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ALSO

Opioids and Your Family

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A PARENT’S GREATEST GIFT: SELF MANAGEMENT » Is it Stress? Insights From Your Child’s Behavior and Emotions » Calming the Perfect Storm » Navigating Self Time and Family Time BROUGHT TO YOU BY


What will

YOUR STORY BE?

PR

O

O

Mark Tom takes a holistic approach to medicine—and life. He credits COD for helping him achieve his goals. Not only does this doctor want to help patients, but also his community and humanity. That mission has taken Tom to places like Honduras and the San Juan Islands, where his impact went beyond medical work. He also ran a children’s soccer camp and developed a volunteer training program to promote senior health. While completing his residency, Tom is researching ways to improve outcomes for hospitalized patients through nutrition, exercise and probiotics.

F

From COD to MD

“I still remember my early college days at COD and how it really laid a strong foundation for the work I do today.” —Mark Tom, COD alumnus

Start your story now. Apply at cod.edu.

For ADA accommodations, call (630) 942-2141 (voice) or (630) 858-9692 (TDD). Please call two weeks in advance. ©2019 College of DuPage. All rights reserved. MCS-19-79350(9/19)

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NOVEMBER 2019

FEATURES

6

A Parent’s Greatest Gift: Self Management

14

Is it Stress? Insights From Your Child’s Behavior and Emotions

16 20

Calming the Perfect Storm

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Opioids and Your Family

Navigating Self Time and Family Time

IN EVERY ISSUE

2 From the Director 5 The Kitchen Table 10 Faces in the Crowd 11 40 Developmental Assets 12 Assets in Action 18 Q&A / By the Numbers BROUGHT TO YOU BY

PRODUCED IN CONJUNCTION WITH

TO ADVERTISE OR CONTRIBUTE

ycdupage@gmail.com

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Director FROM THE

ABOUT THE DUPAGE COUNTY PREVENTION LEADERSHIP TEAM The DuPage County Prevention Leadership Team (PLT) is a county-wide community coalition working together to prevent substance use and increase mental health among DuPage County youth, 18 years and younger. Our mission is to bring together a collaboration of leaders that assess and advocate for the use of best practices to reduce risk behaviors of youth leading to substance use, abuse and addiction to ultimately lead to our vision that DuPage County is a mentally and physically healthy, drug-free community. The PLT came together in 2011 following a county-wide health assessment, which identified substance abuse and mental health as two of the top five health priorities facing DuPage County. This information led to a call to action among community leaders and the PLT was formed. In 2014, the PLT was awarded the Drug Free Communities grant and currently has over fifty active coalition members representing more than twenty organizations throughout the county, and continues to grow in capacity. The PLT is comprised of community leaders and key players in DuPage County who represent one of twelve community sectors; schools, law enforcement, businesses, parents, youth, youth-serving organizations, substance abuse organizations, religious/fraternal organizations, media, civic/volunteer groups, healthcare professionals and state and local government agencies. The coalition utilizes data gathered from the Illinois Youth Survey, an anonymous, self-reported survey given to middle and high school students. This data source assists the PLT in strategic planning and helps the coalition identify the main issues youth are facing. Alcohol, marijuana and prescription drug abuse are the main substances the PLT are looking to address through multiple individual and environmental strategies. Coalition members acknowledge that pooling resources and working together will result in a larger impact at a county-wide level and will lead to achieving the common goal of reducing youth substance use and increasing mental wellness in DuPage.

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ur coalition is very excited to share this new issue of YC Magazine. As we enter another winter season and the holidays are quickly approaching, we really wanted to offer an issue with articles that would focus on the stress that the holidays can sometimes bring. We hope this issue will provide insight on ways to manage that stress! The feature article, “A Parent’s DOUG PETIT Greatest Gift: Self-Management,” looks at the importance of addressing social emotional learning with your kids and explains how to help your children navigate through strong emotions at every age. Additional articles go on to address this important issue of stress with articles like “Is It Stress? Insights From Your Child’s Behavior and Emotions” and “Calming the Perfect Storm.” Helping kids and teens learn how to manage their stress and negative emotions is crucial for them to grow into happy and productive adults. With all this talk about how to help your kids manage their stress, it is just as important for you as the parent to manage YOUR stress! As parents, it is easy to feel overwhelmed with everything that falls on us, especially this time of year. Make sure to check out the article “Navigating Self Time and Family Time” for tips from a super mom on how to stay organized and make time for yourself. Finally, we take great pride in the sections of this magazine that are customized to our DuPage County community. The Assets in Action section highlight adults and teens throughout DuPage who meet one of the 40 Developmental Assets. The Faces in the Crowd section spotlights students, adults, and organizations that are standing out in DuPage and making an impact. The articles on vaping and marijuana were written by local partners of our coalition and, of course, a big thank you to our advertisers who have filled this magazine with ads to promote local services, as well as prevention messages and public service announcements. We hope you enjoy this issue of YC Magazine and hope you find the information valuable to help your teens and family thrive. Happy holidays!

DOUG PETIT

President, Parents and Teens Together Co-Chair, DuPage County Prevention Leadership Team 2824 Wheatland Court Naperville, Il. 60564 jpfunrun@sbcglobal.net (630) 999-0053

This project is funded by IL Dept. of Human Services/Office of Population Affairs


360 Youth Services provides life-changing services for youth through substance abuse prevention education, counseling and housing. 360youthservices.org 1305 W. Oswego Rd, Naperville 60540Â (630) 961-2992

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B E T T E R M E D I C I N E STA RTS W I T H B E T T E R L I ST E N I N G . Northwestern Medicine Behavioral Health is proud to make a difference for teens and families struggling with emotional and psychiatric issues. Our team of expert, compassionate providers is with you every step of the way, offering emotional support and advanced therapies tailored to your needs. No matter when or why you need us, we’ll be there. To learn more about what makes us better, or to find a location near you, visit nm.org/behavioralhealth.

