that are important to the safety of your child: Location sharing: Explain to your children the importance of not tagging their location on their pictures and not turning on their location finder on Snapchat. Friending strangers: It is important to have conversations about who to accept as a friend, especially on social media sites like Snapchat, Kik, or Instagram. There are online predators who try to connect with unsuspecting teens to exploit or even gain confidential information that can be used to extort teens. Children should be told to never connect to anyone who they physically don’t know as a friend. It doesn’t disappear: Children need to know that anything posted on the internet is permanent. Even though Snapchat photos seem to disappear after a short timeframe, they never really disappear. Teaching our children how to use technology is very important. Most of us were not raised with the presence of the internet or smartphones, so we have nothing to compare this new social norm with; however, we can start by talking with our children. The more we have conversations with our children about the positives and negatives of social media, the more likely our children will ask questions or talk about the issues they are dealing with online. IMPORTANT TERMS Here are some important terms parents should know: Catfishing: A person who sets up a false personal profile on a social networking site for fraudulent or deceptive purposes. Clickbait: Clickbait is a term to describe marketing or advertising material that employs a sensationalized headline to attract clicks. They rely heavily on the ‘curiosity gap’ by creating just enough interest to provoke engagement.

DMs: Direct messages – also referred to as “DMs” – (can be a noun or a verb) are private conversations that occur on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook. Both parties must be following one another to send a message. ebook: An ebook is an electronic version of a book. However, most ebooks are not actually available in print (unless you print them). These are typically published in PDF form. For marketers, ebooks commonly serve as lead generating content – people must fill out a form to receive their ebook copy. Ghosting: The practice of ending a personal relationship with someone by suddenly and without explanation withdrawing from all communication. Lurker: A lurker online is a person who reads discussions on a message board, newsgroup, social network, or other interactive system, but rarely or never participates in the discussion. Snapchat Streak: This means a person and your Snapchat friend have Snapped each other every day for more than three consecutive days. Troll: (Can be a noun or a verb.) A troll or internet troll refers to a person who is known for creating controversy in an online setting. They typically hang out in forums, comment sections, and chat rooms with the intent of disrupting the conversation and adding nothing of value. They are often rude and make fun of other people. GAMER ADVICE (FROM A GAMER) Generally, if a gamer is using lingo, it’s in reference to the goals of the game. The real worry should be words people know of already. A lot of gamers use derogatory terms (racial, gender, sexual preference, mental capacity) and curse words like they’re nothing and mostly for trash talking. If not monitored, it ends up becoming part of everyday talk and the teens don’t recognize the effect these words can have on people of different communities. Micromanaging or controlling might only make youth more sneaky about what they’re doing. If you hear a teen using these words, remind them how using them or certain words in negative ways can impact certain people or communities in major ways and that they were made to make people feel less than human. And though it may be a bit grim, for some students regular use of these words are sometimes the tipping point for suicide. ■

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FOSTERING RESILIENCE By KENNETH GINSBURG, M.D., M.S. Ed, Reprinted with permission

Children will be strong when the important adults in their lives believe in them unconditionally and hold them to high expectations. This means all of us, not just parents, but coaches, teachers, neighbors, and other family members. igh expectations’ does not refer to demanding high grades or athletic excellence, although it is reasonable to expect a good effort. Rather, it is about always expecting them to live up to the core values and essential goodness that is known to lie within them. Families, schools and communities can prepare children and teens to thrive through both good and challenging times. Children and teens who have the seven crucial “Cs” – competence, confidence, connection, character, contribution, coping and control – will be prepared to bounce back from challenges and excel in life. What are those 7Cs and how do we know if we are planting them in our children? COMPETENCE is the ability or know-how to handle situations effectively and is learned through actual experience. Children can’t become competent without first developing a set of skills that allows them to trust their judgments, make responsible choices, and face difficult situations. When we notice what young people are doing right and give them opportunities to develop important skills, they feel competent. We undermine competence when we don’t allow them to recover by themselves after a fall. Questions we can ask ourselves: » Do I help my child focus on his strengths and build on them? » Do I notice what she does well, or do I focus on her mistakes? » As I try to protect him, do I mistakenly send the message, “I don’t think you can handle this”? CONFIDENCE is the solid belief in one’s own abilities. Children gain this by demonstrating their competence in real situations. Confidence is not warm-and-fuzzy self-esteem that supposedly results from telling kids they’re special. Children who experience their own competence and know they are safe and protected develop a deep-seated security that promotes the confidence to face and cope with challenges. When we as parents support children in finding their own islands of competence and building on them, we help kids to gain enough confidence to try new ventures and trust their abilities to make sound choices. Children need this to be able to navigate the world, think outside the box, and recover from challenges. Are we helping our kids be confident?

