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VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

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EDGEDAVAO Serving a seamless society

ORGANIC VEGETABLES. Davao City government community affairs worker Barlendo R. Barreda shows off a bundle of eggplants at the exhibit area of the 6th Organic Day celebration held at Rizal Park along San Pedro Street in Davao City yesterday. Hundreds of Dabawenyos trooped to the exhibit to purchase fresh organic vegetables. Lean Daval Jr.

2014 BUDGET PASSED City allocates P5.16 billion, bigger chunk to General Fund By ARMANDO B. FENEQUITO JR.

T

abf@edgedavao.net

HE 17th Davao city council approved the P5.16-billion 2014 budget on final reading in yesterday’s regular session. The council passed the proposed annual budget which will fund all the expenses, projects and other services of the city. The budget will fund the General Fund Proper, the Economic Enterprise for the Operation Of Markets, Slaughterhouse, Davao City Overland Transport Terminal (Dcott), Sta. Ana Port, Cemeteries, Davao City Recreation Center, Operation of Magsaysay Park and The Development Fund .

Of the entire budget, the biggest slice of P4,147,933,539 will be given to the general fund which includes the P1,111,639,660 for personnel services where the salaries of the employees of the offices of the city will be taken from. The city mayor’s office will be allocated P1,505,076,491 to cover budget items like peace and order, Central 911, Traffic Management and Lingap Program, among others. The appropriations also include Statutory/ Contractual, Budgetary Equipments and other

F2014 BUDGET,10

FIRST DAY OF RECOUNT. Ballot boxes are seen piled inside Branch 2 of the Regional Trial Court yesterday while the staff conducts a recount after former Barangay Bucana 76-A Captain Robert Olanolan filed an election protest against newly-installed Brgy. Captain Rolando Trajera. Lean Daval Jr.


2

EDGEDAVAO

THE BIG NEWS

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

Pulong to proceed with case vs Aussie V

ICE Mayor Paolo Z. Duterte has decided to proceed with the direct assault case he filed against an Australian treasure hunter after withdrawing it last month. VM Duterte told reporters in yesterday’s Pulong-Pulong ni Pulong that according to his lawyer, Alexis Lumbatan, the side of Michael Hatcher who had a brush with Duterte in an alleged road rage incident along McArthur Highway last August, did not accept his apology. “Ang gusto na pud daw sa Australiano na akoy mag-apologize and, according to Lumbatan, pabayaron mig tag P5 Million ‘ming duha sa iyaha,” Dute-

rte said. Duterte added that he will leave it to the court as Regional Trial Court Branch 16 Judge Emmanuel Carpio had already issued a warrant of arrest against Hatcher. “Sila na ang bahala nila Atty. Lumbatan, alangan naman dili nimo ipadayon kaysa pabayron mig P10 million. Wala man gani koy P1 million,” Duterte blurted. Last month, Duterte instructed Atty. Lumbatan to communicate with the court and the lawyer of Hatcher as he (Duterte) would withdraw the case against him in the spirit of Christmas.

DAY FOR POLITICAL PRISONERS. Members of progressive groups stage a protest rally along San Pedro Street in Davao City yesterday to demand for the release of all political prisoners in time for United Nations (UN)’s International Day of Political Prisoners. Lean Daval Jr.

Aboitiz assures safety Court sets final of coal-powered plant revision Dec. 19 FPULONG,10

OLANOLAN PROTEST

By EMILORD P. CASTROMAYOR epc@edgedavao.net

T

HE presiding judge of the Municipal Trial Court in Cities Branch 2 has set for December 19 the final revision and recounting of ballots in 117 boxes after losing last termer barangay captain Roberto Olanolan alleged there was “dagdag-bawas” involved that resulted to his defeat in the barangay elections. Judge Marie Estrellita Tolentino-Roxas started

the recounting of ballots yesterday morning in her sala where the revisors of Olanolan and declared winner Rolando Trajera as chairman of Barangay 76-A congested the courtroom. After the recounting, barring any delay, the court will promulgate the result, according to the clerk of court in-charge, who asked to withhold her name.

FCOURT,10

By ARMANDO B. FENEQUITO JR.

A

abf@edgedavao.net

N Aboitiz-owned 345 megawatt coal-powered plant in the border if Binugao, Toril and Sta. Cruz, Davao del Sur is enough assurance that people’s health and the environment will be protected. “We will adhere sa requirements sa (Davao) City Council, DENR, (Department of Environment and Natural Resources), and of course sa Davao del Sur where some parts of the (power) plant is

located,” Benjamin A. Cariaso, president and chief operating officer of Aboitiz Power’s Therma South Inc., told reporters in yesterday’s Pulong– Pulong ni Pulong at the councilors’ lounge of the Sangguniang Panlungsod. Cariaso said that they already have a carbon sink program where they planted 1 Million trees in Marilog with 25 beneficiaries in the area. Manuel Orig, first vice president for Min-

danao Affairsof Aboitiz Power also stressed that the power plant they are building will use modern technology to meet the ‘stringent standards’ imposed by international, national and local authorities. “Our assurance is that we will not do anything that will harm or cause danger to our home or to our environment, ” Orig said, adding that the power plant will be compliant with all the requirements and will not harm the environment. On the other hand, Engr. Alexander Ual, as-

sistant vice president on project execution and plant optimization of Therma Luzon Inc., said that the power plant will use Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB), an instrument which will minimize sulfur residue. Ual explained that the sulfur which is part of the coal is the one harms the environment and if the emission of sulfur will not be controlled it will be a hazard to the people around the place. “Actually, by design it is already safe. May standard kasi na pinafollow,

FABOITIZ,10

Losing brgy. captain finally vacates office A

BRINGING THE SERVICE TO THE PEOPLE. The Public attorney’s Office (PAO) sets up a temporary office for a day at the ground floor of the Ninoy Aquino Hall of Justice in Davao City yesterday to cater the needs of senior citizens and people with disability (PWD). Lean Daval Jr.

defeated re-electionist barangay captain finally vacated the barangay hall yesterday and formally turned it and all other properties to the new barangay council. Yolly Balana, district 1 representative of the Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG)–Davao City said that former barangay captain Darrell K. Birondo left the hall without incident after earlier refusing to vacate it following his defeat. Martinafe Acenas Ara-

biana, 46, the newly elected barangay captain who was also present during the inventory signed documents regarding finances. Meanwhile, Vice Mayor Paolo Duterte said that Birondo should show respect by not allowing the documents and properties of the barangay to be moved outside the hall. Duterte told Birondo that there is a time to win and a time to lose and accept defeat. Birondo served many years as a public official in his barangay.


NEWS

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

3

MINDANAO PEACE

Media, academe play vital roles in process T SLOW WHEEL OF JUSTICE. People walk pass piles of cases archive which were accumulated through the years caused by the slow justice system at the Ninoy Aquino Hall of Justice in Davao City yesterday. Lean Daval Jr.

25 Japanese firms want to invest here

By CHENEEN R. CAPON

A

crc@edgedavao.net

group of 25 Japanese electronic companies has signified interest to invest in the proposed triad zone in Toril, Davao City for the expansion of their operations here. Board of Investment officer-in-charge Gil M. Dureza, told reporters in an interview during the Capability Building Seminar on Project Packaging and Investment Marketing cum Personality Enhancement for LEIPOs in the Davao region at The Marco Polo Davao yesterday that the 25 electornic

companies are clients of RNB (Repair and Maintenance), a Cebu-based company. He said that the companies are engaged in producing electronic parts and components for equipments and phones like IPhone. Dureza said that the companies are eyeing to expand their business in Mindanao because of its potential to cut the cost of electricity use during production. The plan is to replicate the operation of Texas Instruments (Philippines),

OCD11 cites need for alternative evac centers

A

N officer of the Office of Civil Defense has underscored the policy of government to create evacuation centers aside from those traditionally used as places of refuge like schools and gymnasiums. Loreto Rirao, director of the Office of Civil Defense and chair of the Regional Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council said schools and gymnasiums are not evacuation centers, but these infrastructures are often designated as shelters, because these are the ones available in the locality. He said that as policy

of government, every local government unit down to the barangay must establish its own evacuation center that can stand firm against any calamity. Rirao said many local government units in Davao Region have already identified areas by which evacuation centers will be constructed next year. “The Mines and Geosciences Bureau and the Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board must consider if the site for an evacuation center is no longer disaster prone,” he said. Rirao cited the Island

Inc., which was built in 1979. It designs, manufactures and sells semiconductors from facilities in more than 35 countries worldwide. He said that the weather in Toril area, specifically near Eden is suitable for manufacturing semiconductors, as it will lessen their use of air-conditioners and coolers. “It will cut 30 to 40 percent of their power costs,” Dureza said, adding that aside from industrial development area, there will also be a retirement village lo-

cated in the same area. The retirement village is intended for Japanese retirees. He also said that the RNB, with its clients, looks on Davao as their next destination because of the devastation caused by the earthquake in Cebu and Bohol last October. Dureza, meanwhile, said that the Davao City Investment and Promotion Center (DCIPC) will propose an ammendment to the approved Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) to accommodate Japanese investors soon.

HE media and academe play a vital role in peace building and making the public informed about the Mindanao peace process, but there’s still a gap to address to avoid misinformation circulating in the public, an official admitted yesterday. Lawyer Johaira C. Wahab, a member of the Commission on Bangsamoro Transition, said that the media and educators have the responsibility to translate the framework of agreement on Bangsangmoro (FAB) in an easier ro understand way. She said that the technical information in the agreement must be re-

duced in such a way that the public can embrace and understand. “The issues in the negotiations can be so complicated sometimes and that’s unfortunate because these are really important for the people. After all, we’re not negotiating just so we have a peace agreement. The peace agreement should mean something to the people. So the peace agreement has to be understandable to them,” Wahab said, adding that the technical issues and phrasing are not easy to explain to the public. Starjoan D. Villaunueva, executive director of Alternative Forum for Research

FMEDIA,10

Cop, wife mauled by two brothers By EMILORD P. CASTROMAYOR epc@edgedavao.net

P

OLICE filed charges against two suspects for physical injuries after they mauled a police officer and his wife last Sunday afternoon along Mercedez road, Barangay San Miguel, Panacan. Supt. Royina Garma, commander of the Sasa police station, said that on Monday they filed cases against brothers Eldrin Lozada, 30, and Erwin, 29, both residing in Celedonia Village, Panacan. The suspects were both drunk when the incident happened. Garma said that victims PO1 Generoso Indiola Saldua Jr., 32, assigned in Davao del Sur and his wife,

Ethel Saldua, 30, reported the incident that resulted to the apprehension of the brothers. Police said that the victims were aboard a vehicle travelling along Mercedez road when suddenly Eldrin stood in their path which prompted Saldua to get out of the car to confront him. PO2 Roger Rivera, investigator, said that Eldrin punched Saldua and the younger brother, Erwin, joined the fight. Rivera said that when Ethel tried to pacify them, the suspects also mauled her that caused her body pains. The brothers are detained in jail.

GOOD SMARITAN. A shopper drops loose change to a donation pot intended for typhoon Yolanda survivors being peddled by a lady who claims to be a mem-

FOCD-XI,10 ber of a charity group outside SM City Davao yesterday. Lean Daval Jr.


4 SUBURBIA EDGEDAVAO

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

DAVAO DEL NORTE

HIV/AIDS victims honored T

HEALTH EDUCATION. Pricilia Senoc, Health Education and Promotion Officer III of the Davao City Health Office, encouraged people to protect themselves from the deadly HIV/AIDS through abstinence, fidelity, safe sex, particularly with the use of condoms, and use of sterile needles, among other preventive measures. [ONDOY LAGUITAO/DAVNOR PIO]   

GENERAL SANTOS CITY

HE Davao del Norte provincial officials and employees showed that they care for the victims of Human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) by pinning red ribbons which symbolize HIV awareness and support. In celebration of the World AIDS Day, Governor Rodolfo del Rosario also lead local officials in giving Christmas gifts to persons living with HIV, during the monthly convocation program last Monday. The governor further called up the workforce of the Provincial Capitol to spread the message on how to prevent the transmission of HIV/AIDS in the province. “Let us have the courage and compassion to

NORTH COTABATO

reach out and support the people living with HIV and those people who are at high risk of infection,” he appealed. Noting that the fatal disease threatens the wellbeing of the most important resource of the province, the governor urged every Dabaonon to be aware of HIV/AIDS, as well as, to take action to curb the transmission of the infection by promoting safe sex practices. Pursuant to his human development thrust called P.E.O.P.L.E., del Rosario likewise put forward mechanisms to ensure that people living with the disease can still fully participate in the community, free from stigma and discrimination. Pricilia Senoc, Health Education and Promotion Officer III of the Davao City Health Office,

revealed that as of July 2013 Davao del Norte contributed 65 out of the 795 cases of HIV/AIDS infection in the Davao region. Almost half of the total cases in the province came from Tagum City, with 35 cases. Underscoring the theme of the World AIDS Day, Senoc rallied the people of the province to work together in attaining “zero new HIV infections, zero discrimination and zero AIDS related deaths.” She also encouraged the people to protect themselves and other from the deadly disease through abstinence, fidelity, safe sex, particularly with the use of condoms, and use of sterile needles, among other preventive measures. [By Noel Baguio]

LGU wants to detect more HIV/AIDS P10M worth of projects from OPPAP’s cases to help in prevention campaign PAMANA turned over to two villages T H EALTH personnel General Santos City are pushing for the detection of more human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) cases as a strategy to curb the rising incidence of the disease in the area. Dr. Mely Lastimoso, coordinator of the City Health Office’s Social Hygiene Clinic, said they have set anew a series of awareness activities focusing on their free HIV screening program in a bid to encourage more residents to undergo voluntary testing for the disease. She said the initiative was part of the monthlong activities that they have set in observance of the AIDS awareness month. This year’s observance focuses on the theme: “Getting ZERO: zero new HIV infections; zero Discrimination; zero AIDS-related deaths.” Lastimoso urged residents, especially those who have had engaged in risky sexual behavior or “had sex with more than one partner at some point in their lives,” to avail of the free HIV screening. The clinic conducts the initial HIV screening and then submits the samples to the Depart-

ment of Health’s (DOH) STD (sexually-transmitted diseases)/AIDS Cooperative Central Laboratory in Manila for confirmatory tests. “We want to detect or identify all those infected with HIV so we can endorse them to proper treatment and stop them from spreading the disease to other people,” she said. As of Monday, Lastimoso said they have already documented a total of 129 seropositive HIV/ AIDS cases in the city. The area’s HIV/AIDS cases, which were detected through screened blood serum, involve 99 males and 30 females, she said. She said 29 of the victims, comprising 7 females and 22 males, have already succumbed in the last three years to various complications caused by the disease. “The increase in positive cases of HIV is indicative of the increase of health seeking behavior, which is also our objective based on the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals,” Lastimoso said in a statement. She said that with more victims availing of the free HIV maintenance treatment provided by the DOH, the transmission of the disease would

eventually be reduced. “This will help us achieve our goal of zero HIV infections by 2015,” Lastimoso said. The DOH provides HIV patients with maintenance or antiretroviral drug treatment, which mainly stops the multiplication of the infected person’s viral load and eventually prevents them from further spreading the disease. In some countries, the use of antiretroviral drugs has helped effectively lower the incidence of HIV infection to about one percent and eventually stabilized the detected cases. In Mindanao, the DOH has designated the Southern Philippines Medical Center in Davao City as treatment hub for HIV/ AIDS. The city’s confirmed HIV cases, which has continued to increase in the last three years, reached the 100 mark last September. As of the second week of July, the Social Hygiene Clinic confirmed that HIV cases in the city had reached 81, 22 of which were detected in the first four months of the year. At the end of 2012, its records showed 55 confirmed cases of HIV in the area. [MindaNews]

HE Payapa at Masaganang Pamayanan (PAMANA, or Peaceful and Resilient Communities) Program of the Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process (OPAPP) has turned over P10-million worth of agricultural, water and infrastructure projects to two barangays in the municipality of Kabacan in North Cotabato. The projects consist of a rice mill building (P2.250M),

warehouse (P1.9M) and solar dryer (P688,750) in Barangay Pedtad and a peace center (P4.49M), solar dryer (P688,750) and water system rehabilitation (P71,250) in Barangay Nangaan. The turnover ceremony in Pedtad, once a conflict-stricken village, was witnessed by Cotabato Gov. Emmylou “Lala” J. Taliño-Mendoza, Rep. Jose “Ping” Tejada (3rd Dist.) and Kabacan Mayor Herlo Guzman.

Pedtad Barangay Chairperson Romeo Mantawal, the barangay councilmen and residents received the projects. The people of Pedtad, according to Mantawal, were happy to receive the projects, saying that PAMANA already put two projects in the village – a fishpond and rubber seedling dispersal program. [Geonarri Solmerano/ MindaNews]

REFRESHING SIGHT. Aliwagwag Falls in Cateel, Davao Oriental on a rainy Thursday noon (28 November 2013). Though not completely back in form, it is no longer a sorry sight as it was after super typhoon Pablo battered the town on December 4, 2012. [MindaNews photo by Gregorio Bueno]


VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

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6 THE ECONOMY Stat Watch Indicator

Latest

1. Gross National Income 1. GrossRate National Income Growth Growth Rate2000 Prices) (At Constant

7.1 1st Qtr 2013 6.8

2.2.Gross GrossDomestic DomesticProduct Growth Rate Product (AtGrowth Constant 2000 Prices) Rate

7.8 1st Qtr 2013 7.5

(At Constant 2000 Prices)

(At Constant 2000 Prices)

3. Exports 1/ 3. Exports

4. Imports 1/ 4. Imports

5. Trade Balance Trade Balance 6.5.Balance of Payments 2/

7.6.Broad Money Liabilities Balance of Payments

2nd Qtr 2013

2nd Qtr 2013

USD 3,741 million 5,045 FebUSD 2013 million USD 4,708 Sep 2013 million FebUSD 2013 5,711 USD -967 million million Sep 2013 Feb 2013 USD -665 USD -640 million million Sep 2013 Dec 2012 P 4,964,560  USD 692 million million Feb Jun2013 2013 P2.45,980,938 % million Mar 2013 Aug 2013

8. Interest Rates 4/

7. Broad Money Liabilities

P113,609 2.0 % million Sep2013 2013 Mar P P5,281 127,336 billion  million Mar Sep2013 2013

9. National Government 8. Revenues Interest Rate 9. National Government

10.Revenues National government outstanding debt outstanding debt

P 5,609 P 41.14 billion Apr 2013

11.Stocks Peso per US $ 12. Composite                                       Index 6/

6,847.5 P 43.83 Mar Sep2013 2013

12. Stocks Composite

6,191.8 132.8 Sep2013 2013 Apr

13. Consumer Price Index

135.2 Oct2.62013

10.Peso National government 11. per US $ 5/

Sep 2013

13. Consumer Index Price Index 2006=100

      2006=100 14. Headline Inflation Rate 14. 2006=100 Headline Inflation

Apr 2013

2.9 Oct3.12013

Rate 15. Core Inflation Rate       2006=100

Apr 2013

2006=100

15. Core Inflation Rate       2006=100 16. Visitor Arrivals

2.5

418,108 Oct 2013 Feb 2013

382,022 Aug 2013 20.9%

16. Visitor Arrivals

17. Underemployment 7/ 17. Rate Underemploymen

Jan 2013 19.2%

18. 18.Unemployment UnemploymentRate Rate7/

7.1% Jan 2013 7.3%

Rate

Jul 2013 Jul 2013

MONTHLY AVERAGE EXCHANGE RATE (January 2011-September 2013) Month Average December November October September August July June May April March February January

2013

2012

2011

43.83 43.86 43.35 42.91 41.30 41.14 40.71 40.67 40.73

42.23 41.01 41.12 41.45 41.75 42.04 41.91 42.78 42.85 42.70 42.86 42.66 43.62

43.31 43.64 43.27 43.45 43.02 42.42 42.81 43.37 43.13 43.24 43.52 43.70 44.17

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

ADB, Canada gov’t embark on joint project with DOT T

HE Department of Tourism (DOT) has found a partner in Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Canadian government under a technical assistance project specifically on improving competitiveness in tourism. In 2013, the Philippines is ranked 82nd in the tourism and travel competitiveness according to the World Economic Forum. Having identified some issues and concerns in the tourism industry namely the lack of good quality and consistent levels of facilities and services; the need to benchmark the current standards for quality assurance with international norms and practices; the absence and low service standards in existing system; skills mismatch; the absence of labor market and skills planning; low investments in training among employers; and uncoordinated, fragmented and overlapping of functions among agencies, among others, the technical project was granted to DOT and commenced in February 2013 and to last to February 2017. The project amounts

JOINT PROJECT. Mr. John Hardin (Intl Grants Manager), Mr. Tony Meyer (Intl Quality Assurance and Accreditation Expert), Mr. Vincent Gibbons (teams Leader/Skills Dev. Expert), Mr.Peter Philips (Intl Regulatory Expert) and Narcisa Rivera (Senior Program Officer- Canada) arrived on Dec. 1, 2013 for the ADB-Canada project with DOT on Improving Competitiveness in Tourism. The project is hinged on Capacity Development; Economic Growth and Private Sector Participation. A consultation shall take place on December 3 with the Davao stakeholders at the SMX.  to US$ 7,116,900 (Cnd$ 7,000,000) and has three components which are the Regulatory Impact Assessment (RIA), Hotel and Resort Quality Assurance and Accreditation System (HRQAAS) and Tourism Industry Skills Development Program (TISDP).

The project aims to implement a regulatory review of the policies, rules and legislations affecting the sector; to develop and pilot the new hotel and resort standards and accreditation system; and to design, develop and pilot an industry-led skills devel-

opment program. At the end of the project, the industry interventions shall be an improved Philippines ranking in the WEF Travel and Tourism Competitive Index; a reduction in business cost and improved compliance; full implementation

of the new standards and accreditation system; and at least 5,000 tourism workers have been trained as well as some 500 tourism professionals shall be certified under the ASEAN MRA; and a tourism human resources strategy has been developed.

2012-2013 of the World Economic Forum, the Philippines is ranked 98th among 144 countries in terms of quality of overall infrastructure. Philippine infrastructure is worse than Cambodia’s,” Navarro said. Ranked first in the region is Singapore, which is second overall among 144 countries. Malaysia was ranked 29th; Brunei Darussalam, 43th; Thailand, 49th; Cambodia, 72th; and Indonesia; 92th. Lao PDR and Myanmar are not included in the ranking. The Philippines got the lowest rank in terms of quality of port infrastructure (120th) and air

transport infrastructure (112th). This is clearly worse than Cambodia’s 69th and 75th ranking in port and air transport infrastructure, respectively. Navarro attributes this poor turnout to underinvestment in infrastructure. In 2012, only 11 percent of the total appropriated budget for infrastructure was spent—a scenario that has not changed since 2010. Navarro said the decreasing reliance on official development assistance (ODA) loans also contributed to the low quality of Philippine infrastructure. In 2012, ODA loans for infrastruc-

ture was more than US$5 million, which was relatively smaller than the figure in 2008 which was over US$6 million. As of 2013, there are 21 projects in the pipeline under the Public-Private Partnership scheme. Required investments in 18 of these projects are projected at US$5 billion. Three of the 21 projects do not have cost estimates yet. Navarro challenged stakeholders in the financial sector to take advantage of the liquid financial market given the huge projects costs in infrastructure and the single borrower

limits faced by banks in direct lending. Given the maturity of lending capital by Philippine banks (10-15 years) and the long gestation of infrastructure projects (25-30 years), the government could facilitate the creation of credit enhancements for infrastructure bonds that can be issued by private issuers. “The government should also organize a group of experts from both the private and public sectors to formulate clear mechanisms and an institutional setup to mobilize bank resources for infrastructure financing,” said Navarro. [PIDS]

PHL has poorest quality of infrastructure in Asean Q

UALITY of infrastructure in the Philippines is second to the last in the ASEAN region, according to government think tank Philippine Institute for Development Studies (PIDS). PIDS senior research fellow Dr. Adoracion Navarro said during the forum “Financing Infrastructure in the Philippines “ held at PIDS that the only country in ASEAN the Philippines overtook was Vietnam, which placed 119th and ranked as the ASEAN region’s poorest quality in infrastructure. “In the Global Competitiveness Report

as of May 2013 Cebu Pacific Daily Zest Air Daily Cebu Pacific Daily Philippine Airlines Daily Philippine Airlines Daily Cebu Pacific Daily Cebu Pacific Daily Cebu Pacific Daily Cebu Pacific Mon/Tue/Thu/Fri/Sun Philippine Airlines Daily Cebu Pacific Daily Cebu Pacific Thu

5J961 / 5J962 Z2390 / Z2390 5J593 / 5J348 PR809 / PR810 PR819 / PR820 5J394 / 5J393 5J599 / 5J594 5J347 / 5J596 5J963 / 5J964 PR811 / PR812 5J595 / 5J966 5J965 / 5J968

5:45 5:45 6:00 6:10 7:50 7:50 8:00 9:10 9:40 11:30 12:00 12:55

Manila-Davao-Manila Manila-Davao-Manila Cebu-Davao-Iloilo Manila-Davao-Manila Manila-Davao-Manila Zamboanga-Davao-Zamboanga Cebu-Davao-Cebu Iloilo-Davao-Cebu Manila-Davao-Manila Manila-Davao-Manila Cebu-Davao-Manila Manila-Davao-Manila

6:15 6:25 6:30 7:00 8:50 8:10 8:30 9:40 10:10 12:20 12:30 13:25

Cebu Pacific Tue/Wed//Sat 5J965 / 5J968 13:35 Silk Air Mon/Sat MI588 / MI588 13:35 Silk Air Wed/Sun MI566 / MI566 15:20 Silk Air Thurs MI551 / MI551 12:05 Cebu Pacific Mon/Tue/Wed/Fri 5J507 / 5J598 15:00 Philippine Airlines August 15:55 Mani2Mani 16:50 Zest Air Daily Z2524 / Z2525 16:05

Manila-Davao-Manila Davao-Singapore Davao-Singapore Davao-Singapore Cebu-Davao-Cebu

14:05 18:55 18:55 15:45 15:30

Cebu-Davao-Cebu

16:45


7 THE ECONOMY Tiger Air relaunched; to make Davao new hub EDGEDAVAO

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

Asec Boncato say DOT to assist firm efforts

By CHENEEN R. CAPON

T

NEW PLAYER. Tiger Air Phils. vice president for commercial Jose S. Laurente Jr. explains in his presentation why they chose Davao City as one of the destinations during the airline’s Davao-Manila route launching yesterday at Seda Hotel. Lean Daval Jr.

GCASH eyes growth in user base G

CASH, the flagship mobile commerce service operated by G-Xchange, Inc. (GXI), a wholly-owned mobile commerce subsidiary of Globe Telecom, Inc. is set to expand its network in the country by growing its user base with a partnership with TORCHe Global Marketing, Inc. (TGMI), a marketing consultancy firm focused on helping companies reach out to the widest possible consumer base through the latest technologies in mobile commerce and advertising. With the agreement, GCASH will now be offered

to TGMI affiliate companies and organizations such as the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI) and the Franchise Corporation of the Philippines (FranCorp), among others. GCASH services that will be made available for use of TGMI affiliates include the PowerPay+ Card which is a funds disbursement service linked to a Globe/TM SIM offered to organizations that traditionally disburse via cash and check, the Buy Load service which enables GCash users to become load re-sellers by buying airtime load using GCash with as much as 10% rebate, and

GCash outlets which are locations that potential entrepreneurs can set up to accept GCash users who would like to convert their regular cash to GCash and vice-versa, and a soon to be released payment solution that will enable business owners to accept credit card payments without the need for a traditional bank-issued POS terminal. “With our partnership with TORCHe Global Marketing, Inc., we are expanding GCASH to reach more users and business who can directly benefit from an easy, hassle-free, and secure platform for money

transfer services. This will allow business establishments and affiliations to operate more efficiently and enjoy our innovative product portfolio,” expressed Paolo Baltao, GXI President. “It is our privilege to partner with GCASH for this meaningful business opportunity. We are confident that GCASH’s roster of services will further business transactions as well as financial services in the country,” said Atty. Miguel Varela, Chairman of TORCHe Global Marketing, Inc.

“At stake is not only a package of measures to boost the global economy... but also the role of the WTO and the multilateral trading system in global economic governance,” he said in an editorial in the Wall Street Journal. The WTO launched the Doha Round of talks in Qatar in 2001, seeking a wide-ranging accord to open markets and remove hurdles to trade. But the talks have stalled as rich and poor countries spar over a deal that the WTO says would create tens of millions of jobs and spark trillions of dollars in economic activity. A global trade overhaul is now on the back-burn-

er, with the WTO focused instead on a limited “Bali package” that it hopes can keep the Doha Round on life-support. But India is standing firm on its demand that it be allowed to offer greater subsides to protect its farmers, a key sticking point. “We can no longer allow the interests of our farmers to be compromised at the altar of mercantilist ambitions of the rich,” Commerce and Industry Minister Anand Sharma, who will represent India in Bali, was quoted as saying on Monday by Indian media. Many now see the troubled WTO effort – which requires the unanimous support of all its members

– being eclipsed by alternative regional trade pacts including the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership pushed by Washington. “These are positive initiatives, but they offer no substitute for global agreements and global rules” such as the Doha Round that take into account the interests of the world’s poorest countries, Azevedo wrote. He said the consequences of failure in Bali would be “grave” at a time of world economic uncertainty. A WTO spokesman said Azevedo had “cleared the calendar” in Bali of anything that could eat into negotiating time between ministers. [AFP/Rappler. com]

crc@edgedavao.net

IGER AIRWAYS PHILIPPINES is back in Davao with a vengeance. Known as Tigerair Philippines, the company aims to develop Davao as their next hub, according to Jose S. Laurente Jr., vice president for commercial. Tiger Air Philippines, an affiliate of Singapore-based low-cost carrier Tigerair, launched yesterday the Davao- Manila and Davao-Clark destinations at Seda Abreeza Hotel yesterday. With Airbus A320 G19, Tiger Airs Philippines aims “to be the leading airline and travel partner connecting people across Asia.” Department of Tourism 11 regional director Art Boncato said that they luring to establish Davao to other destinations in the Brunei-Indonesia-Malaysia-Philippines East Asean Growth Area (BIMP-EAGA) with Tiger Airways after the Manila- Clark route become successful. He said that they will be assisting the new airline to expand their market in Davao, given the budget for tourism development in the region. Aside from domestic and international connectivity, Tiger Airways is also fully compliant to the Civil Aeronautics Authority of the Philippines (CAAP). Its management is composed of highly-trained and experienced pilots and cabin crews adhering to Philippines and Singapore Civil Aviation Regulation. These is to ensure that only excellent, reliable, and safe services will be provided to their customers.

There will be a daily flight schedule for ManilaDavao which started last Monday while Clark- Davao will be three times a week, on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday to start on December 17. Aside from delivering quality services, discounts and incentives will be also given to their passengers. Tigerair passengers who will present their boarding pass in Mount Apo Highland Resort and Maxima resort in the Island Garden City of Samal can avail themselves of 25 percent discount in their accomodation fee; and 35 percent off on accomodation in Pearl Farm Davao; and 10 percent in Seda-Abreeza Hotel. Tourists who are passengers bound for Crocodile Park will have the privilege of viewing and feeding crocodiles in the park. Other local routes that the Tiger Airs Philippines are Clark- Kalibo, Manila-Bacolod, Manila- Cebu, Manila-Iloilo, Manila-Kalibo, Manila- Puerto-Princesa, and Manila- Tacloban. International routes are Clark- Bangkok, Thailand, Clark-Hongkong, Clark-Singapore, and Kalibo-Singapore. Tigerair offers various promotional rates. With only P99, one can fly a one base fare from Manila-Davao and ClarkDavao which stated last December 2 to 15, this year. Fly domestic roundtrip with P1,000. The routes are Manila-Kalibo- Manila, Manila- Bacolod- manila, Clark-Davao Clark, Manila-Davao-Manila and Manila-Cebu-Manila.

New PPP infra projects WTO’s role hangs in the balance at Bali summit to generate several jobs

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HE WTO launches a frantic drive to salvage its floundering efforts to liberalize global trade at a summit opening Tuesday, December 3 laced with potential makeor-break implications for the body’s influence in the world. WTO chief Roberto Azevedo is pushing hard for an agreement during the four-day gathering on the Indonesian resort island of Bali that he hopes will keep alive the Doha Round of talks on slashing international trade barriers. Azevedo called the 159-member group’s meeting “the most important World Trade Organisation meeting in years.”

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HREE infrastructure projects being built under the government’s public-private (PPP) framework are expected to generate close to 84,000 new construction-related jobs and will facilitate trade and travel. PPP Center Executive Director Cosette Canilao said the Department of Education’s (DepEd) PPP for School Infrastructure Project (PSIP) Phases 1 and 2 can provide 81,107 jobs while the Daang HariSouth Luzon Expressway (SLEX) Link Road project will create 2,672 jobs. “These (84,000 jobs) still exclude new businesses generated,” she said in an interview. Construction of the PSIP Phase 1 and the

Daang Hari-SLEX road projects are ongoing. Canilao said they expect construction on the PSIP Phase II will start early next year. Procurement of independent consultant is ongoing. She said another awarded project, the NAIA Expressway Phase 2, can also generate jobs especially during construction. “These new roads that we are building are also expected to reduce travel time significantly especially Daang Hari and NAIA Expressway. That would translate to transport cost savings,” Canilao noted. She said lower transport costs can lead to cheaper prices of goods. [PNA]


8 VANTAGE EDGEDAVAO

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

EDITORIAL

Lacson as rehab czar

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ANFILO LACSON, the former maverick national police chief and one of the only two senators (the other being Joker Arroyo) known for not having enjoyed the largesse of the now outlawed pork barrel system for 12 years, has been appointed by President Aquino as czar of the gargantuan task of reconstructing “Yolanda”-ravaged Eastern Visayas. Lacson may not be an expert in rehabilitation work, but his reputation as a no-nonsense leader of men and manager will see him through this decidedly difficult job which has still no equal in our history. Many Filipinos familiar with his crusading fiscalizer reputation in the Senate, and his reformist stance as former head of the Philippine National Police, see hope in Lacson’s appointment to a position which is no doubt pivotal in the country’s struggle to rise from the ruins of the strongest typhoon to ever hit the Philippines in memory. He is somebody who would have no problem with dirty politics as he is seen as one who will not hesitate to quit if he thinks that traditional politicians will interfere in his work.

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Watch him as he deals with petty and big-time grafters and profiteers who cannot moderate their greed and will no doubt stand in the way of the great rehab work. If he needs some advisers cum consultants in order to deliver, we suggest the following names: Joker Arroyo, Rene Saguisag, Christian Monsod, Aquilino Pimentel Jr. and Reynato Puno on the side of integrity; Felino Palafox Jr., Felipe F. Cruz, David M. Consunji and R. Villarosa for construction and design; and Henry Sy, John Gokongwei, Jaime Augusto Zobel Ayala, Lucio Tan and Andrew L. Tan, for finance. Take note that Davao City Rep. Isidro T. Ungab, as chairman of the House Committee on Appropriations, has proposed a P14.6-billion supplemental appropriations for the 2013 General Appropriations Act for the rehabilitation and reconstruction of areas ravaged by disasters like the Yolanda super typhoon. Ungab’s bill was certified urgent by President Aquino and was expected to be approved in the plenary session of the House last night. Whatever, Lacson’s entry into the executive branch, indeed, will be a sight to behold.