BETTER

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18-918 Teen Print Ad_7.25x4.75.indd 3

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3/6/18 1:18 PM


CONFESSIONS FROM THE KITCHEN TABLE This is a child’s perspective of ‘coming out.’ P.S. I’m a lesbian.” I remember writing those words on a $2 card I’d bought from the craft store my mom worked at, sitting on my bed, begging my best friend to help me keep my courage. I knew my parents weren’t homophobic, but that didn’t make it any easier. Dozens of “what if ?” questions ran through my head for weeks before I finally came out. But finally, finally—I had found something that ‘fit.’ Something that felt genuine. Real. It took me years to figure out what fit. Now, after befriending countless other lesbians, I’ve learned that the long, grueling thought processes and identity shifts I went through weren’t uncommon at all for lesbians. Growing up, I always knew I liked girls, at least on a subconscious level. Boys never felt ‘right’, and in fifth grade, when all of the other girls in my class were talking about which boy they wanted to dance with at the graduation dance, I remember looking at a friend—and crush—of mine, and asking myself if it was really okay if I wanted to dance with girls instead of boys. At this point, I started trying to force myself to ‘like’ boys, too. I continued to try and force myself to at least like boys in addition to girls up for years, and it was infinitely frustrating. The idea that lesbians were

“closed minded” and “just misandrists and exclusionists!” was pumped into my brain as soon as I started trying to find my place, and even more upsetting, was the idea that the trauma that accompanied my childhood memories was the ‘reason’ I was a lesbian. I entertained both of these ideas until I simply couldn’t anymore. Throughout everything, I had people trying to “guide” me, but unfortunately, it took years for anyone around me to ever ask me if I had ever considered that maybe I was simply a lesbian. When I first started using the term ‘lesbian’ in reference to myself, it was hard. Knowing that ‘lesbian’ was thought of by many as a purely sexual term had to be one of the biggest roadblocks. But, after a few weeks of trying it out, I realized how right it felt. I was a lesbian, and that word doesn’t need to have any sexual connotation. It took a lot of crying in the shower, writing countless short stories featuring my personified insecurities, and the right people in my life to finally help me come to terms with and embrace the fact that I was a Lesbian, with a capital L—and that was okay. After coming out, it was—honestly—a bit of a rollercoaster. Everyone in my immediate family was okay with it, and did incredibly with the news. Obviously, there were a few frustrating questions and comments from those around me, and while

she didn’t want to talk about it, I knew it took my mom a while to really ‘come to terms’ with everything. If I could give a few words of advice to parents, they would be…don’t try and force your child to come out. Don’t joke around about things regarding their orientation unless you know they’re okay with it. Don’t take it too seriously or make it the only point of conversation, but don’t push it aside and ignore it. Don’t out them to people they haven’t given you permission to, especially other family members. Don’t act like it doesn’t exist. Don’t say things like ‘but you’re so young, your feelings will probably change as you age,’ or ‘I don’t care if you’re gay!’ Lastly, I’m going to repeat the first tip I mentioned—do not attempt to force your child to come out. Most of the time, all of the things I touched on are done with the purest, and kindest of intentions, but they can seriously damage your relationship with your child. If you’re guilty of any of the aforementioned, don’t feel bad, so long as you’re able to acknowledge that it wasn’t the greatest idea, and grow past it. Don’t focus on your past mistakes, focus on what you can do now and in the future to support your child. Work on getting past any misconceptions you have, and simply…love, and listen to your child. Really, that’s all. ■

YOU CAN SUBMIT YOUR STORY AT: ycdupage@gmail.com For many of us the kitchen table represents the typical family experience. We have laughed while having family game night. We have cried over our children’s choices. We have blown out the candles on many cakes. We have argued our way out of doing the dishes. We have struggled through those “three more bites.” We have learned hard lessons and celebrated many deserved successes. One thing is for sure though—if our kitchen tables could talk, there would be plenty of stories! So often it is in relating to others’ stories that we realize there isn’t always one answer, or even a right answer. Parenting is hard work! If you have a story of lessons learned, we invite you to share it with our readers. Sometimes, knowing we aren’t the only ones struggling to find the answer is all the help we need.

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a parent’s greatest

SELF MANAG

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gift:

GEMENT By JENNIFER MILLER, M.ED.

“My teacher wants you to sign my test,” my son said as he placed a paper quickly on the table nowhere near where I was sitting and walked out of the room. My curiosity rose. Clearly, he was not eager to show it to me. Glancing at the content, it was immediately recognizable - the science test for which he had genuinely studied. But it appeared as is if he hadn’t cracked his book. How was this possible? asked what happened. And I began to understand when he said, “Mom, it was ‘bring-your-pet-to-school’ day.” My son is allergic to all animals furry. It’s an intense allergy that often ushers in a two-week sickness with wheezing and misery. Yet, and perhaps not surprisingly, there’s nothing my son loves more than animals. So on “bring-your-pet-to-school” day, it’s a painful reminder of his heartache over not having a dog or a cat. He came home that day and ran straight to his room - upset. So, it’s no wonder that a test he was well prepared to take resulted in a failed grade. He couldn’t focus. The acute sadness about his unique position among his classmates - that he remained petless - took over his ability to think. The ability to manage our most intense emotions can challenge even the most studious child making it impossible to focus. Children are faced with this issue not only in the midst of an important test but even on the playground when they are stopped in their tracks unable to respond after a classmate taunts them with cruel words like “No one likes you!” Or, at home, our child may melt down, shut her door, and refuse to come out when we need her to attend a family-obligated event. This inability to focus on a test, to respond to a bully on the playground, or to constructively communicate about an undesirable event is evidence of what is happening in a child’s brain - indeed anyone’s brain - when they are highly emotional. continued on page 9

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NEW TEEN RESOURCES

www.dupagehealth.org/259/Teen-Health

Find information on drug use, mental health and sexual health resources.

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@OnBalanceParenting

@BalanceParentg


continued from page 7

Daniel Goleman, author of the bestseller Emotional Intelligence, called it “emotional hijacking.” The primal - or survival center of your brain called the amygdala - takes over thinking in those heated moments. If a tiger were hunting your daughter in the woods, it would serve to protect her as she focused only on fighting, fleeing, or freezing. But there are times when that fight, flight, or freeze focus does not help. Because in that moment, your child does not have access to the language, logic, and creativity that reside in the higher regions of the brain that might help her think of a clever response or solution. So too if a parent is yelling at or punishing a child and the child is upset, frightened, or awash with shame, they are unable to think about any lessons you might want to teach. Instead, their focus is on fight, flight, or freeze. So then, what restores higher level thinking skills when upset? Your child’s deep, slowed breath is like the whistle blowing at recess time. There was a chaotic mess of running, playing children (read: your internal upset mess) and when that whistle sounds, all children quietly move toward lining up. Deep breathing is that signaling function for your body. The message it sends is “All clear. Return to normal functioning.” Considering the fact that this mental hijacking occurs, how can you prepare your child to respond so that s/he doesn’t get harmed or harm others in those toughest moments? The answer lies in cultivating the skill of self-management. And selfmanagement can engage a host of other important social and emotional skills like impulse control, feelings identification, empathy for others, and responsible decision making. If we work with our children on multiple ways to calm down in a variety of settings, then they can respond to problems safely and constructively. In doing so, they can also more quickly return to learning, return to play, or return to cooperating with family plans while feeling more competent in the process. Check out the following ideas for how parents can best promote the invaluable skill of self-management at various ages and stages. 3 TO 5-YEAR-OLDS Teach the language of feelings. Remember when it was popular for parents and teachers to say to an upset child, “Use your words”? But what words? Children ages 3-5 have not learned the words to express