CHARACTER is the fundamental sense of right and wrong to ensure children are prepared to make smart choices, contribute to the world, and become stable adults. Children with character enjoy a strong sense of self-worth and confidence. They are more comfortable sticking to their own values and demonstrating a caring attitude towards others. Am I instilling character in my child? » Do I help my child understand how his behaviors affect other people in good and bad ways? » Do I allow her to consider right versus wrong and look beyond immediate satisfaction or selfish needs? » Do I express how I think of others’ needs when I make decisions or take actions? CONTRIBUTION by children gives them a sense of purpose, which in turn can motivate them. It is a powerful lesson when children realize that the world is a better place because they are in it. Teens who contribute to their communities will be surrounded by reinforcing thank yous instead of the low expectations and condemnation so many teens endure. » Do I teach the important value of serving others? Do I model generosity with my time and money? » Do I create opportunities for each child to contribute in some specific way? » Do I make it clear to my child that I believe he can improve the world? COPING skills may protect children from unsafe and worrisome behavior. Those who learn to cope well with stress are better prepared to overcome life’s challenges. Questions to ask ourselves: » Do I help her understand the difference between a real crisis and something that just feels like an emergency? » Do I allow him enough time for imaginative play? Do I recognize that fantasy and play are childhood’s tools to solve problems? » Do I recognize that for many young people, risk behaviors are attempts to relieve stress and pain?

» Do I help her recognize what she has done right or well? » Do I praise him enough? Do I praise him honestly and about specific achievements, or do I give such watered down praise that it doesn’t seem true? » When I need to correct her do I focus only on what she’s doing wrong, or do I remind her that she is capable of doing well?

CONTROL allows children to realize they have the ability to do what it takes to bounce back. If parents make all the decisions, children are denied opportunities to learn control. A resilient child knows that he has internal control. By his choices and actions, he determines the results. He knows he can make a difference, which further promotes his competence and confidence.

CONNECTIONS with other people, schools and communities offer children the security that allows them to stand on their own and develop creative solutions. It develops strong values and prevents them from seeking destructive options. Family is the central force in any child’s life, but connections to civic, educational, religious, and athletic groups can also increase a young person’s sense of belonging to a wider world and being safe within it. How connected is my child to the broader world?

» Do I help my child understand that life’s events are not purely random and most things happen as a direct result of someone’s actions and choices? » Do I help my child understand that she is not responsible for many of the bad circumstances in her life (such as parents’ separation or divorce)? » Do I reward demonstrated responsibility with increased privileges?

» Do we build a sense of physical safety and emotional security within our home? » Do I allow my child to have and express all types of emotions, or do I suppress unpleasant feelings? » Do we address conflict within our family and work to resolve problems rather than let them fester?

What we do to model healthy resilience strategies for our children is more important than anything we say about them. Our goal as parents needs to be preparing children to be happy, healthy adults. Giving them tools to handle stress may make them less likely to turn to dangerous fixes to relieve that stress. Resilience may be the greatest gift we could foster in our child. ■

Additional information on the 7Cs can be found in Dr. Ginsburg’s book Building Resilience in Children and Teens.

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TIME TO TALK:

Dangers of Electronic Cigarettes By SARAH SHAPIRO, Tobacco Use Prevention Health Educator

ttention parents! Corporate Tobacco once tried to convince us that cigarettes were ‘safe.’ Now, it’s using some of the same tactics to try and trick your kids into believing that electronic cigarettes are safe. Electronic cigarettes – also known as vapes, e-cigarettes, or hookahs – are devices used to inhale nicotine, flavor, and other chemicals into the lungs. They come in different sizes and colors and often don’t look like typical tobacco products. They also may contain other drugs, like marijuana. Electronic cigarettes come in a variety of candy flavors that attract youth. According to the 2016 National Youth Tobacco Survey, 31 percent of students who use electronic cigarettes say they do so because of the flavors. One popular new electronic device for teens is called JUUL. It’s a cartridge that’s heated to create an aerosol, or mist. JUUL looks like a flash drive, which makes it easy to hide and carry. JUUL and other electronic cigarettes don’t produce harmless water vapor. The liquid, usually propylene glycol or glycerin, contains

nicotine, as well as various kinds of flavoring and other chemicals. Most electronic cigarettes contain nicotine. According to the Truth Initiative, a nonprofit public health organization dedicated to ending tobacco use, a single JUUL cartridge is roughly equal to a pack of cigarettes, or 200 cigarette puffs. Research shows that nicotine harms the developing brain, which isn’t completely developed until about age 25. The number of students who use electronic cigarettes and JUULs is alarming. New research shows that using these devices can lead to using conventional cigarettes. A 2017 research study that looked at tobacco use among 12th graders found that “non-smoking youth who use e-cigarettes are 4 times more likely to try conventional cigarettes than the non-smoking youth who do not use e-cigarettes.” Don’t fall for Corporate Tobacco’s tricks! These new electronic devices may look different than cigarettes, but let’s not be fooled. The variety of flavors, brightly colored packaging, and inconspicuous styling are all marketing tactics to hook our youth. Let’s start the conversation and educate our community to make healthy decisions. ■

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MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE BEING A MENTOR CHANGES LIVES AND IT’S EASIER THAN YOU THINK! If you can give just 2-3 times a month, you can make a BIG difference in the life of a child!