KENNETH IRVING K. ONG Creative Solutions

ARLENE D. PASAJE Cartoons

RAMON M. MAXEY Consultant

GREGORIO G. DELIGERO Associate Editor

LEANDRO S. DAVAL JR. • JOSEPH LAWRENCE P. GARCIA Photography Contributing Photographer

ARMANDO B. FENEQUITO JR. EMILORD P. CASTROMAYOR / CHENEEN R. CAPON Reporters

Columnists: CARLOS MUNDA • MA. TERESA L. UNGSON • EDCER C. ESCUDERO • AURELIO A. PEÑA • MARY ANN “ADI” C. QUISIDO • LEANDRO B. DAVAL SR., • NICASIO AGUSTIN • VIDA A. MIA VALVERDE • Economic ENRICO“ADDIE” “GICO” G. Columnists: MA. TERESA L. UNGSON • EDCER ANGELO C. ESCUDERO • AURELIO PEÑA • ZHAUN ORTEGA Analysts: • BERNADETTE B. DAYANGIRANG M.QUISIDO PEREZ • Lifestyle Columnists: BAISR., FAUZIAH SINSUAT •AMBOLODTO • MEGHANN STA. INES BORBON • MARY• JONALLIER ANN “ADI” C. • LEANDRO B. DAVAL • NIKKIFATIMA GOTIANSE-TAN NICASIO ANGELO AGUSTIN • EMILY •ZEN NIKKI GOTIANSE-TAN CHUA • CARLOS MUNDA Economic Analyst: ENRICO “GICO” G. DAYANGIRANG • JONALLIER M. PEREZ

GENERAL OFFICE SANTOS CITY CAGAYAN DE ORO MARKETING OFFICE CAGAYAN DE ORO MARKETING OLIVIA D. VELASCO OLIVIA D. VELASCO RICHARDRICHARD C. EBONAC. EBONA SOLANI D. MARATAS SOLANI D. MARATAS MARKETING OFFICE | Marketing Manager General Manager General ManagerMarketingAdvertising Supervisor SpecialistFinance FinanceLEIZEL A. DELOSOLEIZEL A. DELOSO | MarketingFLORENCE ManagerS. VILLARIN

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Tel: (088) 852-4894

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ANGELICA R. GARCIA | Marketing Manager Blk. 1, Lot 10, La Mar Townhomes, Apitong St., Marikina Heights, Marikina City Tel: (02) 942-1503


EDGEDAVAO

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

Genetically-altered food promises big profit

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LUNT BUT VERITABLE POTSHOTS - Many private sector economists presumed that it makes harder for other entrepreneurs to join the playing field of business where powerful and filthy rich political clans also have an economic base. Clearly, cronyism and corruption in particular, rob other people the opportunities for enterprise, and there may be reasons for prospective capitalists to be reluctant to venture in profit-oriented businesses – otherwise things can horribly go wrong. PARANOIA OF THE UNKNOWN– After health authorities and the FDA again warned the consuming public about chemically-spiked food products imported particularly from China, Taiwan and Korea, another food innovation that causes concern might as well be risky to health. This is something new in the country, but it has already been a trend in most well-developed nations. Few Filipino consumers probably heard about this food creation technology. But who cares about a thing called genetically-engineered products? Filipino food consumers should now be curious to know about biotechnology. And by the way, what is biotechnology? It is the science of manipulating genetic traits and substances. The products – giant vegetables, tastier flood-proof rice, corn and sea produce, and of course, medicines. What makes the field exceptionally exciting is that biotechnology promises big profits and better life. As a strong growth continued with the adoption of new varieties of diseases-resistant crops, biotech products which include drugs become the fastest adopted technology in recent history. Every day, new results of scientific progress are appearing on dinner tables, store shelves and medicine cabinets.

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Talking of food, dip into a dish of tofu and there’s a good chance it is made from genetically-altered soybeans. But are these genetically-modified marvels really safe to eat or use? Or are they foisted on unsuspecting consumers without proper warning? Most consumers including Filipinos have little choice in the matter of altered products notably foods. They are, as a matter of fact, unaware that many staples have already been altered or contain altered ingredients. However, scientists and biofood producers say they’re aware of the issues and take them into account in their reviews – the more people know about genetically-modified products, the less fearful they will be. Biotechnology actually is nothing new and looks set to revolutionize not only agriculture and the environment, but medicines as well. In drug development, several bio-engineered medicines have already replaced those with conventional methods notably in the US and other developed countries. But no nation clings to genetically-altered products as tightly, again, as China. Its pharmaceuticals industry is fast growing and the country needs to produce inexpensive but high-quality medicines in large quantities to cater to its burgeoning population. Pharmaceuticals likewise comprise most of Japan’s biotech products. Many Japanese firms jumped on the bandwagon as early as

the 80’s. Its drug division has been reeling in ample but undisclosed profits or yearly sales, a good part of it in biotech. Harnessing them has made many types of medicines cheaper and more widely available. Like for instance, most insulin for diabetics is made by genetically-altered bacteria. Human growth hormones, antibiotics and human proteins are also being produced by nature’s “factories.” Other drug companies are also making such bio-engineered products as hepatitis vaccines and anti-cancer intervention protein. Unfortunately, governments around the world have been slow to regulate genetically-modified products. Many countries including the US had no labeling laws but require approval of genetic foods and medicines under certain condition such as if the product contains known toxins, allergens or an entirely new substance. These days, it seems barely a week passes without news of some innovation or advance in biotech and the revolution is already happening in Asia. All of this contributes to a growing sense of wariness among Asian consumers. The bio-engineered drug industry is tipped to be one of the fastest growing in the years to come. Meanwhile, some scientists insist that the social impact is always high on the agenda. They assert that biotech experts cannot do anything without the backing of society. It should involve everyone in the process to eliminate paranoia of the unknown because the fear is bigger than the reality. While doing their routine shopping spree, unknowing Filipino food consumers should now start taking a closer look and carefully examine the foodstuffs they need to purchase. Who knows, a certain favorite food item included in their list is genetically-engineered product?

In the mata (eye) of the beholder

IMATALING. It is one of the interior towns of the Baganian Peninsula of Zamboanga del Sur. Located along the coastal area between Zamboanga City to the west and General Santos to the southeast, it must have been a contested area even way back the pre-conquest era. But based on the demographic reality of a dominant Maguindanao population in the contemporary era, it must have been the Maguindanao Sultanate that exerted a greater influence over this area during the heydays of that Sultanate. However, there are also pockets of Samal-Badjao families residing here. But if one were to ask who were the original inhabitants of the low-lying hills and plains that constitute this municipality, one could conjecture that it was the Subanen for they are known to have populated most of the Zamboanga peninsula since time immemorial. Dimataling. If the Subanens were the first to settle in this place, then its original name has disappeared in the mist of time. For its present name – which can be traced back to the time when the Maguindanao Sultanate flourished – is derived from the name of a fierce Moro warrior named Dimataling. So the town’s legendary narratives indicate and which has been passed on to the present citizens of this town made up of close to 18,000 Subanen, Maguindanao, Samal-Badjao, Cebuano (from Cebu and Negros Oriental) and Bol-anons. Multi-ethnic – with a tapestry of cultures and faith traditions – Dimataling to the mata (eye) of an outsider-beholder can either be a place where tensions could erupt into violence or a perfect place for multi-culture/faith dialogue. In fact, Dimataling is both. In its name – DIMATALING – is the word that means eye,

A SOJOURNER’S VIEW BY KARL M. GASPAR, CSSR

Part 1 of 2 and in this place, the eye has seen both the impact of violence and promise of peace. The Jesuits, based in Zamboanga City, were the first missionaries to explore the coastal area of the Zamboanga peninsula, a few must have reached Dimataling and the adjacent towns of Ipil, Margosatubig and others. Migrant settlers from Cebu and Negros Oriental came in droves a decade after the Second World War, most moving from the towns of Zamboanga del Norte and Misamis Occidental searching for a land to own and till. The fertile land of Baganian and its access to rich fishing grounds were naturally attractive to those seeking a promise of a better life. Since there was peace and both Moro and Subanen communities were not averse to the coming of migrants, the Bisaya settled in. This, despite the fact, that it was not easy to reach these places in the 1950s-60s. Up till the 1980s, there was no road connecting the settlements in the Baganian to Pagadian City; these places could only be accessed through the sea and the travel was both tedious and dangerous. Just before martial law , Dimataling was poised to become a progressive town with its productive farms (coconut, rice and cornfields), abundant fishing grounds and with a port. Which was why when the Columban missionaries (mainly Irish and Australian) decided to expand their presence in West-

ern Mindanao, Dimataling became its main center in the Baganian. A church, convent and a Catholic school were built in the poblacion. Martial rule in 1972 would irrevocably change the town’s history. In the few years just before martial rule, tensions had arisen in central Mindanao which eventually expanded towards the west. These gave rise to the Baracuda-Ilaga armed animosity which erupted in orgies of killings, burning and pillage across the communities caught in the crossfire. In 1974, the town of Dimataling was burned; everything was razed to the ground. While it was the burning of Jolo that attracted the greater media attention, the one in Dimataling was no less tragic for the inhabitants, most of whom were forced to evacuate to safer grounds. It would take years, before the town could be rebuilt. In fact, forty years later, the wound which was slashed across the body politic of the municipality has not been fully healed. On a personal note, because I was a staff member of the Mindanao office of the Philippine Business for Social Progress, I visited Dimataling in the tension-filled days following the town’s burning in the company of Warren Ford, the Columban priest assigned in that area. Through his initiative PBSP and MISSSA provided assistance for the building of bunkhouses, a rice-corn mill as well as carabaos and seeds so the farmers could start to plant once again. These encouraged the evacuees to return to Dimataling. In the few days that I was there recently (end of November, early December 2013) at a celebration of the Mindanao Week of Peace, those who were still children in 1974 could still recall how those assistance helped them rebuild their lives.

VANTAGE POINTS

9

How to survive the next big flood

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Part 1 of 2

ALL IT a “storm s u r g e ”, call it a “delubyo”, call it a “flash flood”, call it a “tsunami”--whatever name you want to call it, it must be clearly understood by every villager---specially the people living near river banks or along the sea coast. The problem is, those people working at PAGASA or at that project called NOAH--- are so enamored with hi-tech gadgets and the internet, they don’t really care if people can understand what they’re talking about. Do they think that giving a warning about a coming “storm surge” on their website--- is enough to warn people of the danger posed by this deadly phenomenon ? People don’t understand what a “storm surge” is. I don’t understand it either, until I saw the devastation it brought to Tacloban and surrounding villages near the coast. Worse, do you expect all the people in Tacloban to have laptops or desktop computers to see the “storm surge” warning set up by PAGASA? So, here are some suggestions or wacky tips or whatever you want to call them, to survive the next big flood or “storm surge” : FLOOD BARKERS. Assign all barangay tanods to act as “Flood Barkers” when a strong typhoon is on the way that will cause sudden flash floods or a “storm surge” (which looks the same to them, anyway). These “barkers” need a megaphone or strong voices to shout “Pa makwet na mo kay mobaha dinhi! Ayaw na paglangan! BAKWET NA MO!!!” EVACUATION POINTS. Those near or beside rivers, must be forced to leave their houses and run as fast as possible to the highest point--- a hill or a strong, high building and go as high as the roof. Those who live near the sea must be forced out of their houses by soldiers or cops in trucks or buses and brought as far away from the danger zone---as fast as possible. People who stubbornly refuse to leave must be yanked out of their houses. Barkers can shout “Kamo mga gahi ug ulo! Gusto mo malumos? GAWAS!!” BAMBOO RAFTS. All barangays should make about 50 bamboo rafts for this kind of emergency. Each raft should have about 20 bamboo poles, about 12 feet long, all tied to each other by strong abaca twine. Each raft should be tied to each house or groups of houses with a 10 ft rope. So when the flood or “storm surge” comes, the raft will just float---a perfect floater for people to escape to, or cling to when flood waters start coming in. WOODEN FLOATERS. Perhaps a better version of the “bamboo raft” is a wooden structure, size 10 ft x 10 ft, made of plywood , like a flat box, looking like a giant book, all hollow inside, that floats and can carry around 20 people during a river flood or a “storm surge” near the sea. It must be tied permanently to big trees with a long rope so it won’t be carried away by the flood but stays in just one place.


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NEWS

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

EDGEDAVAO

2014 Budget...FFROM 1 obligations in the amount of P970,892,750 which enclose the P327,132,687 transfer to the Development Fund, Statutory and Contractual Obligations P281,200,000, Budgetary Requirements P256,028,503. P34,600,000 Miscellaneous Personnel Benefits Fund , the Duly Constituted Committees/Board/ Council P36,110,000; Aids & Contribution to National Government Agencies P24,191,060, Programs/ Projects P10,630,500 and Contributions to Aids funds for Non-Government Entities P1,000,000. Also under the general fund is the City Environment and Natural Resources Office (CENRO) which has a total allocation of P346,192,122.00. The city also allocated P103,824,815 for the Operation of Economic Enterprises in the city. P61,308,047 allocated to the markets, P15,000,000 for the slaughterhouses, Davao City Overland Transport Terminal P20,000,000, Sta. Ana Port P2,529,568, P2,150,000 for the Cemeteries, the Davao City Recreation Center (Almendras Gym) has P2,500,000 and P337,200 for the maintenance of Magsaysay Park. The City Government of Davao operates nine markets and nine cemeteries, a recre-

ation center, slaughterhouse, the Magsaysay Park and the overland transport terminal. For the city government’s Development fund, the SP approved P913,671,698.00 allocated for the both non-infrastructure and infrastructure programs and projects. The non-infrastructure projects include debt servicing program with P500,002,872., social development P96,272,708, economic development P84,167,716 and development administration P31,837,000. For the infrastructure projects, road development program P 92,970,000, buildings & other structures P77,085,000; electrification program P3,400,000; drainage program P14,090,000; and Water System P13,846,402. Councilor Danilo Dayanghirang told reporters in yesterday’s Pulong-Pulong ni Pulong at the Councilor’s Lounge in Sangguniang Panglunsod that ‘this is the fastest approval proceeding of budget that they did in the council. Earlier, Dayanghirang said that the proposed annual budget increased by 22 percent from the P4.1 billion annual budget last 2013.

He also said that he already had forgiven Hatcher with whom he had a

heated encounter leading to the filing of charges. [ABF]

Olanolan alleged that his loss by 582 votes was a result of the “dagdag- bawas scheme” and massive repeated prohibited acts and election offenses perpetrated by Trajera and his supporters as well as the members of the Board Election Tellers (BOTs) and Barangay Board of Canvassers (BBOC), particularly in Bucana and

Kabacan. Trajera garnered 10,351 votes to the 9,769 votes for Olaolan. Judge Roxas prohibited the media from entering the sala reserved only for personnel involved in the recounting. One of the staff said the scheduled date would be subject to change if there is delay in the recounting.

Pulong...FFROM 2 Court...FFROM 2

Aboitiz...FFROM 2 for example building a power plant is high pressure – so naka design na siya na yung pressure niya is safe na hindi siya makakaapekto sa mga tao sa paligid niya,” Ual stressed. Vice Mayor Paolo Z. Duterte said that the council will first study the application before it gives its approval. “As long as they will comply on the environmental compliance nila,”

Duterte said, adding that the concern of the council is the environmental impact and Aboitiz should present their mitigating measures. Councilor Danilo Dayanhirang, chair of the committee on environment, said that they will call for a joint committee hearing with the committee on energy under councilor Joanne Bonguyan to dicuss the application.

GADGETS. A mall goer tries out a popular electronics and gadgets manufacturer’s newest headset on display at the Annex of SM City Davao yesterday. Lean Daval Jr.

SouthCot to review open-pit mining ban

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ENERAL SANTOS CITY (MindaNews / 3 Dec) – The Sangguniang Panlalawigan of South Cotabato will review next year the province’s environment code in a bid to “enhance and amend” some of its provisions, including the controversial ban on open-pit mining. South Cotabato Vice Gov. Cecile Diel said Tuesday they have started initial discussions and consultations regarding the code’s planned review, which will mainly focus on “answering some legal questions” that hounded it since it was enacted three years ago. She was referring to Section 22, Paragraph b of Ordinance No. 4 or the Provincial Environment Code that sets the ban on the use of the open-pit mining method in any part of the province’s 10 towns and

lone city. The national government, through the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) and the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG) had contested such provision, citing it contravenes with Republic Act 7492 or the Philippine Mining Act that allows open-pit mining. “We need to revisit and refine the code to answer its legal questions. There’s the pending question of ultra vires or whether we had gone beyond our authority in passing the code that must be settled once and for all,” Diel said in a media forum. The vice governor said the code’s critics had raised jurisprudence and even court decisions that questioned the legality of the open-pit ban. She said there were

also the Supreme Court principle that sets the capacity or the power of the Sangguniang Panlalawigan to legislate vis-à-vis a national law or a policy. “We should have decided on these matters before and answered all issues that were raised squarely,” Diel said. Aside from the open-pit ban provision, the official said the review will cover several other provisions that need to be updated and enhanced. She specifically noted portions of the code that dwell on the measures addressing concerns on climate change and related issues. “We should refine our policy on environmental protection and include in the code some measures that will address the foreseen effects of climate change in the province,”

she said. As to the code’s mandatory review provision after five years of implementation, Diel said such is not absolute based on the principle of lawmaking that legislative bodies cannot pass laws that cannot be repealed. She pointed out that laws are dynamic in nature and no timetable should be set with regards to its updating or fine-tuning. “The Constitution has even set provisions on how it can be amended so that principle should apply to local ordinances as well,” she said. The national government, business groups and several government and non-government agencies had opposed the inclusion of the ban in the environment code and called for its immediate review and amendment. [MindaNews]

Garden City of Samal as one local government unit which has established its own evacuation center that qualifies the standard set by law. He said that though

Davao City is already prepared financially with the construction of evacuation centers, but the various locations still need thorough comprehensive evaluation on soil analysis, tsunami

and volcanic eruption. Rirao said local government units down to the barangay must have its own evaluation on the need for an evacuation center in their locality.

“Our policy-guideline is for local government units to set up an evacuation center on a disaster-resilient area,” he said. [PIA 11-Joey Sem G. Dalumpines]

in Mindanao (AFRIM), told reporters during the forumworkshop on Understanding the Mindanao Peace Processes and the Significant Role of the Academe and Media in Peace building at the National Educator Academy of the Philippines (NEAP) 11 Leadership Development Center that the effort of integrating peace education to the basic curriculum, for example, in public schools, did help to mitigate conflicts arising in Mindanao. “Yun ang irony. You are promoting the culture of

peace, you are mainstreaming peace education un the public education system but you have Maguindanao Massacre, Zamboanga crisis. Parang may disconnection,” Villanueva said. The integration of peace building was confined within the grounds of good moral conduct. She said that the children’s point of view should not be on the micro level, but the macro level including all the factors that may cause conflicts to arise. She said that to be a peace builder, one should look to the conflict itself.

This is where the solution will arise. Earlier, Wahab’s presentation bared clarifications on the content of the agreement. She said that in the agreement, if approved, Bangsamoro will not be a different nation from the Philippines, but it will give them the identity as natives of Mindanao and the political identity. The political identity will define their power and territory. It is said that based on the framework, Bangsamoro will have an executive power or con-

trol on fiscal matters like regional taxes and block grants but the income tax will still remain under the control of the national government. In terms of territory of Bangsangmoro, she clarified that an area will be part of Bangsamoreo, only and if, majority agreed through a pleibicite. “Because, if they understand, if they know their place in the peace process, they will be able to participate in it effectively,” Wahab said. [CRC]

OCD11...FFROM 3

Media...FFROM 3


11 COMMUNITY SENSE

EDGEDAVAO VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

A doctor just a text away

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R. Roel Cagape may not consider himself technology-literate, but he has found a way to use technology in making his medical services available to those in remote communities in General Santos City and neighboring towns in the Sarangani Province. Through electronic health centers set up in the mountains of Sarangani Province, South Cotabato, Sultan Kudarat and General Santos City, the doctor is just “a text away” to the Indigenous Peoples (IP) groups living in these remote areas. The electronic health center is a combination of an SMS-based communication system called “E-text si Doc” and a bahay kubo or small nipa structure, which houses the Botika Sa Kabukiran where free medicines are dispensed. Under the set-up, a patient in a remote community that has been educated and instructed by Cagape himself on the data needed to be sent, does so using the applicable codes left on a large tarpaulin at the botika or pharmacy. The use of codes shortens the text message/s considerably, which saves the sender expense. Cagape gives his medical advice in text message/s as well. Any medicines needed are dispensed by a volunteer at the botika, where a cell phone and a solar charger are also available for use. Cagape’s version of an electronic health center may seem rather crude, but it works. He receives an average of 100 text messages a day, which he is careful to read and respond to. He finds that the best time to do this is when he wakes up at 3 a.m., when it’s too early for him to be caught up in the day’s activities. An active member of the SOCCSKSARGEN (South Cotabato, Cotabato, Sultan Kudarat, Sarangani and General Santos City) Peace

Network, Cagape is thankful to the partner agencies and organizations as well as charitable individuals who make it possible for him to provide free medical services to communities that do not have access to health services. It also helps that Cagape has built a reputation in the community due to numerous awards and citations received for his work. He is this year’s recipient of the Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Award. The good doctor was also named a Tapat Summit ambassador this year and the Gawad Geny Lopez Jr. Bayaning Filipino Awards last year. In addition, Cagape’s work on the e-health centers was recently named as one of the 10 winners of payITfwd, the newest social development initiative of Smart Communications, Inc. (Smart) which promotes spreading good deeds through technology. It was chosen from among over a hundred entries received by Smart during the first round of competition. “It was very different in the beginning when I had to look for donors and patrons to help fund medicines and logistics needed in the medical missions. Now, they are the ones who contact me,” he says. After graduating with a doctor’s degree in Family Medicine at the Cebu Institute of Medicine in 1987, Cagape went back to his hometown in General Santos City to give back to his community. He started “Tulong Ko Sa Pasyenteng Pilipino” in 2002. In cooperation with different agencies, government and private, he conducts medical missions in remote communities. Activities include, among others, feeding, free consultation, dispensing of medicines, dental consultation and treatment, deworming, circumcision, and distribution of goods such as toothbrush, toothpaste, clothing, etc. He

Dr. Roel Cagape attends to patients in one of the health centers set up in the mountains of Sarangani. maximizes his stay in these remote areas by conducting a seminar on primary health care and introducing Food Always in the Home (Faith) which include the setting up of a kitchen garden and instruction on the proper ways to prepare food to combat iron deficiency, a common problem in the highlands. “I realized that after we packed up our medical mission, the problem remained – inaccessibility to health services,” he says. Thus, the idea of making himself available remotely was hatched. He tried twoway radio in 2002, but found the people more receptive to SMS. In 2004, “E-text si Doc” was born. He concedes that there are problems. When he notified the Department of Health of “E-text si Doc”, the health department warned him about dispensing medical advice via SMS but Cagape

Members of the community are guided by a tarpaulin posted at the health center which details the codes for the symptoms as well as instructions on the sending of text messages.

says he is taking the risk. He says he cannot stomach the alternative – to leave these communities he’d served in medical missions to fend for themselves until he could visit them again. This would take months since these communities are accessible only after days of travel and most of it on foot and under adverse conditions. There’s also the resistance to technology, but “either they continue to resist and suffer or find someone to help them send an SMS and find relief.” Cagape’s concern is that there are still many areas that do not have cellular coverage, especially places reportedly inhabited by rebel groups. “How does one get to have cellular coverage in an area?” he asks. He also wonders if there is a way he can screen hoax text messages or

type his SMS responses to health concerns more conveniently since he is still using an old cellular phone that is not even WiFi-capable. “My right thumb is overworked,” he laughs. The prizes from Smart’s payITfwd may help. Aside from the P50,000 cash prize, Cagape received five tablets. Smart Bro provided connectivity by giving away a Smart Bro pocket wi-fi and P3,000 worth of load. He can use any of the five tablets to send and receive text messages, even copying and pasting information for basic and common health questions. He will also find it easier to manage contacts if he stored them on the cloud so that he does not have to rebuild his phone book from scratch like he did when he lost his phone earlier this year. That is, if he can find

someone to show him how to maximize the connectivity and the mobile Internet devices for his operations, or find the time to do it, or both, he says. When not on a medical mission in the region or seeing patients at his office in General Santos City, Cagape volunteers for medical missions to calamity-struck areas. He does not charge anything for his services. “I don’t expect anything in return. It’s not even about happiness,” he says. “I do know that what I am doing is significant, important and of value. It is enough that I am doing what somebody like me should be doing,” he says. Smart is now accepting entries for the second round of payITfwd. For more details about the program, check out www. smart.com.ph/payITfwd. [By Aimee Luab-Abaricia]

At the Botika sa Kabukiran, medicines are kept inside containers with the name of the medicine and instructions on how to take them. Health booklets are also made available to the residents.


12 CLASSIFIEDS

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VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

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13 COMPETITIVE EDGE

EDGEDAVAO VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

Civil Service revalidated level 2 Philippine Science HS wins accreditation for DA RFO-11 in DCWD’s speech contest THE Civil Service Commission revalidated the accredited level 2 status to the office of the Department of Agriculture (DA) XI, Monday. During the flag raising ceremony in the DA Office 11, Civil Service Director, Anabelle Rosell said that the accreditation was awarded due to DA’s strong human resource and organizational development performance. She said that out of

82 accredited agencies in region 11, 32 were revalidated which include the Department of Agriculture Regional field office 11. “This revalidation means you continue to exercise your final authority to take final action on appointments. You need not having approved or attested by the CSC because the member of the regional director, or whoever is the appointing authority, as long as it was issued in ac-

cordance to CSC laws and rules, those appointments shall take effect immediately”, Rosell said. Agriculture 11 Director, Remelyn R. Recoter who receives the recognition acknowledged the personnel section for its commending performance. She added that the region will be targeting the level 3 accreditation from the CSC which is the Center of Excellence. [LLbocado-Aggie Media Sevice]

CSC Awards DA. Agriculture XI Regional Director, Remelyn R. Recoter (R) receives the award of revalidation of the level 2 accredited status from Civil Service Commission 11 Director IV, Anabelle Rosell.

G

ABRIELLE P. Flores of Philippine Science High School – Southern Mindanao Campus was hailed as champion of Davao City Water District’s 13th Citywide Extemporaneous Speaking contest besting 13 other contestants in the semi-final and final rounds. Finishing as first runner-up was Kassandra Danielle T. Barnes of Davao Christian HS and second runner-up was Dessa John N. Delos Santos of Precious International School of Davao. The top three finalists responded to the same statement “One of the major challenges faced by our water and sanitation sector is the highly fragmented functions at the national and local levels among government agencies. How do you think the Integrated Water Resources Management approach can address this challenge?”. It was Flores’ speech that closed the decision of the three judges. According to her, the IWRM approach will allow the dissemination and sharing of information, sharing of resources and the cultivation of the bayanihan concept. Fifteen finalists were chosen for the semi-final round from among 47 contestants who joined the

three-batch elimination held at Lispher Inn last November 18 and 19. All questions and statements in the contest tackled issues concerning water, watershed and the environment. They were: Mikhaela Joey R. Espinosa (Ateneo de Davao University), Regina Mae O. Baguio (Christian Colleges of Southeast Asia), Therese Andrea U. Gravador (Colegio de San Ignacio, Inc.), Hannan J. Yunos (Davao Central College), Voltaire V. Casido (Davao City National HS), Cherrie Mae Andrea E. Sun (Holy Cross of Agdao), Leah Rose V. Lubiano (Pablo Lorenzo NHS), Danica Natassja B. Austria (Philippine Women’s College of Davao), Bryxx Clyde M. Leria (Rizal Memorial Colleges), Jeric P. Lumiguid (Talomo NHS), Elaine Cleo C. Socorro (University of Mindanao – Main) and Angelu Muriel B. Solis (University of Immaculate Concepcion). However, Yunos failed to compete in the semis due to a pressing family matter. Aside from plaques, winners also received cash prizes. As champion, Flores received Php6,000.00 while Barnes and Delos Santos received Php4,000.00 and Php2,000.00, respectively. Certificates of participation

were given to all contestants while the coaches received certificates of commendation for training the young speakers. The school thru the school heads also received certificates of appreciation for allowing their students to join DCWD’s speech competition. The judges for the semi-final and final rounds were writer, columnist and Toastmaster Rene Gerardo A. Lizada, Interface Development Interventions (IDIS) Inc. executive director Mary Ann V. Fuertes and University of Souhteastern Philippines instructor Joy Reginaldo – Risonar. Elimination judges include retired educator Virginia L. Guibone, IDIS Inc. policy advocacy specialist Chinkie T. Peliño and retired educator and Speechfest Foundation Incorporated chairperson Democracia M. Dominguez. The citywide extemporaneous speaking contest is an annual competition sponsored by DCWD in time for Davao City’s celebration of the Water Consciousness Month every November. For this year’s celebration in time for DCWD’s 40th founding anniversary, the theme is “Conserve Water. Secure the Future”. (Jovana T. Duhaylungsod)


14 SPORTS

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

EDGEDAVAO

‘Padyak Para sa Leyte’on Friday M

TAEKWONDO OFFICIALS. Officials of the newly-formed ITF taekwondo association in Davao pose before the 1st ITF Taekwondo tournament at the Gaisano South Mall.

Pacquiao cutman prefers Bradley as next opponent M

IGUEL Diaz, the renowned Argentine cutman of Manny Pacquiao, told a handful of scribes over the weekend that if he could have his way, he prefers Tim Bradley as Pacquiao’s next opponent. Although Diaz is not scared of seeing Pacquiao get it on for the fifth time with Juan Manuel Marquez of Mexico when he makes his 2014 debut set April 12 in Las Vegas, the seventy-something cornerman said Bradley’s style is more suited to Pacquiao’s gung-

ho attack. “Marquez is very, very smart,” said Diaz, who has been tasked to take care of Pacquiao’s facial cuts the last five years. But Diaz said Pacquiao was winning against Marquez in their fourth fight when misfortune struck in the sixth round. Pacquiao rejoined the elite last week with a masterful 12-round unanimous decision over Brandon Rios in Macau. Diaz was in the country recently when he worked the corner of Don-

nie Nietes, who retained his World Boxing Organization light-flyweight title at the Smart-Araneta Coliseum. Marquez, however, has yet to make a decision regarding his future although he told the Mexican media last week that he doesn’t have any plans of facing Pacquiao a fifth time. But a well-known publicist from the US said Marquez will change his mind once he receives a mouth-watering offer. “It’s all about the mon-

ey,” said the publicist who is heavily involved in bigtime boxing. Marquez is coming off a loss to Bradley and his stock dropped dramatically after the loss, making him vulnerable to a hefty offer sheet. Bradley is more interested in meeting Pacquiao because his June 2012 victory over the Gensan icon remains shrouded in doubt. Ringsiders believe that Bradley was lucky to get a split decision over Pacquiao.

EVEN Filipinos and 13 foreigners will battle it out at this Friday’s ONE Fighting Championship (ONE FC) event, titled ONE FC: Moment of Truth, starting at 7:00 p.m. at the Mall of Asia (MOA) Arena in Pasay City. Filipino Team Lakay striker Honorio “The Rock” Banario will attempt to get back his ONE FC Featherweight World Championship belt as he squares off against Japanese tormentor Koji Oishi in the main event of an evening that features 10 gripping bouts. “This is the moment I have been waiting for. After my defeat in May by Oishi, nothing has occupied my mind except to reclaim my belt,” Banario said. Oishi is a tough veteran that will pose a stern test for Banario. He had been vanquished only once in his previous 14 fights, including the win over Banario in May, which shocked many MMA fans. The featured co-main event will be the fight be-

tween Kevin “The Silencer” Belingon, another Team Lakay fighter, and undefeated Spaniard David Aranda Santacana in the bantamweight division. Belingon, who was also trounced last May in the ONE FC event, is expected to have his hands full as Santacana is no ordinary adversary. Besides being undefeated in nine fights, Santacana, who has competed primarily in Europe, has impressive grappling skills, having won eight of his fights by submission. But what is going in favor of Belingon, with a 11-3 record with seven finishes, is his overwhelming self-confidence, not to mention his back-to-back technical knockout (TKO) victories over Thank Vu and Yusup Saadulaev before that unfortunate May outing. Team Lakay member and former Southeast Asia wushu gold medalist Eduard Folayang will also skirmish with Dutch-Indonesian Shooto veteran Vincent Latoel.

Folayang has to prove he still has it after suffering two successive defeats and will require all his skills, especially since Latoel is no easy rival having fought in six different countries in three continents with a record of 14 wins. He has a kickboxing background and trains out of the famed Golden Glory Gym in the Netherlands. The fourth bout is in the bantamweight division and pits former Japanese Shooto featherweight champion Koetsu Okazaki and jiu jitsu expert Joshua Alvarez, who was born in Guam but whose parents are both Filipinos. Okazaki has showed he has defensive prowess, although he was beaten by unanimous decision by the dreaded Brazilian Bibiano Fernandes in his ONE FC debut for the interim bantamweight championship in May this year. Although a late replacement, the Guam-based Alvarez said he has never skipped the gym and trains almost everyday and does strength and conditioning

drills. He has five straight wins and nine of his 12 victories were by way of submission. The fifth bout is between former American Marines Caros Fodor and South African muay Thai practitioner Vuyisile Collosa, whose matchup will be closely watched as both are contenders for MMA legend Shinya Aoki’s ONE FC lightweight belt. Fodor and Colossa separately won in thrilling matches during ONE FC 10 “Kings and Champions” event in Jakarta, Indonesia, in September this year. Fodor, a veteran of the Ultimate Fighting Championship and Strikeforce before joining the ONE FC fold, thrashed the previously undefeated Seung Ho Yang of Korea for three rounds in his debut match, while Colossa put up an impressive unanimous victory against veteran Japanese Kotetsu Boku, the former One FC lightweight champion, in the main event. [PNA]

7 Filipinos, 13 foreigners battle it out in ONE FC S

ORE than a hundred bikers are expected to join the “Padyak Para sa Leyte”, a 20-kilometer night ride for charity slated this Friday starting at 7 p.m. at the Rizal Park. “We are requesting participants if they can bring also toys for the children,” said organizer Salvador “Jun” Paholio Jr. of Philcycling at the SCOOP session of The Royal Mandaya Hotel. Paholio said that aside from the relief goods, the children in Leyte also need toys as part of their rehabilitation program. “Our Mayor Rody Duterte also saw it is very important to help the children to recover from their bad experience,” said Paholio, whose clan hails from Matalom, Leyte. Participants are also required to register for only P100. “But they can pay more than that amount if they also want to donate cash,” said Paholio, also chairman of the Davao City Sports Consumer Cooperative (DCSCC). The donations and relief goods will be turned over the Lihuk Leyteño project of the office of City Councilor Leo

Avila III, who will be bringing them to Leyte for the victims of the super typhoon Yolanda. Lihuk Leyteño is a group of concerned Filipinos led by Dabawenyos with roots in Leyte willing to extend help to those affected by typhoon Yolanda. Mayor Duterte was born in Maasin City, Leyte. Aside from the mandatory helmet, bikers are also required to have blinkers and headlamp. The assembly time is 5:30 p.m. at the Rizal Park. The night ride will start at Rizal Park going to Bolton St. extension, Magallanes St., turn right Quimpo Boulevard, turn right MacArthur Highway in Matina, Bankerohan Bridge, turn right Magallanes St. turn left Claveria, J.P. Laurel Avenue, turn right Dakudao Avenue, to Magsaysay Avenue, turn left Ponciano Reyes St., Crooked Road and end at Rizal Park. “We will raffle 30 singlets after the night ride,” Paholio said at the weekly public service program sponsored by TRMH, Genesis 88, Mulatto Outdoor Apparel, Beefit Gym, Edge Outdoor and Rice Box.