the whole body takeover that happens when they are angry or frustrated. So when you see your child is emotional, offer her language. “Seems like you’re feeling disappointed. Is that right?” The simple act of attempting to understand her feelings can release some of her built-up tension. As she becomes more adept at seeking understanding from those around her, she’ll grow in her ability to manage her upset effectively. 5 TO 7-YEAR-OLDS Promote self-discipline. Children, ages 5-7, are learning the rules of family and school life, and that learning sometimes involves testing or even breaking the rules to understand where the real boundaries lie. Parents can easily be baited into power struggles when they seek their child’s cooperation and he refuses. Using your own self-management skills are key. As you model, you’ll enjoy the multiplier effect improving your skills and your child’s. The person who is the most emotionally attached to a particular outcome has the least power. So first, if you are frustrated by your child who has just refused to get his shoes on, stop, breathe, and calm down first. Consider that any nagging you engage in could make you later and less successful. When calm, offer a limited but authentic choice. This gives your child a sense of control in a situation where he is attempting to gain power inappropriately. “Would you like to wear your red sneakers or your blue sandals? Either are fine.” Then, move on with your preparations with the expectation that he will do it. 8 TO 10-YEAR-OLDS Practice upstander skills. In a recent survey of U.S. kids by Highlights for Children, they found most children want to take action when they see an injustice, but they need to know what to say and do when a classmate says mean words and uses harmful actions against them or another. Give your child some practice in what to say. For example, when a girl on the playground says, “We don’t want you in our game” your child could be dumbstruck as her amygdala freezes her ability to respond. But if you practice (role playing with family members) some ways to assert herself without harming others like: “I want to play with classmates who want me to join their game,” she’ll be ready to self-manage with competence.

11 TO 14-YEAR-OLDS Brainstorm healthy ways to handle stress. It seems the pressure is on in every aspect of the tween and teens’ life as they tackle rigorous academics, participate in extracurricular activities, attempt to fit in, and find and keep friends. In addition to the many social and academic expectations, they are also in the midst of all of the awkwardness that comes with puberty. Helping your tween or teen develop coping strategies to manage pressure will serve him through high school, college, and beyond. So, brainstorm together. “When you are feeling stress, what can you do?” Make a long list of options and post it somewhere you can refer to later. “Can you take a brain break and walk outside away from your frustrating homework? Can you smell the fresh air and spend a little time outdoors?” These may seem like simple ideas to you, but your teen needs options for calming down when the pressure is mounting. Instead of building up and leading to a volcanic explosion, your tween can manage his stress along the way. This also begins a trusting dialogue in which you acknowledge stress is normal and expected so that when your teen is feeling the pressure, he may confide in you. Self-management just may be one of the greatest tests of our family life. How do we not harm the ones we love when we feel angry, anxious, or hurt? In a recent large survey of parents in the state of Montana, for example, many said they struggled with losing their temper and saying something to their child they later regretted. Those situations need not occur if parents have thought through what they’ll do in those “lose it” moments. How can we calm down to regain our brain’s full capacity? What will we say like ‘Mom needs a minute’? Where will we go? Will we walk outside and breathe in the fresh air? Let your family know your plan for dealing with upset in advance so that when you take a moment, they know that you are self-managing. This is what it means to parent with social and emotional learning. Imagine if you used self-management skills throughout your child’s developing years. When your child faced her toughest life moment and you weren’t there to save her, she’d have internalized the skill of self-management to regain focus, to respond constructively, and to bring her best. There may not be any greater gift a parent could give a child. ■

About The Author: Jennifer Miller, M.Ed., author of the popular site, Confident Parents, Confident Kids, has twenty years of experience helping adults become more effective with the children they love through social and emotional learning. Among other roles, she serves as lead writer for Parenting Montana: Tools for Your Child’s Success, a statewide media campaign to educate parents on social and emotional learning

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Check out who’s standing out in our community. IS THERE SOMEONE YOU’D LIKE TO NOMINATE? Please email ycdupage@gmail.com and tell us why this individual has stood out in your crowd.

Maggie McDonnell

FACES IN THE CROWD

GLENBARD WEST, 10TH GRADE

Maggie has been a valued member of Reality Illinois since she joined last summer. She, along with the other members of Reality, recently presented to the Glen Ellyn Village Board and were successful in persuading the Board to raise the legal age to purchase tobacco products to 21 in their city. Maggie also accepted the National Safety Council Teen Safety Award on behalf of Reality at a DuPage Board of Health meeting. Outside of Reality, Maggie is the first high school-aged intern for the Glenbard Parent Series and has been assisting with their wide-ranging community outreach efforts. Maggie has been recognized by her peers as mature, generous, reliable, and responsible beyond her years.

Vivek Ily

NAPERVILLE NORTH HIGH SCHOOL, 11TH GRADE

Vivek is very involved in school and community. He is involved in Science Olympiad, on the math team, and involved in tennis, band, and the Scholastic Bowl. He is also a member of Reality, which he believes is his biggest opportunity to make a powerful impact in the community. His favorite part of being in Reality is the positive environment in the monthly meetings and being part of a group who all want to spend their time productively to impact the health of the community. Vivek has assisted with planning for presentations to educate community boards on prevention strategies such as Tobacco 21. He hopes to one day become a doctor and continue to impact the health and wellness of people.

Kallie Haney

HEALTH TEACHER, ADDISON TRAIL HIGH SCHOOL

Kallie started teaching at Addison Trail in 2001. She is a passionate student advocate and plays an integral role in teaching students about health and wellness. She cares especially about mental health and helping the students sharpen their decision-making skills. Since students will use the information they learn in the health class for the rest of their lives, Kallie takes her work seriously, all while being approachable and accessible for the students. Her willingness to collaborate with community partners and bring in endless resources for the students is just one thing that makes her so great!

Carol Stream Police Department

The Carol Stream Police Department is the recipient of the inaugural Changemaker Award, awarded by the DuPage County Health Department and the Prevention Leadership Team (PLT). The Changemaker Award recognizes individuals, organizations, or communities who go above and beyond to protect youth in DuPage. Carol Stream Police Department has been a leader in DuPage when it comes to adopting and enforcing laws that will protect youth. They recently updated their social host ordinance in an effort to prevent adults from hosting underage drinking parties at home and have been active in providing education and awareness around Tobacco 21 laws in their community. Carol Stream PD is also a longtime and prominent member of the county’s substance use prevention coalition, the PLT.

DuPage Regional Office of Education

The DuPage ROE is regarded as one of the leading educational service agencies in Illinois and an important prevention partner for DuPage County. The ROE provides guidance and support in areas of school safety, social and emotional learning, equity and justice, mental health, and early childhood education. They were recently awarded a STOP grant, which will build the capacity of educators to increase awareness of mental health issues among school-aged youth in DuPage. This grant will also allow the ROE to provide training and education to students throughout DuPage to recognize and respond to behavioral health concerns within themselves and their peers. The DuPage ROE aims to remove obstacles and barriers so our schools can do their job of educating children for their future.