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We believe that everyone deserves the chance to learn how to read.

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Sept. 18, 20, 25 & 27 6 p.m.-9:00 p.m. ABE, Barton, ESL

* Adult Basic Education (ABE) * Barton Reading & Spelling (Barton) * English as a Second Language (ESL)

The Legacy Center 3200 James Savage Rd Midland MI 48642 989∙496∙1425 tlc4cs.org facebook.com/tlc4cs

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Never SHARE Never Never SHARE SHARE

Take SPARINGLY Take Take SPARINGLY SPARINGLY

Never SHARE

Store SECURELY Store Store SECURELY SECURELY

Take SPARINGLY

Dispose PROPERLY Dispose Dispose PROPERLY PROPERLY

Store SECURELY

YOUR UNUSED MEDICATION YOUR YOUR UNUSED UNUSED MEDICATION MEDICATION

Dispose PROPERLY

YOUR UNUSED MEDICATION

DOESN’T ALWAYS GO UNUSED DOESN’T DOESN’T ALWAYS ALWAYS GO GO UNUSED UNUSED DOESN’T ALWAYS GO UNUSED

Keep Safe! Keep Our Our Community Community Safe! Keep Our Community Safe!

Take of the thefollowing followinglocations: locations: Take your unused medication Takeyour yourunused unusedmedication medication to to one one of of the following locations:

Midland Law Enforcement Center Coleman Pharmacy Midland Law Center Coleman Pharmacy Take your unused medication to one of the Midland LawEnforcement Enforcement Center Coleman Family Family Pharmacy 2727 Rodd Street, Midland 211 Coleman 2727 Rodd Street, Midland 211 Coleman 2727 Rodd Street, Midland 211 EE Railway, Railway, Coleman Midland Law Enforcement Center Coleman Family Pharmacy hours day/7 days aaweek week 9-6 2424 hours a aaday/7 days 9-6 2727 Rodd Street, 211 EMon-Fri Railway, Coleman 24 hours day/7 daysaMidland week Mon-Fri 9-6 Sat Sat 9-1 24 hours a day/7 days a week Mon-Fri 9-6 Sat 9-1 9-1

Michigan State Michigan StatePolice Police following locations: Michigan State Police

2402 Rd, 2402Salzburg Salzburg Rd,Freeland Freeland 2402 Salzburg Freeland Michigan StateRd, Police Mon-Fri 8-4 Mon-Fri 8-4 2402 Salzburg Rd, Freeland Mon-Fri 8-4 Mon-Fri 8-4

Dump Your Drugs! Dump Drugs! Dump Your Drugs! Sat 9-1

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An affiliate of An affiliate An affiliate An affiliate ofof of The Legacy Center The Legacy Center The Legacy The Legacy CenterCenter

Mobile Dump Your Drugs the year. Mobile Dump Your DrugsEvents Eventsare arehosted hosted throughout throughout the year. Mobile Dump Your Drugs Events are hosted throughout the year. Mobile Dump Your Drugs Events are hosted throughout the year. For more information about these events, visit For more informationabout aboutthese these events, events, visit Formore more information For information about these events, visit visit

www.drugfreemidland.org/events. www.drugfreemidland.org/events. www.drugfreemidland.org/events. www.drugfreemidland.org/events. Funding for this program is providedby byfederal, federal,state state and and local Funding for this program is provided localsources. sources.

Funding for this program is provided by federal, state and local sources. Funding for this program is provided by federal, state and local sources.


The Legacy Center for Community Success 3200 James Savage Road, Suite 5 Midland, MI 48642

SUPPORT FOR

LOCAL ATHLETES

PLAY TIME WITH DAD In addition to injury prevention, MidMichigan Health’s WellSport program is designed to help expedite the assessment, referral and treatment of athletes of all ages suffering from strains, sprains, contusions, fractures, joint injuries and concussions. The program focuses on injury prevention through education and training, helping injured athletes return to play as safely and quickly as possible, and managing medical conditions that can affect performance.

For more information, visit midmichigan.org/wellsport or call (989) 837-9350.

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YC Mag, Legacy - June to August 2018  
YC Mag, Legacy - June to August 2018