WO former sparring partners of “Fighter of the Decade” Manny Pacquiao have tough fights this coming weekend against top class opponents. Undefeated light middleweight Glen “Jersey Boy” Tapia who has a record of 20-0 with 12 knockouts battles southpaw James “Mandingo Warrior” Kirkland who boasts of only one loss against 31 wins with 27 knockouts. Tapia’s biggest win was over previously unbeaten Abraham “Abie” Han who was cut on the left side of the head due to an accidental head-butt in round four and was dropped in round seven and retired in round eight. In his last fight Tapia scored a 5th round TKO over Elco Garcia on September 28, 2013. Kirkland won the Continental Americas light middleweight title with a 6th round TKO over rugged Alfredo Angulo before retaining the title when Carlos Molina was disqualified in the 10th round on March 24, 2012. Kirkland was dropped in the first round and came back to knock Angulo down late in the same round and after demonstrating his

boxing skills through the next few rounds, Kirkland hammered Angulo to win by a sixth round stoppage. Shawn “Showtime” Porter another former Pacquiao sparring partner, also faces a tough challenge against Devon “Alexander the Great’ Alexander who has a record of 25-1 with 14 knockouts. Porter is undefeated with 22 wins, one draw with 14 wins coming by way of knockouts. In a rematch with Julio Diaz last September 12, Porter won the vacant IBF North American welterweight title via a ten round unanimous decision 12 after a split draw on December 15 last year. Alexander whose only defeat was at the hands of Timothy “Desert Storm” Bradley when he dropped a ten round technical decision on January 29, 2011 won the IBF title with a unanimous twelve round decision over Randall Bailey on October 20, 2012 and also scored big wins over rugged Lucas Matthysse and Marcus Maidana to boost his stock. Alexander is coming off a win over Lee Purdy who failed to make the weight and retired in the 7th round of their showdown last May 18.

Two former Pacman sparmates get breaks T


INdulge!

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

EDGEDAVAO

WOMEN

A woman of the future

“I

like my money right where I see it… hanging in my closet.” That’s the Carrie Bradshaw in most modern day women, talking. Women nowadays are fast becoming a strong force in the corporate scene, holding high positions which used to be associated to men. Women comprise more than 50% of the labor force, which goes to show that we are competent enough to look after our own needs. Having that stable income gives us the independence and purchasing power to invest in material things and enjoy a bit luxury. With all this economic power, however, comes greater responsibility, for your finances, and for the next generation.

Easy comes, easy goes. Money is just as easily expended as food. Same goes with our job: Nothing is permanent. We need to invest our money wisely and manage our priorities in life. While there is nothing immoral in indulging ourselves with branded clothing, shoes, or bags, we should also try and save something for our future. Yes, ladies. Regardless of your age, financial or domestic status, life insurance is usually necessary. Whether you’re married or single, divorced or widowed - starting your career or approaching retirement — the time to get more involved in your investments is now. More often than not, men and women have a difficult time confronting their own mortality. The fact of the matter is each one of us is going to die. Avoiding this fact doesn’t change the inevitable. Aside from equitable inheritance for your heirs or children, life insurance can also provide you money to help pay expenses and generate more income. It can even give you benefits which you can enjoy during your lifetime. As a single mom, I have become more conscious of how much I spend on myself in order to set aside a enough for my daughter’s future. I certainly do not want to leave our future to chance. A woman of the future Most women have this natural gift to meet and adapt to the changing needs of society who want relational and holistic solutions, and this paved the way for women to find their calling in the insurance industry. Kristin Veronica “Nina” Laurel Borromeo is one of them. As Area Manager for Pru Life U.K. and Managing Director of Borromeo Insurance Agency, her work encompasses representing recruitment, training, administration, management, and

representation of the team in the Pru Life U.K. She is also a wife and mother of 2. All in entrepreneurial spirit “Before the year 2000, my husband and I were at a crossroads.  We had wanted to be able to achieve a few goals of having our own corporate office, a long-term enterprise which helps people and provide recognition for achievements and offers the option to travel both locally and abroad. We wanted a business we can hopefully turn over to our children.” “My husband, Paul, received an invitation to listen to a business opportunity hosted by Allstate Life Insurance. He came home and we stayed up until 3 am talking about the possibilities. We did our due diligence and after two weeks decided to create our business.   We did not have the capital to put up the business right away and at that time, all we had was our home. We decided to take a calculated risk, dive in with both feet, mortgaged our home for 1/4 of its value and created our organization with an initial manpower of 4 associates.” “Our first office was a 100 square meter office space at the Josefina Building and after 5 years our office space grew to 235 square meters. As we could see that we were still in the process of expanding, we decided to construct our own office building at 11 Juna Avenue, to suit our needs and declare to our clients that we intend to stay for the long term. From a start-up group of 4 people, we are now more than 200 strong with 3 distinct groups operating in Metro Manila and Davao.” “We set off on this vocation to help other people achieve the best. Seeing improvements in the lives of our colleagues alone is a great reward. A small smile and whisper that I have been instrumental as a source of inspiration is what

drives me forward. To see my children aspire to be where we are at in the future, encapsulates why we do our mission whole heartedly; to be able to work with my husband, hand in hand, day in and out in an industry that rewards us handsomely by doing what is inherently good and create memories along the way, is living a dream.” “My career path has long since revolved and evolved around education, whether it be through a human resources department, the academe or in our small businesses. Thus my direction has not changed at all, just the vehicle in which I use to educate our friends and colleagues.” “Looking at my career, I will not be able to save the world by myself. I wish for people to give an opportunity an ear. What the worst that can happen?” On life insurance “Investment is a practice of trust and patience.  Once it is done with an educated decision, and done in the longer term, I believe it will always be for the better.” “Our services offer clients the alternative to maximize their productivity and health now, by providing financial protection for themselves and their loved ones. I have realized that there are only two things that can happen to us in this world; either we leave too soon or live too long.  In both of these cases, we provide a back-up plan for disability, illness, accident, investments and of course life.” “At this day and age, women and mothers need to think of the future. Independence does have a cost. As we become more and more productive, we maximize our abilities by investing for the long term to augment our retirement and our whims at a cost comfortable today. As the state of health changes due to the change in the environment, we protect our families from

financial distress by investing in a program that provides for the cost of illness should it strike.  As our children’s future relies on our own hands, I encourage women to provide for life protection so our dreams will live on even if we are no longer around.” “With my exposure in Pru Life U.K. and the insurance industry, I have become more discerning on wants and needs, quality of service and long term use and potential.  These are parallel to what it is that we try to relay to our clients and colleagues.   As an example, I would prefer to purchase a sensible pair of good quality, but not necessarily name branded pumps, because it will serve the same purpose. Women should invest in knowing the alternatives and looking forward to a future of less worry. Less worry, less wrinkles.” “We should not hesitate in investing. Strip down all the technicalities of life insurance and what it all boils down to is a concrete expression of Love.  To see dreams to fruition, to not leave the futures of children to chance, to provide for an illness fund and a dignified retirement, I believe is the work of love.”


A2 INdulge!

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

EVENT

F

BIMP-EAGA to boost film exchange and production

ILM industry members of BIMP-EAGA are planning to boost the exchange of culture and arts through the propagation of film production in a bid to transform the sub-region as a film industry focal point. A BIMP-EAGA working group on film and creative industries was recently formed to promote the economic sub-region not just as a viable tourist destination, but also as a center for film exchange and production. BIMP-EAGA stands for Brunei Darussalam Indonesia Malaysia the Philippines East ASEAN growth area, a sub-regional economic cooperation designed to spur economic development in lagging sub-economies of the member countries by boosting trade, tourism, and investments. The creation of the group was formalized during the BIMP-EAGA Film Connection meeting, a side event to the SalaMindanaw International Film Festival, held here last week. “For the first time in the history of BIMP-EAGA, a group is formed solely designed to boost the region’s film industry,” said Teng Mangansakan, Festival Director of SalaMindanaw. He added that the common challenge is the marketing and distribution of films within the sub-economic region. “This collaboration with our BIMP-EAGA counterparts will certainly help address that concern, especially that we share a lot of things in common,” said Mangansakan. At the meeting, filmmakers from the subeconomic cooperation are

EVENT

setting sights on the possibility of creating mutual markets for films produced from each member countries. The group is also looking at the possibility of expanding mutual film markets within the Indonesia Malaysia Thailand Growth Triangle (IMT-GT). “A mutual market can work like a twin marketing scheme in which a movie produced in Mindanao can be marketed in other member-countries, and vice-versa,” explained Mangansakan. He added that the issues with government approval can also be dealt with through the BIMP-EAGA platform and that this recent collaboration has opened avenues for experience sharing and knowledge transfer among filmmakers. “For instance, Brunei is somewhat lagging behind in terms of content development, but they have all the necessary technical resources. Mindanao on the other hand sees content creation as one of its strengths,” said Mangansakan while adding “these are just some areas where we can complement each other and come up with audio visual outputs that have better market viability.” Among the EAGA member countries, Brunei’s film industry is considered in development stage due to market constraints and censorship standards. Other member countries however are fast to offer promotion support through film appreciation seminars and workshops.

EDGEDAVAO

UP AND ABOUT

Milk Tea lovin’ at CrazyWraps

By ATHENA JILLIAN BRAVO

T

IME to get crazily in love with CrazyWraps this Christmas as they bring down surprises for milk tea lovers! For every purchase of Milk Tea product from CrazyWraps, customers are entitled to get a free “Drink of the Day” that would totally satisfy one’s tea cravings. Tea lovers may enjoy this lovely thirst-quencher treat with the restaurant’s wide variety of delicious food choices for a fully loaded meal this holiday season. Here’s how: Pair your choice of Milk Tea with CrazyWraps’ delish specialty wraps inspired by South East Asian and Middle Eastern recipes. One of it is a Chicken Wrap specially made in Malaysia and stuffed with the tastiest filling they have in store. If you’re up for no diet day, you may also try the restaurant’s pastas, rice meals and sandwiches that would totally load you up some more. But one thing in the mustnot-miss dishes are the Fish & Chips dipped in special dressing, Spaghetti Meatballs and their ‘makes-you-forget-yourname’ Buffalo Wings. Visit CrazyWraps located at second level, near the Cinema Lobby of SM Lanang Premier and indulge to this delicious treats this Christmas.

Grab a bite of CrazyWraps Chicken Wrap to pair with your Milk Tea.

CrazyWraps’ own version of meaty, succulent and spicy Buffalo Wings deep-fried to a golden brown perfection.

Christmas in Damosa Fairlane’s Continental Club A

FTER a series of developments in Damosa Fairlane, the Continental club – the community’s central amenity was finally inaugurated last November 30. The Continental Club is treated with an overlooking view of the lush green landscaping of the whole community. It was a coveted piece of expansive, modern, and resort-chic place for gathering. For residents use are different amenities like pool, in-pool lounge and cozy function hall perfect for parties and community gatherings in the future. One of the many things that made this celebration extra special was the early Christmas treat for the fu-

ture homeowners. They were entertained with fiery fire dancing with the accompaniment of the singing bands for a disco entertainment. A sumptuous array of Christmas food was also served while they enjoyed themselves to the snow-flakes machine which filled the clubhouse with a white-Christmas feel. Residents also had a better chance to know their neighbors through a kris-kringle where each exchanged gifts and shared their warmest smiles. Truly, the Continental Club of Damosa Fairlane brought together future homeowners ready to start their new lives in their new homes.

Mark Jone Malhin, top seller foe the month of September. With him are (leftmost) Damosa Land, Inc’s Vice President and General Manager Edgardo Villaver and (rightmost) ANFLOCOR Senior Vice President Mr. Ricardo Floirendo


EDGEDAVAO

INdulge! A3

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

ENTERTAINMENT

Multi award-winning Singaporean film ‘Ilo Ilo’ hits local cinemas today

SINGAPORE’S entry into next year’s Oscars and multi-awarded film, “ILO ILO,” finally hits local theatres as today.

Touches upon the challenges and experiences faced by the Philippines’ overseas workers, particularly those who acquire jobs as household helps for foreign families, acclaimed Singaporean director Anthony Chen took inspiration from his experience, growing up under the care of a Filipina his family had hired as a maid when he was still a little boy. In his Academy Awardnominated film “ILO ILO,” his experiences in growing up under her care are somehow reflected in the story of a child named Jiale (Koh Jia Ler) and his family’s household help, Terry (Angeli Bayani). “ILO ILO” details the story of a “Auntie Terry” who accepts work as a maid for a middle-class family living in a tenement in Singapore. In taking upon this new chapter in her life, she quickly discovers her biggest challenge: the precocious tenyear old son of her employ-

ers. The boy tries to make her life a living hell by being difficult, disobedient, and rude—even framing her for acts that aim at her getting deported. Other challenges arise as the boy’s family struggles with their finances. However, with determination and tough love,

the relationship between the two slowly changes, ultimately putting things far greater than employment on the line. “ILOILO” stars Angeli Bayani, Koh Jia Ler, Yeo Yann Yann, and Tian Wen Chan. In Davao City, “ILO ILO” will be shown at the Cinema of SM City Davao.

Investigative Documentaries: A program with a lot of math If one were to factor in all elements that make a television program succeed, Investigative Documentaries (ID) would not. It is full of numbers, which a lot of TV viewers are not too keen on analysing. It airs at 8 in the evening, when soaps reign supreme. It tackles government policies, systems, and processes, which many find too unwieldy. Yet the program, hosted by veteran journalist Malou Mangahas, has found a core group of supporters, making it one of the highestranking programs on GMA News TV, the country’s number 1 news channel. This year, it won the St. Hildegarde Award for Outstanding Achievement in Broadcast Media, an honor given by St. Scholastica’s College. Just last month, the Catholic Mass Media Awards named it Best Public Service Program. This was followed by the Department of Health Media Awards’ Health Media Recognition for its episode on nutrition just last month. To top it all off, Metrobank

Foundation named ID program host Mangahas as one of this year’s Journalists of the Year. “ID was born nearly three years ago on a few modest goals. We wanted to produce a program that would tackle with reason, candor, and solid research -- rather than shock or scare or dazzle -- issues and events with large public interest and impact; enrich and add value to the public discourse by offering data on the backward and forward links of our stories as a people; and help locate the role of Filipino citizens, even as we firmly hold public officials and agencies accountable, in addressing problems and rolling out solutions,” says Mangahas. And while it has been a joke that students take up mass communication to avoid mathematics, doing the math and analyzing government’s numbers have become the core competency of the ID staff. ”Just as important, we had wished, too, that as the ID staff constantly try to ac-

cess information and documents from government agencies for our stories, we could also help inform our viewers about how they can assert and practise their right to know and secure information they need, want, and are entitled in law to get, because these involve public welfare and the use of public funds,” says Mangahas. The past three years, ID has tackled, at length, issues that bring to light the impact of government policies and programs. It has devoted numerous episodes on assessing the performance of political clans, corruption in infrastructure projects, and neglected social concerns. Naturally, the program’s Facebook page has become a watering hole of sorts for those with opinion on politics and governance. ID’s Facebook page has 137,000 supoorters, a feat for a serious program with loads of math. Investigative Documentaries airs at 8 PM every Thursday night on GMA News TV.

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE 2D Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson

PG 13

11:20 | 2:00 | 4:40 | 7:20 | 10:00 LFS

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE 2D Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson

PG 13

1:00 | 3:40 | 6:20 | 9:00 LFS

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE 2D Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson

PG 13

12:10 | 2:50 | 5:30 | 8:10 LFS

R-16 THOR: THE DARK WORLD 2D Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman PG 13

12:40 | 3:00 | 5:20 | 7:40 | 10:00 LFS


A4 INdulge! ENTERTAINMENT EDGEDavao Davao Partners

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

EDGEDAVAO

Four times the fun with Vice Ganda in Girl, Boy, Bakla, Tomboy IT’s four times the fun and laughter as Star Cinema teams up once again with Viva Films as they reunite the unkaboggable tandem of Vice Ganda and box-office director Wenn V. Deramas in Girl, Boy, Bakla, Tomboy – their official entry to the 39th Metro Manila Film Festival (MMFF).

Girl, Boy, Bakla, Tomboy is the wackiest, craziest, and most heartwarming family movie of the holiday season. The film features Vice Ganda in his most challenging movie to date as he plays quadruple roles of four siblings who are all in search for love, family, and acceptance. The movie revolves around the story of quadruplets who were separated from each other when they were babies. Two of the siblings, Team GirlBoy, flew to the States with their father while the other two, Team Bakla-Tomboy, were left behind under the care of their mother. Conflict begins when the siblings based in the States discover that the boy is afflicted with a liver disease and must undergo a transplant. The US-based siblings soon discover that they have two other siblings in the Philippines whose liver could be a match to the boy’s. The situation forces them to come home and reconnect with their siblings and mother. For the very first time Team Girl-Boy and Team Bakla-Tomboy meet face to face ushering a series of riotous and hilarious events that may or may not unite their broken families together. Girl, Boy, Bakla, Tomboy is the biggest, most-anticipated, and most heartwarming family movie of the year as Vice Ganda offers four times the fun and excitement this Christmas. “I’m so happy to be part of the MMFF once again,” says Vice. “Moviegoers can look forward to a different kind of family movie this December. With all the many problems that we faced in the past months it would be great to just relax and have fun the cinemas with us.” Direk Wenn on the other hand explains that the movie is first and foremost a family movie with a heart. “It’s a given that audiences can expect non-stop laughter from Vice and our cast but at the very core of the movie is our message that Christmas is truly the best time for every family to forget their differences and be together as one.” It should also be noted that this is also the very first film collaboration between Vice and Diamond Star Maricel Soriano whom he considers as one of his idols in the industry. “I am so thrilled and honored to work with Inay Marya. It’s my all-time dream to be slapped by the Diamond Star on screen and you should all watch out for that intense scene between Inay Mary and I,” says The Phenomenal Box-Office Star. Girl, Boy, Bakla, Tomboy also stars Joey Marquez, Ruffa Guttierez, Cristine Reyes, Ejay Falcon, JC De Vera, Kiray Celis, JM “Cho” Ibanez, Red Bustamante, and Xyriel Manabat. Girl, Boy, Bakla, Tomboy is part of Star Cinema’s 20th anniversary celebration and it is showing in mainstream cinemas nationwide starting December 25.


EDGEDAVAO

SPORTS 15

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

Spurs trip Hawks on buzzer-beater S

AN ANTONIO (AP) -- Tim Duncan made a jumper with 0.4 seconds left to lift the San Antonio Spurs to a 102100 victory over the Atlanta Hawks on Monday night. Duncan finished with 23 points and 21 rebounds as San Antonio dominated the middle against the younger and more athletic Atlanta front court. Boris Diaw had 16 points and Tiago Splitter finished with 11. Atlanta had all five starters score in double figures. Jeff Teague had 19 points, Al Horford added 18 and DeMarre Carroll finished with 17. The Hawks trailed 98-94 when Paul Millsap made a 3-pointer over Diaw with 17.5 seconds remaining. Manu Ginobili then made a pair of free throws for the Spurs, but Teague drained a 3 over Kawhi Leonard to tie it at 100 with 4.7 seconds left. Curling off a pick, Duncan drained a jumper near the free-throw line to put San Antonio ahead to stay. Millsap’s desperation jumper hit the side of the backboard. Tony Parker added 15 points for the Spurs. Marco Belinelli had 13 and Ginobili finished with 10. There were 20 lead changes and 17 ties in a game with almost identical schemes. Atlanta is

STEAL. Tony Parker of the San Antonio Spurs gets ballhawked in this bit of action against the Atlanta Hawks. Nine of the 10 Spurs a jumper just before the coached by former longtime San Antonio assis- who played in the first shot clock expired to give half scored. Danny Green San Antonio a 94-87 lead. tant Mike Budenholzer. NOTES: Budenholzer The Spurs returned to didn’t score until there their ball-sharing ways was 2:54 remaining in the received a loud ovation after they struggled on of- game, but it proved to be a from the crowd during fense in a loss to Houston. critical basket. He drained pregame introductions. He

LIKE KOBE

George designs game resembling childhood idol

L

PAUL GEORGE. Like idol Kobe.

OS ANGELES (Reuters) - With each pull-up jump shot and polished offensive move, Indiana Pacers forward Paul George resembles his childhood idol Kobe Bryant, yet he has managed to carve out his own identity as one of basketball’s rising stars. There are times when the similarities between George and Bryant, the guard for the Los Angeles Lakers, are uncanny: from the footwork and mid-range jumpers all the way down to the number 24 on both their jerseys. But this is all by design, as the 23-year-old George has used Bryant as a basketball template en route to fulfilling his own limitless potential. “Paul grew up idolizing Kobe,” Pacers coach Frank Vogel told Reuters. “So much of the last two years (George has heard) stories about Kobe; about how Kobe works. They’re legendary, we all know them. It’s helped to establish (George’s own) work ethic.”

It has also established George and the league-leading Pacers as arguably the most formidable threat to the reign of the two-time defending National Basketball Association (NBA) champion Miami Heat. Indiana’s latest victory, a 105-100 road win over the Los Angeles Clippers on Sunday, ran their record to a near-flawless 16-1. George left his imprint on the game with an array of dunks, fadeaways and play-making that resulted in 27 points, six rebounds and five assists. As Bryant remains sidelined recovering from a torn Achilles’ tendon, George’s performance in Los Angeles was a fitting imitation of the city’s biggest star. It was also a reminder of George’s basketball roots. Having grown up just outside Los Angeles, George watched future Hall of Famer Bryant collect acclaim and five NBA championships and dreamed of matching his feats.

spent 19 seasons with San Antonio, including the previous 17 years as an assistant with the team. . Diaw played with his two fingers heavily taped after dislocating his left middle finger

during San Antonio’s loss to Houston on Saturday . Spurs G Cory Joseph and P Aron Baynes were recalled Monday from the NBA Developmental League team in Austin.

Blazers stop Pacers’streak despite 43 points by George

P

ORTLAND, Ore. (AP) -- LaMarcus Aldridge had 28 points and 10 rebounds and the Portland Trail Blazers defeated Indiana 106-102 Monday night, snapping the Pacers’ seven-game winning streak. Paul George had a career-high 43 points for Pacers (16-2), who own the NBA’s best record. The Blazers pulled in front until early in the fourth quarter but the Pacers kept it close, and George hit consecutive 3-pointers that narrowed it to 98-96 with 1:37 left. Damian Lillard answered with a 3-pointer and Nicolas Batum made a pair of free throws for the Blazers before George hit another 3-pointer that got Indiana within 10399 with 21 seconds to go. Lillard hit free throws and George made yet another 3 with 10 seconds to go to make it 105-102, but the Pacers couldn’t get closer. Lillard finished with 26 points for the Blazers, who have won 13 of their last 14 games. The Blazers (15-3) beat the short-handed Los Ange-

les Lakers 114-108 Sunday night. The victory snapped a seven-game losing streak to the Lakers at the Staples Center. The Pacers (16-2) were coming off a 105-100 victory over the Los Angeles Clippers on Sunday to open a fivegame road trip. Earlier Monday, the NBA named Indiana coach Frank Vogel the Eastern Conference coach of the month for November. Portland’s Terry Stotts was named coach of the month for the Western Conference. The Pacers went 15-1 in November and opened the season with a nine-game winning streak for the best start in franchise history. The Blazers went 13-3 under Stotts to start the season, including an 11-game winning streak. George had a 14-foot jumper that gave the Pacers an early 20-11 lead, but the Blazers hung close through the first half. Mo Williams, who helped Portland keep up with seven points, had three fouls and was sent to the bench.


16 EDGEDAVAO Sports

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

KNOCKOUT PUNCH. Filipino world lightflyweight champion Donnie “Ahas” Nietes delivers the killer blow to Mexican challenger Sammy Gutierrez in the third round of their title fight last Saturday night at the Smart Araneta Center. Nietes won via 3rd round TKO. Lean Daval Jr.

AND NOW, FOR THE WORLD ALA Boxing Gym for Pinoy boxers opens in San Diego

By NEILWIN JOSEPH L. BRAVO

H

njb@edgedavao.net

ERE are some modifications the boxing world should consider: First, aside from English and Spanish as official instructional language used by referees, why not include Tagalog? Consider the increasing number of Pinoy boxers fighting in world title fights. Second, with more boxers figuring in world championships, why not set up a gym for Pinoy fighters in the United States? The first proposition as a boxing reform may have to wait. The boxing world still believes that is not needed. Pinoy boxers, afterall, are known to adapt to the language barrier and speak English better than any other fighter from non-English speaking countries. The second proposition is now a reality. Michael Aldeguer, the

big boss over at the ALA Boxing camp from where the Philippines’ future world champions are slowly but surely molded into title caliber, revealed that the ALA Boxing Gym is now open in San Diego, California and ready to bring in the country’s next big stars in the prizefighting business. “Donny Nietes, Milan Melindo, Merlito Sabillo are now ready for the world. So it’s high time we have a gym in the US for our boxers to prepare for their fights overseas,” Aldeguer told Edge Davao after Nietes scored a third round knockout over Mexican challenger Sammy “Guty” Gutierrez on Saturday night at the Smart Araneta Center. Aldeguer said they have set up the gym purposely to have a place forPinoy fighters to train prior to their fights in the mainland. “We have to prepare

for the bigger fights of our boxers. They will not be fighting here all the time. We have to bring them to the word stage,” said Aldeguer. Nietes retained his WBO world lightflyweight championship while Sabillo also returned his minimumweight title but not after going through tense moments where

he got tagged effectively by counterpunching machine like Carlos

Buitrago of Nicaragua. Sabillo and Buitrago fought to a split draw giving the Pinoy champion a chance to keep his crown. Jason Pagara also retained his world inte r n a t i o n a l lightwelterweight title

against Vladimir Baez of Dominican Republic while Milan Melindo decisioned Jose Alfredo Rodriguez of Mexico for the WBO international flyweight championship. AJ Banal had a lackluster points win over Lucian Gonzales of Puerto Rico. The overseas exposure for the ALA boxers begin in March in Singapore followed by the another fight in Dubai.

SWINGING. Merlito “Tiger” Sabillo (right) swings at unbeaten Nicaraguan challenger Carlos Buitrago in their WBO world minimumweight title fight. The fight ended in a split draw. Lean Daval Jr.


EDGEDAVAO

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

16th City Council 29th Regular Session Series of 2012

CLASSIFIEDS

C1

Republika ng Pilipinas SANGGUNIANG PANLUNGSOD Lungsod ng Dabaw

PRESENT: Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor Councilor

Karlo S. Bello Nilo M. Abellera Jr. Victorio U. Advincula Jr. Bernard E. Al-ag Al Ryan S. Alejandre Dante L. Apostol Sr. Conrado C. Baluran Joanne M. Bonguyan Louie John J. Bonguyan Pilar C. Braga Arnolfo Ricardo B. Cabling April Marie C. Dayap Jimmy G. Dureza Emmanuel D. Galicia Sr. Jashera L. Gonzales Edgar R. Ibuyan Leah A. Librado-Yap Rene Elias C. Lopez Berino L. Mambo-o Sr. Tomas J. Monteverde IV J. Melchor V. Quitain Jackson V. Reyes Marissa P. Salvador-Abella Jose Louie P. Villafuerte

Acting Vice Mayor

ON OFFICIAL BUSINESS: Councilor

Paolo Z. Duterte

ABSENT: Vice-Mayor Councilor Councilor

Rodrigo R. Duterte Myrna G. L’Dalodo-Ortiz Rachel P. Zozobrado

-

On Vacation Leave On Vacation Leave On Vacation Leave

ORDINANCE NO. 0334-12 Series of 2012 AN ORDINANCE FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC CODE OF DAVAO CITY Be it ordained by the Sangguniang Panlungsod of Davao City in session assembled that: ARTICLE I GENERAL PROVISIONS

ronment-friendly plans and strategies;

SECTION 1. TITLE OF THE ORDINANCE. This Ordinance shall be known and cited as the “Comprehensive Transport and Traffic Code of Davao City”.

(b) The flow of people and goods through the road network shall be as efficient, safe, unhampered, and orderly as possible for the economic growth and social vitality of the city;

SECTION 2. SCOPE AND APPLICATION. This Code provides for the implementing mechanism, traffic rules and regulations on all roads or highways, within the territorial jurisdiction of the City of Davao, whether national or local classification; pedestrian rules and regulations; vehicle stops and public transport terminals; the use of sidewalks and alleys; road use by all motor vehicles including motorized tricycles and trisikad, motorcycles, bicycles, manualpowered tricycles, animaldrawn rigs, pushcarts, and other forms of conveyances, whether public or private; including water and fishing vessels covered by this ordinance; day parking zones and night parking zones; and in general, such other rules and regulations hereinafter promulgated in furtherance of an optimum utilization of the road network in the City of Davao. SECTION 3. DECLARATION OF POLICY. It is hereby declared the policy of the City of Davao that: (a) Transport and traffic management in Davao City shall be addressed judiciously through a rationalized mechanism that shall have the authority to carryout pro-people and envi-

bell, or repeater horn, with blinking hazard lights proceed past a traffic control signal displaying red or yellow circle or a red or yellow arrow or proceed contrary to the direction or instruction of any traffic control devices;

or road tractors, which is designated as an authorized tow vehicle by the city;

(b) On sounding a siren, bell, or repeater horn, with (c) Urban road space is a blinking hazard lights drive scarce commodity, the com- in any direction or any part peting use of which must be of the road or overtake to allocated for the greatest pass on either side of angood and the greatest num- other vehicle; ber through judicious, fair, participatory and informed (c) Stop, leave waiting or traffic management system; park the vehicle at any place at any time with blinking (d) Traffic problems and is- hazard lights; or sues must be resolved in a rational manner, guided (d) Exceed the speed limits by facts and formulated as prescribed in this Code. through consultations, collaboration, and coordination ARTICLE II with the national agencies DEFINITIONS like the Department of Public Works and Highways, the SECTION 5. DEFINITION Department of Transporta- OF TERMS. When used tion and Communications, in this Code, the following the Philippine National Po- terms shall mean: lice, and the Department of Environment and Natural 1. Abandoned vehicle - any Resources; vehicle left unattended for more than twenty-four (24) (e) The constituents of the hours on primary and secCity of Davao have the right ondary city streets including to be informed a priori and to highway, and open spaces, participate in the formulation except those parked in priof any measures that may vate pay parking areas; affect their community and travelling habits. 2. Authorized maintenance vehicle – any vehiSECTION 4. EXEMPTIONS cle of the city government FOR EMERGENCY VE- used in street lighting, traffic HICLES. The driver of any signal, highway construcemergency vehicle, as de- tion and highway repair and fined in the succeeding Sec- maintenance works; tion 5, paragraph 17 hereof, when it is expedient and 3. Authorized tow vehicle safe to do so: – any vehicle specially constructed for towing vehicles, (a) On sounding a siren, other than trucks and farm

5. Bicycle – any twowheeled vehicle designed to be propelled solely by human power;

4. Acceleration lane – a speed change lane used for increasing speed and merging with fast moving vehicle;

6. Bicycle path or lane – a way established for the exclusive use of bicycle, including tricycles propelled by human power, but excluding push carts and animal drawn vehicles; 7. Breath analyzer - a device used for estimating Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) indirectly by measuring the amount from a breath sample; 8. Built-up area – a type of street normally characterized by relatively low speeds, wide ranges of traffic volumes, narrower lanes, frequent intersections and driveways, significant pedestrian traffic, and prevalence of business and houses; 9. City – City Government of Davao; 10. City Traffic Citation Ticket – refers to a complaint or notice upon which a City Traffic Enforcement Officer shall record an occurrence involving one or more vehicle traffic law violations by the driver or person cited; 11. City Traffic Enforcers – traffic enforcers duly paid

from the fund of the City Government of Davao; 12. Cargo Truck – refers to a vehicle having a license plate with the following classifications; “S”, “T”, “TC”; and other delivery vehicles, whether loaded or empty which have gross capacity of 5,000 kilos; 13. Center – in relation to a thoroughfare, means a line or series of lines, marks or other indicators placed at the middle of the thoroughfare or, in the absence of any such line, lines, marks, or other indicators, the middle of the main traveled portion of the thoroughfare; 14. Channelized intersection – an intersection provided with islands meant to guide and limit vehicle movements;

19. Driver – a. refers to any person having control of the directional and motive power of a vehicle; or b. any person who guides animals, singly or in herds, or flocks or draught, pack or saddle animals on the road; 20. Emergency Vehicle means a motor vehicle: a. conveying members of the police force on urgent police duty; b. conveying members of a fire brigade traveling to or on duty at any place in consequence of a fire or an alarm of fire;

c. being an ambulance or any other vehicle, answering an urgent call or conveying to a hospital any injured or sick person urgently re15. Clearway – a length of quiring treatment; carriageway generally defined by signs, along which d. being used to obtain or vehicles may not stop or convey blood or other supbe left standing at times of plies, drugs or equipment the day as provided on the for a person urgently requiring treatment which may or signs; may not carry a siren, bell or 16. Deceleration lane – a repeater horn for use as a speed change lane used for warning instrument; or decreasing speed, preparatory to stopping or exiting a e. duly authorized as an emergency vehicle for purfast lane; poses of this Code by the 17. Divided road – a high- appropriate authority; way or road with separated carriageway for traffic trave- 21. Footway – that portion of road set aside for pedesling in opposite directions; trian use only; 18. Driveway – a private road giving access from a 22. Front Seat Passengers public road, street, or high- – person/s on board a public way to a building on abutting utility vehicle seated at the right side beside the driver grounds; for Public Utility Jeepneys