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Before/After-School Care • Camps • Sports • Swim Academy and Swim Team • Kids Fitness

B.R. RYALL YMCA | 630.858.0100 | www.brryallymca.org

This happy, carefree moment made possible by Rosecrance

40 DEVELOPMENTAL ASSETS

BUILDING BRIGHTER FUTURES DEVELOPING FUTURE LEADERS

40 Developmental Assets are essential qualities of life that help young people thrive, do well in school, and avoid risky behavior. Youth Connections utilizes the 40 Developmental Assets Framework to guide the work we do in promoting positive youth development. The 40 Assets model was developed by the Minneapolis-based Search Institute based on extensive research. Just as we are coached to diversify our financial assets so that all our eggs are not in one basket, the strength that the 40 Assets model can build in our youth comes through diversity. In a nutshell, the more of the 40 Assets youth possess, the more likely they are to exhibit positive behaviors and attitudes (such as good health and school success) and the less likely they are to exhibit risky behaviors (such as drug use and promiscuity). It’s that simple: if we want to empower and protect our children, building the 40 Assets in our youth is a great way to start. Look over the list of Assets on the following page and think about what Assets may be lacking in our community and what Assets you can help build in our young people. Do what you can do with the knowledge that even through helping build one asset in one child, you are increasing the chances that child will grow up safe and successful. Through our combined efforts, we will continue to be a place where Great Kids Make Great Communities.

Turn the page to learn more!

Leaders in addiction treatment for teens and young adults. If your son or daughter is abusing drugs or alcohol, Rosecrance can help. It’s time to reclaim the ordinary moments you miss most. Life’s waiting. Call 815.391.1000 for a free consultation.

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The 40 Developmental Assets® may be reproduced for educational, noncommercial uses only. Copyright © 1997 Search Institute®, 615 First Avenue NE, Suite 125, Minneapolis, MN 55413; 800-888-7828; www.search-institute.org. All rights reserved.

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assets in action

40 DEVELOPMENTAL ASSETS

7 SUPPORT

1. Family support: Family life provides high levels of love and support. 2. Positive family communication: Young person and her or his parent(s) communicate positively, and young person is willing to seek advice and counsel from parent(s). 3. Other adult relationships: Young person receives support from three or more nonparent adults. 4. Caring neighborhood: Young person experiences caring neighbors. 5. Caring school climate: School provides a caring, encouraging environment. 6. Parent involvement in school: Parent(s) are actively involved in helping young person succeed in school.

PLT receives National Safety Council Teen Safety Award

EMPOWERMENT

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7. Community values youth: Young person perceives that adults in the community value youth. 8. Youth as resources: Young people are given useful roles in the community. 9. Service to others: Young person serves in the community one hour or more per week. 10. Safety: Young person feels safe at home, at school, and in the neighborhood.

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BOUNDARIES & EXPECTATIONS Local health center creates teen resource center

Planting flowers in the Ribbon of Life at GWHS

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11. Family boundaries: Family has clear rules and consequences and monitors the young person’s whereabouts. 12. School boundaries: School provides clear rules and consequences. 13. Neighborhood boundaries: Neighbors take responsibility for monitoring young people’s behavior. 14. Adult role models: Parent(s) and other adults model positive, responsible behavior. 15. Positive peer influence: Young person’s best friends model responsible behavior. 16. High expectations: Both parent(s) and teachers encourage the young person to do well.

CONSTRUCTIVE USE OF TIME

Reality attend Governor Pritzker’s signing of Tobacco 21

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17. Creative activities: Young person spends three or more hours per week in lessons or practice in music, theater, or other arts. 18. Youth programs: Young person spends three or more hours per week in sports, clubs, or organizations at school and/or in the community. 19. Religious community: Young person spends one or more hours per week in activities in a religious institution. 20. Time at home: Young person is out with friends “with nothing special to do” two or fewer nights per week.


If you or your child would like to submit a picture that represents one of the 40 Developmental Assets, please email ycdupage@gmail.com with a picture and the number of the asset the picture represents.

Not all pictures are guaranteed publication.

18 COMMITMENT TO LEARNING

21. Achievement motivation: Young person is motivated to do well in school. 22. School engagement: Young person is actively engaged in learning. 23. Homework: Young person reports doing at least one hour of homework every school day. 24. Bonding to school: Young person cares about her or his school. 25. Reading for pleasure: Young person reads for pleasure three or more hours per week.

Students with Representative Terra Costa Howard at Teen PhilanthroParty

POSITIVE VALUES

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26. Caring: Young person places high value on helping other people. 27. Equality and social justice: Young person places high value on promoting equality and reducing hunger and poverty. 28. Integrity: Young person acts on convictions and stands up for her or his beliefs. 29. Honesty: Young person “tells the truth even when it is not easy.” 30. Responsibility: Young person accepts and takes personal responsibility. 31. Restraint: Young person believes it is important not to be sexually active or to use alcohol or other drugs.

Teens pick up litter at DuPage Community Center

SOCIAL COMPETENCIES

32. Planning and decision making: Young person knows how to plan ahead and make choices. 33. Interpersonal competence: Young person has empathy, sensitivity, and friendship skills. 34. Cultural competence: Young person has knowledge of and comfort with people of different cultural/racial/ethnic backgrounds. 35. Resistance skills: Young person can resist negative peer pressure and dangerous situations. 36. Peaceful conflict resolution: Young person seeks to resolve conflict nonviolently.

PLT members participating in youth-guided sticker shock event

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POSITIVE IDENTITY

37. Personal power: Young person feels he or she has control over “things that happen to me.” 38. Self-esteem: Young person reports having a high self-esteem. 39. Sense of purpose: Young person reports that “my life has a purpose.” 40. Positive view of personal future: Young person is optimistic about her or his personal future.

Kind messages created to spread positivity and mental wellness

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IS IT STRESS?

insights from your child’s behavior and emotions By STEFFANI TURNER, LCSW

ast night, my normally laid back 11-year-old started sassing me at bed time. He subtly began to make fun of me and started to challenge some of the directions that I gave him to start getting ready for bed. As many parents would do, I gave him the warning that he was getting out of line – to which he swore he wasn’t. Is this sounding familiar yet? And then after I tucked him in bed, I started thinking, this isn’t how he usually behaves, especially around bed time… hmmmm? So, I went back in and asked what was going on and asked him about a few things that might be happening in the next few days. It was then, after some prompting and being curious that he was able to tell me how he “might, maybe be a LITTLE worried” about his upcoming first airplane trip. This is one of the million little ways our children let us know that they are stressed. They don’t usually just come out and say it. It would be great if they did. But often our children, especially our young children do not recognize that what they are feeling is “stress.” It is only by adults recognizing the signs and supporting our children that they learn to identify the feeling in their own bodies. So, how do we know our child is stressed? For infants and young toddlers, the cues can be very simple, they can be whimpering, crying or behaving restlessly. It could also be subtler than that, perhaps they appear frozen, or “spaced out.” They could be experiencing an uncomfortable sensation in their body, they could be hungry or need a diaper change and possibly they just feel disconnected and need some snuggles from their parents. As our children get older, their cues continue to adapt and change with their

needs. They also learn through all the little interactions they have with their caregivers. If a child cries and their mom is attentive and gives them comfort, they learn that crying is an acceptable cue to

We can’t make the test go away or make sure their best friend doesn’t stay mad at them, but we can understand, be with, validate and support them. We can’t fix it all, but by being there helping them handle the feeling, we are teaching them that this feeling doesn’t feel great, but it’s not the end of the world.

get their need met. But if the crying is met with yelling, they may learn that crying is not a good idea. Children can be open and out there with their cues of stress, they may be irritable, grumpy, angry, picking on others, weepy, or very busy. Or they could

be subtler, isolating themselves, becoming very quiet, perhaps being overly concerned about something. Whatever it is, a change in your child’s behavior is their attempt at trying to tell you something. And it’s probably not what they are saying with their words! So, what does a child need when they are stressed? They need us to “be there” with them and for them, according to Circle of Security cofounder Kent Hoffman. They first need us to help them recognize what their feeling is. What are they stressing about? Be curious about how they are behaving and what they are thinking. I’m sure that before I asked my son what was going on, he didn’t recognize that he was stressing out about something; it can sneak up on us all. Once we help them recognize what the feeling is, then we can decide if an action can be taken or not. In the case of my son, I was able to educate him some about my experiences on an airplane. But I did NOT try to talk him out of his feelings of worry. Instead, I told him that I would be there with him and we would go through it together. Sometimes there is nothing we can do about whatever they are stressing about. We can’t make the test go away or make sure their best friend doesn’t stay mad at them, but we can understand, be with, validate and support them. We can’t fix it all, but by being there helping them handle the feeling, we are teaching them that this feeling doesn’t feel great, but it’s not the end of the world. So currently I’m wrapping up this short article while sitting on the plane with my son. Sure, he was a “LITTLE” worried, for all of a second, but now he’s excited, staring out the window taking pictures. He learned to deal with his worry over flying, helped by a caring adult and he’s off and away! ■

Steffani Turner, LCSW, is the Community Services Director at Intermountain in Helena. She has a Bachelors in Psychology and a Masters in Social Work. She is the mother of two.

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calming the

PERFECT STORM By TRACIE DAHL, LCPC

ool clothes. Good grades. Lots of friends. The pressures of being an adolescent have always been great. However, there seem to be an increasing number of demands, stressors, and fears being experienced by youth today which are affecting their ability to socialize, attend school, and prepare for the future. It’s often difficult to clearly define all of the reasons for the rising anxiety and because of this, it can be just as challenging to generate solutions. Parents can easily describe many pressures from their own “tween” and teen years which bring back awkward memories and cringe-worthy recollections. However, the world has changed exponentially in the last several decades and continues to undergo rapid changes at an erratic and unpredictable pace. Societal change aside, understanding the stage of development that adolescents are going though between the ages of 10 and 15 is a significant part of understanding the anxiety that is created during this time frame. The physiological changes alone are progressing at a rate so great that the body is undergoing more developmental change than at any other time except from birth to two years old. Bones are growing faster than muscles. Fluctuations in basal metabolism occur. Puberty begins. Youth start to develop the capacity for abstract thought processes as the prefrontal cortex continues to develop. To make sense of the world around them, young adolescents, as learners, build upon their individual experiences and prior knowledge (Piaget, 1960). In order to understand how adolescents today are experiencing their world, constructing meaning out of it, and how this is affecting them, we must first recognize and

acknowledge the experiences that the world is giving to our adolescents, which serves up a perfect storm of exhaustion, confusion, and internalizing or externalizing behaviors. The world today is filled with what can only be perceived by teens as unsafe events. War, bullying, gun violence, natural disasters, and the constant stream of reporting of these events via every available media source from television to internet streams; there is a never ending, shock provoking flood of horrifying news. The time that children and adolescents spend absorbing this news via the media is also increasing and the method of absorption is rapid and relentless. There is no way to describe our youth’s use of social media other than “it’s complicated.” There are no empirical research studies to say with certainty, one way or another, whether the role that technology is playing in our children’s lives is good or bad. Teens themselves will attest that social media forges friendships, creates a sense of belonging, and provides support. However, they will also admit that it can create anxiety and contribute to depression and sleep deprivation. All of the above being considered, the task of fostering resiliency in the face of so much adversity may seem daunting. Adults must help adolescents learn how to navigate the perils, reduce anxiety, and build the strength and tools they will need when their instinct is to protect and shelter them as the adult response to the very real threats in the world today may also be an increase in fear and anxiety. Start by using supportive problem solving; giving adolescents the opportunity to learn to think for themselves instead of making decisions for them, which takes away their power. Any setbacks or mistakes become learning experiences,

while successes allow children the ability to feel truly capable of handling difficult situations. As a result, both their resilience and confidence will grow. Oftentimes, I have coached parents in my practice to ask their kids when they present a problematic situation to them to respond with the question, “Do you want me to help you with this or do you just need to vent?” Kids really just need someone they trust to talk through a situation and are searching for a way to find the answer for themselves. By just facilitating this process, adults can build very key components of responsibility and resiliency. Be a model of responsibility and allow children opportunities to help others. A child’s intrinsic need to help triggers anxiety in the face of tragic news while feeling helpless creates a sense of hopelessness about the state of the world we live in. Having the ability to actually help others reinforces both responsibility and a sense of empathy while giving kids a sense of ownership and investment in their own destiny, an appreciation of how their actions affect and impact others, and a genuine feeling of positivity and success. Finally, approach life with a healthy dose of optimism, hope, and courage. We must remember that what is reported on the news and coming across our social media platforms is largely (some research studies estimate up to 90%) negative and this translates into negative thought patterns, so it is apparent why anxiety, fear, and depression are triggered. As adults we can choose to be optimistic about situations, people, and the future and we can choose hope while instilling courage in adolescents. The solution lies in changing our mindset, shifting our view, and promoting strengths instead of weaknesses. ■

Tracie Dahl is the Day Treatment Director for Intermountain in Helena. Previously, Tracie worked primarily with middle school-aged students and families as a School Based Outpatient Therapist and has worked with all age levels in school-based counseling since 2010. Tracie is a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC) and holds a M.Ed.