C2 CLASSIFIEDS (PUJs) and to passengers seated at the right side beside the driver and those at the first row immediately behind the driver in the case of Public Utility Buses (PUBs) and to passengers seated on the right side beside the driver for private vehicles; 23. High beam – means a beam of light projected from vehicle headlights such that the main bright portion of the beam thereof rises above the horizontal plane passing through the lamp centers parallel to the road level upon which the vehicle stands; 24. Horn – includes any or every device for signaling by sound; 25. Heavy Delivery Vehicles - vehicles having more than four (4) wheels and four-wheeled vehicles using jeep trailers or similar contrivances with wheels; 26. Government-owned Vehicle - any motor vehicle owned by any local government unit, national government or any of its agencies, instrumentalities or other political subdivisions, including government-owned or controlled corporation or their subsidiaries for official use; and any diplomatic vehicle; 27. Gross Weight - the combined weight of a vehicle and the weight of any load thereon; 28. Intersection - Includes every part of a city road or public highway which joins another at an angle, whether or not it crosses the other; 29. Laned thoroughfare – means a thoroughfare divided into two or more marked lanes for vehicular traffic; 30. Low beam – means a beam of light projected from vehicle headlights such that none of the main bright portion of the beams thereof rises above a horizontal plane passing through the lamp centers parallel to the road level upon which the vehicle stands; 31. Marked cross-walk – means a portion of a thoroughfare between two parallel lines marked across the thoroughfare, intended for use of pedestrian; 32. Merging – the converging of separate streams of traffic into a single stream; 33. Motor vehicle - means any conveyance designed to be self-propelled by engine, and includes any vehicles designed to be propelled by electric power obtained from overhead wires but not operated upon rails; 34. Motor Vehicle of Running Engine - a vehicle operating, waiting and standing on any road or thoroughfare with engine running;

only, as indicated by appropriate signs or signals; 37. Overtake – to pass or attempt to pass a slowermoving vehicle traveling in the same direction; 38. Parked Vehicle– a vehicle is said to be parked if it is stationary for the period during which the vehicle is not limited to the time needed to pick up or set down persons or goods; 39. Parking Area – means a portion of the thoroughfare where parking is permitted as indicated by appropriate notices or parking signs; 40. Pedestrian – any person on foot, on toy vehicle, or in a perambulator; 41. Pedal Operated Trisikad – is a vehicle having three (3) wheels and operated by means of a pedal to include bicycle with sidecar; 42. Pedicab for Commercial Use – is being used to transport commercial goods of its owner for delivery to customers. 43. Private Pedicab – is being used by its owner for transport of his own goods and for personal use; 44. Private Motor Vehicle - any motor vehicle owned by individual and juridical person for private use; 45. Public Place – any place where the public have access, upon payment of fees or otherwise; 46. Public Utility Vehicle – any motorized vehicle with franchise from the Land Transportation Franchising & Regulatory Board (LTFRB) and the City Government for tricycles used in conducting passengers such as, but not limited to, buses, vans, motorized tricycle-for-hire; 47. Right of Way – also mean “priority”, establishes who has the right to use the conflicting part of the road and who has to wait until the other does so; 48. Road – sometimes called street or highway, means that part of the land surface designed or used for the passage of vehicles, whether motorized or not, inclusive of sidewalks and shoulders forming part of the right-of-way; 49. Road or Pavement Marking – any traffic control device laid out or painted on the surface of the road or carriageway used to regulate traffic or to warn or guide road users, used either alone or in conjunction with other signs or signals to emphasize or clarify their meaning; 50. Roundabout – an intersection where all traffic travels in one direction around a central or circular island;

35. No Parking Area – means a portion of a thoroughfare between two consecutive “No Parking” signs and with arrows pointing generally towards each other or other appropriate signs;

51. Safety/Crash Helmet - Refers to any headgear made of or strengthened with any hard materials worn as protection against head wounds and/or concussions in accordance with the standard prescribed by the Safety Organization of the Philippines, Inc;

36. One-way thoroughfare – means a thoroughfare on which vehicles are permitted to travel in one direction

52. Seat belt device - refers to any strap, webbing or similar device in the form of pelvic restraint or lap

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belt, upper torso restraint or shoulder strap or a combination thereof designed to secure a person in a motor vehicle in order to mitigate the results of any accident, including all necessary buckles and other fasteners, and all hardware designed for installing such belt device in a motor vehicle;

tion to face or travel in the opposite, or substantially in the opposite direction;

53. Separate line – a line marked on the pavement of a thoroughfare to separate traffic traveling in opposite directions;

66. Waiting Vehicle – means a vehicle permitted to remain stationary with the motor running.

54. Standing vehicle – a vehicle is said to be standing if it is stationary for the time needed to pick up or set down persons or to load or unload goods; 55. Stop line – a line marked across the thoroughfare near a traffic control signal, stop sign, children’s crossing or intersection; 56. Student Carpool Transport Service - A public utility vehicle for hire used exclusively in transporting students or school children to and from any school which is owned, operated and provided by a private person, cooperative, or corporation; with business permit, registered with Land Transportation Office and have been granted Certificate of Public Conveyance (COPC) by the Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board; 57. Transport Terminal/ Terminal – any location where passengers either originate or terminate in the transportation process. Terminals are central and intermediate location of the movement of passengers; 58. Thoroughfare – means that portion of a road improved, designed or used for vehicular travel exclusive of the shoulder and footway; 59. Traffic Control Signal – may also be known as stoplights, traffic lamps, or traffic signals, signaling devices positioned at road intersections, pedestrian crossings and other locations to control competing flows of traffic. They assign the right of way to road users by the use of lights in standard colors (red-yellow-green), using a universal color code; 60. Traffic Island – a defined area within the roadway, usually at an intersection and set off above ground level, from which traffic is intended to be excluded and which is used for control of vehicular movements and as pedestrian refuge; 61. Traffic Management Authority – refers to the City Transport and Traffic Management Office designated and authorized to perform traffic engineering, planning, education, enforcement activities, and/or regulatory functions; 62. Trailer – a vehicle not otherwise self-propelled, usually attached to the rear of a motor vehicle; 63. Two-way thoroughfare – means any thoroughfare where traffic is permitted in opposite directions; 64. U-turn – a movement which causes a vehicle facing or traveling in one direc-

65. Vehicle – means any conveyance or other device propelled or drawn by any means and includes a bicycle and, where the context permits, includes an animal driven or ridden, but does not include a train;

ARTICLE III ERECTION AND OPERATION OF OFFICIAL TRAFFIC CONTROL ITEMS AND SIGNAGES SECTION 6. ERECTION AND INTERFERENCE WITH TRAFFIC CONTROL ITEMS. (a) No person shall, except when duly authorized by the proper authority, erect, establish or display on any road or in the view of any person on any road, or interfere with, alter or take down, any official traffic control sign or item; (b) No person shall erect, establish, place, maintain, or display on any road or in the view of any person on any road anything which purports to be or is an imitation of or similar to any official traffic control sign or item, or which interfere with the effectiveness of or prevents an approaching driver from clearly distinguishing the whole or part of any official traffic control item, or distracts his attention from any official traffic control sign or item. SECTION 7. LIMITS ON OPERATION OF SIGNS. Any sign associated with a “No Parking Area”, “No Waiting Area”, or “Parking Area” or any sign of a kind referred to in Section 10 shall be limited in its operation and effect in respect of days, periods of the day, classes of vehicles or circumstances to the extent (if any) shown on the sign. SECTION 8. ALL TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNS OR ITEMS TO BE OPERATIVE. (a) Where any official traffic control sign or item of a kind referred to in this Article exists on roads, it shall be effective and operative as an official traffic-control item duly established for the purpose under this Code; (b) Any traffic control or item which substantially conforms to the requirements of these sections with respect to dimensions, shape, color, position, direction, angle or any other features of traffic-control signs or items of any kind shall be deemed to be official traffic control sign or item of that kind. SECTION 9. DISPLAY OF DAZZLING LIGHTS. No person shall establish, place, or maintain any light of such kind or so placed as to prevent a driver from clearly distinguishing the road ahead of him, nor shall any person maintain or use any light which the proper authority has declared by notice in writing to that person to be a danger to traffic.

EDGEDAVAO

ARTICLE IV OBEDIENCE TO OFFICIAL TRAFFICCONTROL SIGNALS, SIGNS AND ROAD MARKINGS SECTION 10. OBEDIENCE TO OFFICIAL TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNAL. (1) Every person shall at all times observe and comply with the instructions of any traffic control signal applicable to the individual; (2)The driver facing the display by a traffic control signal of (a) the display of a lighted green color alone is an instruction that (i) a driver facing the traffic control signal, may, subject to the provisions of this Article, proceed straight ahead, or turn left, or turn right unless a sign at such place prohibits either such turn. Vehicles turning right or left shall give way to any opposing traffic and or pedestrians; (ii) a walking man symbol which is lighted green is an instruction that a pedestrian facing the traffic control signal may proceed across the thoroughfare; (b) the display of a lighted yellow color alone is an instruction that (i) a driver facing the traffic control signal shall not proceed beyond the stop line before the assigned pedestrian lane, or in the absence of a stop line, the traffic control signal itself, unless the vehicle is so close to stop line, or pedestrian lane, or traffic control signal when the color amber first appears that the driver cannot safely stop the vehicle before passing the stop line, pedestrian lane, or traffic control signal; (ii) a pedestrian facing the traffic control signal shall not obstruct vehicles entering or approaching the intersection; (c) the display of a lighted red color alone is an instruction that (i) a driver facing the traffic control signal shall not proceed straight ahead, or turn left beyond the stop line, pedestrian lane, or in the absence of stop line or pedestrian lane, shall not proceed ahead or turn left beyond the traffic control signal itself; (ii) a pedestrian facing the traffic control signal shall not obstruct vehicles entering or approaching the intersection; (d) the display of a raised hand or standing man signal is an instruction that a pedestrian facing the traffic control signal shall not enter upon the thoroughfare; (e) a green arrow is an instruction that a driver facing the traffic control signal may proceed in the direction indicated by the arrow; (f) a yellow arrow is an instruction that a driver facing the control signal shall not, for the purpose of proceeding in the direction indicated by the amber arrow, proceed beyond the stop line and/or pedestrian lane or, in the absence of both, shall not enter the intersection at or near, which the traffic

control signal is erected unless the vehicle is so close to the stop line, or pedestrian lane, or the intersection when the amber arrow first appears that the driver cannot safely stop the vehicle before passing the stop line or entering the intersection; (g) a red arrow is an instruction that a driver facing the traffic control signal shall not, for the purpose of proceeding in the direction indicated by the red arrow, proceed beyond the stop line and/or pedestrian lane, or in the absence of both, shall not enter the intersection at or near, which the traffic control signal is erected. SECTION 11. OBEDIENCE TO OFFICIAL TRAFFIC SIGNS. Traffic signs installed on or along the road shall be obeyed by motorists at all times. (1) a driver shall not cause the vehicle to turn in any intersection, contrary to the instruction on any “No Turns”, “No Left Turn”, and “No Right Turn”, “No UTurn” erected to face an approaching driver at or near the intersection; (2) where “One-Way” sign is erected to face a driver entering a thoroughfare to face an approaching driver, the driver shall not proceed on that thoroughfare beyond the sign; (3) where a “No Entry” is erected over or adjacent to a thoroughfare to face an approaching driver, the driver shall not proceed on that thoroughfare beyond the sign; (4) where “No Overtaking or Passing” sign is erected to face an approaching driver, the driver shall not overtake or pass a vehicle traveling the same direction; (5) (a) where “No Overtaking on Bridge” sign is erected near a bridge to face an approaching driver, the driver shall not overtake a vehicle on the bridge; (b) a driver shall not drive a vehicle and its load, including trailer attached to it, when it exceeds the weight indicated on the bridge load limit sign facing the driver; (6) (a) where a “Keep Right” sign is erected to face an approaching driver, the driver shall pass to the right of the sign; (b) where a “Keep Left” sign is erected to face an approaching driver, the driver shall pass to the left of the sign; (7) where a “Stop” sign is erected to face the driver who is approaching or has entered an intersection, the driver shall: (a) stop the vehicle before reaching and as near as practicable to the stop line associated with the sign or, in the absence of a stop line, at the point nearest the first intersecting thoroughfare where the driver has a clear view of traffic approaching the intersection; (b) on reaching and after passing the “Stop” sign, give way to any vehicle which is entering or within or leaving the intersection, except where that vehicle: (i) is facing on, has passed a “Stop” sign or “Give Way”


EDGEDAVAO sign erected at the intersection, and (ii) is about to turn, or is turning at the intersection; (8) (a) where a “Give Way” (or “Yield”) sign is erected to face a driver who is approaching or has entered an intersection, the driver shall, on reaching or passing the “Give Way” sign, give way to any vehicle which is entering or within or leaving the intersection road, except where the vehicle: (i) is facing on, has passed a “Stop” sign or “Give Way” sign erected at the intersection, and (ii) is about to turn, or is turning at the intersection; (b) where a “Give Way” sign is erected to face a driver approaching a bridge, the driver shall not pass the sign while any vehicle traveling in the opposite direction is between the sign and far end of the bridge; (9) where a “No U-Turn” sign is erected adjacent to a thoroughfare to face an approaching driver, the driver shall not make a Uturn while the driver is in between the sign and the far side of the first intersection beyond the sign, nor shall the driver who enters the thoroughfare between the sign and the intersection and travels towards the intersection makes a U-turn before the driver passed the intersection. SECTION 12. OBEDIENCE TO OFFICIAL TRAFFIC ROAD OR PAVEMENT MARKING. Road and/or pavement marking have important functions in providing guidance and information for the road user. A driver shall obey major road and/or pavement marking types which include pavement and curb markings, object makers, delineators, colored pavement, barricades, channelizing devices and islands. Most markings use to supplement other traffic control devices such as signals, signs and other markings. SECTION 13. OBEDIENCE TO OFFICIAL TRAFFIC SIGNALS AND INSTRUCTIONS. (1) all persons driving motorcycles, bicycles and/ or operating animal-drawn carriages shall obey the instructions of official trafficcontrol signals, signs, road and/or pavement markings and other control devices applicable to vehicles, unless otherwise directed by a police officer and/or traffic officers and/or any other persons authorized to direct, control, or regulate traffic; (2) where authorized signs are erected indicating “No Right Turn” or “No Left Turn” or “U-turn”, no person driving a bicycle or operating animal-drawn carriage shall obey the direction of any such except where such person dismounts from the bicycle to make such turn, in which event such person shall then obey the regulations applicable to pedestrians. ARTICLE V GENERAL DRIVING RULES SECTION 14. KEEPING AS FAR RIGHT AS PRAC-

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TICABLE. Unless otherwise provided for in this Code, a driver shall keep his/her vehicle as close as practicable to the right boundary of the thoroughfare except when there are two or more lanes marked on the thoroughfare available exclusively for traffic direction in which the driver is traveling. SECTION 15. OVERTAKING. (a) When overtaking a moving vehicle, a driver shall pass to the left of that vehicle and shall not drive in front of it until his/her vehicle is safely clear; provided that, where a thoroughfare has two or more marked lanes, vehicles traveling in one of those lanes may overtake and pass to the right of a vehicle traveling in another of those lanes, if traffic conditions permit the driver to do so safely; (b) A driver overtaking a vehicle apparently about to make a left turn shall pass to the right of it; (c) When overtaking a vehicle on a two way thoroughfare; (d) If the thoroughfare is not divided into three lanes, a driver shall not drive to the left of the center of the thoroughfare, unless the left side of the thoroughfare is free of oncoming traffic far enough ahead to permit overtaking movement to be completed in safety; (e) If the thoroughfare is divided into three lanes, a driver shall not drive in the center lane unless that lane is free of oncoming traffic far enough ahead to permit the overtaking movement to be completed in safety. SECTION 16. USE OF CENTER AND LEFT LANES OF THREE LANE THOROUGHFARE. On a two-way lane thoroughfare divided into three lanes, a driver shall not drive his/her vehicle in the center lane, except: (a) to overtake another vehicle in accordance with the rules on overtaking; (b) in preparation for a left turn; or (c) where the center lane is at the time allocated exclusively to vehicles traveling in the same direction to which the driver is traveling. SECTION 17. PASSING VEHICLE. A driver passing a vehicle traveling in the opposite direction shall keep to his right relative to his/ her vehicle. SECTION 18. GIVING WAY TO OVERTAKING VEHICLES. Except where overtaking on the right is permitted, the driver of a vehicle being overtaken shall not increase the speed of his vehicle until it has been completely passed by the overtaking vehicle, and shall yield in favor of the overtaking vehicle upon the driver of the overtaking vehicle sounding and/or signaling a warning instrument. SECTION 19. DRIVERS NOT TO OBSTRUCT TRAFFIC. A person shall not, without proper cause, drive a vehicle abnormally slow or in such other manner as to obstruct, hinder, or prevent the free passage

of any person or vehicle. In a thoroughfare with two or more lanes in the same direction, lane hugging or occupancy of more than one lane for a length of time not called by traffic conditions shall be considered as obstruction. SECTION 20. DRIVING IN LANES ON THOROUGHFARE. (a) A driver shall drive his/ her vehicle as nearly as practicable entirely within single marked lane or a single line of traffic and shall not move laterally from such lane or line of traffic until the driver can safely do so; (b) A driver traveling along a marked lane any boundary of which is a single unbroken line shall not permit any part of his/her vehicle to cross that line, except when safety demands otherwise. SECTION 21. DRIVING THROUGH ROUNDABOUTS OR ROTUNDAS. A driver passing a traffic roundabout shall drive to the right of the central traffic island. SECTION 22. KEEPING RIGHT OF DOUBLE YELLOW LINES. Where a thoroughfare is marked with a double yellow longitudinal line comprising of two continuous lines; or yellow continuous line on the right of a white broken line; a driver shall not permit any portion of his/her vehicle to travel on it over the left of the double yellow longitudinal line. SECTION 23. DRIVING IN BICYCLE LANES. Motor vehicles are prohibited from being driven or parked on any lane of a public street or path reserved exclusively for bicycles and provided with a sign bearing a symbol of a bicycle. SECTION 24. DRIVING IN RESERVED LANES. In order to encourage efficiency in the use of road space, specific lanes of a major thoroughfare may be reserved for certain types of vehicles such as public utility buses, jeepneys, and other high occupancy vehicles. Vehicles not otherwise mentioned in the signs posted therein are prohibited, at the times and days indicated, from being driven in those reserved lanes, except when it is turning right at the next intersection. SECTION 25. DRIVING OVER A YELLOW BOX. A portion of an intersection marked with yellow box must always remain unobstructed and open for passage. A driver must not enter a yellow box if his/her exit road or lane from it is not clear, or if he/she cannot cross and go beyond the boundaries of the box in time before the traffic signal turns to red.

CLASSIFIEDS

C3

thoroughfare shall give way to any vehicle which has entered the intersection except that where the two vehicles have entered at the same time, the driver which has the other vehicle on the right shall give way;

enter takes precedence over a vehicle approaching or about to enter. Hence, the driver of vehicle entering a roundabout shall give way to any vehicle on the driver’s immediate left unless otherwise indicated;

on the sign. ARTICLE IX TURNING, REVERSING AND STOPPING (Ordinance No. 989, s.1974, Amending Ordinance No. 778, s. 1973)

(c) (i) Where traffic-control signals are erected at or near an intersection, paragraph (b) above shall not apply to a driver proceeding in accordance with the instruction of any such signal;

(b) Within the rotunda, the driver must give way to vehicles intending to leave by the nearest exit point.

(ii) Paragraph (b) above shall not apply to the driver of a vehicle having another vehicle on the driver’s right at an intersecting thoroughfare where that other vehicle is facing or passed a “Give Way” or “Stop” sign.

SECTION 32. SPEED LIMITS.

SECTION 27. GIVING WAY DURING TURNS.

(b) The foregoing provisions of this Section shall not apply to the driver of an emergency vehicle;

SECTION 37. RIGHT TURNS. A driver who is about to make a right turn at an intersection shall so drive the vehicle that when it reaches the intersection, it shall be to the right of any vehicle abreast of his vehicle and traveling in the same direction, or at the rightmost lane of a thoroughfare, provided that this Section shall not apply to a driver whose vehicle is in a marked lane allocated exclusively to right-turning vehicles.

(a) Subject to the provision of Section 11, paragraph 8, and Section 31, a driver who intends to turn, is turning or has turned to the left of the intersection, shall give way to any vehicle which has entered or is approaching the intersection from the opposite direction; (b) A driver turning to the right or left at an intersection shall give way to all pedestrians; (c) A driver making a U-turn shall give way to all other vehicles and to all pedestrians; (d) Except as otherwise provided in this Section, the provision of Section 26 of this Article shall apply to turning vehicles. SECTION 28. MOVEMENT TO OR FROM PARKED VEHICLES. (a) A driver who is about to drive or driving a vehicle into or out from parking area or the boundary of a thoroughfare shall give way to all other vehicles; (b) A driver shall not move in reverse out of parking area and cross the center of the thoroughfare, unless traffic conditions permit the driver to do so. SECTION 29. APPROACH OF EMERGENCY VEHICLES. A driver shall give way and make reasonable effort to give clear and uninterrupted passage to every emergency vehicle sounding siren, bell or repeater horn, or using other signals to indicate an emergency. SECTION 30. ENTERING OR LEAVING A ROAD. (a) A driver entering a road from adjoining land, shall:

ARTICLE VI GIVING WAY

(i) except when proceeding pursuant to an instruction of a traffic-control signal, a traffic policeman, a traffic aide or other duly authorized traffic enforcers, give way to all vehicles traveling in either direction along the road;

SECTION 26. GIVING WAY AT INTERSECTION.

(ii) give way to all pedestrians on the road;

(a) A driver approaching or passing through an intersection shall exercise special care and where appropriate shall drive at a reduced speed;

(b) A driver leaving a road to enter an adjoining land shall give way to all vehicles traveling in the opposite direction and to all pedestrians on the road.

(b) Except as provided in paragraph c (i) and (ii) of this Section, the driver of a vehicle which is approaching an intersection from one

SECTION 31. ROUNDABOUTS OR ROTUNDAS. (a) In a roundabouts or rotunda, the first vehicle to

ARTICLE VII SPEED RESTRICTION

(a) No person shall drive a vehicle at a speed exceeding the design limits for the street by numerals on signs set up along the road;

(c) Nothing in this Section shall be construed to justify the driver of the vehicle driving at a speed which (i) may constitute driving carelessly, recklessly, or at a speed or in a manner which is dangerous to the public having regard to all circumstances; or (ii) exceed any maximum speed applicable to the vehicle and fixed by under the law, ordinance or regulation. SECTION 33. SPEED LIMIT ON SUBDIVISION ROAD CONVERTED TO CITY STREET. No driver shall drive a vehicle at a speed exceeding twenty (20) kilometers per hour on public or private subdivision road converted to City Street any time of the day.

SECTION TURNS.

38.

LEFT

(a) A driver who is about to make a left turn at an intersection shall: (i) where a driver is traveling on a two-way thoroughfare, approach and enter the intersection so that his/ her vehicle is to the right of, parallel to and as near as practicable to the center of the thoroughfare; or (ii) where the driver is traveling on a one-way thoroughfare, approach and enters the intersection so that his/ her vehicle is parallel to and as near as practicable to the left boundary or leftmost lane, of the thoroughfare; However, this sub-section shall not apply if the driver’s vehicle is in a marked lane which has a sign along side or over it or markings on its surface indicating that a left turn must or may be made;

SECTION 34. SPEED CONTEST. It shall be unlawful for any person to engage in, or to aid any motor vehicle, speed contest or exhibition of speed, on any public or private street upon which the City has been authorized to impose traffic regulations except when permitted by special ordinance of the Sangguniang Panlungsod.

(b) Notwithstanding the foregoing provisions of this Section, a person driving a bicycle who is about to make or making a left turn at an intersection may make the left turn so that:

ARTICLE VIII ONE-WAY STREETS (Ordinance No. 989, s. 1974, Amending Ordinance No. 778, s. 1973)

(ii) Enters the intersection and proceeds in a straight line until his/her bicycle is as near as practicable to the prolongation of the right boundary of the thoroughfare he/she is about to enter; and

SECTION 35. DESIGNATION OF ONE-WAY STREETS. (a) Vehicular traffic on any city street or highway or portion thereof may be designated by the head of the City Transport and Traffic Management Office as oneway on an experimental basis, and shall be referred immediately to the City Transport and Traffic Management Board for its final decision or action; (b) The department head of the City Transport and Traffic Management Office is hereby authorized to expand, reduce, amend, or modify Appendix I (OneWay Streets) with the concurrence of the City Transport and Traffic Management Board, approved by the City Mayor, subject to the final approval of the Sangguniang Panlungsod. SECTION 36. OPERATING RULE. The driver shall drive along a one-way thoroughfare only in the direction indicated by the arrow

(i) He/she approaches the intersection parallel to and as near as practicable to the right boundary of the thoroughfare;

(iii) Turns his/her bicycle to the left and after giving way to vehicles on his left and right leaves the intersection in accordance with the provisions of this Section, but when any traffic control signal is operating at the intersection, a person driving a bicycle shall wait before turning and shall not proceed to leave the intersection until the traffic control signal is displaying a green light indicating the appropriate direction of his intended movement. SECTION 39. TURN AND STOP SIGNALS. (a) A driver shall not turn right or left or diverge right or left or stop or suddenly decrease speed or make a U-turn without giving a signal as prescribed in this Section; (b) A driver who is about to turn right or left, diverge right or left, stop, suddenly decrease speed or make a


C4 CLASSIFIEDS U-turn shall signal his/her intent of doing so for such time as is necessary to give reasonable warning to drivers approaching from behind; (c) For purposes of and without limiting the generality of paragraph (b) above, a signal shall be deemed to give reasonable warning if given continuously: (i) While a vehicle is traveling 30 meters immediately before it commences to turn and during any period when it is stationary before it comes to turn; (ii) While a vehicle is traveling 30 meters immediately before it commences to diverge right or left; or

and shall merge with caution into the left hand lane of the far roadway, unless otherwise instructed; (d) Vehicles intending to turn left from a divided highway exit, by means of a left turn decelerating lane constructed in the medial strip area, shall enter decelerating lane and shall yield the right of way to approaching vehicles before proceeding with caution across the intersection and into the intersecting roadway, unless otherwise instructed. ARTICLE X STOPPING AND PARKING OF VEHICLES (Ordinance No. 989, s. 1974, Amending Ordinance No. 778, s. 1973)

(iii) While the brakes of a vehicle are applied before it stops or while it is slowing down;

SECTION 43. VEHICLES NOT TO BE IN CERTAIN AREAS. No driver shall:

(d) Any signal required by this Section shall be given:

(a) Leave a vehicle waiting in a “No Waiting Area”;

(i) In the case of a signal of intention to stop or reduce speed suddenly, by means of stop lamp or red lamps; or

(b) Park a vehicle in a “No Parking Area”, except when loading or unloading goods or passengers;

(ii) In the case of a signal of intention to turn right or left, diverge right or left to make U-turn, by means of a flashing orange lamp signaling device; Such signaling device or stop lamp shall comply with the specifications for that device or stop lamp prescribed by the Land Transportation Office. SECTION 40. USE OF SIGNALING DEVICES. A driver shall not permit a signaling device on his/ her vehicle to remain in operation after the completion of the turn or divergence which prompted the device to be put into operation. SECTION 41. U-TURNS. A driver shall not cause his/ her vehicle to make a Uturn: (a) Where there is a probability of colliding with another vehicle or interfering with the free movement of traffic; or (b) On any intersection at which an official traffic control sign or signal prohibits a U-turn. SECTION 42. PROCEDURE AT CHANNELIZED INTERSECTION. When accelerating or decelerating lanes are provided for right or left turns at unsignalized intersection, vehicles shall proceed as follows: (a) Vehicles intending to turn right from a roadway entrance, by means of a right turn accelerating lane, shall enter such roadway by means of the accelerating lane, so provided and shall merge with caution into the right hand traffic, unless otherwise instructed; (b) Vehicles intending to turn right from a roadway exit, from which is made by means of a right-turn decelerating lane, shall enter the decelerating lane and merge with caution into the right hand traffic lane, unless otherwise instructed; (c) Vehicles intending to turn left into far roadway of a divided highway shall come to a complete stop before crossing the near roadway of such highway

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(k) Within 10 meters upon the approach to any reflectorized flashing beacon or stop sign located at the side of a roadway; (l) Immediately in front of right-of-way and all passages to public parks, fire and police stations; (m) Any place where parking is prohibited; (n) In front of any hotel entrance; provided, however that this provision shall not apply where the driver of a vehicle stops temporarily for the purpose of loading or unloading passengers; (o) On a traffic island; (p) Within the turnaround area of any, dead-end street;

(c) Leave a vehicle in “No Stopping” area;

(q) Blocking main entrance of theaters, cinematographs, stadiums, banks, schools, churches, and offices and public buildings, during the period of performance in theaters, cinematographs and stadium, during banking hours, during classes hours in both public and private schools, during services in churches and during office hours;

(d) Leave a vehicle waiting in Parking Area contrary to any limitation in respect of days, periods of the day, and classes of vehicles indicated by the inscription on the sign or signs associated with the area;

(r) Blocking main entrance of Court building during session hours, and all entrances of hospitals, properly marked or signposted and main entrances of building where the City Council is in session.

However, a driver may park a vehicle in a “No Parking” area or leave a vehicle waiting in a “No Waiting” area or “No Stopping” area under any of the following conditions:

SECTION 45. PARKING DURING CERTAIN HOURS PROHIBITED.

(i) During anytime that the restriction is suspended by reason of the inscription on the sign associated with the area; or (ii) If the inscription on the sign or signs associated with the area exempts the driver’s vehicle from restriction imposed within the area. SECTION 44. PROHIBITED PARKING OR WAITING PLACES. No person shall park or leave a vehicle waiting or standing so that any portion of the vehicle is: (a) Between any other waiting vehicle and the center of the thoroughfare; (b) Between pedestrian zone and the nearest curb; (c) Immediately in front of right-of-way, passage or private driveway;

(a) A driver shall not stop, wait, stand or park a vehicle any longer than is absolutely necessary to load or unload passengers or goods, upon any city street, or portions thereof between the specified hours indicated on the erected official sign; (b) A driver of a car, motorized tricycle, all other vehicles which are animal drawn and other kinds of vehicles shall not park between 12:00 midnight to 5:00 A.M. the following day on any city street, except those that are declared as night parking zone as provided by this Code; (c) A driver of a truck, sixwheeler truck and above shall not park along any city street and/or subdivision road including national highway within the territorial jurisdiction of Davao City anytime of the day unless otherwise provided for in this Code.

(e) On any footway, marked pedestrian crosswalk or pedestrian crossing;

SECTION 46. PARKING FOR CERTAIN PURPOSE PROHIBITED. No person shall park a vehicle upon any roadway, pedestrian sidewalk, road shoulder, including the national highway for the principal purpose of:

(f) Upon a bridge or other elevated structure;

(a) displaying such vehicle for sale;

(g) Under any elevated pedestrian crossing;

(b) washing, greasing, painting, repainting or introducing any car accessories and repairing such vehicle except repairs necessitated by an emergency;

(d) Alongside or opposite any excavation if the vehicles would obstruct traffic;

(h) Upon an intersection; (i) On any portion of the road on which the sign “Keep Clear”; (j) Within 3 meters of any fire hydrant or fire plug or any sign or mark indicating the existence of a fire hydrant or fire plug;

(c) vending any goods. SECTION STOPS.

47.

SPECIAL

(a) A driver of a vehicle shall stop at the “stop line” on the stop sign erected upon

streets or thoroughfare intersecting any through streets at the entrance or upon streets or thoroughfare at the entrance of any intersection; (b) The “stop line” shall mean a clearly visible solid white line or lines extending across a roadway or any portion thereof to indicate the point at which all vehicle of whatever classes are required to stop; and (c) A driver of a vehicle emerging from an alley, driveway or building shall stop prior to driving onto a sidewalk or onto the sidewalk area extending across such alley, driveway or building, and shall yield the right-of-way to any pedestrian as may be necessary to avoid collision, and upon entering the roadway shall yield the right-of-way to all vehicles approaching on said roadway. SECTION 48. METHOD OF PARKING VEHICLES. Any driver who parks or leaves a vehicle waiting, or standing on a road shall park or leave the vehicle waiting: (a) in the case of a road on which vehicles are permitted to travel in both direction, as near as practicable to the right boundary of the thoroughfare; (b) in case of a road on which the vehicles are permitted to travel in one direction, as near as practicable to the right boundary of the road and parallel to the boundary of the road thoroughfare; (c) in case of a road or highway which the vehicles are permitted to travel in both directions, parking of vehicles on road or highway shoulders as far as practicable to the right shoulder of the road or highway, parallel to the boundary of the thoroughfare in the same direction which the vehicle was originally moving; (d) so that not less than 3 meters of the width of the road between the vehicle and the far boundary of the road is available for the movement of other vehicles; (e) in a manner that it does not cause undue obstruction on the thoroughfare; and (f) where parking bays are marked on the thoroughfare, entirely within the confines of a single bay; Provided that paragraphs (a) and (b) of this Section shall not apply to a person leaving a vehicle waiting in a Parking Area. SECTION 49. PARKING NEAR GRADE OF CREST OR CURVE. No person shall park or leave a vehicle waiting on or near a crest or curve so that any portion of it is upon a thoroughfare unless a driver from the rear would have a clear view of the vehicles for a distance of at least 200 meters as identified by the City Transport and Traffic Management Board. SECTION 50. PARKING ON PARADE ROUTES AND ON ANY SPECIAL OCCASION. The City Transport and Traffic Management Office is authorized, whenever in its judgment deems necessary, to prohibit or restrict the park-

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ing of any vehicle on either side or both sides of any street, or portion thereof, constituting a part of the route of a parade or procession, or on any special occasion, and also upon the street adjacent thereto by the erection or placement of temporary signs setting forth such restrictions. When such signs are erected or placed prior to the parade, procession, or special occasion, it shall be unlawful to park or leave unattended any vehicle in violation of such signs; The City Traffic Enforcer or Police assigned in the area is authorized to remove, or cause to be removed, any vehicle left unattended or parked in violation of such signs at the owner’s expense. SECTION 51. LOADING ZONES. (a) A driver of a truck, van or any cargo vehicle may park the vehicle in a “Loading Zone” when actually taking up or setting down goods, provided that the driver is present at all times. Certain types of vans will be allowed to park at “Loading Zone” as provided under the Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR); (b) A driver of a public utility jeepney shall stop, pick up or unload passengers only at designated “PUJ Loading and Unloading Zone”. On sections of the road where there is no prohibition against loading and unloading, the driver may stop to take up or set down passengers provided it is 30 meters away from a signalized intersection. SECTION 52. OFFICERS AUTHORIZED TO REMOVE ILLEGALLY STOPPED VEHICLES. (a) Whenever any City Traffic Enforcer of the City Transport and Traffic Management Office and/or Police Traffic Officer finds a vehicle standing upon a highway in violation of any of the foregoing provisions, such officer is authorized to move such vehicle, or require the driver or other person in-charge of the vehicle to move the same, to a position off the paved road, or main traveled part of such highway; (b) Whenever any City Traffic Enforcer and/or Police Traffic Officer finds a vehicle unattended upon any bridge or causeway where such vehicle constitute an obstruction of traffic, he is hereby authorized to provide for the removal of such vehicle to the nearest impoundment area, garage or other place of safety; (c) The expense incurred in the removal of such vehicle shall be charged to the owner of the vehicle. SECTION 53. REMOVAL OF VEHICLES. Removal of a vehicle as provided for in paragraph (b) Section 52 is only authorized under the following circumstances whenever a vehicle: (a) upon any road, street, or highway is so disabled as to constitute an obstruction to traffic, and the person/s in charge of the vehicle are by reason of physical injury incapacitated to such an extent as to be unable to provide for its custody or removal;

(b) is left unattended upon any road, street, bridge, viaduct, or causeway where such vehicle constitutes an obstruction to traffic; (c) is left unattended upon any road or street and is so parked illegally as to constitute a definite hazard or obstruction to the normal movement of traffic; (d) is left unattended or parked in tow or tow-away zones during the time of restricted parking during the morning peak traffic hours designated by official signs specifying the hours of restricted parking every day, except Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays on the streets or portions thereof designated by the City Transport and Traffic Management Office (CTTMO); (e) is left unattended or parked in tow or tow-away zones at all hours of any day on the streets or portions thereof designated by the CTTMO; (f) is left unattended or parked in tow or tow-away zones during the time of restricted parking designated by official signs specifying those times of restricted parking on the streets or portions designated by the CTTMO; (g) is left unattended upon a street and is parked in front of a public or private driveway so as to constitute an obstruction to vehicular traffic using driveway for purpose of egress and ingress; (h) is left unattended and parked on a street or portion thereof so as to interfere with or impede construction or repairs being made thereon; provided, adequate signs giving notice of construction and prohibiting such parking and designating the time of the prohibition are properly posted by the City Transport and Traffic Management Office; (i) is left unattended upon any street within three (3) meters of a fire hydrant. SECTION 54. AUTHORITY TO DISPOSE OF UNCLAIMED VEHICLES. (a) The City Transport and Traffic Management Office (CTTMO), in coordination with the PNP City Director, shall recommend to the City Mayor the disposal of all vehicles that have been taken into custody pursuant to the provisions of this Code including those impounded prior to its approval, provided court approval is secured for vehicle involved in litigation. Written notice of such auction shall be advertised once a week for two (2) consecutive weeks in one daily local newspaper of general circulation in the City. A written notice shall also be sent to the last known registered owner by registered mail addressed to the owner’s last known address, at least ten (10) days prior to the date of auction, and said auction shall be held not earlier than sixty (60) days after the date upon which such vehicle shall have been taken into custody. Any person entitled to such vehicle may claim the same at any time prior to such auction upon payment of all fees, charges and/or penalties, as well as costs and expenses relating to the towing and storage of such vehicle,


EDGEDAVAO as determined by the City Transport and Traffic Management Office (CTTMO), through the Traffic Enforcement and Street Management Division; (b) The funds derived from such auction shall be applied to the fees, charges and/or penalties due, the expenses of storage and those incurred in taking into custody, and to defray the expenses of the auction sale of such vehicle; and the balance if any, if there will be no claimant, shall form part of the General Fund; (c) In the event that no bid is received, the City Mayor shall offer such vehicle to any interested person under such terms favorable to the city government with the approval of the Sangguniang Panlungsod; and if no person is interested, the City Mayor shall dispose of such vehicle at the city dump site at the expense of the City. ARTICLE XI PARKING ZONES AND FACILITIES (Ordinance No. 130, s.1990, Amending Ordinance No. 989, s.1974, Amending Ordinance No. 778, s. 1973) SECTION 55. DESIGNATION OF PUBLIC PAY PARKING ZONES. (a) The City Transport and Traffic Management Office (CTTMO) is hereby authorized and directed to establish, mark and designate portions of a thoroughfare as on-street public pay parking zones; (b) The streets listed under Appendix IV (Public Pay Parking Zones) are hereby designated as either onesided or two sided onstreet public pay parking zones. The City Transport and Traffic Management Office is hereby authorized to expand, reduce, amend or modify from time to time the list as it sees fit, subject to the approval of the City Transport and Traffic Management Board for any changes or revision; provided however, that the City Transport and Traffic Management Office recommend it to the Sangguniang Panlungsod for approval. The revised list shall be deemed final if not acted by the Sangguniang Panlungsod within six (6) months upon receipt thereof; (c) Pay parking shall commence beginning 6:00 o’clock A.M. to 9:00 o’clock P.M. from Monday to Saturday; (d) Except otherwise provided in this Code, the left side of any street designated as one-way-street listed in Appendix I, shall be assigned as parking zone while the right side shall be designated for loading and unloading area. SECTION 56. OFFSTREET PARKING, TRANSPORT TERMINAL AND OTHER FACILITIES. (a) Parking facilities, public transport terminals, garages, wharves, may be constructed, operated and maintained by the City, or by private transport entities, subject to the approval of Sangguniang Panlungsod upon the recommendation of the City Transport and

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Traffic Management Office and its Board;

passengers in their private garage.

(b) Application for establishment and construction of public utility van transport terminal owned, operated and maintained by private entities shall have an attachment of required traffic impact assessment submitted to the City Transport and Traffic Management Office, including those located in major commercial and industrial establishment, as a requirement before a Building Permit is issued by the appropriate authority; Provided however, that public utility van transport terminal located within a commercial or industrial establishment shall apply for separate business permit application and pay corresponding regulatory fees and charges;

SECTION 58. PROVISION OF PRIVATE PARKING AREA. In the construction of a building of private establishment such as, but not limited to, commercial, industrial, institutional building:

(c) Construction of public utility van transport terminal owned and operated by private sector shall be located at least 100 meters from the nearest curve, junction, or intersection of city road and/or highway; Provided however, that the distance of entry and exit gates of public transport vehicles to the terminal shall be thirty (30) meters from the nearest road, street or highway; (d) An off-street public utility van transport terminal owned and operated by private entities shall have security guards and shall be equipped with CCTV camera, parking bays, shaded passenger lounge with seats, toilet for male and female, water, garbage bins, and other amenities for the comfort and welfare of the riding passengers; (e) Pedestrian overpass, underpass, footbridge, footway, waiting shed for public use constructed using government monies shall be operated and maintained by the city government, thru the City Transport and Traffic Management Office; Provided however, that pedestrian overpass and underpass crossing any city road, street or highway, and waiting shed along any road, street, or highway for public use constructed by private entities shall be turned over to the city government for operation and maintenance; (f) Pedestrian overpass, underpass, footbridge, footway, waiting shed shall not be used as trading center, for display of merchandise for sale, and other activities that would totally or partially obstruct pedestrian walkway. SECTION 57. PRIVATE GARAGE FOR VEHICLES-FOR-HIRE. (a) The City Transport and Traffic Management Office is hereby authorized to regulate the construction, operation, and maintenance of garage for the use of private vehicles-for-hire for vehicles not in use; (b) It is prohibited for operator and/or owner of vehicles-for-hire to construct, operate, and maintain garage without first securing a permit from the City Transport and Traffic Management Office; (c) It is prohibited for the owner and/or operator of privately-owned garage for vehicles-for-hire to solicit passengers or to unload

(a) New Construction - it shall require the owner of the building to incorporate in the development plan to provide a minimum of three (3) meters setback beginning from the private property line abutting city street, road, or highway for purposes of vehicle angle parking; Provided however, if the location of the building is along a corner abutting two roads or streets, the same minimum three (3) meters according to the existing provisions of the National Building Code shall be provided in both sides of the building; Provided finally, that no part of parked vehicle shall obstruct the free passage of pedestrian sidewalk. SECTION 59. PAY PARKING CHARGES AND SIGNS. Appropriate signs indicating the parking charges and the time that such facility is open for business, shall be installed at each public pay parking zones; Parking fees shall be collected during the regulated period at rates shown in Appendix IV. The rates shall be updated from time to time by the City Transport and Traffic Management Office subject to the concurrence of the City Transport and Traffic Management Board for approval of the Sangguniang Panlungsod. SECTION 60. ALLOCATION OF PARKING FEES COLLECTED. All fees collected for overnight parking in a designated public pay parking zone within a specific barangay shall be allocated as follows: Fifty percent (50%) shall be apportioned to the barangay concerned and the other Fifty percent (50%) to the Traffic Management Trust Fund. SECTION 61. OVERNIGHT PARKING. (a) Overnight parking on city roads not determined as pay-parking zones may be recommended by the Barangay Council through an appropriate resolution, subject to evaluation of the City Transport and Traffic Management Board and duly approved by the Sangguniang Panlungsod, through an appropriate ordinance. Those local roads that may be designated, shall as much as practicable, be on a one-side parking basis and in no case shall prevent egress or through passage. No alley or road less than three (3) meters in width shall be designated as overnightparking zones; (b) The operations of overnight parking zones established by the Barangay Council shall be supervised by the City Transport and Traffic Management Office, through the Traffic Enforcement and Street Management Division. SECTION 62. ENFORCEMENT OF OVERNIGHT PARKING. The enforcement and collection of over-

CLASSIFIEDS

night parking fees may be undertaken by the Barangay in the City upon compliance with the following: (a) The Barangay Council itself with the technical assistance of the CTTMO, will determine which of the local roads may be utilized for overnight parking, before enacting a resolution to that effect; (b) Overnight parking shall be limited to the hours of 9:00 o’clock P.M. to 6:00 o’clock A.M. the following day: (i) No cargo trucks or tractor trailers of eight (8) wheels and up shall be allowed to avail of overnight parking in any streets of the City except by reason of emergency repair which shall be accomplished as expeditiously as possible. Cargo trucks found parking during these hours on any City streets shall be towed to the vehicle impounding area, and the driver/operator is required to pay the corresponding fines; (ii) The cost of the tickets or receipts issued by the Barangay for collection of overnight parking fees shall be chargeable to the City Government of Davao; (iii) Overnight parking fees shall be collected at the rate of One Hundred Pesos (Php 100.00) per vehicle, per night; provided however, that the owner of the motor vehicle shall have the option to pay a monthly overnight parking fee net of twenty percent (20%) discount; (iv) The Barangay Council, through a resolution, shall provide barangay security force assigned to maintain order in the parking area and to ensure that vehicles parked for overnight parking are not used for any immoral and lewd acts; (v) It shall be the duty of the Barangay Treasurer to remit collections pertaining to the share of the City to the City Treasurer’s Office. SECTION 63. VIOLATIONS IN PUBLIC PAYPARKING AREAS. Within any public pay-for-parking facility, it shall be unlawful for any person: (a) To refuse or fail to pay the parking charges; (b) To park any vehicle across any line or marking of a parking space or in such position that the vehicle shall not be entirely within the area designated by such lines or markings; (c) To tamper or damage any vehicle, other than his own, parked in the same parking facility; (d) To park any vehicle for the purpose of washing, cleaning, greasing, painting, selling merchandise or repairing or installing any car accessories and/or tinting, except repairs necessitated by an emergency on a designated area in the parking facility; (e) To display for sale or to sell goods and merchandise; and (f) To disregard any official direction, instruction or restriction posted therein, in accordance or in conformity with the provisions of this Code.

ARTICLE XII CARELESS AND DANGEROUS DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF LIQUOR SECTION 64. CARELESS DRIVING. A person shall not drive a vehicle without due care or attention or without consideration for other persons or vehicles which violation include the following, among others, and as may be determined by the CTTMO: a. driving a moving vehicle along road shoulders to overtake other vehicles; b. driving a motor vehicle in continuous zigzag motion along any city road or highway; c. using cellular or mobile telephone for texting or calling/receiving calls, while the vehicle is in motion. SECTION 65. RECKLESS AND DANGEROUS DRIVING. A person shall not drive a vehicle recklessly or at a speed or in a manner dangerous to public safety. SECTION 66. DRIVING A MOTOR VEHICLE WHILE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF LIQUOR OR INCAPACITATING DRUG. No person shall drive a motor vehicle while under the influence of liquor or other incapacitating drug. For purposes of this Section, a driver is considered under the influence of liquor, if, at the time of competent examination performed or with the use of DOH-approved breath analyzer to determine the blood alcohol concentration, within an hour of apprehension of a person, the person is found to have at least 0.06% of alcohol in his/her blood, or in the case of drugs, if it reasonably manifests from the person’s action or behavior that the exercise of his/her five senses is physically impaired as to expose the driver himself/herself, or the vehicle or other persons to a possible accident. The operation of any vehicle, although non-motorized, in the same manner stated herein, is likewise prohibited. ARTICLE XIII ACCIDENTS SECTION 67. ACCIDENTS INVOLVING DEATH OR PERSONAL INJURIES OR DAMAGE TO A VEHICLE. The driver of any vehicle involved in an accident resulting in injury or death of any person or damage to a vehicle which is driven or attended by any person, shall immediately stop such vehicle at the scene of the accident and shall remain at the scene of such accident until he has fulfilled the requirements of Section 69 of this Code. Every step must be taken to ensure that such stop is made without obstructing traffic. SECTION 68. DUTY TO GIVE INFORMATION AND RENDER AID. The driver of any vehicle involved in an accident resulting in injury to or death of any person or damage to any vehicle or other property damage, shall give his name, and the vehicle license number he/she is driving and upon request, exhibit his/her driver’s license to the person struck, or to the driver or occupant of, or person

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attending the vehicle collided with, and shall render reasonable assistance to any person injured in such accident. SECTION 69. DUTY UPON STRIKING UNATTENDED VEHICLE. The driver of any vehicle that collides with any vehicle which is unattended shall immediately stop and shall then locate and notify the operator or owner of the unattended vehicle or if the operator or owner cannot be located, the driver shall inform the nearest police station through any means of communication. SECTION 70. DUTY UPON STRIKING FIXTURES ON A HIGHWAY. The driver of any vehicle involved in an accident resulting only in damage to fixture legally upon or adjacent to a street or highway shall take reasonable steps to locate and notify the owner or person in-charge of such property and shall give his name and address, and the vehicle license number he is driving, and upon request, exhibit his driver’s license and shall make a report of such accident as required by this Code. SECTION 71. REPORT OF ACCIDENTS. (a) The driver of any vehicle involved in an accident resulting in injury or death of any person shall, immediately by the quickest means of communication, give notice of such to the Davao City Police Office (DCPO) or City Transport and Traffic Management Office (CTTMO); (b) The driver of any vehicle involved in property damage, shall make an agreement to the persons whose property is involved as to the amount of property damage sustained; provided however, that with or without agreement between the two parties, the accident shall be reported immediately to the Davao City Police Office and City Transport and Traffic Management Office; (c) Every Davao City Police Traffic Officer, with the assistance of Davao City Traffic Enforcer, in the regular course of duty, investigate a motor vehicle accident of which report must be made as provided herein, either at the time of and at the scene of the accident or thereafter by interviewing participants or witness, shall, within 24 hours after completing such investigation, forward a written report of such accident to the City Transport and Traffic Management Office. SECTION 72. ACCIDENT REPORTS. (a) The Davao City Police Office, with the assistance of City Traffic Enforcer, shall prepare and upon request, provide to the motor vehicle repair shop and agencies concerned, forms for accident reports required. The written reports to be made by persons involved in accidents and by investigating officers shall call for sufficient detailed information, such as, causes of accident, existing conditions and the person and vehicle involved. Written reports from the Davao City Police Office shall be made within a maximum period of three (3) working days;


C6 CLASSIFIEDS (b) Accidents must be recorded using the prescribed Accident Report Form agreed upon by the CTTMO, DCPO and other national agencies for uniformity; (c) The City Traffic Enforcer, for purposes of data bank of the CTTMO, shall document, report, monitor the accident in a prescribed form called “Daily Road Accident Monitoring Report.” The City Traffic Enforcer shall inhibit himself/herself from investigating accident, however, he/she is allowed to make a rough sketch of the vehicle accidents before the police arrives. SECTION 73. MOTOR VEHICLE REPAIR SHOP TO REPORT. Owners of Motor Repair Shops are required to report to the DCPO and CTTMO all vehicles involved in accidents of suspicious circumstances (carnapping, kidnapping or any other crimes, etc.) using the prescribed form prepared by the CTTMO called “Motor Vehicle Repair Shop Report.” The report must be confidential between the repair shop and the DCPO and the CTTMO. (All prescribed forms and procedures will be duly provided under the IRR). SECTION 74. ACCIDENT REPORTS CONFIDENTIAL. All accident reports in writing made by a person involved in accidents or by motor vehicle repair shop shall be for the confidential use of the CTTMO, Davao City Police Office and the City Mayor having use for the records for accident prevention purposes, except that the Davao City Police Office may disclose the identity of a person involved in an accident when such identity is not otherwise known or when such person denies his presence at such accident; No such report shall be used as evidence in any trial, civil or criminal, arising out of an accident except upon order of any Court which the Davao City Police Office shall comply. SECTION 75. WHEN DRIVER UNABLE TO REPORT. (a) An accident report is not required under this Article from any person who is physically incapable of making report during the period of such incapacity; (b) Whenever the driver of a vehicle is physically incapable of giving an immediate notice of an accident as required in Section 72 and there was another occupant in the vehicle at the time of the accident capable of doing so, such occupant shall make a report not made by the driver or if the driver is not the owner of the vehicle, then the owner of the vehicle involved in such accident shall within five (5) days after learning of the accident make such report not made by the driver. SECTION 76. RESPONSIBILITY TO TABULATE AND ANALYZE ACCIDENT REPORTS. Without impinging on the authority of the Davao City Police Office, the City Transport and Traffic Management Office shall tabulate and analyze all accident reports and shall publish annually the statistical information based on the number and circumstances of traffic ac-

cidents. SECTION 77. COPIES OF REPORTS TO BE FURNISHED THE OFFICE OF THE CITY MAYOR. The Davao City Police Office shall furnish true copies of all accident reports within 48 hours from the filing thereof, to CTTMO and the Office of the City Mayor. ARTICLE XIV OPERATION OF ANIMALDRAWN CARRIAGES AND BICYCLES SECTION 78. EFFECT OF REGULATIONS. The regulations applicable to animaldrawn carriages and bicycles, shall apply whenever animal-drawn carriages and bicycles are operated upon any road or upon any path set aside for the exclusive use of such carriages and bicycles. SECTION 79. LICENSE REQUIRED. No person, whether resident or not of the City of Davao, shall operate, ride or propel an animal-drawn carriage or bicycle, on any street, highway, alley roadway, sidewalk or upon any public path set aside for the exclusive use of such carriages or bicycles unless such has been licensed and a license plate 5.0 cm x 7.5 cm (2 x 3) in size is attached thereto as provided herein. The license is renewable every January the following year.

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regular seat attached thereto; (c) A driver of a bicycle shall not carry more persons at one time than the number for which it is designed and equipped; (d) A driver of a bicycle shall not place any cargo or passenger in between the driver’s arms or between the steering bar and the driver; (e) A driver of a bicycle shall not hitch the same or himself to any moving vehicle upon any roadway; (f) A driver of a bicycle shall keep at least one hand upon the handle bars; (g) No person shall operate a bicycle unless it is equipped with a bell, a horn or other devices capable of giving a signal for a distance of at least 100 feet except siren or whistle; (h) No person shall drive a bicycle on major city streets or highways, unless otherwise designated by CTTMO; (i) Every bicycle shall be equipped with a brake which will enable the operator to make the braked wheel skid on dry, level, clean pavement; (j) A driver of bicycle shall not park his/her bicycle along pedestrian sidewalks;

SECTION 80. REGISTRATION. All animal-drawn carriages and bicycles owned by residents of the City of Davao shall be registered with the CTTMO, through the Franchising and Regulatory Division, issuance of license plates and upon payment of authorized amount to the City Treasurer’s Office:

(k) A bicycle driver shall wear a protective helmet to be worn all the time when traveling a distance of more than ten (10) kilometers;

For Animal-Drawn Carriage PhP 150.00 annually

(m) Every bicycle or horsedrawn carriage when operated at night shall be equipped with a lamp on the front which shall emit a white light from a distance of at least 20 feet to the front and with a rear red reflex mirror or lamp visible for distance of 200 feet to the rear.

For Bicycle Php 150.00 annually Renewal of registration shall be every one year from the date a bicycle or animal-drawn carriage has been of registered. SECTION 81. ATTACHMENT OF LICENSE PLATE. The license plate shall be firmly attached to the rear of the animal-drawn carriage or rear mudguard or frame of the bicycle for which it is issued in such position as to be plainly visible from the rear. SECTION 82. LIGHTING, WARNING SIGNS. An animal-drawn carriage and bicycle operated at night shall be equipped with headlight visible at least 60 meters to the front and a rear red reflex mirror or reflectorized tape visible for a distance of 60 meters to the rear. SECTION 83. OPERATING A BICYCLE AND ANIMALDRAWN CARRIAGE ON PUBLIC ROADS. (a) No person is allowed to drive a bicycle on public roads and national highway who is not at least 18 years of age; (i) A person driving a bicycle who is below 18 years old shall be given due warning for the first offense; (b) A driver of a bicycle shall not ride other than upon or astride a permanent and

(l) A driver/operator of a bicycle or animal-drawn carriage shall not operate at a speed greater than what is reasonable and prudent under the existing conditions;

SECTION 84. PENALTIES. Penalties shall be imposed upon the driver or owner/ operator of animal-drawn carriage or bicycle for the violations indicated hereunder: (i) No registration Php 100.00 (ii) No plate number Php 100.00 (iii) Not equipped with bell, horn Php 100.00 (iv) No headlight Php 100.00 (v) No red light to the rear Php 100.00 (vi) No red reflector on its rear Php 100.00 (vii) Carrying more persons than it is designed and equipped Php 100.00 (viii) With electronic device such as car stereo, radio, and other devices that creates public nuisance confiscation of device and Php 100.00 The apprehending City Traffic Enforcer shall have

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the authority to confiscate the device to be deposited at the CTTMO;

with operations registered with the City Government of Davao;

The device shall be claimed by the owner/driver/operator within seven (7) working days upon payment of corresponding fee of Php 150.00, otherwise the device shall be up for auction. The proceeds of the sale shall go to the General Fund.

(2) Registration and Licensing - applicants shall submit a duly accomplished registration form at the City Transport and Traffic Management Office, with the following requirement:

SECTION 85. BICYCLE LANE. The CTTMO shall prepare bicycle route development plan which, among others, designate a bicycle lane, shared roadway, or signed bicycle lane in consideration of the safety of both the bicycle driver and his/her bicycle. SECTION 86. TRAFFIC LAWS APPLICABLE TO OPERATING AN ANIMALDRAWN CARRIAGE OR PERSONS RIDING BICYCLES. The provisions of this Code granting right to and imposing duties upon a driver of a vehicle shall apply to every person riding a bicycle or operating an animal-drawn carriage upon a road, except those provisions that by their very nature are not applicable. ARTICLE XV OPERATION OF MOTORIZED TRICYCLEFOR-HIRE SECTION 87. EFFECT OF REGULATIONS. The regulations applicable to motorized tricycle-for-hire shall apply whenever Motorized Tricycles-for-Hire (MTH) is operated upon any road. SECTION 88. CLASSIFICATION OF MOTORIZED TRICYCLE-FOR-HIRE. The following classification is established for purposes of registration and regulations: (a) Type of Use: (i) MTH used for transporting passengers; and (ii) MTH used for commerce, trading of merchandise, other uses; (b) Type of Fuel: (i) Conventional (gasolinefed); (ii) Unconventional (solarpowered, LPG, electric, battery-operated); (c) Type of Make: (i) Sidecar; (ii) Centercar. SECTION 89. FRANCHISING AND REGULATORY UNIT. There shall be created a Motorized Tricyclefor-Hire Franchising and Regulatory Unit under the City Transport and Traffic Management Office which shall issue franchise and regulate the operations of motorized tricycle-for-hire. SECTION 90. MOTORIZED TRICYCLE-FORHIRE REGISTRATION AND LICENSING. An owner/operator/driver shall register and secure a license from the City Transport and Traffic Management Office in order to operate an authorized motorized tricyclefor-hire: (1) Qualification (a) Filipino citizen, 18 years old and above, and a resident of the City of Davao; (b) Cooperatives, associations, partnerships, and corporations registered under the Philippines laws, with 60% Filipino equity,

(a) Owner of New Unit (i) Official Receipt/Certificate of Registration indicating with sidecar/cab; (ii) Official Receipt/absolute Deed of Sale of the sidecar/ cab attached to the unit; (iii) Motorcycle Registration Papers from LTO; (iv) Driver’s License from LTO; (v) Completed registration form; (vi) Barangay clearance where the operation would take place; (vii) Health certificate from the City Health Office; (viii) Police clearance; (ix) Residence certificate; (x) Common carrier insurance for passengers and third party; (b) For the driver (i) Residence certificate; (ii) Barangay clearance; (iii) Health certificate from the City Health Office; (iv) Police clearance; (v) LTO-issued driver’s license; (vi) Certification from the owner/operator who hires the driver’s services; With reference to subparagraph (a)(vi) and subparagraph (b)(iii), health examination shall be conducted on driving fitness of the owner and/or driver of the MTH which shall include, but not limited to, vision examination, physical examination, sense of hearing, among others; provided however that the examining physician shall have the authority to recommend or deny the applicant’s fitness to drive; Motorized Tricycle Operators Permit (MTOP) shall be issued to owners/operators for every unit of motorized tricycle-for-hire upon payment of the following annual regulatory fees in the City Treasurer’s Office: Regulatory Fees Amount • Franchise/provisional authority Php 1,000.00 • Registration Fee Php 500.00 • Filing fee for MTOP per unit Php 50.00 • Fare adjustment fee for fare increase Php 50.00 • Filing Fee for Amendment of MTOP Php 30.00 (to be collected upon application) • Supervision Fee Php 100.00 (payable on or before September 30 annually) • Business Permit Fee payable to Business Bureau Php 200.00 (payable on or before January 20 annually) • CTTMO-issued driver’s ID Php 100.00 • Penalty for late renewal of MTOP 25% of the amount • Penalty for late renewal of business permit 25% of the amount • Penalty for lost CTTMOissued license plate Php 500.00 SECTION 91. DISPOSITION OF MONIES COLLECTED. Source of Revenue City Government Barangay

• Annual franchise fee 100.0% TMTF • Filing fee for MTOP 50.0% TMTF 50.0% • Fare adjustment fee 50.0% TMTF 50.0% (divided equally to barangays traversed by MTH operation per MTOP) • Supervision fee 50.0% TMTF 50.0% • Business permit fee 100.0% (General Fund) SECTION 92. OPERATING CONDITIONS OF MOTORIZED TRICYCLE-FORHIRE. (a) Only approved prototype sidecar/centercar designed and recommended by CTTMO shall be allowed for transport of passengers and qualified for issuance of franchise; provided however, that an MTH moving on any road used for transporting passengers, or waiting, parking or standing conspicuously soliciting passengers with sidecar/ centercar not in conformity with the approved prototype shall be apprehended and shall be impounded in the city impoundment area; (b) A driver shall not conduct and/or operate a MTH at any time on national roads and highways; (c) MTH terminal and routes assigned and approved by the City Transport and Traffic Management Office shall be strictly followed; (d) Only approved fare by the City Motorized-Tricyclefor-Hire Franchising and Regulatory Committee shall be collected for every passenger; (e) A driver shall conspicuously display the codedCTTMO-issued MTH license plate in front, back, and inside the cab facing the passenger; this is aside from the license plate issued by the Land Transportation Office which shall be conspicuously displayed; (f) A driver shall only conduct passengers and goods/cargos that meet the capacity of the MTH so as not to endanger the lives of the passengers; (g) The driver of MTH shall carry at all times the photocopy of MTOP, LTO-issued Official Receipt and Certificate of Registration, and CTTMO-issued licenses; (h) An MTH shall be built in accordance with the design and built and other specifications recommended by the CTTMO; (i) Only MTH with motorcycles 125cc and above shall be qualified for the granting of franchise or MTOP; (j) The CTTMO shall regulate the number of franchisees allowed to ply in every approved zone or route; (k) The MTH franchise or MTOP shall not be transferable; (l) The owners/operators of MTH shall show proof of garage for their MTH; (m) A common color of sidecar/centercar for MTH


EDGEDAVAO operating in the same zone shall be imposed. Each unit shall be assigned and bear identification number, aside from its LTO license plate number. SECTION 93. RESPONSIBILITIES OF MTH OWNER/OPERATOR. It shall be the sole responsibility of the owners/operators of MTH over the franchising, registration, qualifications, and conduct of the drivers hired to transport passengers/ cargoes, as provided for in this Code. SECTION 94. RESPONSIBILITIES OF MTH DRIVER. It shall be the responsibility of the driver to act, perform, and follow traffic laws, rules and regulations of the City of Davao, as provided for in this Code, and maintain the MTH for the safe and comfort of the passengers. SECTION 95. ADMINISTRATIVE SANCTIONS. (a) Suspension of Franchise - The department head of the CTTMO or his duly authorized representative may demand from any driver to surrender his/her license plate in violation of the above regulation and the MTH Temporary Operator Permit (MTOP) shall be issued to said driver during the pendency of the case against him; Provided further, that any holder or possessor of a driver’s license duly issued who shall allow or permit the use of the license by any other person shall be suspended for a minimum period of one(1) month and a maximum period of six (6) months after which, the former holder of the driver’s license may apply again for a license; (b) Revocation of Franchise - Any MTOP issued may be revoked by the Chairman of the CMTFRC or his duly authorized representative whenever the holder, or possessor of said license shall have been convicted by final judgment of any of the following offenses: (i) gross immoral conduct such as soliciting or acting as agent of houses of ill-repute committed during the discharge of such calling as MCH driver; (ii) when convicted of murder or homicide, robbery or theft, abuse of chastity or any acts of lasciviousness, coercion or threats, committed during the discharge of his call as driver, in which event he shall be issued probationary franchise for a period to be determined by the CTTMO. SECTION 96. ADMINISTRATIVE FINES. The following administrative fines shall be imposed against owners, operators and drivers of MTH for violation of any provisions of this Article; provided however, that owners, operators and drivers who are found liable for violating any other provision of this Code but not contained in this Article, shall also be subjected to the corresponding prescribed penalty or fine thereof: (a) On first offense: a fine of One Thousand Pesos (Php 1,000.00), and/or, suspension or cancellation of the franchise/provisional authority; (b) For second offense: a fine of Two Thousand Pe-

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sos (Php 2,000.00); (c) Upon subsequent violations: a fine of Four Thousand Pesos (Php 4,000.00) for each succeeding offense; (d) Duly authorized enforcement officers are hereby empowered to take custody of, and impound the MTH for operating without a franchise or special permit or with expired franchise/special permit; (e) Compromise penalties for the following violations in the event a violator opts to pay the same without resorting to judicial proceedings: Violation Penalty • No LTO - driver’s license Php 500.00 • Non-display of prescribed ID card issued by the CTTMO Php 100.00 • Failure to secure the prescribed ID Php 500.00 • Wearing of slippers or bare foot driving Php 100.00 • Wearing of sleeveless tshirt Php 100.00 • Wearing of shorts Php 100.00 • Smoking while driving Php 500.00 • Non-wearing of shirt Php 100.00 • Failure to carry MTOP Php 500.00 • Overloading Php 500.00 • Overcharging Php 500.00 • Failure to display approved tariff rate Php 500.00 • Failure to comply the route color coding Php 500.00 • Installation of stereo Php 500.00 • Wearing headphone, earphone while driving Php 500.00 • Installation of additional extension Php 500.00 • Not following prescribed routes Php 500.00 • Traversing along national roads/highways Php 500.00 • Unreasonable refusal to convey passengers Php 500.00 • Use of tampered/fake MTH license plate Php 500.00 • Without rear-view mirror Php 500.00 • Operating with expired franchise Php 500.00 MTH apprehended under this Article shall be removed by authorized city traffic enforcer from the road and shall be impounded at the city impoundment area; provided however, that the release of apprehended MTH shall be subject to payment of penalty/ ies stated in this Section, other fees and charges as determined by the CTTMO subject to the approval of the MTFRC. SECTION 97. TRANSITORY PROVISION. (a) Existing MTOP issued by the TRD shall remain in force and effective until its expiration; (b) Existing MTH being operated without and/or expired franchise/provisional authority are hereby given two (2) months from the effectivity date of this Code to secure MTOP;

(c) Existing MTH with franchise shall operate motorcycle engines with minimum power of 100cc or higher as maybe required by the CTTMO; (d) Existing MTH with franchise shall be given a period of two (2) years to modify and conform with the sidecar/centercar specifications from the date when prototype sidecar/centercar with fixed specifications shall have been approved by the CTRMB; (e) Existing MTH with franchise shall be given a period of six (6) months to conform with the route color code from the date when color assignment shall have been approved by the CTTMB; (f) Owners, operators and drivers of MTH who are not residents of the barangay in which they are operating shall be given one (1) year from the effectivity of this Code to continue its operation after which they shall be phased out unless they provide their own garage where the MTH are being operated; (g) Existing Transport Regulatory Division (TRD) under the City Legal Office shall be subsumed under the CTTMO. ARTICLE XVI OPERATIONS OF PEDALOPERATED TRICYCLES SECTION 98. EFFECT OF REGULATIONS. The regulations applicable to pedaloperated tricycle or trisikad shall apply whenever pedal-operated tricycle, which is classified “for hire”, “commercial use”, and “ownerdriven”, is operated upon any road or upon any path set aside for the pedal-operated tricycles. SECTION 99. CLASSIFICATION OF PEDAL-OPERATED TRICYCLE. (a) Type of Use: (i) For transport of passengers; (ii) For vending merchandise; (iii) For transport or delivery of goods; (iv) For personal use; (b) Type of Built: (i) Sidecar; (ii) Center car; (iii) Cart-type. SECTION 100. REGISTRATION AND LICENSING. An owner shall register and secure a license plate in order to operate a pedal-operated tricycle or trisikad; (a) Qualification (i) Filipino citizen, 18 to 60 years old, and resident of City of Davao; (ii) Cooperatives, associations, partnerships, and corporations registered under the Philippines laws, with 60% Filipino equity, with operations registered with the City Government of Davao; (b) Registration and Licensing (i) All trisikad owned by residents, cooperatives, associations, and other entities with juridical personality in Davao City shall register with the Franchising and Regulatory Division (FRD) of the CTTMO for the issuance of registration and pedicab license plates and upon payment of the following amount to the City

CLASSIFIEDS

Treasurer’s Office:

dential areas;

For transport of passengers P h p 500.00 annually/unit

(f) The fare to be collected by trisikad driver from passengers shall not exceed the rates approved by the CTTMO on public utility jeepneys in Davao City;

For vending merchandise Php 1,000.00 annually/unit For transport or delivery of goods Php 1,000.00 annually/unit For personal use Php 500.00 annually/unit Provided, however, that the owner/operator shall have the option to register the newly-acquired unit/units for a period of three (3) years; (ii) Newly acquired pedaloperated tricycle or trisikad shall be registered within thirty (30) days from the date of acquisition; (iii) Renewal of license plate shall be done annually from the date the unit has been registered; (iv) Failure to register within the periods specified above shall make the owner of the pedicab liable to a fifty percent (50%) surcharge and paragraph (ii) shall apply; (v) No registration or renewal of registration shall be allowed of units which are unfit for public use or not roadworthy as determined by the CTTMO. SECTION 101. ATTACHMENT OF LICENSE PLATE. The license plate number of a trisikad shall be prominently attached at the rear portion of the trisikad clearly visible at a distance of fifty (50) feet and the driver/operator shall always carry a photocopy of the registration papers. SECTION 102. LIGHTING, WARNING SIGNS. A trisikad operated at night shall be equipped with headlight visible at least 60 meters to the front and a rear red reflex mirror or reflectorized tape visible for a distance of 60 meters to the rear. SECTION 103. RESTRICTIONS. (a) Only approved cab and/ or body prototype designed and recommended by CTTMO are allowed for transport of passengers and are qualified for issuance of franchise; provided however, that a trisikad moving or being operated on any road used for transporting passengers, or waiting or parking with cab and/or body which does not conform with the approved prototype shall be apprehended, impounded and stored in the city impoundment area; (b) Trisikad used for transport of passengers shall not be allowed to operate on streets designated as “offlimits” by the CTTMO; (c) No trisikad shall traverse along the national highway and secondary roads; except those trisikad not used for transporting passengers; (d) The license plate is nontransferable, it is punishable by a fine of Php 500.00, and if any person uses the license plate that belongs to another, the said person shall pay such fine; (e) As far as practicable, the operation of pedicab used for transport of passengers shall be limited within resi-

(g) A homeowners’ association of private subdivision may prescribe some limitations regarding the operation of trisikads within said subdivision, upon approval of the CTTMO, not contrary to the traffic provisions of this Code; (h) The total number of passengers of a trisikad shall be limited to three (3) persons including the driver; (i) No person shall operate a trisikad unless it is equipped with a bell, a horn or other devices capable of giving a signal for a distance of at least 100 feet except siren or whistle; (j) No electronic devices shall be attached to the trisikad that would create public nuisance such as, but not limited to, radios, stereos, and other soundgenerating devices; (k) No person shall drive a trisikad, unless he/she wears long pants or trousers, shirt and shoes; (l) Using a license plate not issued by the CTTMO is punishable by a fine of Php 500.00 and impoundment; (m) No person shall drive a trisikad wearing headphones, using cell phones to text or call and smoking is strictly prohibited. SECTION 104. REGULATORY OFFICE AND ITS FUNCTION. The CTTMO shall regulate the registration of trisikad with the following function: (a) Registration of pedaloperated tricycles or trisikad; (b) Establish routes for pedal-operated tricycles or trisikad used for transporting passengers; (c) Establish color coding with respect to zone/route for trisikad used for transporting passengers; (d) Recommend other guidelines and standards on the operations of pedaloperated tricycles subject to the approval of the Motorized Tricycle Franchising and Regulatory Committee. SECTION 105. VIOLATIONS AND PENALTIES. Penalties shall be imposed upon the driver or owner/ operator of the trisikad for the violations indicated hereunder: (a) For Owner of pedal-operated tricycles Penalty (i) No registration Php 500.00 (ii)No CTTMO-issued license plate Php 500.00 (iii) Not equipped with bell, horn Php 500.00 (iv) No headlight Php 500.00 (v) No light or rear red reflex mirror Php 500.00 (vi) Failure to comply registration papers Php 500.00 (vii) With electronic device such as car stereo, radio, and other devices that cre-

C7

ates public nuisance Confiscation of device plus Php 500.00 The apprehending City Traffic Enforcer shall have the authority to confiscate the electronic sound device to be deposited at the City Transport and Traffic Management Office; The device shall be claimed by the owner/driver within seven (7) working days upon payment of corresponding fee of Php 1,000.00, otherwise the device shall be up for auction. The proceeds of the sale shall go to the General Fund; (b) For drivers Penalty (i) Driving without shirt Php 500.00 (ii) Driving in short pants Php 500.00 (iii) Driving in slippers Php 200.00 (iv) Driving while wearing headphone/earphone Php 500.00 (v) Smoking while driving Php 1,000.00 (c) For pedal-operated tricycles used in transporting passengers Penalty (i) Operating outside the designated routes: First Offense Php 500.00 Second and subsequent offenses Php 1,000.00 (ii) Traversing along national highway Php 500.00 (iii) Fare overcharging Php 500.00 (iv) Excess number of passengers as provided in this Article Php 500.00 A trisikad apprehended under this Article shall be removed by authorized city traffic enforcer from the road and shall be impounded at the city impoundment area; provided however, the release of apprehended trisikad shall be subject to payment of penalty/ies stated in this Section, other fees and charges as determined by the CTTMO subject to the approval of the Sangguniang Panlungsod. SECTION 106. TRAFFIC LAWS APPLICABLE TO PEDAL-OPERATED TRICYCLE OR TRISIKAD. The provisions of this Code granting right to and imposing duties upon a driver of a vehicle shall apply to every person driving a trisikad upon a road, not contained in this Article and all other provisions contained of this Code also apply. ARTICLE XVII REGISTRATION OF NONMOTORIZED BOAT USING THE CITY OF DAVAO AS PORT OF CALL SECTION 107. EFFECT OF REGULATION. This regulation is applicable to non-motorized boat using the City of Davao as port of call. All other boats/vessels not covered by this Code shall be registered in accordance with the provisions of RA 9295, otherwise known as the “Domestic Shipping Development Act of 2004”. SECTION 108. SCOPE. The registration function of the City Government of Davao is limited only to the conferment of identity


C8 CLASSIFIEDS to non-motorized fishing boats, but does not, however, serve as an authorization or license to fish in municipal waters.

the Franchising and Regulatory Division (FRD), shall formulate registration process that would be facilitative to applicants;

SECTION 109. PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES. This Article intends to institutionalize and provide guidelines, system and procedure in the conduct of registration of non-motorized boats with Davao City as homeport or destination, providing for fees and penalties therefor.