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NUMBERS Why should I talk to my kids about drugs/alcohol and what do I say? Whether your child smokes, drinks, or uses drugs is more likely to be determined by what they learn from home than anything they learn at school. The key is to know the facts and stick to them. For example, if a teen states, “Marijuana is all-natural,” you can reply, “So is arsenic.” If they say, “Everyone is doing it,” you can state that according to the most recent survey of teens, the majority are not choosing to drink and do drugs. We know that the earlier and more often an adolescent smokes, drinks, or uses drugs, the more likely they are to become addicted. Every day they don’t use reduces the chances they’ll develop mental or physical illnesses or suffer from a substance-related accident. Think of it as a war where you’re batting the forces of evil to keep your kids safe— because that’s what you’re doing. Explain to your child that experimenting with drugs at an early age can change his/her brain permanently, even if he/ she just experiments once or twice. With drugs, there is no way of knowing what has been added to the substance. The threat of damage to the brain from heavy drinking can be one of the best arguments you can make to your teen for saying no. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, teens who begin drinking before age 15 are four times more likely to become alcohol dependent than those who wait until 21. Daily marijuana use in high school is associated with a six-fold increase in depression and anxiety later in life. Probably not the life we envision for our kids. Try this effective script: “I expect you not to drink or do drugs until you’re 21 (if at all). It’s dangerous, illegal, and unhealthy for kids your age to be at parties where drugs/ alcohol are provided. The possible consequences of drunk driving, aggressive sexual advances, and alcohol poisoning are things I don’t want you to experience. It’s not that I don’t trust you, it’s that I know how easily things can get out of hand where kids are using drugs or alcohol. I’m concerned with your health and safety.” Talk early. Talk often. Stick to the facts. It’s hard to argue with science. Here are some resources: www.drugabuse.gov www.drugfree.org

www.theparenttoolkit.org www.talkingwithkids.org www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov

HAVE A QUESTION?

email: ycdupage@gmail.com We cannot guarantee all questions will be published; however, we will do our best to respond to all questions submitted.

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The number of escalators in all of Wyoming.

200

The number of muscles used to take a step.

200,000 The number of glasses of milk a cow produces in her lifetime.

167.04

The highest speed recorded on a bicycle (mph).

46,001

The world record for most push ups in a day.

68

Percentage of people that experience “phantomvibration syndrome” (feeling their phone is buzzing when it’s not)


DUPAGE COUNTY PREVENTION LEADERSHIP TEAM NOVEMBER 2019

MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION: A PARENT'S GUIDE by Dr. Aaron Weiner, PhD, Director of Addictions at Linden Oaks Behavioral Health

Love it or hate it, the Illinois legislature made the decision to legalize the use and sale of marijuana in Illinois, effective January 1st, 2020. This decision will undoubtedly have a significant impact on the social fabric of Illinois, but as parents, the most pressing question is, “how will this change affect my kids, and how do I talk to them about it?”  I’ve listed here the three concepts that I believe are most important for parents to understand about marijuana legalization, and how best to use them to help drive meaningful and productive conversations with your children. 

“Legal” doesn’t mean “safe.” Historically, one of the most consistent trends in youth drug use patterns is that the lower the perceived risk of a substance is, the more adolescents and young adults that will use it. One of the greatest concerns of drug prevention experts about marijuana commercialization is that getting high on marijuana for fun will become normalized, lowering perceptions of risk and thus increasing the chance that a young person will start using.  Emphasizing with your child that this policy change was about regulation and profits, rather than an endorsement of the drug as safe, is critical to helping them to understand this changing paradigm.  As a comparison, alcohol and tobacco are also legal, yet they kill 88,000 and 480,000 people in the United States each year, respectively (although it’s also worth mentioning that this is not a justification for promoting the use of yet another addictive and harmful drug in society).  Legal” doesn’t mean “safe.”  And particularly not for kids.

Marijuana is much, much stronger than it used to be, and this high THC content leads to the most negative consequences. The average THC (the active ingredient in marijuana that is intoxicating and addictive) in marijuana flower during the 1960s was about 3-4%. Currently, the average THC content in marijuana flower in the United States is almost 21% - smoking one of today’s joints would be like lighting up 7 joints, at once, from the 1960s.  Further, one of the fastest growing markets in the marijuana industry are concentrates (such as “wax,” “shatter,” and“ butane hash oil (BHO)”), which are regularly over 70% THC, and sometimes over 90%.  These concentrates and extracts are often vaped, making them particularly attractive and even more accessible to youth.

This trend of rapidly escalating THC values, coupled with easier youth access to the strongest products, is concerning for multiple reasons. High doses of THC have been linked to permanent structural changes in the developing brain, particularly in the hippocampus (used for learning and memory) and the prefrontal cortex (used for executive functioning, including abstract thought, task switching, planning, and motivation). Marijuana flower use has been linked to a 50% increase in the development of psychosis and schizophrenia, and concentrate use is related to a 500% increase.  High THC doses also can lead to cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome, which recently was reported to have killed a 17-year old boy in Indiana.

Although many adolescents can have an “invincibility complex,” many more do care about risks to their physical health. Combined with the current vaping epidemic that has killed 9 and hospitalized over 500 with no specific cause yet isolated, the health risks may be great enough to deter some adolescents who are on the fence about whether they want to use THC products.

Understand the appeal – why are they drawn to it in the first place? If marijuana use carries so much risk, what draws youth to it in the first place?  There are numerous factors that play into this, but three of the strongest ones are social acceptance, identity differentiation/ rebelliousness, and industry marketing. Middle-school and high-school years, the most common time for a child to start using marijuana, are difficult and stressful times.  Many aspects of their life are in flux, and one of the most important anchoring factors during this time is to feel like they belong to a peer group.  For them, drug use is, in many ways, a great social equalizer: you don’t have to be smart, talented, or physically beautiful to belong.  All you have to do is use the same drugs that everyone else is using, and you’re part of the group.  Or, on the flip side, if you don’t use the substances that your friends are using, you may quickly find that you don’t belong to that group of friends anymore.

This social acceptance, combined with the fact that the child knows they are doing something that is likely against their parents’ values, can seem like a very appealing way to develop an identity separate from their family. Combine this with an industry that regularly markets in ways that appeal to younger people, with product names such as “Platinum Girl Scout Cookie,” “Bio-Jesus,” “Gorilla Glue #4,” and “Ghost Train Haze,” and you have a potent mix of factors to hook a teenager. How, as a parent, do you navigate this?  In brief, make sure you’re taking the time to stay connected to your child, and form family bonds that they want to lean into, rather than away from.  Help them find prosocial peer groups and after-school activities that will discourage drug use, rather than encourage and normalize it.  And make sure they understand that this is an industry that has them in its cross-hairs: 90% of addictions start during teenage years, and marijuana industry executives know it. POSTMODERN January of 2020 will be a challenging time PAINTING. Stella for parents in Illinois in regardsalternately to paints in marijuana.  If you have a teenager oil or andprewatercolor teen in your home, make sure to sit down and have a talk with them about the changing landscape in Illinois related to drug policy, and help them tell fact from fiction.  Stay connected, stay compassionate, and make sure to listen actively and discuss your child’s concerns Take a peek into a day with them. 

in the life of budding

Remember: artist push into a teenager, Stella Young, and they are much more likelyshe to push back. Ally and how improves with a teenager, guide a teenager, and they her craft are much more likely to live your advice when you’re not looking over their shoulder.