(c) Application Requirements – the following are necessary documentary requirements for the filing of application for registration and upon payment of annual registration fee of P200.00:

SECTION TION.

110.

DEFINI-

(a) Registration – an act/ process of enlisting a nonmotorized fishing boat for the purpose of establishing its identity and ownership by assigning it a permanent number. (b) License/Permit to fish – the privilege to fish in its municipal waters granted to registered fisherfolk by the Local Government Unit.

(i) For New Applicants • Completed Application Form (Municipal Fishing Vessel Application form); • Certification or Clearance from the Davao City Philippine National Police (PNP) or from the PNP Maritime Office certifying that the non-motorized fishing boat is not involved in any criminal offense; • Environmental Clearance from the City Environment and Natural Resources Office (CENRO);

(c) Fishing boat – any watercraft used for fishing or in support to fishing operations in municipal waters.

• Barangay Clearance;

(d) Municipal Waters – include not only streams, lakes, inland bodies of water and tidal within the municipality which are not included within the protected areas as defined under Republic Act No. 7586 (The NIPAS Law), public forest, timberlands, forest reserves, or fishery reserves, but also marine waters included between two (2) lines drawn perpendicular to the general coastline from points where the boundary lines of the municipality touch the sea at low tide and a third line parallel with the general coastline including islands and fifteen (15) kilometres from such coastline. Where two (2) municipalities are so situated on opposite shores that there is less than thirty (30) kilometres of marine waters between them, the third line shall be equally distant from the opposite shore of the respective municipalities.

• All requirements under sub-paragraph (i) of Section 112 of this Article;

(e) Registered Non-Motorized Fishing Boats – fishing boats duly registered with the City Government of Davao satisfying all registration requirements. (f) Unregistered Non-Motorized Fishing Boats – fishing boats unregistered with the City Government of Davao (g) Homeport – refers to the locality where the fishing vessel is registered (h) MARINA – Maritime Industry Authority (i) PCG – Philippine Coast Guard (j) CAO – City Agriculturist’s Office (k) CENRO – City Environment and Natural Resources Office SECTION 111. REGISTRATION PROCEDURE. (a) Eligible Applicants – only Filipino citizen, single proprietorship, partnerships, and/or corporations and duly registered or accredited fisherfolk organizations, associations and cooperatives are eligible to apply for registration; (b) The CTTMO, through

(ii) For Transfer of Registration (change of homeport)

• Original Copy of the Certificate of Number; • Clearance to Change Homeport (to be issued by the City Government of Davao through the City Transport and Traffic Management Office); (d) Certificate of Number – Upon submission of the owner/operator of completed requirements for the registration of municipal fishing vessel to the CTTMO, the CTTMO shall recommend to the City Mayor for the issuance of the Certificate of Number (Certificate of Number form) which is nontransferable; (e) Official Number - The CTTMO shall assign an official number to a registered fishing vessel which shall correspond to a code bearing the City of Davao; the official number shall be painted, permanently marked or plated on both sides of the forward portion of the fishing vessel; (f) Assignment of Name – The City Transport and Traffic Management Office, upon request of the owner/ operator may assign a name to the fishing vessel. A name shall be assigned to only one (1) fishing vessel regardless of type of fishing gear. If the proposed name has already been assigned to another registered boat, the owner/operator has the option of adding letters of the alphabet, any Arabic number or Roman numeral which can be represented by words or its numeric equivalent, to the proposed name. The name of the fishing vessel shall be painted on both sides of the mid portion of the fishing vessel; (g) Marking of Vessels – The City Transport and Traffic Management Office may institute a vessel marking or color coding system within its territorial jurisdiction; (h) Issuance of New Certificate of Number – A new Certificate of Number shall be issued in case the fishing vessel changes its homeport:

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EDGEDAVAO

(i) A change in homeport may occur in case the owner decides to change residence or principal office, or sells or transfers ownership of the fishing vessel to a person or entity with domicile in another municipality or city; the city shall, upon application for change of homeport, issue a certificate of clearance, and shall delete the registration of such fishing vessel from its register;

motorized fishing boat has applied for a Change of Name;

(ii) No clearance for the change in homeport shall be issued by the CTTMO, being the current homeport, under the following instances:

An application for change of name shall not be approved if the boat is involved in civil case regarding question of ownership or in a criminal or civil case for violation of a fishery law or ordinance.

SECTION 116. MONITORING OF REGISTERED NON-MOTORIZED FISHING BOAT. There shall be a comprehensive monitoring strategy to determine the compliance of this Code.

(i) Deletion or Cancellation of Registration – In case of loss or decay of the fishing vessel, or its involvement in a marine/maritime incident, the owner/proprietor shall immediately inform the City Transport and Traffic Management Office, and shall delete or cancel the fishing vessel’s registration.

(a) The Barangay Council shall report to the CTTMO, violations of any provision of this Article for appropriate action;

• the single proprietorship, partnership, corporation, or fisherfolk cooperative has no branch office in the intended homeport; • there is an outstanding safety requirement which the boat has to comply; • the fishing vessel is involved in a pending criminal, civil or administrative case for violation of fishery law or ordinance, or civil case regarding question of ownership; (iii) The new homeport shall issue a new Certificate of Number upon filing of an application for issuance of a new Certificate of Number pursuant to the requirements in this Article; (iv) Re-issuance of Certificate of Number – The CTTMO shall re-issue the Certificate of Number in the following instances: a. Change in ownership – In case the fishing vessel is sold or transfer of ownership, the CTTMO shall re-issue the Certificate of Number, containing the amended information on ownership upon application of the new owner or transferee, upon the submission of the following requirements: (i) Duly notarized Deed of Absolute Sale; (ii) Posting in the Barangay Hall or in the City Hall of the City Government of Davao for seven (7) consecutive days giving notice that the fishing boat has been sold or transferred to a new owner; (iii) Affidavit of Publication executed by the City Mayor, through the Office of the City Transport and Traffic Management Office, that the said notice had been posted in the premises and that there are no oppositors to the fishing boat’s sale; and (iv) Original copy(ies) of Certificate of Number; b. Change of name of the boat – The CTTMO shall issue a Certificate of Number when the owner/operator desires to change the name of the boat, upon application filed with the current homeport, in this case the City of Davao, stating the reason for such. The following documents shall be attached upon submission of the application; (i) Original copy of the Certificate of Number; (ii) Posting in the Barangay Hall or in the City Hall of the City Government of Davao for seven (7) consecutive days giving notice that the

(iii) Affidavit of Publication executed by the Punong Barangay and the City Mayor, through the Office of the City Transport and Traffic Management Office, that the said notice had been posted in the premises and that there are no oppositions or claims during the seven (7) day posting;

SECTION 112. FINES AND PENALTIES. Fines and penalties for unregistered non-motorized fishing boats within the municipal waters of Davao City, pursuant to the Local Government Code of 1991, with the following: (a) For a fisherfolk who is a resident of the City of Davao (i) First offense - P1,500.00 (ii) Second offense - P2,500.00 (iii) Third offense - P5,000.00 and cancellation of registration (b) For a fisherfolk who is not a resident of the City of Davao First and subsequent offenses - P5,000.00; while the fish catch, or any merchandise including fishing gears, found in the boat, shall be confiscated in favor of the City Government of Davao, and hold the fishing boat from sailing for a period of time until the payment of fine is paid and duly receipted by the Office of the City Treasurer; (c) For a fisherfolk whose boat is registered in other areas but not a resident of the City of Davao The fisherfolk shall pay a fishery auxiliary invoice of P5,000.00. The fishery auxiliary invoice is not transferable and can only be used for a period of 24 hours of fishing activity in the municipal waters of Davao City. Payment for the fishery auxiliary invoice shall be made at the Office of the City Treasurer during office hours. SECTION 113. QUALIFIED TO FISH IN THE MUNICIPAL WATERS OF DAVAO CITY. Only duly registered fishing boats are qualified to fish in the municipal waters of the City of Davao. SECTION 114. PRIORITY IN THE REGISTRATION OF NON-MOTORIZED FISHING BOATS. The following is the order of priority in the registration of nonmotorized fishing boats: Priority 1 - Fishing boats owners/operators who are residents of the City of

Davao; Priority 2 - Fishing boats owners/operators who are residents from other areas in the Philippines. SECTION 115. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY. The City Transport and Traffic Management Office shall implement the provisions of this Article in collaboration with the City Agriculturist’s Office.

(b) The City Transport and Traffic Management Office and the City Agriculturist Office, in coordination with the Barangay Council, shall conduct periodic inspection of fishing boats to determine the extent of compliance of this Code. SECTION 117. REPORTORIAL SCHEME. The City Government of Davao, through the CTTMO in collaboration with the City Agriculturist Office shall maintain an updated records of non-motorized fishing boat under the city’s jurisdiction and submit quarterly to the MARINA Region XI, to the Philippine Coast Guard where the City of Davao belongs, and Department of Agriculture-BFAR the list of non-motorized fishing boat registered and deleted/cancelled. SECTION 118. REGISTRATION OF NON-MOTORIZED VESSEL. (a) Used for Fishing Purposes per Unit (i) Latest Residence Certificate of the owner; (ii) Barangay Clearance; (iii) Completed Registration Form; (iv) Annual registration fee of Php 200.00 (renewable annually from the date of registration); (b) Used for Commercial Purposes per Unit (i) Business Permit; (ii) Barangay Clearance; (iii) Completed Registration Form; (iv) Annual registration fee of Php 500.00 (renewable annually from the date of registration); (c) Assignment of registration number (i) The CTTMO shall assign a permanent registration number to every unit registered; (ii) The registration number is non-transferable; (iii) The registration number shall be written on the middle part of the boat on both sides; (d) Disposition of monies collected from registration fee – 25.0% shall go to the Barangay where there is boat registration, while the remaining 75.0% shall go to the Traffic Management Trust Fund. ARTICLE XVIII LIGHTING, WARNING SIGNS, EQUIPMENT, ETC. SECTION 119. LIGHTS ON MOVING MOTOR VEHICLES. No person shall

drive a motor vehicle or a combination of a motor vehicle and trailer between sunset and sunrise, unless the motor vehicle or combination is equipped with appropriate lamps and reflectors prescribed as mandatory by the Land Transportation Office (LTO) to be carried by that vehicle or combination, and the lamps are lighted. SECTION 120. DIMMING OF HEADLIGHTS. (a) The driver of a motor vehicle shall dim the headlights or tilt the beam downward whenever the vehicle is approached by any other vehicle traveling in the opposite direction; (i) When the other vehicle reaches a point Two Hundred (200) meters from his/ her motor vehicle; or (ii) Immediately when the light projected by every headlight of the other vehicle is switched to low beam and shall cause every headlight of his vehicle to remain on low beam until the other vehicle has passed; (b) No person shall drive a motor vehicle without the required headlights that are capable or being operated on low beam. SECTION 121. LIGHTS ON STATIONARY MOTOR VEHICLES. (a) Subject to the provision of Section 130, no person shall leave a motor vehicle waiting on a road with a lamp of a power exceeding seven (7) watts lighted and showing to the front, except while the vehicle is loading or unloading passengers or is compelled to remain stationary by the exigencies of traffic; (b) No person shall leave a motor vehicle or a trailer waiting on or partly on any thoroughfare between sunset and sunrise unless that motor vehicle or trailer is equipped with: (i) Two lamps (one on each side) showing a clear white light to the front and clearly visible under normal atmospheric conditions at a distance of 180 meters, or where the motor vehicle or trailer is waiting on or adjacent to the boundary of the thoroughfare, one such lamp, which shall be on the side of the motor vehicle or trailer near to the center of the thoroughfare; and (ii) Appropriate rear lamps, number-plate lamps, front and rear clearance lamps and reflectors prescribed as mandatory by the LTO and the lamps so affixed are lighted; (c) Paragraph (b) of this Section shall not apply: (i) Where the street lighting in the vicinity renders the motor vehicle or the trailer clearly visible at a distance of 180 meters; or (ii) To any motorcycle nor connected to a side car, trailer left waiting parallel to and as near as practicable to the boundary of the thoroughfare. SECTION 122. PORTABLE WARNING SIGNS FOR DISABLED VEHICLES. (a) No person shall drive a vehicle on a road, or permit a vehicle to be driven,


EDGEDAVAO unless that vehicle carries a portable early warning device complying with the specifications prescribed by the Land Transportation Office (LTO); (b) Whenever a disabled vehicle is stationary on a thoroughfare, the portable early warning devices shall be placed one to the rear of the vehicle and one to the front side nearer to the center of the thoroughfare at a distance prescribed by the LTO to give reasonable warning to approaching drivers; (c) Nothing in this Section shall affect any duty imposed by this Code to display lighted lamps on stationary vehicles. SECTION 123. LIGHTS AND OTHER EQUIPMENT ON BICYCLES. (a) No person shall ride or propel a bicycle between sunset and sunrise, unless it is equipped with: (i) A lighted lamp showing a clear white light to the front; (ii) A lighted lamp showing a clear red light to the rear; (iii) A red reflector on its rear; and, (iv) A rear mudguard, the rear half of which is colored white;

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or leave waiting vehicle on which, is mounted a lamp displaying intermittent flashes, except (i) A lamp displaying intermittent red and/or blue flashes on the top of an emergency vehicle; (ii) A lamp displaying intermittent amber flashes on top of • A tow truck or motor breakdown service vehicle at the scene of an accident or breakdown; or, • A vehicle being used by a government, public or local authority in connection with its functions and occupying a hazardous position on the thoroughfare; (b) A motor vehicle moving or stationary in a hazardous position on a thoroughfare because of an emergency situation, shall display such flashes from both sides of the front and rear of the vehicle by means of a flashing lamp signaling devices or Early Warning Device (EWD); provided, that the display of such flashes and the operation of EWD are in accordance with the specification of the LTO. SECTION LAMPS.

127.

SPOT

(b) Such lamps and reflectors shall be of the types and affixed in the positions prescribed by the proper authority and shall be kept clean at all times;

(a) No person shall cause or permit any spot lamp, or fog light/lamp or search lamp offered or connected to any vehicle to be lighted unless:

(c) No person shall ride a bicycle unless it is equipped with: (i) An efficient brake; and, (ii) An efficient bell or some other suitable warning device.

(i) The vehicle is stationary and the lamp is used only for the purpose of reading a road sign;

SECTION 124. LIGHTS ON ANIMAL DRAWN VEHICLES. (a) No person shall drive or permit any animal-drawn vehicle or any trailer attached to it to be upon any thoroughfare between sunset and sunrise, unless the vehicle or the trailer is equipped with appropriate front and rear lamps, clearance lamps and reflectors, as prescribed by proper authority and the lamps are lighted; (b) All reflectors and lights prescribed under this Section shall be kept clean and shall not be obscured by any part of the vehicle or its load. SECTION 125. LIGHTS ON TOWED VEHICLES. No person shall between sunset and sunrise drive a motor vehicle which is towing another vehicle unless a lighted lamp is attached to the portion of the towed vehicle facing any following vehicle, with a power not exceeding seven (7) watts showing a clear red light visible under normal atmosphere conditions at a distance of 100 meters which lamp is so placed that: (a) It is clear not more than one (1) meter above the ground; and (b) It is in the center or to the left side of the center of that portion of the towed vehicle which faces any following vehicle. SECTION 126. FLASHING WARNING LIGHTS. (a) No person shall drive

(ii) The vehicle is outside the territorial jurisdiction of Davao City; (b) The provision of paragraph (a) of this Section shall not apply if the vehicle is an emergency vehicle or if the vehicle is being used by law enforcement agencies in the performance of their official function. SECTION 128. MUFFLERS AND NOISE CONTROLLING DEVICES. No person shall operate a motor vehicle on a street unless such motor vehicle is equipped, at all times, with a muffler or mufflers in constant operation and of sufficient capacity for the motor and equipped with an exhaust system to prevent the escape of excessive fumes or smoke and unusual noise; Owners or operators of motor vehicles within the territorial jurisdiction of the City of Davao shall at all times ensure that their vehicles comply with the exhaust emission standards set forth in RA 8749, otherwise known as the “Philippine Clean Air Act of 1999” and its implementing rules and regulations. SECTION 129. WINDSHIELDS TO BE UNOBSTRUCTED AND EQUIPPED WITH WIPERS. (a) No person shall drive any motor vehicle with any sign, poster, or other nontransparent material upon the front windshield of such vehicle which obstructs the driver’s clear view of the road or highway; (b) Posters or stickers approved by the proper authority shall be placed at

the lower right hand corner of the front windshield; (c) No person shall drive any motor vehicle with any non-transparent material or object suspended within the windshield area as viewed from the driver’s seat nor shall any person drive any motor vehicle upon the hood of which is attached to any fixture ornament of any material which vibrates, or swings within view of the driver of said vehicle; (d) The windshield on every motor vehicle shall be equipped with a wiper for cleaning rain or other moisture from the windshield and shall be maintained in good working order. ARTICLE XIX SEATBELT SECTION 130. EFFECT OF REGULATIONS. The regulations applicable to all private, governmentowned, and diplomatic vehicles with four (4) to multiwheeler motor vehicles, and in compliance with Republic Act No. 8750, otherwise known as the “Seat Belt Use Act of 1999”. SECTION 131. MANDATORY USE OF SEATBELTS. (a) For their own safety, the driver and front seat passengers of a public or private motor vehicle are required to wear or use their seat belt devices while inside a vehicle of running engine on any city road or thoroughfare; Provided, that for private vehicles, except for jeeps, jeepneys, vans, buses and other private vehicles as may be determined by the CTTMO, front and back seat passengers are likewise required to use their seat belt devices at all times; (b) In the case of public motor vehicles, the driver shall be required to immediately inform and require the front seat passengers upon boarding a vehicle of running engine to wear the prescribed seat belts. Any passenger who refuses to wear seat belts shall not be allowed to continue his/her trip; (c) For special public service vehicles such as school services and other similar vehicles as may be determined by the CTTMO, seat belt devices should be provided and used by both drivers and front seat passengers as defined herein and the first row passengers immediately behind the driver at all times while inside a vehicle of running engine; (d) Operational motor vehicles, both public and private, which are not equipped with the required\ seat belt devices, are given one (1) year to retrofit appropriate seat belt devices in their vehicles. SECTION 132. TYPE OF SEAT BELT DEVICES REQUIRED. The seat belt devices required to be installed in all motor vehicles shall comply with the standards and specifications established by the Bureau of Product Standards of the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) in consultation with the LTO of the Department of Transportation and Communication (DOTC); Provided however that the seat belt devices installed in imported second-

CLASSIFIEDS

hand motor vehicles shall conform with the standards and specifications of the Bureau of Product Standards for purposes of importation and registration. SECTION 133. CHILDREN TO SIT IN FRONT SEAT. Infants and/or children ages six (6) years and below shall be prohibited to sit in the front seat of any motor vehicle. SECTION 134. PROVISION FOR SEAT BELT. Amended under R.A 8750, otherwise known as the Seat Belt Use Act of 1999, car manufacturers, assemblers and distributors are required to ensure that seat belt devices are properly installed before the distribution and sale of the said vehicles as determined by the IRR thereon: Provided, that manufacturers, assemblers and distributors of jeepneys may install a pelvis restraint or lap belt only in the driver’s and front seat passengers’ seat and this shall be considered as substantial compliance with the requirement of the said Article. SECTION 135. PENALTIES AND FINES. The City Government of Davao, through the City Transport and Traffic Management Office shall impose fines against a driver/operator of public utility vehicle operating in Davao City roads and thoroughfares for violation of this Article, which shall be defined in Appendix VI (Truck Ban Route); (a) On the Driver (i) For failure to wear the prescribe seat belt devices and/or failure to require his passengers to wear the prescribe seat belt device; (ii) Public utility vehicles shall post appropriate signage instructing front seat passengers to wear seat belts when inside the vehicle. Non-compliance hereof will hold the driver and the operator liable. SECTION 136. RESERVATION OF FRONT SEATS FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITY. Drivers and/or owners of public utility vehicles are required to reserve the seat on the front for persons with disability. ARTICLE XX WEIGHT, SIZE, LOAD SECTION 137. GROSS WEIGHT, AXLE AND WHEEL LOADS. No motor vehicle or other power vehicle or combination of such vehicles equipped wholly with pneumatic tires, which has a total gross weight, including vehicle and load, in excess of the requirements as prescribed by the Land Transportation Office (LTO), shall be operated or moved upon any public places, city roads and street or highway. SECTION 138. PROJECTING LOADS ON PASSENGER VEHICLES. No passenger-type vehicle shall be operated on any road, street or highway with any load thereon projecting beyond the extreme width of the vehicle, regardless of the nature of the property being transported. SECTION 139. LOADS TO BE PROPERLY SECURED. No vehicle shall be driven or moved on any road, street or highway:

(a) Unless such vehicle is so constructed or loaded as to prevent any of its load from dropping, shifting, leaking, or otherwise escaping therefrom, except that soil, sand, or gravel, may be dropped for the purpose of traction, or water or other substance may be sprinkled on a roadway in cleaning or maintaining the roadway; (b) With any load not entirely within the body of the vehicle; Provided, however, that the ropes, straps, cargo nets, locks or other suitable mechanical device to prevent such load from dropping onto the highway or from shifting in any manner and further, that this provision shall not be deemed to supersede the provision of Section 141 herein above; (c) With any load consisting partially or entirely of loose paper, empty cartons, crates, or any other material susceptible of being blown or carried by the wind, unless such load is entirely covered by tarpaulin, net, canopy or other suitable material, effectively preventing any part of such load from being blown or carried by the wind; Provided however, that this paragraph shall apply to any vehicle carrying a load consisting entirely of soil, sand, coral or gravel, to prevent particles thereof from being blown or carried by the wind. SECTION 140. TRAFFIC OFFICERS MAY WEIGH VEHICLES AND REQUIRE REMOVAL OF EXCESS LOADS. (a) The City Traffic Enforcer having reason to believe that the weight of a vehicle and load is unlawful, is authorized to require the driver to stop and submit to weighing of such vehicle by means of a portable or stationary weighing scale or may require that the vehicle be driven to the nearest public weighing scale available in the area; (b) Whenever a traffic enforcer/officer upon weighing a vehicle and load as above provided, determines that the weight is unlawful, the officer may require the driver to stop the vehicle in a suitable place and remain standing until portion of the load is removed as may be necessary to reduce the gross weight to such limit as permitted. All materials so unloaded shall be cared for by the owner or operator of the vehicle at their own risk; (c) Any driver of a vehicle who fails or refuses to stop and submit the vehicle and load to weighing when directed by a Traffic Enforcer/ Officer shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. SECTION 141. EXCESSIVE WIDTH, HEIGHT OF VEHICLES RESTRICTED. No motor vehicle or other power vehicle of a greater width than nine (9) feet, including load, and a height of fifteen (15) feet, shall be operated on any city street or highway except under the provisions herein specified. SECTION 142. RESTRICTING THE USE OVER BRIDGES. (a) No person shall drive or operate any motor vehicle

C9

having an aggregate weight of vehicle and load in excess of the specified allowable weight indicated over any bridge in the City; (b) No person shall drive any motor vehicle over any wooden bridge at a speed greater than 10 kilometers per hour; (c) A driver of any motor vehicle when traveling over said wooden bridge shall not approach within ten (10) feet of another motor vehicle proceeding in the same direction. SECTION 143. PERMIT TO MOVE EQUIPMENT AND/ OR LOAD OF EXCESSIVE WEIGHT, WIDTH OR HEIGHT. (a) No vehicle shall be moved, transported or caused to be moved through the city streets having an equipment and/or load of excessive weight, width or height unless a permit or clearance has been issued by the department head of the CTTMO; (b) All applications for permit required under this section shall be made in writing to the CTTMO and shall contain the following: (i) Description of the vehicle, equipment and/or load to be moved; (ii) Street location or other identifying description of the place to which the same is to be moved; (iii) Complete designation of the route to be followed; (iv) Height, width and length of the same; (v) Time at which the movement of the same will commence and terminate; (vi) Certified statement that the moving contractor has examined the route and determined that there will be a clearance of at least one (1) foot on each side of the vehicle, equipment and/or any possible obstruction existing along such route; (c) No permit shall be issued unless: (i) The applicant shall have secured and presented to the issuing officer all clearances required by any law, ordinance or regulation; (ii) There is more than one (1) foot clearance on each side of the vehicle and/or equipment along the route to be followed; (iii) The issuing officer shall be satisfied that there are available sufficient pull out areas for the use in case of delay or breakdown; and (iv) The applicant shall have filed with the CTTMO, a certificate of any insurance carrier that there is a comprehensive automobile liability insurance policy covering said applicant and his authorized agents, executors, administrators, heirs and assignees for a minimum amount of Php 30,000.00 in case of bodily injury to or death of one or more persons in any accident or damage to or destruction of property; (d) The CTTMO may, upon the department head’s discretion or any authorized representative, change and designate another route to be followed or the time during which the movement shall be made prior to the issuance of a permit. SECTION 144. REGULATION AS TO MOVEMENT OF LOADS OF EXCESSIVE WIDTH ON CITY


C10 CLASSIFIEDS STREETS.

ONDARY STREETS.

(a) Such loads of excessive width shall be moved or transported at any time upon the discretion of the issuing officer that may be diverted over an alternate route and where the flow of city traffic will not be unduly impeded by such movement;

(a) Public transport utility vehicles with less than eighteen (18) passengers seating capacity shall only be allowed to operate, ply or pass through secondary streets, thoroughfares or roads in the city subject to existing certificates of public convenience issued by the Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board (LTFRB).

(b) The maximum speed of movement of such loads shall be 25 kilometers per hour; (c) When movements are permitted during daytime, such loads shall be marked at each corner by a red flag; (d) When movements are made at night, such loads shall be lighted by at least one string of incandescent lamps spaced at a maximum of five (5) feet on center around the entire load. At least one lamp in string shall be located at each corner of the load. All such lamps shall be located not less than five (5) feet from the roadway surface. In addition thereto, at least one (1) lamp shall be placed or located at each corner and at the lowest point of the load. All lamps located at the corners of the load shall be red in color and not less than one hundred (100) watts each, all others may be red, white or amber in color and shall not be less than fifty (50) watts each. Sufficient lanterns shall be provided of the colors specified for incandescent lamps to be used in the event of power failure or other similar emergency to insure that the minimum lighting required by this Traffic Code is maintained at all times; (e) The vehicle or tractor carrying, transporting or drawing such load at night shall be equipped with at least two (2) flashing yellow lights of not less than six (6) inches in diameter which shall be mounted on each side at the front of the vehicle or tractor, near the headlight but not in the same horizontal line therewith; (f) All military tactical movements shall be exempted from the provisions of this Section. SECTION 145. PASSING OF VEHICLES OVER FIVE (5) TONS ON SUBDIVISION ROAD ALREADY CONVERTED TO CITY ROAD. (a) That except in cases of compelling necessity such as delivery of things and goods at places within the subdivision or in times of emergencies such as fires or in any form of conflagration or when authorized by the Sangguniang Panlungsod, it shall be unlawful for vehicles over five (5) tons in weight to enter, pass or make use of subdivision roads within the City of Davao; (b) That in cases of deliveries of things or goods at places within the subdivision, the prohibited vehicles shall in no case stay therein longer than one (1) hour and/or after the delivery has been made or completed. SECTION 146. PUBLIC TRANSPORT UTILITY VEHICLE WITH LESS THAN EIGHTEEN (18) PASSENGERS PASSING SEC-

SECTION 147. MOVEMENTS OF TRAILERS, TRUCKS, OR ANY APPROVED TRANSPORTATION MEDIUM LINKED TO A CONTAINER VAN. No driver shall be allowed to operate a trailer or truck carrying 10, 20, 40, 45, 48, and 52 footer container vans in any city streets without safety locking device, to prevent such container van to be thrown off or separated from the trailer or truck while maneuvering on a bending, uneven or rough roads thereby principally causing a road traffic accident. ARTICLE XXI TRUCK BAN AND PUBLIC TRANSPORT ROUTES SECTION 148. TRUCK ROUTES AND LIMITED TRUCK BAN. (Ordinance No. 0154-03, Series of 2003; amending Ordinance No. 066-02, Series of 2002; amending Ordinance No. 042-02, Series of 2002) (a) The entry and exit of cargo trucks, gravel and sand trucks and other heavy cargo trucks with more than six (6) wheels and up, or whose gross vehicle weight exceed 4,500 kilograms, including tractor trailers, containerized haulers, or refrigerated vans shall not be allowed to travel on any and all city streets of Davao City, except Saturdays, Sundays, Special and Non-Working Holidays, and along streets specified as truck routes shown in Appendix VI. The use of the truck routes shall be restricted to the hours of seven in the morning (7:00 a.m.) to nine in the morning (9:00 a.m.), and from five in the afternoon (5:00 p.m.) to eight in the evening (8:00 p.m.); (b) The City Mayor may, upon recommendation of the City Transport and Traffic Management Office, ban the access for limited hours of any cargo trucks and heavy vehicles on any other city street when conditions warrant and in order to ensure orderly traffic flow. SECTION 149. VEHICLES EXEMPTED FROM LIMITED TRUCK BAN. 1. Without corresponding permit (a) Government-owned garbage trucks or governmentcontracted garbage trucks; (b) Fire trucks; (c) Government-owned or private towing trucks responding to emergency situation; (d) Private utility trucks responding to emergency circumstances; (e) Trucks and vans carrying hospital or health-related cargo;

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(f) Armored trucks and vans of banks and financial institutions; (g) Trucks carrying fuel and petroleum products; (h) Trucks carrying merchandise for purposes of donation and free distribution to various social welfare institutions; 2. With corresponding permit (a) Private cargo and hauling trucks carrying unprocessed fruits and vegetables, fresh water and marine products, live fowls and hogs, unprocessed/ unpreserved dressed chicken and or meat and the like, which are perishable in nature; and (b) Private transit concrete mixers and dump trucks for use or intended to be used for government projects; 3. Application for exemption shall be filed at the City Transport and Traffic Management Office and shall pay corresponding annual permit fee of Php 5,000.00 per vehicle at the City Treasure’s Office which shall be deposited in the General Fund; 4. A driver/operator/owner of a truck without exemption permit, in reference to paragraph 2 of this Section, shall be penalized as shown in Appendix V. SECTION 150. PAYMENT OF FINE.

port and Traffic Management Office a copy of their approved routes prior to this Code; Without necessarily modifying their basic authorized routes, the City Transport and Traffic Management Office may adjust the turning points and terminal of public utility buses and jeepneys, prescribe their loading or unloading points, and/or require them to utilize passengers interchange terminals, if so required by an approved traffic improvement scheme. SECTION 153. MOTORIZED TRICYCLES-FORHIRE AND TRISIKAD. In the granting or revision of routes or areas of operations, the recommendations of the City Transport and Traffic Management Office shall be given consideration to ensure safety and minimize their traffic impact. In no case shall tricycles or trisikad be permitted to run along national roads with heavy traffic, nor operate along public utility bus or jeepney routes. In the absence of off-street tricycle terminals or stations, the number of tricycles operating or to be operated maybe restricted or curtailed on a thoroughfare to minimize traffic congestion; in such a situation, no additional units shall be franchised. ARTICLE XXII PEDESTRIAN RIGHTS AND DUTIES (Article XIII of Ordinance No. 778, s. 1973)

a. Failure of driver/operator/owner of the truck, with business permit issued by the City Government of Davao, to pay the penalty within ten (10) days from date of apprehension for violating paragraph (a), Section 151, shall cause immediate suspension of business permit; or

SECTION 154. PEDESTRIAN CROSSING.

b. If the truck is covered by business permit issued by other local government units, the vehicle shall be impounded at the city impounding area and shall be released only if fine and impounding charges is fully paid; and

(b) A driver shall give way to any pedestrian who is on a pedestrian crossing;

c. On succeeding violations, paragraph b of this Section shall apply including payment of applicable administrative fine under the city’s local tax ordinance. SECTION 151. REGULATING THE OPERATION OF PUBs AND PUJs. Any application of public utility buses and jeepneys, including taxis and shuttle vans, for franchise and routes with the Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board, which terminates or originates within the City of Davao, shall be subject to preliminary evaluation and recommendation of the City Transport and Traffic Management Office, for consideration of the City Transport and Traffic Management Board and for endorsement to the Sangguniang Panlungsod for approval. SECTION 152. ROUTES OF PUBLIC UTILITY BUSES AND JEEPNEYS. Public utility buses and jeepneys, including taxis and shuttle vans with valid authorization from the Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board and whose routes terminates or originate within the City shall furnish the City Trans-

(a) A driver of a vehicle approaching a pedestrian crossing shall travel at a speed that, if necessary to comply with this Section, the driver will be able to stop the vehicle before reaching the pedestrian crossing;

(c) A driver shall not permit any portion of the vehicle to enter upon a pedestrian crossing even if any vehicle headed in the same direction is stopped on the approach side of, or upon pedestrian crossing apparently for the purpose of complying with this Section; (d) A driver of a vehicle turning or intending to turn right or left shall yield to any pedestrian who is on a pedestrian crossing; (e) When a vehicle is stopped to give way to a pedestrian, the driver of a vehicle approaching from the rear shall not overtake or attempt to pass such stopped vehicle. SECTION 155. DUTIES OF PEDESTRIANS. A pedestrian: (a) Shall cross a thoroughfare at marked crosswalk, pedestrian crossing, pedestrian overpass, or pedestrian footway; (b) When on a footway, marked cross-walk, or pedestrian crossing, shall keep as close as practicable to the right side of the footway; (c) When crossing a thoroughfare at an intersection shall keep right of pedestrian crossing in the opposite direction;

EDGEDAVAO

(d) When crossing a thoroughfare or portion of a thoroughfare shall do so promptly by the shortest and most direct route, as may be practicable, to the thoroughfare boundary; and (e) A pedestrian or passenger shall board or alight from PUJ in designated PUJ Loading and Unloading Zone. SECTION 156. RESTRICTIONS ON PEDESTRIANS. A pedestrian shall not: (a) While waiting to board a vehicle stand on any portion of the thoroughfare; (b) Proceed from footway towards a vehicle that has not fully stopped for the purpose of boarding it; (c) Alight from or board a moving vehicle, or do so at an area where loading and unloading is prohibited; (d) Remain on a pedestrian crossing, or marked crosswalk longer than necessary for the purpose of passing over the thoroughfare with reasonable dispatch; and (e) Stand up a footway or thoroughfare so as to inconvenience, obstruct, hinder or prevent the free passage of any pedestrian or any vehicle. SECTION 157. PEDESTRIANS ON THOROUGHFARES. Except when there is a sidewalk or footway, a pedestrian: (a) Proceeding along a thoroughfare shall, when practicable, travel on the thoroughfare or side of the thoroughfare used by vehicles traveling in the opposite direction, and shall keep close as the pedestrian can to the boundary of the thoroughfare on the left of the pedestrian; (b) Shall not proceed along a thoroughfare abreast of more than one (1) pedestrian, except in a procession or parade authorized by the proper authority. SECTION 158. PENALTIES. Erring pedestrians under this Article shall be cited and issued Pedestrian Citation Receipt (PCR) and be penalized with a fine as indicated in Appendix V (Schedule of Fines and Penalties) or four (4) hours community service to be determined by the CTTMO in coordination with the City Social Services and Development Office (CSSDO). ARTICLE XXIII USE OF SOME TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE OPERATION OF NOPHYSICAL CONTACT APPREHENSION SECTION 159. INSTALLATION AND USE OF VIDEO CAMERA. The City Transport and Traffic Management Office shall install authorized video camera or CCTV in strategic places into different roads, streets, and highways of Davao City to record traffic violations. SECTION 160. USE OF SPEED CAMERA/GUNS TO APPREHEND OVER SPEEDING MOTOR VEHICLES. Motor vehicles violating speed limits as provided by speed limit signs strategically erected along roads, streets, and high-

ways shall be recorded by duly authorized City Traffic Enforcement Officer using authorized LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) speed guns, or other vehicle speed recording technology and take photos and videos as evidence of violation. SECTION 161. USE OF VIDEO/DIGITAL CAMERA TO APPREHEND VIOLATORS. Whenever a motor vehicle without a driver is found illegally parked as provided in Article X and Article XI Section 62 (c) (i), Section 63 (b), (d) and (e) shall be recorded by CTTMO or by duly authorized City Traffic Enforcement Officer using authorized digital camera and take photos as evidence of violation, and may take information displayed on the vehicle which may identify its user and shall conspicuously affix to such vehicle a duplicate copy of the summon for the owner/driver of the motor vehicle, and consequently the CTTMO shall immediately send the original copy of the summon to the violator with the photo/s of the vehicle and place where the violation was committed, and the traffic citation ticket as attachments to answer the charge against him/her within seven (7) days during the hours and at a place specified in the summon. SECTION 162. AUTHORIZED PERSONNEL TO USE DIGITAL CAMERA. The “no-physical contact apprehension” policy shall be strictly observed by City Traffic Enforcement Officers who are issued digital cameras in apprehending traffic violators. ARTICLE XXIV MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS SECTION 163. OFFICIAL PUV DRIVER IDENTIFICATION CARD. (a) No person shall drive a Public Utility Vehicle (PUV) such as public utility jeepneys, taxi cabs, motorized tricycle-for-hire, passenger vans, school transport service vehicles, with approved franchise plying within the territorial jurisdiction of the City of Davao, without bearing an official identification card, issued by the City Transport and Traffic Management Office, and shall be displayed conspicuously inside the vehicle; provided however, that public utility buses and trucks for-hire are not covered by this paragraph; (b) Prior to the issuance of new or renewal of driver’s license from the Land Transportation Office, an official identification card from the City Transport and Traffic Management Office shall be secured by a PUV driver through mandatory attendance to seminar on safety driving, road safety, road courtesy, discipline, traffic rules and regulations, and city traffic code conducted by the City Transport and Traffic Management Office in cooperation with national agencies concerned regarding transport and traffic laws, rules and regulations; (i) The official identification card shall bear information on the driver which includes: name of the driver and picture, city residential address, control number, date of issuance and ex-


EDGEDAVAO piration date, and other important information as determined by the City Transport and Traffic Management Office. SECTION 164. OBSTRUCTION TO DRIVER’S VIEW OR DRIVING MECHANISM. (a) No person shall drive a vehicle when it is so loaded, or when there are in the front seat such number of persons exceeding two (a driver and 1 passenger for taxi, passenger van and private vehicle) while three (3) for trucks, so as to obstruct the view of the driver to the front or sides of the vehicle as to interfere with the driver’s control over the driving mechanism of the vehicle; (b) No passenger in a vehicle shall ride in such a position as to interfere with the driver’s view ahead or to the sides, or to interfere with his control over the driving mechanism of the vehicle. SECTION 165. FOLLOWING EMERGENCY VEHICLES. A driver of any vehicle shall not follow any emergency vehicle traveling in response to any emergencies closer than 50 meters or approximately 165 feet; provided however the driver of any vehicle shall not drive into or parked within the block where a fire apparatus has stopped in answer to fire alarm. SECTION 166. PUTTING GLASS, ETC. ON CITY ROAD OR HIGHWAY. No person shall throw or deposit upon any city road or highway, any bottle, glass, nails, tacks, wires, cans, wood, used tires, or any substance such as, but not limited to, automotive oil or fluid that are likely to injure any person, animal or vehicle. SECTION 167. TRACKING MUD UNTO CITY ROAD OR HIGHWAY. No vehicle using the city street or highway shall track mud or dirt unto the traveled portion of such city road or highway in such quantities that will constitute a hazard when the roadway is wet, or obscure the painted pavement markings thereon. In the event that the mud or dirt is unavoidably tracked unto the city road or highway, it shall be the duty of the owner of the offending vehicle to have such mud or dirt removed as quickly as possible. SECTION 168. DRIVING THROUGH FUNERAL OR OTHER PROCESSIONS. (a) No person shall drive a vehicle between the vehicles comprising a funeral or other authorized procession while they are in motion. When the lead car of any funeral or other processions shall have entered any intersection, notwithstanding the light conditions at those intersections controlled by traffic signal devices, then all other traffic shall yield the right of way to all vehicles comprising such funeral or other procession until it has passed through the intersection. The foregoing provisions of this Section shall apply only to such funeral or other processions moving under police escort; (b) No funeral, procession, assembly, or parade containing 100 or more persons or 25 or more ve-

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hicles, excepting the Armed forces of the Philippines and the forces of the Police and Fire Departments, shall occupy, march or proceed along any city street except in accordance with a permit issued by the City Transport and Traffic Management Office and such other regulations as set forth herein which may apply; (c) A funeral procession composed of any number of vehicles shall be identified as such by the conspicuous display on the top center of each vehicle a banner not less than 20 centimeters or 8 inches long and 10 centimeters or 4 inches wide predominantly black or violet in color, with a word FUNERAL printed on both sides thereof, in letters no less than 4 centimeters or 1.5 inches in height and the display on the top center of both lead vehicle and the end vehicle of a flashing amber light. While in the procession each driver shall turn on the head lamps of his/her vehicle as further identification. SECTION 169. RESTRICTING ANIMALS AND LIVESTOCK ON CITY ROAD AND HIGHWAY. (a) No person owning, controlling or having the possession of any livestock or animals such as cattle, horses, swine, goats, canine, etc., shall negligently permit any such livestock or animals to stray upon or remain unaccompanied by person in-charge or control thereof, upon any city road or highway; (b) No person shall drive or lead any such livestock upon, or across any city road or highway, without keeping a number of herders on continual duty to open the road so as to permit the passage of vehicles. SECTION 170. OPERATION OF PUBLIC UTILITY JEEPNEYS. (a) It is shall be prohibited for driver or owner or operator of PUJ to install or equip car stereo, radio, or any audio gadgets in PUJ so as not to attract the driver to switch on thereby impeding the hearing capability of the driver; (b) No driver and conductor of PUJ shall conduct passengers wearing short pants, sleeveless shirt, slippers, headphones/ earphones, using cellular phone while driving, and smoking while driving; (c) It is shall be required from owner or operator of PUJ for their hired driver and conductor to be registered with the CTTMO; (d) It shall be prohibited for driver to conduct passengers outside the routes approved by LTFRB;

proved route; except such road diversion is caused by untoward weather conditions or natural disasters, road accidents that impede smooth traffic flow or other activities where temporary rerouting is allowed by CTTMO or traffic enforcement officer on duty. SECTION 171. FABRICATION/MANUFACTURING OF LOCALLY-DESIGNED/ BUILT PUBLIC UTILITY VEHICLE. (a) A shop owner/fabricator/ manufacturer of locally-designed/built body or cab of public utility vehicle where such public utility jeepney and motorized tricycle-forhire, operating in the territorial jurisdiction of the City of Davao, shall register the shop or enterprise with CTTMO. An annual registration fee of five hundred pesos (Php 500.00) shall be paid to the City Treasurer’s Office under the Traffic Management Trust Fund;

shall be recommended for cancellation of franchise of the public utility jeepneys to the LTFRB and the franchise of the motorized tricycle for hire by the CTTMO to the City Mayor;

of vehicle.

(h) CTTMO shall coordinate with the LTFRB for the inspection of locally designed/ built public utility vehicle not fabricated / manufactured in Davao City prior to the application of franchise with LTFRB. An inspection fee of Five Hundred Pesos (Php 500.00) shall be paid by the owner of the vehicle to the City Treasurer’s Office which shall be deposited under the Traffic Management Trust Fund;

(b) Any person driving a motor vehicle on the road shall, when requested to do so by a City Traffic Enforcement Officer or any officer and staff of the CTTMO, or any authorized person, produce his/her license for inspection and state his/her true name and address;

(i) This Section excludes motor vehicles such as taxis, buses and passenger vans used as public utility vehicles. SECTION 172. OPERATION OF MOTORCYCLES, ETC.

(b) All registered shop fabricating and manufacturing body for PUJ, MTH, Nonmotorized tricycle or Pedicab, shall secure a permanent body serial number from the CTTMO during registration. The procedure on the issuance and assigning permanent body serial number shall be included in the implementing rules and regulations;

(a) A person shall not drive or ride upon a motorcycle unless that person is wearing a safety helmet on his/ her head securely fastened under the chin of the wearer;

(c) It shall be the responsibility of the owner/operator of a registered shop to embed a Passenger Cab Chassis Number (PCCN) to a fabricated or manufactured body; provided however, that any completed passenger body being used for conducting passenger without bearing a PCCN shall be impounded where both the owner/driver of the vehicle and the fabricator/manufacturer of the body shall be penalized aside from paying impoundment fees and charges;

(c) A person shall not drive a motorcycle while wearing a safety helmet to which is attached an eye protector unless that eye protector complies with the standard set by the Department of Trade and Industry;

(d) A shop owner/fabricator/manufacturer of locallydesigned/built body or cab of public utility vehicle shall report the number of units fabricated or manufactured every six (6) months to the CTTMO; provided however, that CTTMO shall provide the forms use in reporting; (e) It shall be the responsibility of shop owner/fabricator/manufacturer of locallydesigned/built body or cab of public utility vehicle to install, mount or fit an engine according to locallyapproved standards as provided in the implementing rules and regulation of this Code; provided however, that violation of this paragraph shall subject the owner of the shop to penalty and the CTTMO shall immediately recommend to the City Mayor the closure of the shop;

Trip-cutting or cutting-trip: a violation of LTFRB-approved route in transporting passengers where the driver of the PUJ cut short the trip which usually occurs when only a few passengers are left to and from its original destinations;

(f) Before release of completed/finished product to the owner of vehicle, it shall be subject to final inspection by the CTTMO as to its road worthiness based on the approved standards. An inspection fee of Two Hundred Pesos (Php 200.00) shall be paid by the owner of the vehicle to the City Treasurer’s Office which shall be deposited under the Traffic Management Trust Fund;

(f) It is prohibited for driver of PUJ to divert or use other city roads aside from its ap-

(g) Existing public utility vehicle which do not conform to the approved standards

(e) It shall be prohibited for driver of PUJ to do “trip-cutting” to the disadvantage of the riding public;

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(b) A safety helmet referred to in paragraph (a) herein shall comply with the standard set by the Department of Trade and Industry;

(d) A person driving a motorcycle shall always turn on the headlight of the motorcycle while driving along any city road or highway; (e) It shall be prohibited for driver of motorcycle, while moving along city road or highway (i) to have riders of more than one person; (ii) to carry a child age seven (7) years old and below or have passenger where the foot of the rider does not reach the rear footrest of the motorcycle; (iii) to have riders in front of the driver; (iv) to have cargo in front of the driver; (v) without shirt, wearing slippers, with headphones/ earphones, using cellular phone, and smoking while driving; (vi) or any motorcycle to use the inner lane of city thoroughfare. SECTION 173. IMPROVISED MUD-GUARD. It is prohibited for driver/operator of any moving motorized vehicle to attach an improvised mud-guard at the back of the vehicle with height clearance less than 20 centimeters or eight (8) inches from road surface when the vehicle is loaded. SECTION 174. PRODUCTION OF DRIVER’S LICENSE TO TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT OFFICER. No person shall drive a motor vehicle on city road or highway unless he/she has a valid driver’s license issued by the Land Transportation Office for that type

(a) Any person who drives a motor vehicle on a road shall carry his/her driver’s license with him/her at all times;

(c) In this Section “authorized person” means a person in uniform authorized by this Code or under any Act to require a driver of a motor vehicle on a road to produce his/her driver’s license; (d) A bona fide tourist or transient who is holding an international driver’s license may be permitted to operate a motor vehicle in the Philippines for a period not exceeding the expiry date of said license, or in accordance with international agreements to which the Philippines is a signatory; (e) A person who knowingly drives a motor vehicle without having secured a priori any appropriate license is guilty of major offense, and shall be punishable in accordance with the penalty under Appendix V. SECTION 175. CONDUCT OF STUDENT PRACTICE DRIVING BY DRIVING SCHOOLS. (a) It shall be prohibited for the owner/operator of a driving school to conduct student practice driving along city roads and highways without being accompanied by driving instructor from the concerned driving school with driver’s license duly issued by LTO; (b) Student practice driving shall only be conducted along city roads and highways from 9:00 A.M. to 11:00 A.M. and 2:00 P.M. to 4:00 P.M. daily except Mondays and Fridays; (c) Any violation committed on paragraph (a) or par (b) of this Section shall be cited and penalized with administrative fines as follows: (i) First offense P1,000.00 plus warning (ii) Second offense P2,000.00 warning

plus

(iii) Third and subsequent offenses P5,000.00 and recommend for non-renewal of business permit (d) A duly licensed driving school operating within the territorial jurisdiction of Davao City shall be registered with the CTTMO for purposes of monitoring driving schools with a registration fee of One Thousand Pesos (P1,000.00) annually. The registration fee shall be payable at the City Treasurer’s Office to be deposited to the Traffic Management Trust Fund; provided however, that the non-payment of regulatory fee, the driving school shall be made to pay the registration fee plus a fine in the amount of not more than fifty percent (50%) of the amount of the regulatory fee; provided further that an

additional fine of twenty-five percent (25%) of the registration shall be collected from the driving school every day until the payment has been made. SECTION 176. OPERATION OF STUDENT CARPOOL TRANSPORT SERVICE (a) Owner/operator/provider of student carpool transport service shall have a uniform “yellow” color body paint accented with “black” color chevron as prescribed by the CTTMO; (b) The driver of student carpool transport service shall wear a white polo shirt with the name of the driver printed on the left breast while the name of the owner/operator/company name on the right breast of the white polo shirts; (c) Owner/operator/provider of student carpool transport service shall comply with applicable guidelines issued by LTFRB on school transport service; (d) A person, cooperative, or corporation intending to own/operate/provide or currently operating a student carpool transport service shall register with the CTTMO for purposes of monitoring the welfare and safety of the passenger, with an annual carpool transport fee of P2,000.00; (e) The owner/operator/ provider of student carpool transport service shall cause the registration of the driver of the vehicle used as student carpool transport service with registration fee of P500.00 per driver. SECTION 177. REGULATING THE CONSTRUCTION OF DRIVEWAY, CARWASH SERVICES, AND MOTOR VEHICLE REPAIR SHOP. (a) The owner of a building or commercial establishment with existing driveway abutting a city road, street, or highway within a public parking pay zone shall pay an annual driveway permit fee of P1,000.00; (b) The owner/operator of existing carwash business operation with location abutting a city road, street or highway within a public parking pay zone, with no fixed vehicle entrance/exit facility, shall pay an annual driveway permit fee of P1,000.00; (c) The owner/operator of existing motor vehicle repair shop with location abutting a city road, street or highway, with no fixed vehicle entrance/exit facility shall pay an annual driveway permit fee of P1,000.00; and (d) The owner of a building or commercial establishment with existing driveway, and the owner/operator of existing carwash business, including motor vehicle repair shop, shall pay a driveway permit fee within three (3) months upon approval of this Code; provided however, that driveways located within public and private residential subdivisions, not used for commercial or business operations, are exempted from paying driveway permit fee; (e) Violation of this Section shall have a fine as follows:


C12 CLASSIFIEDS (i) First offense P1,000.00 plus warning (ii) Second offense P3,000.00 plus warning (iii) Third and subsequent offenses P5,000.00 and recommend for non-renewal of business permit SECTION 178. PRODUCTION OF VEHICLE REGISTRATION DOCUMENTS TO TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT OFFICER. No person shall drive a motor vehicle on city road or highway unless he/she has the original vehicle registration documents issued by LTO. Provided however, that in lieu of the original vehicle registration documents, a certified true copy or photocopy thereof may be carried in the motor vehicle he/she is driving or operating. (a) Any person who drives a vehicle on a road shall carry his/her OR and CR with him/her at all times; (b) Any person driving a motor vehicle on the road shall, when requested to do so by a City Traffic Enforcement Officer or any officer authorized by the CTTMO, or any authorized person, produce his/her OR and CR for inspection and state his/ her true name and address; (c) In this Section “authorized person” means a person in uniform authorized by this Code or under any Act to require a driver of a motor vehicle on a road to produce his/her OR and CR; (d) A person who knowingly drives a motor vehicle without having secured a priori any appropriate registration documents is guilty of major offense, and shall be punishable with the highest fine under Appendix V. SECTION 179. OPENING DOORS AND ALIGHTING FROM VEHICLE. A person shall not open or leave open a door of a vehicle or alight except the driver but with dash from a vehicle unto a thoroughfare, so as to cause danger to other person using the road or so as to impede the passage of traffic. SECTION 180. OPENING DOORS AND ALIGHTING FROM PUBLIC UTILITY BUS AND PASSENGER VAN. A driver, conductor, or any person of a passenger utility bus or passenger vans shall not open or leave open a door of a bus or passenger van for purposes of soliciting passengers or allowing passenger to alight from a vehicle unto a thoroughfare while operating within the territorial jurisdiction of Davao City. SECTION 181. USE OF HORNS, ETC. (a) No person shall use or cause to be used the horn or any other warning instrument on a vehicle, except when necessary as a traffic warning or an indication that the driver of the vehicle intends to overtake another vehicle; (b) No person shall attach, use or cause to be used the siren, bell, repeater horn or any other warning device that are used by fire truck, ambulance, police in responding to emergency situations.

SECTION 182. MODIFICATION OF MUFFLER ON MOTORCYCLE SUBJECT TO THE PROVISIONS OF ARTICLE XV OF THIS CODE. (a) It is prohibited for a person to drive a motorcycle or motorcycle with sidecar or centercar with modified muffler or detached muffler or without a muffler; (b) Any person driving motorcycle or motorcycle with sidecar or centercar with modified muffler or detached muffler or without a muffler, aside from payment of fine, shall likewise be penalized by impoundment of the motorcycle unit at the city impoundment area; (c) The owner/driver of apprehended motorcycle unit shall cause the installation of suitable factory-designed DTI-approved replacement muffler, or reinstallation of original muffler of the motorcycle by a repairman at the choice of the driver/ owner; (d) The owner/driver of apprehended motorcycle shall bear the cost of the purchase and installation of suitable factory-designed DTI-approved replacement muffler, or reinstallation of the original muffler, fee for the repairmen, including the payment of impoundment fee; (e) Installation of suitable factory-designed DTI-approved replacement muffler or reinstallation of the original muffler shall be done exclusively in the city impoundment area; (f) Only a motorcycle with completely installed/reinstalled muffler and upon payment of appropriate impounding fee shall be released by the designated officer-in-charge of the impoundment area. SECTION 183. OBSTRUCTING ROADS. (a) No person shall drive or leave standing or waiting any vehicle on a road for the following purpose: (i) for soliciting services or business from the vehicle; (ii) by displaying an installed advertisement on the vehicle; or (iii) by offering goods for sale from the vehicle. (b) No person shall stand or place himself/herself on a thoroughfare for the purpose of soliciting contributions, displaying any advertisement or offering goods for sale; (c) No person in a vehicle shall buy or offer to buy an article from any person standing or placed on a road; (d) A person, natural or juridical, including government agencies and instrumentalities shall not bar, impede or divert the flow or direction of traffic from any road, streets or highway, unless authorized in writing or except when the closure of a road or any part thereof to traffic or the diversion of traffic is dictated by reasons of emergency to protect the public from any calamity, fire or other public danger; (e) Stalled vehicles on thoroughfares shall be construed as obstructing traffic if not removed or towed within 5 minutes;

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(f) The prohibition contained in this section shall also apply to the use of sidewalks and road shoulders by vendors, repair shops, or any business establishments as extension to display their merchandise or services. SECTION 184. DIGGINGS AND EXCAVATION ON EXISTING ROADS. (a) It is unlawful for any person or entities, whether on their own or as contractors to any government agency, local or national, to excavate or dig for purposes of installing water pipes, telecommunication lines, poles, drainage pipes, and other underground facilities, within city roads, streets, thoroughfares, and alleys, including highways without first securing an excavation permit from the City Traffic and Transport Management Office and City Engineer’s Office, except in cases of emergency, provided that the permit should be secured within three (3) calendar days from the emergency work; (b) The application for temporary closure of a road or part of the road, due to diggings and/or excavation shall be submitted to the CTTMO together with a traffic plan which shall be evaluated first by the City Traffic and Transport Management Office so that a timetable, remedial steps, and other precautions can be undertaken to minimize the adverse effect on traffic flow; (c) Excavators and/or diggers must at all times put up reflectorized signs based on the DPWH standards on road signs and pavement markings for precautionary measures to motorists and pedestrians alike or safety signs warning of the excavation work ahead; (d) All dug or excavated areas must be properly restored to its original form under the standard specification for road construction. To ensure restoration, the party undertaking the digging or excavation shall post a bond at one hundred fifty percentum of the cost to restore the same, the amount to be determined by the City Engineer. The bond shall be forfeited in favor of the City Government of Davao if restoration work is not commenced within ten (10) days of completion of the excavation and completed the same number of days for which the excavation has been authorized. It shall be released within five (5) days after the determination by the City Engineer or his authorized representative that the road has been restored satisfactorily. SECTION 185. PROVISION OF WATER AND AIR FACILITIES IN FUEL REFILLING STATION. (a) Fuel refilling station with two or more refilling units shall provide a functional water and air facilities which shall be available to motorists on a 24-hour basis or during the hours of operations of the fuel refilling station as part of the services without any fee; (b) If the facility is under repair, the owner/operator of the fuel refilling station shall cause to post a notice to motorists that services is not available; provided

however that the facility shall be fixed within two (2) days from the day the services becomes unavailable or for a number of days but not more than five (5) days upon receipt of a written request to the CTTMO by the owner/operator; (c) A notice shall be furnished to all owners/operators found to have violated this section upon the full implementation of this Code and shall serve as a warning against such initial violation. Thereafter, all violators of this provision shall be subject to the following: (i) First offense a fine of P1,000.00 (ii) Second offense a fine of P2,000.00 (iii) Third and subsequent offenses a fine of P5,000.00 and non-renewal of business permit SECTION 186. ACCESS RESTRICTION ON SOME ROADS. (a) It shall be unlawful for any person, natural or juridical, to close, obstruct, prevent, or otherwise refuse to the public or vehicular traffic the use of free access to any subdivision or community street owned by the government and within the jurisdiction of the City Government of Davao, or to exact fees in any form for the use thereof, unless with prior authorization from the Sangguniang Panlungsod. Such act is hereby declared a nuisance per se and the City Mayor is hereby authorized to remove such closure or obstruction and to open said road to the public motu propio at the expense of the offender; (b) Private subdivision roads and/or private roads not turned over to the City may be opened to the public under the following conditions: (i) The road will strengthen the road network and provide traffic relief to nearby roads that are congested as maybe determined by the CTTMO; (ii) The Sangguniang Panlungsod has approved its opening, under such terms and conditions that will minimize or obviate any disturbances, pollution, or inconvenience to the residents in the area. SECTION 187. REQUIREMENT OF TRANSPORT/ TRAFFIC IMPACT ASSESSMENT. (a) All major commercial, industrial, housing and condominiums, institutional developments, including government institutions and other similar developments, as may be determined by the City Traffic and Transport Management Office, shall submit a transportation/traffic impact assessment to the CTTMO for evaluation and recommendation of approval to the City Transport and Traffic Management Board as preliminary documentary requirement in the application of Building Permit; (b) The transportation/traffic impact assessment shall be prepared, signed, and sealed by a transportation engineer or planner certi-

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fied by the Environmental Management Bureau and the National Center for Transportation Studies or licensed environmental planner duly recognized by the Professional Regulations Commission. SECTION 188. PROHIBITION ON PRODUCTION OF ROAD SIGNS. (a) It is unlawful for any person, natural or juridical, or any government instrumentalities, except for the City Transport and Traffic Management Office, to manufacture, fabricate, install, and erect, traffic sign and/or signal and/or pavement marking on city road, thoroughfare, and highway. The use of logo or emblem of a company on any unauthorized road sign shall be prima facie evidence that said road sign was erected by the owner of the logo or emblem. SECTION 189. MOTORCYCLE DEALER, DISTRIBUTOR, ETC. (a) It is prohibited for motorcycle dealer/distributor to sell motorcycle to buyer without requiring the buyer to show his/her driver’s license in reference with the restriction code issued by the Land Transportation Office; (b) It is prohibited for motorcycle dealer/distributor to release motorcycle to buyer without approved registration documents under the name of the dealer/distributor from Land Transportation Office; (c) It is prohibited for dealer/ distributor to sell motorcycle spare parts, including crash/safety helmet without genuine PS (Philippine Standard) or ICC (Import Commodity Clearance) seal; (d) It is required of motorcycle dealers to furnish CTTMO on a monthly basis inventory report of their stock using Inventory Report Form issued by the CTTMO for data-banking purposes. SECTION 190. INFORMATION, EDUCATION CAMPAIGN. In order to ensure comprehensive implementation of this Code, the City Traffic and Transport Management Office shall institutionalize a continuing information and education activities to city traffic enforcers, drivers of vehicles, and the general public through various kinds of media such, as but not limited to, seminars, barangay pulong-pulong, posters, leaflets, driver’s handbook, or may be radio program that would maximize the city government’s reach to educate its constituents; provided however, that the City Government of Davao can enter into a privatepublic partnership in the promotion of this Code to the public. SECTION 191. MANDATORY REVIEW EVERY THREE YEARS. The Sangguniang Panlungsod shall undertake a mandatory review of this Code at least once every three (3) years and as often as it may deemed necessary, with the primary objective of providing a more responsive and improved transport and traffic management policy of the City Government of Davao.

ARTICLE XXV PENALTIES AND PROCEDURE SECTION 192. PROCEDURES IN THE ISSUANCE OF CITY TRAFFIC CITATION TICKETS TO VIOLATORS OF THIS CODE. Except when authorized or directed by law to immediately take a person for violation of any traffic laws before a Court, the following procedures shall be observed in the apprehension of any person found violating any provision of this Code: (a) In case of drivers of motor vehicles, the City Traffic Enforcement Officer or deputized traffic officer, shall demand presentation of the driver’s license and registration documents of the motor vehicle. The apprehending city traffic enforcement officer shall then indicate the name and address of the driver, the license number, plate number, and the issuing agency of the driver’s license in the city traffic citation ticket. The name and the address of the owner and the registering agency of the vehicle, including the certificate of registration number, shall likewise be indicated therein. The apprehending officer shall stipulate the specific violation and furnish copy of the citation ticket to the person apprehended. The city traffic citation ticket shall also contain information which shall require him/her to answer the same at the time and place designated in the citation ticket within seven (7) days after such violation; (b) In case of business establishment found violating the provision of traffic obstruction, the City Traffic Enforcement Officer shall demand the presentation of Mayor’s Permit, or in case of construction, the Building Permit; and indicate the name and address of the owner and the corresponding Mayor’s or Building Permit number, the particular provision violated and furnish copy of said citation ticket; (c) In case of pedestrian found violating this Code, he/she shall be taken to the City Treasurer’s Office or to the nearest location in the area where an authorized City Treasurer’s bonded collection officer is available to pay appropriate penalty. In the event of inability to pay the fine, that person shall render a community service of not less than four (4) hours, or if that person decides to contest his/her apprehension, he/she can file a complaint at the Adjudication Committee of the CTTMB, the apprehending City Traffic Enforcement Officer shall immediately file the corresponding complaint before the Office of the City Fiscal. SECTION 193. FAILURE TO OBEY SUMMONS. Upon receipt of City Traffic Citation Ticket, any person who fails to appear at the place and within the time specified in the city traffic citation ticket issued to him/her by the City Traffic enforcer cited for any violation, is guilty of non-appearance with corresponding penalty of Five Hundred Pesos (Php500.00) regardless of the disposition of the charge of which originally cited.


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SECTION 194. SUMMONS ON ILLEGALLY PARKED VEHICLES. Whenever any motor vehicle without driver is found parked or stopped in violation of any of the restrictions contained in this Code, the officer finding the vehicle shall note down the plate number and may take any information displayed on the vehicle which may identify its user, and shall conspicuously affix to such vehicle a summon for the driver to answer the charge against him/her within seven (7) days during the hours and at a place specified in the summon.

SECTION 197. VIOLATIONS AND/OR OFFENSES UNDER FORMER ORDINANCE SAVED. Nothing contained in any provision of this Code shall apply to an act done or omitted, or to an offense committed at any time before the day that this Code shall become effective. Such act or omission shall be governed by and any such offense shall be punished according to the provisions of the ordinances existing when such act, omission or offense occurred in the same manner as if this Code had not been enacted.

SECTION 195. FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH SUMMONS ATTACHED TO PARKED VEHICLE. Noncompliance to summons shall be construed as a waiver of right to contest the citation. All violators issued with summons shall be liable for the payment of the fine corresponding to the violation committed.

SECTION 198. PENALTY.

In the event that a violator of the restrictions on stopping, waiting, standing or parking under this Code does not appear within a period of seven (7) days in response to a summon affixed to a motor vehicle, the City Transport and Traffic Management Office shall issue to the registered owner of such vehicle another summon ordering his appearance before the City Transport and Traffic Management Office. SECTION 196. WHEN COMPLAINT BE ISSUED. In the event any person fails to comply with a summon or citation given to him/her or attached to a vehicle or if any person fails or refuses to deposit bail as required and within the time permitted, the City Transport and Traffic Management Office shall have a complaint entered against such person in the proper court; Aside from filing of the appropriate action before the Court, the following administrative remedies for enforcement shall be undertaken: (a) For traffic and driving related violations, the City Transport and Traffic Management Office shall communicate with the Land Transportation Office to hold in abeyance the renewal of driver’s license or vehicle registration until clearance has been obtained from the City; (b) For violations under “no physical contact apprehension” policy, non-payment of fines and penalties within the prescribed number of days shall subject the erring vehicle to be up for apprehension by the PNP Highway Patrol Group, Land Transportation Office traffic officers, PNP Traffic Division and the City Traffic Enforcement Officers; (c) For other violations, the City Transport and Traffic Management Office shall immediately request for the cancellation of the permit and the issuance of closure from the City Mayor. In the event that the owner of the thing or object causing obstruction on the sidewalk to city streets could not be determined, the City Transport and Traffic Management Office shall cause its removal or impoundment.