"Legal doesn't mean safe, and particularly not for kids."

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navigating

SELF TIME AND FAMILY TIME By TINA EBLEN, Super Mom

think most of us are looking for balance in life. Especially as a parent, I am constantly looking at how to balance several aspects of my life – parenting, working, social life, spiritual life, working out and sleeping. At one point in my life, I had hoped that maybe someone would add more time to each day so I could accomplish more, but then I would have to prioritize more. We only have 24 hours in a day and the experts tell us that we should be getting between seven and eight hours of sleep a night, so that leaves me with only 16 hours to get everything that needs to be done, done. I am also a working mom, I usually work from 8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. and I work through lunch, so work accounts for another eight hours. The remaining eight hours are split up between getting ready for work in the morning, running kids to after school activities, cooking dinner and eating, cleaning up the house, making sure homework is done, working out and getting things ready for the next day. How could I possibly fit in one more thing? I had to get smarter with my time and become more organized. I had to figure out how to balance my life with everything that was going on in my family. So, this was my journey on learning how to create that balance in my life. Two and a half years ago I experienced a medical emergency which put me on bed rest for four days. This medical emergency opened my eyes to my poor physical health. I decided to set a goal and incorporate physical activity, specifically biking. I signed up for a biking competition and asked people to sponsor me which forced me to complete my goal. How could I add a new hobby, a new activity, or a new relationship when I have a family to care for? Communication Communication was the first step in this process. I found that adding a new activity to my life would impact my whole family. I

How could I possibly fit in one more thing? I had to get smarter with my time and become more organized. I had to figure out how to balance my life with everything that was going on in my family.

sat my kids down and explained the plan to incorporate this new activity of biking into my daily routine. I explained that I would need their support and encouragement to make this activity stick. I also stressed that I needed to make a change in my physical health. This helped them understand that mom needed to be healthier in order to keep taking good care of them. Timing Determining when was the second step. I had to look at my schedule and decide when would be the best time to add this activity. I found that I needed to add my new activity in the morning. For my family and me, the morning was the easiest time to add something new. Now it was quite an adjustment to start biking at 5:30 in the morning but I found that way I could get in what I needed before the kids woke up. This ultimately allowed me more time to spend with my children.

Scheduling The third step was looking at and rearranging our weekly schedule. I started looking at our schedule. What could I do smarter and free up more time in the evening so I would be able to get to bed sooner? I started writing down the week’s schedule on Sunday so everyone in the family could see what was happening over the next week. Re-organizing Preparing/organizing for the week ahead was the last step. I started making a dinner menu and really looking at it strategically. For example, I would make a crockpot meal on Monday and then save the leftovers for another night. Having dinners lined up for the week allowed me to add at least 30 minutes- to one hour to my life. Circling back, communication was the key to making this work. Again, involving my family in this change was the most important piece to implementing this new activity. I found that having the support of my family and loved ones, made the implementation of the new activity easier. The family would discuss how things were going over the week and I allowed my children to give feedback as well. The first couple of weeks I made some time to get used to this new activity. I think of all the activities that one could use these steps for to add a new activity: sport/working out, craft club, book club, going back to school/taking a class and even a new relationship. All of these things can impact the balance of life and family. Now, life is unexpected and sometimes unpredictable. It’s important to be patient and give ourselves and our families some grace. There are times when life throws curve balls; however, I have found that if I get back on schedule and begin organizing again, then it falls back into place. ■ www.dupageplt.org

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Your Future. Our Focus. Build a quality education experience tailored to you.

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opioids

AND YOUR FAMILY By SHELBY KOPPANY, PHARM.D. Candidate, 2020

rug overdose deaths are widespread in the United States. It is crucial to recognize the dangers that can be associated with the misuse of opioids. The term “opiate” refers natural or synthetic compounds derived from the opium poppy. Common prescription opioids include hydrocodone, oxycodone, hydromorphone, morphine, and fentanyl. In the body, these substances bind to opioid receptors and work to reduce pain. While these medications can be effective and beneficial when used correctly, misuse can have devastating outcomes. Along with pain relief, euphoria is commonly associated with opioids. Euphoria is an intense feeling often considered “the high.” Other effects of opioids include: sedation, mental clouding, constipation, and respiratory depression. Decreased breathing (respiratory depression) is a major concern and is often the cause of death following an overdose. Signs of opioid overdose: abnormally small pupil size, loss of consciousness that does not return upon stimulation, and slowed breathing. If these symptoms are observed, it is important to contact help immediately. The use of alcohol with opioids can further increase the risk of overdose. There are times when a child may be prescribed opioids to treat pain from an injury or surgery. These medications are safe and

effective when used as prescribed. It is always important to ask your child’s provider and pharmacist about medication dose, frequency, side effects, and length of treatment. Always mention any other medications your child is taking, including prescription, nonprescription, and herbal products. It is also important to discuss any family history of substance use disorder. There are important steps you can take to avoid misuse and diversion. Store opioids in a secure location where access is limited to adults that will be dosing the medication. Start with the lowest recommended dose and monitor your child carefully. Non-prescription pain relief products, such as ibuprofen and acetaminophen, can often be used in conjunction with opioids to minimize opioid exposure. Dispose of remaining medication immediately when it is no longer needed. Most cities have drug take-back locations at local police stations or local pharmacies and many communities hold drug take back events twice a year. Visit DEATakeBack.com to find locations, dates, and times. Although prescription drug abuse is a widespread issue, there are measures that can be taken to deter this issue from affecting your household. Never hesitate to ask your trusted healthcare professional when questions arise regarding opioid use and safety. ■

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󶀱󶀱󶀱 󶀱n 󶀵󶀵 teens have mental health conditions. Living in recovery is possible with recognition of warning signs and support. NAMI DuPage educates and empowers teens, school staff, and parents through Ending the Silence to end the stigma surrounding mental health and promote connections to services. We also provide: Teen Support Groups | Parent Support Groups | Basics Classes for Parents | Family Peer Counselors www.namidupage.org • (630) 752-0066 • 115 N County Farm Rd • Wheaton, IL 60187

Treating the whole you We specialize in the treatment of addictions, anxiety, depression, eating disorders, self-injury, and geriatric behavioral health. Comprehensive outpatient services for adults and adolescents are located in Naperville, Plainfield, St. Charles, Hinsdale, Mokena and Arlington Heights. At Linden Oaks, we can get you the treatment you need to help you get your life back.