(a) Any violations of the provisions of this Code shall be punishable with fines indicated in Appendix V (Schedule of Fines and Penalties) hereof; (b) Where the violator is not a driver, a written notice or citation ticket to the offending party shall be issued by the City Traffic Enforcement Officer; (c) The appropriate fine and penalty shall be paid within seven (7) days from the date of issuance of the citation ticket. In the event of failure to pay the prescribed fine, an additional surcharge of ten percent (10.0%) for each day of delay or failure to pay the appropriate fine is hereby imposed until the full amount of fine and surcharge is paid. SECTION 199. CREATION OF TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT TRUST FUND. There is hereby created a special account in the General Fund to be known as the Traffic Management Trust Fund (TMTF) wherein all receipts from registration, franchising, supervisory fees, regulatory fees, fines, parking fees, penalties and surcharges as herein set forth in this Code, including all expenditures and transfers shall be recorded under this Fund; Fines collected for violation of any section or provision of this Code evidenced by the issuance of CTCT (City Traffic Citation Ticket) shall be paid to the City Treasurer of Davao City; The share of the City Government of Davao on traffic fines collected in accordance with prior, existing and future arrangement with the LTO shall form part of the TMTF; The TMTF shall be disbursed only to activities related to the functions of the City Transport and Traffic Management Office such as, but not limited to, traffic enforcement measures and other activities and requirements of the City Transport and Traffic Management Office including maintenance of facilities and traffic control devices but excluding salaries of personnel; Any unused balance at the end of the fiscal year in excess of twenty percent (20%) of the previous year’s expenditures shall revert back to the General Fund. ARTICLE XXVI TRAFFIC ADMINISTRATION SECTION 200. TRANSPORTATION AND TRAFFIC ADMINISTRATION. To rationalize the management

and operation of the entire scope of the transport and traffic administration of the City of Davao, there shall be created mechanisms that shall constitute both the policy-making body which provides advice and policy direction, and the management and operations which shall be the frontline service in the enforcement and implementation of this Code. SECTION 201. CREATION OF CITY TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT BOARD (CTTMB). There is hereby created a City Transport and Traffic Management Board which shall have the primary function to provide advice and policy directions to the City Transport and Traffic Management Office (CTTMO); The CTTMB shall be vested with authority to formulate policies, review, recommend and approve transport and traffic management plans and programs that may hereafter be drawn or prepared. The Board shall also review and recommend for approval the budget of the CTTMO. The Board shall ensure a holistic approach to problem-solving and cooperation in the implementation of transportation and traffic schemes of Davao City; Provided however, that a special body within CTTMB shall be created as Motorized Tricycle For-Hire Franchising and Regulatory Committee (MTFRC) with its functions limited to provide advice and policy directions, including mediation, act on complaints, review and approve the plans and programs in the implementation and enforcement that may hereafter be drawn or prepared for the operations of motorized tricycle for-hire, and; Provided further that there shall only be five (5) members of the MTFRC, chaired by the City Mayor and the remaining members shall be appointed by the City Mayor from among the members of the CTTMB; Provided finally, that a Public Utility Vehicle Adjudication Committee (PUVAC) shall be created solely to provide mediation services. SECTION 202. COMPOSITION OF THE CITY TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT BOARD. Chairperson : City Mayor or in his/her behalf the City Administrator Vice Chair : Department Head, CTTMO Members: • Department Head, City Planning and Development Office • Department Head, City Engineer’s Office • Chairperson, SP Committee on Energy, Transport, and Communication • Chief, Traffic Section, Davao City Police Office (DCPO) • Regional Manager, Land Transportation Franchising Regulatory Board (LTFRB) • Regional Director, Land Transportation Office (LTO) • Regional Director, Department of Public Works and Highways • One (1) Transport Groups Representative • One (1) Professional Group Representative • One (1) Davao City Chamber of Commerce and Industry Representative • One (1) from NGO Repre-

CLASSIFIEDS C13

sentative Secretariat : City Transport and Traffic Management Office SECTION 203. MEETINGS AND QUORUMS. The CTTMB shall have a regular meeting once a month. However, the Chairperson can call a special or emergency meeting, if necessary, to address immediate concerns. The presence of a simple majority of the entire membership of the Board shall constitute a quorum. Provided however, that if any member, for one reason or another, cannot attend the meeting of the Board, the member concerned shall issue an official communication addressed to the Chairperson stating among others the reason/s for not attending the meeting, and may designate an alternate permanent representative to attend the meeting for and in behalf of the member, otherwise the member shall be marked absent, and; Provided further, that this Section shall also apply in the administration of MTFRC meetings. SECTION 204. HONORARIUM AND FUND SOURCE. Each member of the Board shall receive an honorarium for every board meeting to be determined by the City Mayor; a member who is absent shall not receive honorarium for that particular meeting. The fund requirement of the Board shall be initially drawn from the budget of the Office of the City Mayor. Thereafter, the budget shall be regularly included in the annual budget to be included under the CTTMO. SECTION 205. CREATION OF CITY TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT OFFICE (CTTMO). There is hereby created a City Transport and Traffic Management Office under the direct supervision and control of the City Mayor. It shall be the sole transport and traffic management authority vested with the powers to formulate, coordinate and monitor policies, standards and programs relating to transport and traffic management, to rationalize the existing transport operations and to administer and implement all traffic engineering services, traffic enforcement operations, traffic and transport planning, regulations and franchising, transport facilities management, traffic education program, and shall institute a “no-physical contact apprehension” policy in apprehending traffic violators thru the use of some technologies in the territorial jurisdiction of Davao City; and finally, other plans and programs that may hereafter be drawn prepared and approved by the CTTMB and the MTFRC; The City Transport and Traffic Management Office shall have six (6) divisions with the following functions: (1) TRAFFIC ENGINEERING AND INFRASTRUCTURE DIVISION (TEID) (i) Identify traffic bottleneck points and establish priorities in implementing remedial measures; (ii) Formulates traffic engineering schemes, such as banning of turning movements, creation of one-way streets, prohibition of park-

ing, designation of loading/ unloading zones, installation of traffic signages, regulating speeds, and similar measures, in accordance with its approved priority list; (iii) Install and maintain traffic signs, road and or pavement markings and other traffic control devices or cause the preparation and installation of the same; (iv) Recommend to the Transport and Traffic Management Advisory Board (TTMAB) in support of traffic management schemes; (v) Review major property development proposals, especially those located on the central business district, along major thoroughfares, and national roads and highways within the territorial jurisdiction of Davao City, on its impact to traffic generation;

vehicle obstructing traffic including abandoned vehicle; (vii) Suggest changes in any traffic scheme, including provision of traffic signals; (viii) Cause the removal of any obstructions on pedestrian sidewalks, alleys, streets and main thoroughfares which are in violation of this Code. In the event that no one admits ownership of any object or thing found impeding vehicular or pedestrian traffic, take possession of the same in the city impoundment area for later disposition; (ix) Cause the removal of unauthorized traffic signs and take possession of the same in the city impoundment area for later disposition;

(vi) Identify private subdivision roads that should be opened to improve traffic overall circulation, and initiate moves for the full or partial integration into the road network;

(x) Cause the filing of a complaint or information and secure the issuance of warrant of arrest against violators who fail or refuse to obey the city traffic citation tickets or penal summons in coordination with Davao City Police Office;

(vii) Review and collect data and statistics such as vehicular counts, road layouts and dimensions, and other relevant data which would be of importance for appropriate transport and traffic policy formulation;

(xi) Prescribe and recommend rates of administrative fines or penalties to be imposed on violators in admission of a violation, and willing to settle the same without having the case filed in court; and

(viii) Review and recommend requests for approval for road diggings, road constructions, temporary closures, production and installation of traffic-related signages from individuals, private entities and barangay councils, parades, and conduct of extra ordinary events that would reduce road capacity; and

(xii) Perform other duties and functions as directed by the Department Head.

(ix) Perform other duties and functions as directed by the Department Head. (2) TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT AND STREET MANAGEMENT DIVISION (TSMD) (i) Assign personnel to direct traffic at intersection and other locations requiring such intervention; (ii) Execute the enforcement component of any traffic schemes devised or considered by the Traffic Engineering Division as approved by Transport and Traffic Management Advisory Board TTMAB; (iii) Enforce applicable traffic rules and regulations, including apprehensions and issuance of city traffic citation tickets and penal summons to drivers found in violation of any provisions in this Code in coordination with the regional offices of the Department of Transportation and Communications; (iv) Assist the Davao City Police Office (DCPO) in the conduct of investigations of any vehicular accidents that occur within the territorial limits of the City; (v) Coordinate with Davao City Police Office traffic enforcers and Land Transportation Office traffic enforcers to harmonize personnel deployment and other field operations within the city; (vi) Initiate the towing or removal of all illegally parked, stopped/stalled, or disabled

(3) TRANSPORT PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT DIVISION (TPMD) (i) Provide technical inputs into the preparation and updating of the city’s Land Use Plan, particularly the long-term road network plan of the city; (ii) Conduct studies and researches in both transport and traffic administration appropriate to the local setting of the Davao City; (iii) Update and analyze the public transport routes and services covering motorized tricycles, buses, jeepneys and other public transport modes; (iv) Identify and recommend possible “missionary routes” that a private operator of public transport can provide; (v) Collect traffic data and statistics such as vehicular counts, road layout and dimensions, etc., and analyze the same for use in policy formulation; (vi) Appear at hearings of the LTFRB to ensure that the issuance of permits of public convenience is consistent with the plans and programs of the city; (vii) Evaluates request, in coordination with the City Planning Development Office, for variances from the zoning ordinance that are likely to have significant traffic impact; (viii) Formulate and advocate programs that will promote and encourage walking and trips by public transport and higher-capacity modes; and (ix) Perform other duties and functions as directed by the Department Head.


C14 CLASSIFIEDS (4) FACILITIES MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS DIVISION (FMOD) (i) Establish, operate, maintain and/or administer PUB and PUJ transportation terminals, public parking facilities, wharves, bicycle paths, including collection of user fees and charges through the Office of the City Treasurer; (ii) Operate towing services using approved gadgets or with duly authorized and accredited private towing operators; (iii) Formulate and recommend appropriate policies to TTMAB in support of traffic management schemes; (iv) Take custody of vehicles and articles impounded by virtue of this Code and secure the same in the city impoundment area until released to their owners or lawful claimants, or disposed of in accordance with this Code; and

dresses and other information relating to the physical identification of motor vehicles; (iv) Adopt a computerized transport and traffic management data retrieval system; (v) Handle the paper work and documentation attendant to enforcement, such as the processing of city traffic citation tickets and Ordinance Violation Receipt (OVR); (vi) Conduct public information campaigns in support of any activities, functions and responsibilities of the Office; and (vii) Perform other duties and functions as directed by the Department Head. (6) MOTORIZED VEHICLE FRANCHISING AND REGULATORY DIVISION (MVFRD) For Motorized Tricycle

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mend appropriate policies, subject to the approval of MTFRC; (ix) Keep records of all MTH registered and/or operating in Davao City, which shall include the names of registered owners, operators, drivers, users and their addresses and other information relating to the physical identification of MTH; (x) Conduct public information campaigns in barangays with MTH operations in support to enhance the implementation and enforcement of traffic rules and regulations; and (xi) Perform other duties and functions as directed by the Department Head. For Motorized and Non-Motorized Vessel (i) Manage the conduct of registration of motorized fishing vessels, three (3) tons and below, using the City of Davao as homeport, and other commercial operations within the municipal waters of the City of Davao;

(v) Perform other duties and functions as directed by the Department Head.

(i) Manage the operations and registration of motorized tricycle-for-hire;

(5) ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPPORT DIVISION (ASD)

(ii) Hear and decide uncontested MTOP application;

(ii) Prescribe rules and regulations that are acceptable to stakeholders;

(iii) Issue, amend, revise, drop, cancel and revoke MTOP after due notice and hearings;

(iii) Implement the enforcement component devised or considered as approved by TTMAB;

(iv) Conduct investigations and hearings of complaints on violations of this Code, other traffic laws, rules and regulations, and other issuances of MTFRC;

(iv) Perform other duties and functions as directed by the Department Head.

(i) Provide administrative and logistical support and services to all the divisions of the Office; (ii) Provide and maintain data base through management and information services, including collection of necessary and appropriate data and information, update and maintenance of all records, inventory of roads and traffic control devices, and other pertinent data that would enhance the planning and operations of the Office; (iii) Keep records of all kinds of vehicles registered and/or operating in Davao City, which shall include the names of registered owners, users and their ad-

(v) Summon, operators/ drivers and witnesses to appear in hearings conducted by the MTFRC; (vi) Determine, fix, and prescribe summons or MTH citation tickets; (vii) Recommend proposals for the location of MTH terminals in the barangays; (viii) Formulate and recom-

SECTION 206. QUALIFICATION OF THE DEPARTMENT HEAD, ASSISTANT DEPARTMENT HEAD, AND DIVISION HEADS. The CTTMO shall be headed by a Department Head with a regular position who shall be appointed by the City Mayor, concurred by the Sangguniang Panlungsod. He shall be a natural-born Filipino citizen, a resident of Davao City, at least thirty-five (35) years of age, of good moral character and sound probity; shall

have a master’s degree in public administration, urban and regional planning, management, civil engineering, traffic engineering and management, and/or a lawyer; and shall possess a three-year supervisory experience in government service. Provided, however, that the employment status and qualifications shall also apply to two department heads which are Assistant Department Head for Operations, and Assistant Department Head for Administration; The heads of the Divisions of the Office shall be appointed by the City Mayor upon the recommendation of the Department Head. A Division head must be at least thirty (30) years of age, a graduate of any fouryear course with two (2) years government supervisory experience, appropriate expertise or equivalent experience in the field of assignment. Except for the required qualifications for the five division heads, an active PNP Officer may be designated as head of the Traffic Enforcement and Street Management Division, prohibition against dual positions to the contrary notwithstanding. SECTION 207. STAFFING. The number and composition of staff comprising each of the six (6) divisions of the Office shall be determined by the Sangguniang Panlungsod through enactment of an Ordinance for such purpose, taking into consideration the volume of work required to fulfill the functions efficiently and effectively, subject to the approval of budget. Existing personnel affected by the creation of the Office such as those involved in tricycle regulation, parking administration, traffic enforcement, shall comprise the initial staff of the divisions to which their functions belong. In addition, the City Mayor

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may deputize any city government officials, employees or barangay personnel to act as traffic auxiliaries. The appointed or designated traffic auxiliaries shall be under the operational supervision of the head of the Traffic Enforcement and Street Management Division. SECTION 208. UNIFORM OF CITY TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS. In order to provide a distinction between Traffic Officers and members of the Philippine National Police, the City Traffic Enforcement Officers shall wear a uniform distinct from the uniform or attire of the members of the PNP. The determination of the color and type of uniform shall be left to the discretion of the City Mayor, provided, however, that no changes in the type, color or style of the uniform shall be allowed for a period of five (5) years, determined from the date the prescribed uniforms were first implemented. ARTICLE XXVII TRANSITORY PROVISION SECTION 209. FORMULATION OF IMPLEMENTING RULES AND REGULATIONS. (a) Within fifteen (15) days after the approval of this Code, an Oversight Committee which shall be composed primarily of the author/authors of the ordinance and the consultants thereof and other members to be determined by the City Mayor, shall prepare the Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR) for the efficient and effective implementation of the Code; (b) The funding requirement shall be provided by the Office of the City Mayor in the sum of Two Hundred Thousand Pesos (P200,000.00) or upon the discretion of the City Mayor.

ENACTED, August 7, 2012, by a majority vote of all the Members of the Sanggunian present.

CERTIFIED CORRECT:

SGD. CHARITO N. SANTOS Acting Secretary to the Sangguniang Panlungsod (City Government Asst. Department Head II) ATTESTED:

SGD. KARLO S. BELLO Acting Vice Mayor cns/mbk APPROVED: __________________, 2013

LAPSED DEEMED APPROVED AFTER THE LAPSE OFTEN (10) DAYS, PER SEC. 54. R. A. 7160 SARA Z. DUTERTE City Mayor

ATTESTED:

ATTY. ZULEIKA T. LOPEZ Acting City Administrator

SECTION 210. CREATION OF THE CITY TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT OFFICE. Within fifteen days (15) from the approval of this Code, the City Mayor shall issue an Executive Order creating a Task Force to formulate and draft an Ordinance for the creation of the City Transport and Traffic Management Office; The Chairman of the SP Committee on Transportation, Energy, and Communications shall head the Task Force with members appointed by the City Mayor; The Task Force shall submit its final draft on the creation of the CTTMO to the City Mayor within one (1) month after its organization. ARTICLE XXVIII FINAL PROVISION SECTION 211. REPEALING CLAUSE. All previous issuances, executive orders, ordinances, rules and regulations or parts thereof which are inconsistent or in conflict with the provisions of this Code are hereby repealed and modified accordingly. SECTION 212. SEPARABILITY CLAUSE. If for any reason, any provision or section of this Ordinance is declared not valid by a court of competent jurisdiction or suspended or revoked, such judgment or order shall not affect or impair the remaining provisions, sections, or parts which are not affected thereby and shall continue to be in force and effect. SECTION 213. EFFECTIVITY. This Ordinance shall take effect fifteen days (15) after its approval and publication in a local community newspaper with daily frequency.


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APPENDIX I ONE WAY STREETS (Ordinance No. 127, s. 1990, amending Ordinance No. 778, s. 1973, otherwise known as the Revised Traffic Ordinance of the City of Davao)

corner Quirino Avenue towards Rasay Street n. Quirino Avenue from Datu Bago towards Mercury Drug/Quirino Avenue o. Palma Gil Street from C. M. Recto Street towards Cayetano Bangoy Street

a. Marfori Private Alley from Bago Inigo Street towards Antonio Pichon Street b. Antonio Pichon Street (Magallanes) from corner Legaspi Street to C. M. Recto Avenue c. San Pedro Street from corner Quezon Boulevard towards corner Ilustre Street d. Claro M. Recto Street from corner A. Pichon Street to Roxas Avenue except Jones Circle e. Cayetano Bangoy Street from Roxas Avenue all the way to Palma Gil intersection, Bonifacio intersection, Rizal intersection, and the whole length of Crooked Road f. Bolton Street from Bonifacio Street up to Pichon Street g. San Pedro Street to General Luna Street h. Ilustre St. from General Luna to Quirino Avenue to Legaspi Street i. From the corner of Pelayo Street going to Quirino Street (T. Claudio) j. Gov. Duterte Street from Pelayo (Legapi Street) to Malvar to Quirino Street k. Marfori Road from Antonio Pichon Street towards Datu Bago Street l. Rasay Street from A. Pichon Street towards Datu Bago Street m. Datu Bago Street from

APPENDIX II PROHIBITED LEFT TURNS (existing per Traffic Management Center as of 25 August 2011) a. Entering left a one-way street of Pichon from: (i) V. Ilustre (ii) Bolton Extension b. Entering left a one-way street of San Pedro from: (i) Bolton Street (ii) Crooked Road (iii) Anda Street/ I. Inigo Street (iv) Legaspi Street/Pelayo Street c. Entering left a one-way street of Marfori from: (i) Father Selga Street d. Entering left a one-way street of V. Ilustre from: (i) Duterte Street (ii) Gen. Luna Street e. Entering left a one-way street of Cayetano-Bangoy from: (i) Palma-Gil Street (ii) Bonifacio Street (iii) Rizal Street f. Entering left a one-way street of Datu Bago from: (i) Clover Leaf g. Entering left a one-way street of Duterte Street from: (i) Quirino Avenue h. Entering left a one-way street from Quirino Avenue to: (i) Duterte Street (ii) San Pedro Street

CLASSIFIEDS C15

(iii) Pichon Street i. Entering left a one-way street of Bolton from: (i) Rizal Street j. Entering left a one-way street of C.M. Recto from: (i) San Pedro Extension (ii) Rizal Street (iii) Bonifacio Street (iv) Palma Gil (v) Roxas Avenue k. Entering left a one-way street of City Hall Drive from: (i) Pichon Street

Marfori Street to C. M. Recto Avenue (left side only coming from Marfori Street)

APPENDIX III LOCATION WITH NO U-TURNS

e. Bolton Street - from A. Pichon Street to A. Bonifacio Street (left side only coming from Bonifacio Street) with designated loading /unloading area

a. All intersections and junctions b. Tip of an island along 1. Quirino Avenue 2. Quimpo Boulevard 3. Jose P. Laurel – Sta. Ana Street 4. Quezon Boulevard 5. R. Castillo Street 6. Cabaguio Avenue (Assumption School) 7. Leon Garcia Street 8. Davao-Agusan Road (Alcantara-junction of Bangoy Airport) APPENDIX IV PUBLIC PAY PARKING ZONES (Ordinance No. 153-A, s. 1990) I. Streets Designated as Public Pay Parking Zones a. San Pedro Street - from C.M. Recto Avenue to Quirino Avenue (left side only coming from Recto Avenue) b. A. Pichon Street - from

c. Ilustre Street - f r o m San Pedro Street to Jose Camus Street (left side only coming from San Pedro Street) d. Pelayo Street - from A. Pichon Street to A. Bonifacio Street (both sides) with designated loading / unloading area

f. Inigo Street - from A. Pichon Street to A. Bonifacio Street (both sides) with designated loading / unloading area g. C. M. Recto Ave. - from corner San Pedro/ Recto Streets to R. Magsaysay Avenue (left side only coming from San Pedro St. to Magsaysay Ave. / Jones Circle h. Magsaysay Ave. - from C. Bangoy Street to Sales Street (both sides); • left side only coming from Magsaysay Park to Sales Street; • from Sales Street to Jones circle (both sides); with designated loading/unloading area i. Villa Abrille St. - from Hospital Avenue to L. Guerrero Street (both sides) with loading/unloading area

j. Monteverde Ave. - from L. Guerrero Street to Leon Garcia Street (both sides) with designated loading/unloading for every block on both sides

Php 10.00 Php 5.00

k. V. Duterte St. - from Ilustre Street to Pelayo Street (left side only coming from Ilustre Street)

Sedan/SUV/AUV Php 10.00 Php 5.00

l. City Hall Drive from San Pedro Street to A. Pichon Street (both sides) m. Marfori Street - from A. Pichon Street to Posadas Street (left side only coming from A. Pichon Street) n. Rasay Street - from A. Pichon Street to Posadas Street (left side only coming from A. Pichon Street) o. Posadas Street - from Marfori Street to Rasay Street (left side only coming from Marfori Street) II. Parking fee per Unit of Motorized Vehicle a. Rate of Parking Fee Type of Vehicle For first 3 hours Per hour or Fraction Delivery Van Php 10.00 Php 5.00

Armored Car/Van Php 10.00 Php 5.00

Motorcyle/ Motorbike Php 5.00 Php 2.50 Other motorized vehicle Php 5.00 Php 2.50 b. Annual Parking Space Subscription with Parking Sticker Type of Vehicle Annual Parking Fee Delivery Van Php 5,000.00 Delivery Truck Php 5,000.00 Truck for Hire Php 5,000.00 Cargo Truck Php 5,000.00 Armored Car/Van Php 5,000.00 Sedan/SUV/AUV Php 5,000.00 Motorcyle/ Motorbike Php 2,000.00

Delivery Truck Php 10.00 Php 5.00

Other Motorized Vehicle Php 1,500.00

Truck for Hire Php 10.00 Php 5.00 Cargo Truck

APPENDIX V SCHEDULE OF FINES AND PENALTIES No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41

Section of Ordinance Section 6 Section 9 Section 10 Section 11 Section 12 Section 13 Article V Section 26 Section 27 Section 28 Section 29 Section 31 Article VII Section 36 Article IX Sections 43 & 44 Section 45 Section 46 Section 47 Section 48 Section 49 Section 50 Section 51 (a) Section 51 (b) Section 56 (b) Section 56 (c) Section 56 (d) Section 57 (b) Section 57 (c) Section 58 Section 59 Section 63 Section 64 Section 65 Section 66 Article XIII Section 79 Section 83 Section 92 Section 120 Article XVIII

42 43 44 45 46 47 48

Article XIX Section 139 Section 140 Section 141 Section 142 Section 144 Section 145

Type of Offense or Violation Erection and Interference with Traffic Control Items Display of Dazzling Lights Disobedience to Official Traffic Control Signal Disobedience to Official Traffic Signs Disobedience to Official Traffic Road or Pavement Markings Disobedience to Official Traffic Signals and Instructions Any Violation of General Driving Rules Not Giving Way at Intersection Not Giving Way During Turns Improper Movement to or from Parking Area Not Giving Way to Emergency Vehicles Not Giving Way at Roundabouts or Rotundas Violating Speed Limits Violating Operating Rule on One-way Streets Improper Turning, Reversing and Stopping Parking, Waiting, or Standing in Prohibited Areas Parking during Certain Hours Prohibited Parking for Certain Purpose Prohibited Non-Stopping at Special Stops Improper Method of Parking Vehicles Parking Near Grade or Curve Parking on Parade Routes and on Any Special Occasion Loading/unloading at Loading Zone without the presence of driver Loading/unloading of passengers of PUJ in undesignated zone Operating without approved traffic impact assessment Violation of off-street public utility van transport terminal Violation or non-compliance regarding security guards, CCTV, facilities, etc. Private Garage for Vehicles-for-Hire without permit Loading/unloading of passengers in private garage Non-provision of six (6) meters setback for angle parking Non-payment of Parking Fees Violations in Public Pay Parking Areas Careless Driving Reckless and Dangerous Driving Driving a Motor Vehicle while under Influence of Liquor or Incapacitating Drugs Violation of Procedure Involving Traffic Accidents Operating Animal-drawn Carriages, and Bicycles that are not Licensed Operating a Bicycle and Animal-drawn Carriage on Public Roads Violation of Operating Conditions of Motorized Tricycle-for-Hire 500.00 Non-Payment of Supervision Fee Violation or non-compliance with any section of Article XVIII regarding lighting, warning signs, equipment, etc. Violation or non-compliance with any section of Article XIX regarding seatbelt Exceeding Gross Weight, Axle and Weight Loads Projecting Loads on Passenger Vehicles Loads not Properly Secured Refusal to Have Vehicles Weighed and/or Remove Excess Load Violation of restriction or limits in the use of bridge No permit to Move Equipment and/or Load of Excessive Weight, Width, or Height.

1st Offense Amount (Php) 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 1,000.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 2,000.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 1,000.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 1,500.00 5000.00 500.00 100.00 200.00 2,000.00 300.00 300.00 500.00 500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 500.00 1,000.00


C16 CLASSIFIEDS 49 50

Section 147 Section 148

51

Section 149

52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89

Article XXI Section 156 Section 158 Section 165 Section 166 Section 167 Section 168 Section 169 Section 170 Section 171 Section 172 Section 173 (a) Section 173 (c)

Section 173 (d) Section 173 (e) Section 173 (f) Section 173 (g) Section 173 (h) Section 174 (a-c) Section 174 (d) Section 174 (e) Section 175 Section 176 Section 178 Section 180 Section 181 Section 182 Section 183 Section 184 (a) Section 185 Section 185 (e ) Section 186 Section 188 Section 189 Section 190

VOL. 6 ISSUE 188 • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013

Passing of Vehicles over Five Tons on Subdivision Road Already Converted to City Street Public Transport Utility Vehicle with more than Eighteen Passengers Passing Secondary Streets Movements of Trailers, Trucks, or any Approved Transportation Medium Linked to a Container Van Truck Ban, Non-Complying Buses and Jeepneys Violating Pedestrian Crossing Rules Violating Restrictions on Pedestrians No PUV-Driver’s Identification Card Obstruction to Driver’s View or Driving Mechanism Following Fire Vehicles Putting Glass, etc. on a City Road or Highway Tracking Mud unto City Road or Highway Driving Through Funeral or Other Processions Violating Restrictions of Animals and Livestock on Roads Violating Operation of Public Utility Jeepneys No shop registration Non-embedding the PCCN by the owner/operator of shop Owner/driver with no PCCN on the fabricated/manufacture body of the PUJ Owner/driver with no PCCN on the fabricated/manufacture body of the MTH Owner/driver with no PCCN on the fabricated/manufacture body of the Pedicab Non reporting of manufactured/fabricated PUV Installing, mounting, fitting engine not according to locally-approved standards Releasing the vehicle without inspection PUV not in accordance with approved standards PUV not fabricated/manufactured without inspection Non-wearing and/or no safety helmet for motorcyclist Non-turning on the headlight while driving along city roads and highways Violating Passenger/Cargo of Motorcyclist Violating Standard of Improvised Mud-guard Non-production of LTO-issued Driver’s License Violating Operation of Student Carpool Transport Service Non-production of Vehicle Registration Document Improper Opening Doors and Alighting from Vehicles Opening Doors and Alighting from Public Utility Bus Improper Use of Horns, etc. Modification of Muffler on Motorcycle Obstructing roads by person, motor vehicles, including stalled vehicles Obstructing roads or sidewalks by residential, vendors, or commercial establishments Street diggings or road closure without permit Unlawful restriction on road access Violating Requirement of Transport/Traffic Impact Assessment Prohibition on Production of Road Signs

EDGEDAVAO 1,000.00 500.00 2,000.00 1,000.00 200.00 100.00 1,000.00 500.00 500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 500.00 200.00 1,500.00 1,000.00 500.00 300.00 200.00 100.00 500.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 5.000.00 2,000.00 500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 300.00 500.00 1,000.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 1,000.00

B. For the second and third offenses; the penalties shall be two times the value of the most recent fines on record – whether the same had been paid or not. Fourth and habitual offenders, or when the violation involved property damage in excess of ten thousand (Php10,000.00) or loss of life, the City Transport and Traffic Management Office shall seek cancellation of the driver’s license through the Land Transportation Office. APPENDIX VI TRUCK BAN ROUTES (Ordinance No. 0154-03 amending Ordinance No. 042-02, s. 2002) NORTHBOUND TO SOUTHBOUND ROUTE Beginning from the junction of J.P. Laurel and R. Castillo near the gate of C. Alcantara and Sons, Inc. at kilometer 7 in Lanang. SOUTHBOUND TO NORTHBOUND ROUTE Beginning from Bangkal at the vicinity of Lonbisco at the junction of McArthur Highway and Carlos P. Garcia Highway proceeding to diversion road and Carlos P. Garcia superhighway going to Panacan. APPENDIX VII NATIONAL ROADS DAANG

MAHARLIKA

ROAD from Lasang, Bunawan, Buhisan, Tibungco, Ilang, Panacan, Sasa, Lanang, Bajada, Poblacion D AVA O - C O TA B AT O ROAD (PRIMARY, NATIONAL) from jct. City Hall Drive, Anda, jct. Anda St., jct. Legaspi St., jct. Magallanes St., jct. UM Road., jct. Don Julian Rodriguez Avenue. Jct. Marian Village. Jct. Davao Memorial Park. Jct. Mars St., jct. Aquarius St., jct. Libra St., jct. Virgo St., jct. Aries St., jct. Matina Pangi Road. Jct. Pag-asa Drive. Jct. Maligaya Avenue. Jct. Davao City Diversion Road. Jct. Skyline Subd., jct. Peace Avenue. Jct. Bago Gallera Road. Jct. Davao-Bukidnon Road. Jct. Benedict Priory Road. Jct. Generoso E. jct. Better Living Road. Jct. Dacoville Subd., jct. Lobogan Road. Jct. IWHA Road. Solana Ice Plant. Jct. Greenland Village Road.

DAVAO BUKIDNON ROAD (PRIMARY, NATIONAL) from jct. Hope Mt. Road. Jct. One Way Out Reach Road. Jct. Green Hills Subd., jct. SPDA Road. Jct. Davao Bible Seminary Road. DAVAO CITY DIVERSION ROAD from jct. Juan Cruz Elementary School. Jct. Panacan Relocation. Pag-ibig Subd. Cabantian Purok 3. Jct. San Isidro. Jct. Medalla Milagrosa. Jct. San Nicholas. Jct. Buhangin Lapanday Road. Jct. Molave St., jct. Quarry. Jct. Brgy. Langub. Jct. Sison Quarry. Jct. Country Subd., jct. Matina Pangi Road. Jct. St. Francis Xavier Seminary. Jct. Skyline Subd., jct. Countryside Village Phase II. Jct. Country Village Phase I BUHANGIN-LAPANDAY ROAD from jct. Davao Di-

version Road to Davao Agusan Road. F. TORRES STREET from jct. Jacinto Extension. Jct. Tiongko Avenue. Jct. Mabini St., jct. Padre de Tavera St., jct. Lopez Jaena St., E. QUIRINO AVENUE from jct. Jacinto Extension. Jct. Tiongko Avenue. Jct. Mabini St., jct. Camus St., jct. San Pedro St., jct. Apo St., jct. General Luna St., jct. Mt. Mayon st., RAFAEL CASTILLO STREET. from jct. Belisario. Jct. Ubalde. Jct. del Rosario. Jct. Leon Garcia St., DAVAO REGIONAL MEDICAL TRAINING CENTER from jct. Davao-Agusan Road QUEZON BOULEVARD from jct. Bangoy St., jct. Lizada St., jct. Suazo St., jct. San Pedro St., jct. Rizal St.,

jct. Artiaga St., jct. Bonifacio St., jct. Roxas St., jct. Rizal St., LEON GARCIA STREET from jct. Lapu-Lapu St., jct. Gotamco RAMON MAGSAYSAY AVENUE from jct. Chavez St., jct. Suazo St., jct. Marginal Road, jct. Monteverde St., jct. Lizada St., jct. Gempesaw FIFTH AVENUE from jct. Guerero St., jct. Narra St., jct. Chavez St., jct. Suazo St., jct. Bangoy St., jct. Lizada St., jct. Sales St., J.P. CABAGUIO AVENUE from jct. R.G.A. Village, jct. Del Pilar St., jct. Vinzon MA-A ROAD (DON JULIAN RODRIGUEZ AVENUE) from jct. Ma-a City Jail, jct. Don Julian Village, jct. North Street.

ABS-CBN QUIMPO BOULEVARD DIVERSION ROAD from jct. 80th St., jct. Acacia St., jct. Mangga St., jct. University Avenue, jct. Calamansi St., jct. Executive Homes, jct. Dona luisa I, jct. Davao Matina Golf Club, jct. Adela Drive, jct. Tulip Drive. FATIMA – MALABOG ROAD from jct. Mabuhay Road, Km. 6 Fabian Diez, Panulawan Gym, jct. Crossing Rancho San Miguel, Archidocese of Davao Church, Malabog Central, jct. Kapihan Peter Lo, jct. Balugo. MABUHAY – PAÑALUM – PAQUIBATO ROAD from jct. to Bodega, San Roque Chapel, Day Care Center, jct. Private Road, Upper Mabuhay Paquibato Elementary School.


Edge Davao 6 Issue 188