Call our Help Line 24/7 at (630) 305-5027 for your free, confidential assessment.

lindenoaks.org

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DUPAGE COUNTY PREVENTION LEADERSHIP TEAM

VAPING: WHAT TO KNOW AND HOW TO TALK ABOUT IT By Rabia Mukhtar, DuPage County Health Department

When you hear the term vaping, it may sound like a harmless

Even with a significant percent of youth vaping, it can be easy to

mix of vapor and flavorings. In reality, when someone is vaping,

hide, but there are some hints:

they are inhaling and exhaling an aerosol that is produced by an

Signs around the house. Some devices may resemble a USB

e-cigarette or vaping device. E-cigarettes can come in many

flash drive (such as JUUL), marker, or pen. Look for disposable

different shapes and names, such as JUUL, vapes, vape pens, e-

pods that have been thrown away in the trash, or unfamiliar

cigs, and mods. Regardless of the name, all of these e-cigarettes

batteries or chargers.

come with serious health risks, especially for youth.

Changes in your child’s behavior, such as increased

irritability or mood changes due to nicotine addiction.      

What’s in the Aerosol?

New sweet odors in their room or on their clothes, like mint,

The liquid, or e-juice, found in e-cigarettes can contain a

vanilla, or fruit punch.

variety of ingredients. E-juice usually contains nicotine, which is highly addictive for youth. Other common substances include

Talking with Your Teen

flavorings such as diacetyl, which is linked to a serious lung

Having a healthy conversation with your teen can be an

disease; cancer-causing chemicals such as acetaldehyde and

important part in preventing them from using e-cigarettes. Here

formaldehyde; heavy metals such as nickel, tin, and lead; and

are some tips to get started:   

ultrafine particles that can be inhaled deep into the lungs. Ecigarettes can also be used to vape marijuana or other drugs.

What Are the Risks? Because vaping is relatively new, we still don’t know the long-

Know the facts. Get information from credible sources, like the U.S. Surgeon General, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or American Lung Association.        Choose the right time and place. Find a time when you and your child feel comfortable and relaxed. To open the

term health effects. Based on the common substances found in

conversation, you can ask what they think about vaping, or a

e-cigarettes, we know that e-cigarettes can be addictive for

situation you witnessed together.

youth. Youth who vape are four times more likely to begin

Compliment their good judgement. Tell them you are proud

smoking traditional cigarettes. E-cigarette use can also impact

of them for a smart decision they have made.       

the parts of the brain responsible for decision making, attention,

Ask open-ended questions. This can create a more open

learning, and impulse control. Other risks include higher blood

discussion than yes or no questions and can make your child

pressure, increased heart rate, and irritation of the ear, eye, and

less defensive.

throat.

Listen to their answers, and keep this an ongoing conversation.

Recently, there has been a multistate outbreak of lung injury associated with e-cigarette use, with over 800 cases and twelve deaths. As the investigation of this outbreak is ongoing, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends refraining from using e-cigarettes or vaping products.

What to Look For In DuPage County, the percent of high school students who reported using a vaping product in the past month more than doubled from 8% in 2016, to 20% in 2018.

Quit Vaping Resources for Youth Young people who would like support to quit vaping can text QUIT to (706) 222-QUIT to access the This is Quitting program, which provides young people with free, confidential, and anonymous support through text messages and on-demand support. Parents and other adults looking to help young people quit can text QUIT to (202) 899-7550. References: 1. Primack BA, Shensa A, Sidani JE, et al. Initiation of Traditional Cigarette Smoking after Electronic Cigarette Use Among Tobacco-Naive US Young Adults. The American Journal of Medicine. 2018;131(4):443.e441-443.e449. 2. https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/about-e-cigarettes.html 3. https://www.lung.org/assets/documents/stop-smoking/vape-conversation-guide.pdf

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DuPage County Prevention Leadership Team 2824 Wheatland Court Naperville, IL 60564

Join other parents, high school and middle school students and professionals to learn about issues facing today’s youth. The Glenbard Parent Series engages top experts, parents and school staff to become proactive and informed in pursuit of the mutual goal to strengthen our communities. Programs are free and open to the public, no registration required. Details at glenbardgps.org

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2019

Jess Shatkin, M.D., MPH * Parenting Young Children to Thrive: Healthy Body and Healthy Mind 7pm at Glen Ellyn Public Library

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2019 Jess Shatkin, M.D., MPH Are Teens Born to Be Wild? Why Teens Take Risks and How We Can Keep Them Safe noon at Marquardt Administration Center 7pm at Glenbard North High School

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2019

Young Adult Author Event: Erika Sanchez I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter 7pm at Glenbard South High School

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2019

Dr. Michele Borba UnSelfie: Then Empathy Advantage to Succeed in Our “All About Me” World 7pm at Glenbard East High School

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2019 Dr. Michele Borba * No More Misbehavin’: Difficult Behaviors in Young Children and How to Stop Them noon at CCSD93 Administration Center

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2019 Dr. David Jernigan The Media, the Marketing, and Teen Drug Abuse: An Update noon at Marquardt Administration Center

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

Dr. Paul Corona Lee’s 3 Habits: A Workshop for Stronger Relationships and Greater Happiness 7pm at Glenbard West High School

THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2020

Documentary Film Screening The Kids We Lose: Lives in the Balance noon at Glenbard South High School

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2020

Amy Morin 13 Things Mentally Strong Parents Don’t Do: Raising Self-Assured Children 7pm at College of DuPage McAninch Arts Center

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2020

Amy Morin 3 Things Mentally Strong People Avoid and How to Become your Strongest & Best Self noon at Marquardt Administration Center

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2020 Andrew Solomon The Secret Sadness of Depression 7pm at Glenbard West High School

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2020

Cathy Adams, LCSW, CPC Self-Awareness/Self-Compassion/Self-Care noon at CCSD93 Administration Center

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2020

Ben Glenn, the Chalk Guy Simply Special: Learning to Love Your ADHD 7pm at Glenbard North High School

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2020

Jennifer Abrams Finding Your Voice Around What Matters: Successful Teacher/Parent Conversations/Advocacy 7pm at Glenbard East High School

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2020

Dr. Ross Greene Parenting the Explosive Child: A New Approach for Understanding & Parenting 7pm at Glenbard South High School

* for parents of children ages 3 to 8

26

November 2019

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YC MAGAZINE

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www.dupageplt.org

For questions, contact Gilda Ross at (630) 469-9100 or gilda_ross@glenbard.org

Profile for Deanna Johnson

YC Mag, DuPage County - November 2019  

YC Mag, DuPage County - November 2019